Art & Archaeology of Mediterranean World (AAMW)

AAMW 425 Late Antique Arts

What is 'Late Antiquity'? In 312 when Roman emperor Constantine inaugurated a Christian empire, 'Roman' culture was centuries old. The period ca. 200-650 CE saw profound transformations that launched Medieval, Byzantine and Islamic traditions. In this epoch of economic and political upheaval destruction was frequent but partial: Rome long survived, Constantine's 'new Rome,' Constantinople flourished, and around the Empire both proto-global visual culture and local forms prospered. Roman cultural models authorized both innovation and passion for tradition, in forms and styles: we critique art-historical models for Late Antique 'decline', analyse habits of material reuse and curation, and look at new Christian and Jewish roles for Roman things as well as polytheist visual survival. Foreign allies and enemies, and new peoples invading an already polyethnic Empire, interacted with Greco-Roman Late Antiquity: we visit arts of Sasanian and Islamic empires east and south, and 'barbarian' domains in Africa, Europe, Britain. Media discussed, for sacred, courtly, domestic, funerary, political and civic spaces and structures include not just 'monumental' painting, mosaic, sculpture, but also objects of silver, ceramic, ivory, figural textile, glass; painted books; jewelry; mass-media artifacts like coins and pilgrimage tokens. We also study Late Antique texts on art, objects, space and viewership.

Taught by: Ann Kuttner

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 425, CLST 425

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 427 Roman Sculpture

Survey of the Republican origins and Imperial development of Roman sculpture - free-standing, relief, and architectural - from ca. 150 BC to 350 AD. We concentrate on sculpture in the capital city and on court and state arts, emphasizing commemorative public sculpture and Roman habits of decorative display; genres examined include relief, portraits, sarcophagi, luxury and minor arts (gems, metalwork, coinage). We evaluate the choice and evolution of styles with reference to the functions of sculptural representation in Roman culture and society.

Taught by: Kuttner, Rose

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 427, CLST 427

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 428 Hellenistic Art and Spectacle

Hellenistic usually names art in the age of Mediterranean culture from the 4th century BCE and the rise of Alexander the Great's Macedon, and the Greco-Macedonian conquest of the Persian Empire, to Cleopatra of Egypt's defeat by Rome at the end of the Republic. Our course looks also at the age of Augustus and his successors, 1st century CE. While Greek and Macedonian practice in city-states and kingdoms is our launching point, this course also looks at international culture and cultural interaction among peoples from North Africa and Etrusco-Roman Italy, Egypt, (Etrusco) Anatolia, the Mideast and Central Asia. We probe art, artifacts, and visual display from a range of settings, from sanctuary to house, palace and parade, and in all media, from marble monuments to pottery and jewelry. Our archaeology of Hellenistic visual culture also looks at the rich body of Hellenistic and Roman texts of art history, art criticism, and the description of objects and image, to better understand the Hellenistic maker, patron, and viewer. No prerequisites. It is desirable for undergraduates to have experience of research. Of interest to students in AAMW, ARTH, ANCH, CLST, VLST, NELC, RELS and ANTH.

Taught by: Kuttner

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 428

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 435 Medieval Islamic Art & Architecture

An introduction to the major architectural monuments and trends, as well as to the best-known objects of the medieval (seventh-to fourteenth-century) Islamic world. Attention is paid to such themes as the continuity of late antique themes, architecture as symbol of community and power, the importance of textiles and primacy of writing. Suitable for students of literature, history, anthropology as well as art history.

Taught by: Holod

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 435, NELC 489

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 509 Curatorial Seminar

Curatorial seminars expose students to the complexity of studying and working with objects in the context of public display. With the guidance of faculty and museum professionals, students learn what it means to curate an exhibition, create catalogues and gallery text, and/or develop programming for exhibitions of art and visual/material culture. Students in this curatorial seminar will participate in planning the exhibition of Japanese illustrated books from the Tress collection to be held in the Kislak Center in spring 2021. Japanese illustrated books are celebrated for their high technical and aesthetic achievements and the collection spans all genres and formats over more than three hundred years. In this course, students will be thinking through how we can tell the story of the illustrated book in Japan in the space of the exhibition. We will think through how these materials related to their broad and largely literate audiences, and we'll pay close attention to artists, genres, technologies, and subjects. Students will conduct research, prepare didactic labels, write entries for the catalogue, and develop the website and symposium as part of their curatorial practice. There will be extensive hands-on engagement with examples from the Kislak collections as well as practical training in papermaking, materials, and binding. By permission only.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 501, NELC 501

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 512 Petrography of Cultural Materials

Introduction to thin-section petrography of stone and ceramic archaeological materials. Using polarized light microscopy, the first half of this course will cover the basics of mineralogy and the petrography of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks. The second half will focus on the petrographic description of ceramic materials, mainly pottery, with emphasis on the interpretation of provenance and technology. As part of this course, students will characterize and analyze archaeological samples from various collections. Prior knowledge of geology is not required.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANTH 514, CLST 512

