Art & Archaeology of Mediterranean World (AAMW)

AAMW 401 Introduction to Greek Archaeology

An introduction to the art and archaeology of ancient Greece from the Archaic through Hellenistic periods. Topics to be considered include the formation of the Greek polis, the rising and falling fortunes of Athens and the other Greek city-states in the Classical period, and the world of Alexander the Great. Emphasis is placed on the consideration of the archaeological evidence, e.g., sculpture, painting, pottery, architecture, and other material culture. This course is part of a sequence of introductory courses (with Ages of Homer and Introduction to Roman Archaeology) on the archaeology of the Greco-Roman world. There are no prerequisites, and these courses need not be taken in a particular order.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 427 Roman Sculpture

Survey of the Republican origins and Imperial development of Roman sculpture - free-standing, relief, and architectural - from ca. 150 BC to 350 AD. We concentrate on sculpture in the capital city and on court and state arts, emphasizing commemorative public sculpture and Roman habits of decorative display; genres examined include relief, portraits, sarcophagi, luxury and minor arts(gems, metalwork, coinage). We evaluate the choice and evolution of styles with reference to the functions of sculptural representation in Roman culture and society.

Taught by: Kuttner, Rose

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 428 Hellenistic Art and Spectacle

Hellenistic usually names art in the age of Mediterranean culture from the 4th century BCE and the rise of Alexander the Great's Macedon, and the Greco-Macedonian conquest of the Persian Empire, to Cleopatra of Egypt's defeat by Rome at the end of the Republic. Our course looks also at the age of Augustus and his successors, 1st century CE. While Greek and Macedonian practice in city-states and kingdoms is our launching point, this course also looks at international culture and cultural interaction among peoples from North Africa and Etrusco-Roman Italy, Egypt, (Etrusco) Anatolia, the Mideast and Central Asia. We probe art, artifacts, and visual display from a range of settings, from sanctuary to house, palace and parade, and in all media, from marble monuments to pottery and jewelry. Our archaeology of Hellenistic visual culture also looks at the rich body of Hellenistic and Roman texts of art history, art criticism, and the description of objects and image, to better understand the Hellenistic maker, patron, and viewer. No prerequisites. It is desirable for undergraduates to have experience of research. Of interest to students in AAMW, ARTH, ANCH, CLST, VLST, NELC, RELS and ANTH.

Taught by: Kuttner

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 435 Medieval Islamic Art & Architecture

An introduction to the major architectural monuments and trends, as well as to the best-known objects of the medieval (seventh-to fourteenth-century) Islamic world. Attention is paid to such themes as the continuity of late antique themes, architecture as symbol of community and power, the importance of textiles and primacy of writing. Suitable for students of literature, history, anthropology as well as art history.

Taught by: Holod

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 509 Curatorial Seminar

Curatorial seminars expose students to the complexity of studying and working with objects in the context of public display. With the guidance of faculty and museum professionals, students learn what it means to curate an exhibition, create catalogues and gallery text, and/or develop programming for exhibitions of art and visual/material culture. Spring 2015: Practiced in almost all ancient cultures, magic offered ways of managing or understanding the present, controlling supernatural agencies, and seeing the future. The objects and images associated with magical practices are rich and varied and are well represented in the University of Pennsylvania Museum. The aim of the seminar is to prepare an exhibit on magic and divination, working with the archaeological collections of the UPM, specifically the Ancient Near Eastern, Egyptian, and Mediterranean sections. It will include objects such as amulets, curse tablets, incantation bowls, and magical papyri, as well as images representing magical practices. Participating students will select and research objects and prepare wall texts for the exhibit.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 512 Petrography of Cultural Materials

Introduction to thin-section petrography of stone and ceramic archaeological materials. Using polarized light microscopy, the first half of this course will cover the basics of mineralogy and the petrography of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks. The second half will focus on the petrographic description of ceramic materials, mainly pottery, with emphasis on the interpretation of provenance and technology. As part of this course, students will characterize and analyze archaeological samples from various collections. Prior knowledge of geology is not required.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 519 Ancient Greek Colonies

This seminar examines the archaeology of Greek colonization from the Late Bronze Age to ca. 600 B.C. These colonies were highly diverse in their motivations, physical settings, and political and social structures, as well as their relationships with mother cities and the new worlds they inhabited. Emphasis is placed on the colonial experience as a cross-cultural and negotiated process. In addition to archaeological and epigraphic evidence, literary and historical traditions are examined. Colonies from the southern Balkan peninsula, Black Sea, Ionia, northern Africa, and Magna Graecia will be the focus of reading, reports, and discussion.

Taught by: Tartaron

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 520 Topics in Aegean Bronze Age

Topic varies. Fall 2016: Minoan and Cycladic Wall Paintings are considered a hallmark of the Aegean Bronze Age Civilization. Often, these paintings are discussed in terms of their iconography but in isolation of their archaeological contexts. In