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 514 Kinship and Connectivity in the Roman World

An individual's life course is often reflected, enhanced, and defined by their relations to other individuals. This course will investigate the concept of kinship in the Roman world through textual, visual, and archaeological evidence. We will explore relationships at all levels of society from the imperial family to the slaves and freedmen who were part of larger households, in order to understand how different relationships shaped and structured interactions in Roman society. Together, we will explore the following questions: how were relationships and bonds represented in the ancient world? What structures were in place for families to perpetuate themselves through biological or adoptive means? How could non-Roman citizens create family connections through formal and informal channels? How could relationships be celebrated in life and commemorated in death? We will use written evidence from ancient historians, visual evidence like the Altar of Peace, and archaeological evidence from cemeteries to examine how Roman notions of kinship shaped life and death in different social milieu.

Taught by: Brent

Also Offered As: ANCH 315, ANTH 315, CLST 315, CLST 515

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 519 Ancient Greek Colonies

This seminar examines the archaeology of Greek colonization from the Late Bronze Age to ca. 600 B.C. These colonies were highly diverse in their motivations, physical settings, and political and social structures, as well as their relationships with mother cities and the new worlds they inhabited. Emphasis is placed on the colonial experience as a cross-cultural and negotiated process. In addition to archaeological and epigraphic evidence, literary and historical traditions are examined. Colonies from the southern Balkan peninsula, Black Sea, Ionia, northern Africa, and Magna Graecia will be the focus of reading, reports, and discussion.

Taught by: Tartaron

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CLST 532

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 520 Topics in Aegean Bronze Age

Topic varies from semester to semester. This Fall 2019 seminar will discuss The Architecture of Akrotiri, Thera. Around 3,500 years ago a culture thrived on the small island of Thera in the Cycladic islands of Greece. Excavations have revealed a portion of a sophisticated town with multi-storied buildings decorated with elaborate fresco programs and equipped with all the necessities to support a cosmopolitan community with trade contacts reaching throughout the Mediterranean, Egypt, and the Ancient Near East. Due to the Bronze Age eruption of the volcano at the center of the island, Akrotiri is known as the best-preserved Late Cycladic site in the Aegean. In this class, we will examine the architecture and frescoes, or wall paintings, of Akrotiri and explore what they reveal to us about this unique group of people. Students will write and present two research papers to the class.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 520

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 522 Topics in Ancient Iranian Art

Topic varies. Spring 2018: This seminar will focus on the environmental, archaeological and textual record for settlement in the Persian/Arabian Gulf region from the Neolithic to the pre-Islamic Late Antique. Emphasis will be on the settlement history and material culture. Special attention will be paid to the close interaction of the local communities on the Arabian side of the Gulf with those on the Iranian/Indus valley side. The patterns of sea faring trade and interaction from Mesopotamia, Iran, Indus Valley and beyond will be considered. It is possible that this class will take a site trip to the UAE during the spring break, if the logistics can be arranged. Instructors: Professors Holly Pittman (Penn), Peter Magee (Bryn Mawr College).

Taught by: Pittman

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 522

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 523 Narrative in Ancient Art

Art history, and its cousins in religious, social, political and literary studies, have long been fascinated with the question of narrative: how do images engage time, tell stories? These are fundamental questions for ancient Near Eastern, Egyptian and Mediterranean art history and archaeology, whose rich corpus of narrative images is rarely considered in the context of "Western" art. Relations between words and things, texts and images, were as fundamental to the ancient cultures we examine as they are to modern studies. As we weigh classic modern descriptions of narrative and narratology, we will bring to bear recent debates about how (ancient) images, things, monuments, and designed spaces engage with time, space, and event, and interact with cultural memory. We will ask "who is the story for, and why?" for public and private narratives ranging from political histories to mythological encounters. Our case studies will be drawn from the instructors' expertise in Mesopotamian visual culture, and in the visual cultures of the larger Mediterranean world from early Greek antiquity to the Hellenistic, Roman, and Late Antique periods. One central and comparative question, for instance, is the nature of recording history in pictures and texts in the imperial projects of Assyria, Achaemenid Persia, the Hellenistic kingdoms, and Rome.

Taught by: Kuttner/Pittman

Also Offered As: ARTH 523, CLST 523, NELC 523

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 524 Penn Museum Curatorial Seminar: Reconfiguring the Classical World Galleries

The Greek galleries in the Penn Museum were opened in 1994, and the Etruscan and Roman galleries in 2003. The world was very different them, and many of the themes used to frame the artifacts in the galleries are not especially relevant to contemporary students, scholars, and visitors. In this course we will completely reorganize and reinstall the galleries digitally, creating a series of websites that will highlight the new layout and themes. We will work extensively with the Greek Etruscan, and Roman artifacts themselves to reconfigure the galleries, which will highlight the connections between antiquity and the contemporary world, focusing on themes such as armed conflict, trauma, migration, xenophobia, and wealth and poverty.

Taught by: Rose

Also Offered As: CLST 524

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 525 Topics in Greek and Roman Art

Topics varies from semester to semester. For the Spring 2020 semester, the topic will be Violence and Ancient Mediterranean Art. The Greek and Roman world was fascinated by representing humans and beasts enduring physical and psychological pain, and images of violence inflicted by mortal and supernatural beings alike. These images occur in art of all kinds, consumed both privately and publicly, emerging in the domestic, religious, military and political sphere. They had a range of aims, from affording emotional catharsis, building political cohesion or enforcing social norms, to generating religious awe or confidence in empire -- and giving entertainment. As we explore this corpus, we can ask: what might be the roots of such preoccupation with the art of violence and pain in the 'Classical tradition' and its post-antique legacy? Many modern cultures exhibit similar fascination: how far can modern reactions to and theories about such images be guides to reconstructing ancient viewership? How can ancient texts and histories help us in this interdisciplinary project?

Taught by: Kuttner

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 525, CLST 521

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 526 Material & Methods in Mediterranean Archaeology

This course is intended to familiarize new graduate students with the collections of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology and the wide range of scholarly interests and approaches used by faculty at Penn and neighboring institutions, as well as to provide an introduction to archaeological methods and theory in a Mediterranean context. Each week, invited lecturers will address the class on different aspects of archaeological methodology in their own research, emphasizing specific themes that will be highlighted in readings and subsequent discussion. The course is divided into five sections: Introduction to the Mediterranean Section; Collections; Method and Theory in Mediterranean Archaeology; Museum Work; and Ethics. The course is designed for new AAMW graduate students, though other graduate students or advanced undergraduate students may participate with the permission of the instructor.

Taught by: Tartaron

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: CLST 526

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 529 Topics in Roman Architecture

Topic varies. Spring 2018: This seminar offers a critical assessment of digital Roman architecture studies. What has been accomplished and learned over the last generation since the Digital Turn, and where is the field of Roman architecture being taken? Points of focus include several landmark case studies, such as digital reconstructions of the city of ancient Rome, and threatened cultural heritage sites in Syria. The course will involve readings of significant texts, in class discussions and presentations lead by the seminar s participants, and testing and critiquing of a limited set of digital tools.

Taught by: Stinson

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 529

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 530 Topics in Byzantine Art

Topic varies from semester to semester. For the Fall 2020 semester, the topic will be: The Icon. This seminar explores the Byzantine icon and its legacy. Spanning nearly two millennia, from the emergence of Christian sacred portraiture to the reception of icon painting by the early twentieth-century Russian avant-garde, the seminar will introduce you to the history, historiography, and theories of the icon. While our focus will be on Byzantium and the wider world of Orthodox Christianity, especially in the Slavic Balkans and Eastern Europe, the seminar will also engage with fundamental questions concerning the nature, status, and agency of images across cultures. Topics to be addressed include iconoclasm and the problem of idolatry; the social and ritual lives of icons; authorship, originality, and replication; viewer response and the cultural construction of vision; the frontier between art and the sacred image; and the afterlife of the icon in modernity.

Taught by: Drpic

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 532

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 533 Topography and Monuments of Ancient Rome

An intensive exploration of Rome's urban topography during the Republican and Imperial periods (6th c. B.C. through 4th c. A.D.) Using archaeological and textual sources, including the Etruscan and Roman collections of the Penn Museum, the goal will be to reconstruct the built environment and decoration of Rome over the course of a millennium. Of interest to students of classics, archaeology, art history, and architecture. Some familiarity with Rome will be a plus, but is not required.

Taught by: Rose

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CLST 328, CLST 533

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 534 Problems in Greek and Roman History: Archaeic and Classical

This seminar is designed to introduce students to the major issues and problems in the early history of Ancient Greece, from approximately 776 BC until the reign of Alexander the Great nearly four hundred and fifty years later. A number of these issues have been the subject of academic investigation for decades: the historicity of Homeric society, the origins of democracy, the reforms of Kleisthenes, the population of Athens, for example. The investigation of many of these problems, however, has received fresh impetus from newer approaches: demographic studies of the Aegean islands, the dating of 5th century inscriptions, the study of Solons poetry have all yielded new insights and transformed our understanding of Greek culture and history. In this seminar we will explore many older questions from newer perspectives, with attention to such recent topics as gender, ethnicity and subaltern studies.The result is a view of Greece that is both more familiar and yet equally more alien.

Taught by: McInerney

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANCH 535

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 536 Archaeology of Anatolia

This class is devoted to the archaeology and history of Anatolia (ancient Turkey) from the beginning of the Bronze Age (3000 BC) to the end of the Byzantine period (1453 AD). Emphasis will be placed on the great empires in Anatolia (Hittite, Phrygian, Lydian, Urartian, Persian, Roman, and Byzantine), and on the great cities (Troy, Sardis, Ephesus, Constantinople). The course is intended to complement the major exhibit on Gordion, the Phrygians, and Anatolian archaeology that will open at the Penn Museum in February of 2016 and run for 10 months.

Taught by: Brian Rose

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 421, CLST 336, NELC 121, NELC 521

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 539 Archaeobotany Seminar

In this course we will approach the relationship between plants and people from archaeological and anthropological perspectives in order to investigate diverse plant consumption, use, and management strategies. Topics will include: archaeological formation processes, archaeobotanical sampling and recovery, lab sorting and identification, quantification methods, and archaeobotany as a means of preserving cultural heritage. Students will learn both field procedures and laboratory methods of archaeobotany through a series of hands-on activities and lab-based experiments. The final research project will involve an original in-depth analysis and interpretation of archaeobotanical specimens. By the end of the course, students will feel comfortable reading and evaluating archaeobotanical literature and will have a solid understanding of how archaeobotanists interpret human activities of the past.

Taught by: Chantel White

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANTH 533, CLST 543, NELC 585

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 540 Topics in Medieval Art

Topic varies from semester to semester. For the Fall 2020 semester, the topic will be Migrating Materiality: Ivory Carving Around the Mediterranean. The craft of ivory carving around the Mediterranean is contingent upon the availability of imported elephant tusks, from either South East Asia or, more frequently, from the African continent. The shifting winds of trade routes offer an interpretive paradigm with which to analyze ivory objects from a variety of different cultural groups: the lack or abundance of ivory and the resulting desire for or surfeit of the material shapes its meaning and use around the Mediterranean basin. The study of ivory objects as they migrate around the Mediterranean allows us to investigate the rich intercultural interactions between Eastern and Western Christians, and both of these with the Islamic world. This course focuses on an object-oriented knowledge of ivory artifacts, with a strong emphasis on the collections at the Penn Museum, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and other area collections.

Taught by: Guerin

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 538, ARTH 540

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 542 Ancient Seafaring

This course explores ships, seafaring, and seafarers of the ancient Greek World from the Bronze Age (Minoans and Mycenaeans) to the Age of Alexander (Hellenistic period). Sources include shipwrecks and related artifacts, artistic representations, and ancient documents and literature. The emphasis is not so much on the technical aspects of shipbuilding and navigation as on the ways that seafaring shaped Greek history and connected the Greeks to a wider world through trade, warfare, colonization, and adventure.

Taught by: Tartaron

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CLST 340

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 546 Museum Internship

The Museum Internship in the spring consists of a research project with Penn Museum collections based on a proposal designed and approved during the fall AAMW Proseminar (AAMW 526). It is offered to, and is a requirement for, first-year AAMW graduate students only.

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: AAMW 526

Activity: Independent Study

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 552 Archaeometallurgy Seminar

This course is designed to provide an in-depth analysis of archaeological metals. Topics to be discussed include: exploitation of ore and its transformation to metal in ancient times, distribution of metal as a raw materials, provenance studies, development and organization of early metallurgy, and interdisciplinary investigations of metals and related artifacts like slag and crucibles. Students will become familiar with the full spectrum of analytical procedures, ranging from microscopy for materials characterization to mass spectrometry for geochemical fingerprinting, and will work on individual research projects analyzing archaeological objects following the analytical methodology of archaeometallurgy.

Taught by: Moritz Jansen

Also Offered As: ANTH 552, CLST 552, NELC 587

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 557 Seminar in Archaeological Theory and Method: Archaeology of Landscapes

Advanced seminar for potential professional archaeologists. Course will examine critically main past and present theoretical issues in archaeological research and interpretation, and consider various methodologies utilized towards these interpretive ends.

Taught by: Erickson

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANTH 557, LALS 557

Prerequisite: ANTH 241 OR ANTH 600

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 562 Intro to Digital Archaeology

Digital methodologies are an integral part of contemporary archaeological practice, and demand that archaeologists to hold a new set of skills and knowledge fundamentals. This course will expose students to a broad range of digital approaches through a review of relevant literature and through applied learning opportunities centered on a course project. The technological underpinnings, best practices, and influences on archaeological practice and theory will be discussed for each method covered in the course. Applied learning opportunities in digital data collection methods will include: aerial and satellite remote sensing, global navigation satellite system (GNSS) survey, 3D scanning methods, close-range photogrammetry, and near-surface geophysical prospection. Students will also have opportunities for practical experience in digital database design and management, geographic information science (GIS) and 3D modeling and visualization. Students will communicate the results of the course project in a digital story that will be presented at the end of the term. Prior archaeological classwork and/or experience preferred.

Taught by: Herrmann

Also Offered As: ANTH 362, ANTH 562, CLST 362, CLST 562, NELC 362

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 572 Geophysical Prospection for Archaeology

Near-surface geophysical prospection methods are now widely used in archaeology as they allow archaeologists to rapidly map broad areas, minimize or avoid destructive excavation, and perceive physical dimensions of archaeological features that are outside of the range of human perception. This course will cover the theory of geophysical sensors commonly used in archaeological investigations and the methods for collecting, processing, and interpreting geophysical data from archaeological contexts. We will review the physical properties of common archaeological and paleoenvironmental targets, the processes that led to their deposition and formation, and how human activity is reflected in anomalies recorded through geophysical survey through lectures, readings, and discussion. Students will gain experience collecting data in the field with various sensors at archaeological sites in the region. A large proportion of the course will be computer-based as students work with data from geophysical sensors, focusing on the fundamentals of data processing, data fusion, and interpretation. Some familiarity with GIS is recommended.

Taught by: Herrmann

Course offered spring; even-numbered years

Also Offered As: ANTH 572, CLST 572, NELC 572

Activity: Laboratory

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 604 Troy and Homer

An interdisciplinary seminar focusing on the city of Troy both as an archaeological site and as the setting of the legendary Trojan War. We will consider Homer's Iliad (with selected sections read in Greek) together with the topography and archaeology of the site of Troy in order to address a series of interrelated questions: What are the points of continuity and discontinuity between the stories told by the literary tradition and the material record? How do both types of evidence contribute to our understanding of political relations and cultural interactions between Greece and Anatolia in the Bronze Age? How do Hittite sources bear on our reconstruction of the events behind the Troy legend? How have the site and the poem contributed to each other's interpretation in the context of scholarly discovery and debate? We will give some attention to modern receptions of the Troy legend that deliberately combine material and textual elements, such as Cy Twombly's "Fifty Days at Iliam" and Alice Oswald's "Memorial: An Excavation of Homer's Iliad." The seminar will include a visit to the site of Troy during the Spring Break.

Taught by: Murnaghan

Also Offered As: CLST 604, GREK 604

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 606 Pastoral Nomadism in the Past and Present

Pastoral nomadism is a "third way" of human subsistence separate from farming and foraging. It is a sustainable human adaptation to grassland and arid environments practiced through particular technologies and domesticated animals. This course begins by examining the human ecology and social organization that emerge from mobile ways of life, drawing on modern, ethnographic, and archaeological examples of pastoral nomadic groups in the Middle East and Central Asia. Academic readings and ethnographic films will form the basis of discussions about several larger themes, including: the origins of pastoral nomadism and horse riding; the development of dairy-based foods and human adaptations allowing the digestion of lactose; the historical relationship between mobile groups of pastoralists and territorial states; popular perceptions of nomads in various forms of historical and modern media; and the influence of ideas about nomads on modern senses of heritage and nationalism in the Middle East and Central Asia.

Taught by: Hammer

Also Offered As: ANTH 108, NELC 106, NELC 606

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 611 Greek Epigraphy

An introduction to the principles and practices of Greek Epigraphy. Study of selected Greek inscriptions.

Taught by: McInerney

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANCH 611, CLST 611, GREK 611

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 618 Art and Architecture in Ancient Egypt

This course will be an introduction to the art, architecture and minor arts that were produced during the three thousand years of ancient Egyptian history. This material will be presented in its cultural and historical contexts through illustrated lectures and will include visits to the collection of the University Museum.

Taught by: Silverman

Also Offered As: ANCH 068, ARTH 218, ARTH 618, NELC 068, NELC 668

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 622 Art of Ancient Iran

This course offers a survey of ancient Iranian art and culture from the painted pottery cultures of the Neolithic era to the monuments of the Persian Empire. Particular emphasis is placed on the Early Bronze Age.

Taught by: Pittman

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 222, ARTH 622

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 624 Art of Mesopotamia

The class presents a survey of the art and archaeology of Mesopotamia beginning with the appearance of the first cities and ending with the fall of the Assyrian Empire in the seventh century BCE. It presents the major artistic monuments of Mesopotamian culture, embedding them in their historical context. Focus is placed in particular on the interactions with surrounding cultures of Iran, Central Asia, the Caucasus, the Persian Gulf and Anatolia in order to decenter the discourse from a strictly Mesopotamian perspective. The format is lecture; assignments involve reading response papers; there are in class midterm and final exams.

Taught by: Pittman

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 224, ARTH 624, NELC 224, NELC 624

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 625 Greek Art and Artifact

This course surveys Greek art and artifacts from Sicily to the Black Sea from the 10th century BCE to the 2nd century BCE, including the age of Alexander and the Hellenistic Kingdoms. Public sculpture and painting on and around grand buildings and gardens, domestic luxury arts of jewelry, cups and vases, mosaic floors, and cult artefacts are discussed. Also considered are the ways in which heroic epic, religious and political themes are used to engaged viewers' emotions and served both domestic and the public aims. We discuss the relationships of images and things to space and structure, along with ideas of invention and progress, and the role of monuments, makers and patrons in Greek society.

Taught by: Kuttner

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 225, ARTH 625, CLST 220

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 626 Hellenistic and Roman Art and Artifacts

This course surveys the political, religious and domestic arts, patronage and display in Rome's Mediterranean, from the 2nd c. BCE to Constantine's 4th-c. Christianized empire. Our subjects are images and decorated objects in their cultural, political and socio-economic contexts (painting, mosaic, sculpture, luxury and mass-produced arts in many media). We start with the Hellenistic cosmopolitan culture of the Greek kingdoms and their neighbors, and late Etruscan and Republican Italy; next we map Imperial Roman art as developed around the capital city Rome, as well as in the provinces of the vast empire.

Taught by: Kuttner

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 226, ARTH 626, CLST 221

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 628 Greek Architecture and Urbanism

Introduction to the art of building and city planning in the ancient Greek world, 7th-1st c. BC. Emphasis on concepts of organizing space, on issues of structure, materials, decoration, proportion, and the Mycenean and eastern heritage as well as on theory and practice of urbanism as reflected in ancient cities (Athens, Pergamon, Alexandria) and writings (Plato, Artistotle, and others). Excursions to the Penn Museum and Philadelphia. No prerequisites.

Taught by: Zarmakoupi

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 228, ARTH 628, CLST 245

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 630 Etruscan Art & Archaeology in the Penn Museum

The Etruscans, who spoke a language unlike any others known, were cast by their Greek and Roman rivals as outsiders and enemies: pirates, lovers of luxury, loose women. Today we must rely on the archaeological evidence of painted tombs, decorated Tuscan temples and massive engineering works to correct the picture. The course will survey a millennium (1st millennium BCE) of Etruscan culture through archaeological sites, works of art and everyday material culture, especially illustrated with objects in the collection of the Penn Museum. An additional insight into Italic culture comes from tomb groups excavated for the Museum at the Faliscan settlement of Narce. Students will gain familiarity with the societies of pre-Roman Italy through close study of their vases, jewels, arms, armor, textiles and tools, and even their very bones, and discover a surprising amount of Etruscan heritage surviving today.

Taught by: Turfa

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CLST 335, CLST 635

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 632 Byzantine Art and Architecture

This course offers a wide-ranging introduction to the art, architecture, and material culture of Byzantium--a Christian, predominantly Greek-speaking civilization that flourished in the Eastern Mediterranean for over a thousand years. Positioned between the Muslim East and the Latin West, Antiquity and the Early Modern era, Byzantium nurtured a vibrant and highly sophisticated artistic culture. With emphasis placed upon paradigmatic objects and monuments, we will examine an array of artistic media, from mosaic and panel painting to metalwork, ivory carving, book illumination, and embroidery. We will consider the making, consumption, and reception of Byzantine art in a variety of contexts: political, devotional, ritual, and domestic. Topics include the idea of empire and its visual articulation; court culture; the veneration of images and relics; patronage, piety, and self-representation; authorship and artistic agency; materiality and the sensory experience of art; the reception of the pagan Greco-Roman past; and the changing nature of Byzantium's interactions with neighboring cultures.

Taught by: Drpic

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 232, ARTH 632

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 633 Eastern Medieval Architecture

This lecture course examines major architectural developments in the eastern Mediterranean between the 4th and 14th centuries CE. The focus is on the Byzantine Empire, with its capital at Constantinople. Lectures also devoted to related developments in the Caucasus (Armenia and Georgia), early Russia, the Balkans (Bulgaria and Serbia), Sicily and under the Normans, the Crusader states. Parallel developments in early Islamic architecture are used for comparative purposes. The course examines evidence for religious and secular buildings, as well as urbanism and settlement patterns.

Taught by: Ousterhout

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 233, ARTH 633

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 635 Introduction to Visual Culture of the Islamic World

A one-semester survey of Islamic art and architecture which examines visual culture as it functions within the larger sphere of Islamic culture in general. Particular attention will be given to relationships between visual culture and literature, using specific case studies, sites or objects which may be related to various branches of Islamic literature, including historical, didactic, philosophical writings, poetry and religious texts. All primary sources are available in English translation.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 235, ARTH 635, NELC 285, NELC 685, VLST 235

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 640 Medieval Art

An introductory survey, this course investigates painting, sculpture, and the "minor arts" of the Middle Ages. Students will become familiar with selected major monuments of the Late Antique, Byzantine, Carolingian, Romanesque, and Gothic periods, as well as primary textual sources. Analysis of works emphasizes the cultural context, the thematic content, and the function of objects. Discussions focus especially on several key themes: the aesthetic status of art and the theological role of images; the revival of classical models and visual modes; social rituals such as pilgrimage and crusading; the cult of the Virgin and the status of women in art; and, more generally, the ideology of visual culture across the political and urban landscapes.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 240, ARTH 640

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 646 GIS for the Digital Humanities and Social Sciences

This course introduces students to theory and methodology of the geospatial humanities and social sciences, understood broadly as the application of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and spatial analysis techniques to the study of social and cultural patterns in the past and present. By engaging with spatial theory, spatial analysis case studies, and technical methodologies, students will develop an understanding of the questions driving, and tools available for, humanistic and social science research projects that explore change over space and time. We will use ESRI's ArcGIS software to visualize, analyze, and integrate historical, anthropological, and environmental data. Techniques will be introduced through the discussion of case studies and through demonstration of software skills. During supervised laboratory sessions, the various techniques and analyses covered will be applied to sample data and also to data from a region/topic chosen by the student.

Taught by: Hammer

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: ANTH 346, NELC 346, NELC 646

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 647 Archaeological Fieldwork in Southern Iraq

After several decades of closure to foreign researchers, the heartland of the world's earliest cities (southern Iraq) has reopened for archaeological expeditions. This course is a seminar for graduate students who will conduct fieldwork in Spring 2019 at two major Mesopotamian cities, Ur (Tell al-Muqayyar) and Lagash (Tell al-Hiba), as part of Penn-led teams. Leading up to fieldwork, we will conduct a critical review of past investigations at these and other contemporary Mesopotamian sites of the fifth-second millennium BC. We will discuss how recent work in northern Mesopotamia (Syria, SE Turkey, Kurdistan), Anatolia, and South Caucasia provides new archaeological approaches to be applied, new questions to be answered, and new models to be tested in southern Iraq. In the field, students will work alongside the instructor and other archaeological project staff to learn and hone excavation and survey techniques. During and following fieldwork, each student will conduct an independent project on material excavated and surveyed in the field at Ur and/or Lagash. This project should align with the student's interests and will further the research program of the archaeological teams at Ur and Lagash.

Taught by: Hammer

Course offered spring; odd-numbered years

Also Offered As: NELC 645

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 698 Prospectus Workshop

Designed to prepare graduates in any aspect of study in the ancient world to prepare for the dissertation prospectus. Course will be centered around individual presentations and group critique of prospectus' in process, as well the fundamentals of large-project research design and presentation.

Taught by: Bowes

Also Offered As: CLST 698

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 700 Geoarchaeology

In this course, students will learn the basic concepts of earth systems and explore the ways that archaeologists use various environmental sciences (e.g., geomorphology, limnology, palynology, and dendroclimatology) and paleoecological modeling in their research. The course will include lectures and laboratory activities on the basics of geology, including surficial geology, rock and mineral identification, geomorphology and soils, sedimentation and stratigraphy, as well as a systematic review of depositional environments and their archaeological potential. A series of archaeological case studies will illustrate the application of these concepts in real-world field archaeology.

Taught by: Tartaron and Magee

Also Offered As: CLST 700

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 701 Proseminar In Methods in the History of Art

The meanings we ascribe to art works of any culture or time period are a direct result of our own preoccupations and methods. This colloquium will give both a broad overview of contemporary debates in the history of art-including such issues as technologies of vision, feminism, gender and sexuality studies, globalism, the pictorial turn or material/vision culture-and locate these methods within art history's own intellectual history,as well as the history of aesthetics. The course will consist of wide-ranging weekly readings and discussion, and also clarify such key terms as iconography, formalism, connoisseurship, and the Frankfurt and Vienna Schools.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 701

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 702 Greek Sanctuaries

Sanctuaries remain an important focal point for the study of Greek religion. Both as sites for worship, dedication, oracular activity and other cult activity and as sites for the mediation of elite and state competition sanctuaries are, along with the polis, the most essential structuring institutions of Greek life. This seminar takes a selection of larger and smaller extra-urban sanctuaries and examines their growth, articulation and function.

Taught by: McInerney

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANCH 702, CLST 702

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 705 Ethnoarchaeology: Greece

Ethnoarchaeology involves distinctive theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of living societies for the explicit purpose of shedding light on archaeological questions. In this seminar, we will review the intellectual history of ethnoarchaeology in North America and Europe, and explore case studies from Greece, the wider Mediterranean, and beyond. Among the topics will be analogy, cross-cultural comparison, experimental archaeology, oral history research, and archaeologically oriented ethnographic fieldwork. Students will create a proposal for ethnoarchaeological fieldwork in their area of interest in NSF or Wenner-Gren format, to be critiqued by the instructor and their peers.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CLST 705

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 706 Archaeology of the Hellenistic Period in Italy, Greece, and Asia Minor

A survey of the archaeology of the Hellenistic period (331-31 BCE) across the Mediterranean, with a focus on Rome, Magna Graecia, Greece, and western Asia Minor. The course will stress the interactions among cities and kingdoms during the Roman Republic and Greek Hellenistic periods, especially the second century B.C. Students will work with relevant objects in the Penn Museum's Mediterranean Section.

Taught by: Rose

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 706, CLST 706

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 715 Archaeology of Troy

An introduction to the archaeology of Troy, in northwestern Turkey. The course will focus on the results of excavations at the site in 1988, although the earlier excavations of Schliemann, Dorpfeld, and Blegen will also be considered. The course will cover a broad chronological span--from the early Bronze age through the late Roman period, and will include Greek, Roman, and Medieval attitudes toward Troy and the Trojan legend.

Taught by: Rose

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CLST 715

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 720 Topics in Aegean Art

Topic varies. Fall 2018: The choices made by groups of people with regard to the treatment of their dead can be reflective of a society s beliefs and social structure. In this course, we will examine the burial traditions of the people of the Prehistoric Aegean from the Neolithic through the end of the Bronze Age, circa 7,000-1,100 BCE. We will focus on burial architecture, grave goods, burial rituals, mortuary variability, and the symbolic meaning of death and burial in Prehistoric Greece. Particular attention will be paid to recent discoveries on Crete, the Mainland, and the Cycladic islands. Students will write two papers, and these papers will be presented to the class. The first paper will be circa 15 pages long with footnotes, bibliography, and images (presented via powerpoint) and the second will be a 20-25 page paper with footnotes, bibliography, and images presented via powerpoint.

Taught by: Shank

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 720, CLST 720

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 723 Topics in the Art of the Ancient Near East

Topic varies. Fall 2019: During the short period of the Neo Sumerian Empire at the end of the third millennium BCE, Mesopotamian concepts of kingship were crystallized through images, buildings, and textual creations. This seminar will examine this central institution from many points of view that invite cross historical and cross-cultural consideration.

Taught by: Pittman

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 723, NELC 740

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 726 The Archaeology of Greece and Asia Minor in the Archaic and Classical Periods

An examination of new discoveries and conflicting interpretations in the archaeology of Greece and Asia Minor between the seventh and fourth centuries B.C.E. Both sides of the Aegean will receive equal attention, and emphasis will be placed on sanctuaries, settlements, and cemeteries.

Taught by: Rose

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 726, CLST 711

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 732 Topics in Byzantine Art and Architecture

Topic varies. Spring 2018: The recent "return" to the object across the humanities and social sciences has brought to the fore concerns with the nature of material things, their operation in the world, and their entanglement with humans. This seminar will introduce you to some of the key theoretical writings on the object and material culture and will ask you to interrogate their relevance for the discipline of art history. Our focus will be on the Middle Ages, but depending on the specific interests of the seminar s participants, we may venture into other historical periods and cultural domains. Topics to be addressed include the social life of things; agency; materiality; the relic; the gift; the miniature; and the question of the human/nonhuman divide.

Taught by: Drpic

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 732

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 737 Islamic Architecture

This seminar will address the problems of studying architecture in the Islamic world. Considered will be issues of architectural design, regional and trans-regional constructional traditions, structural know-how and innovation, patronage and use. The examples discussed will be mainly religious and social service complexes. Attention will be paid to the manner of transmission of architectural design knowledge and constructional skill.

Taught by: Holod

Also Offered As: ARTH 737

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 738 Topics in Islamic Archaeology

Topic varies. Spring 2017: This seminar will trace the development of the field from one that was centered largely on the recovery of major monuments to one in which issues of daily life, demography, chronology and the study of settlement patterns have come to play a major role. The seminar will review work in the major zones of the Islamic world: Central Asia, Iran, Iraq, Anatolia, Syria, Palestine, Egypt, North Africa I (Libya-Tunisia), North Africa II (Algeria- Morocco), Spain. Of special interest this semester will be the study of landscape archaeology and settlement patterns. The seminar will discuss changes in patterns of settlement, trade and material culture 650 - 1300 CE in different areas of the Islamic world, concentrating on sites in Iran, Syria and North Africa.

Taught by: Holod

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 738, NELC 731

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 740 Topics in Medieval Art

Topic varies. Spring 2015: Among the functional genres shaping religious imagery in the Middle Ages and Renaissance, the altarpiece is arguably the most important, and many of the most famous panel paintings that hang today in museums originated as components of altarpieces. The altarpiece in the Latin church bridged the divide between clergy and laypeople, between cult and devotion, between public acclaim and private interests. Such altarpieces developed into extraordinarily dynamic vehicles for staging the religious image, akin to mural painting (in its potential for narrative elaboration), and manuscript illumination (in its potential for interchanging and juxtaposing imagery). As an umbrella for diverse research projects in both medieval and Renaissance art, this seminar affords an overview of the origins, development and articulation of the altarpiece as a functional and pictorial genre in European art, on both sides of the Alps. It also seeks to provide students with the materials and practical training--technical, scholarly, interpretative-- required to study altarpieces as visual, narrative, and material totalities.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 740, RELS 702

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 751 Participation in Archaeological Excavations

Opportunities for qualified students to join in current expeditions. Credit allowed will depend on the length of time spent in the field.

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Independent Study

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 800 Pedagogy

Activity: Independent Study

1.0 Course Unit

AAMW 999 Independent Study

May be repeated for credit.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1.0 Course Unit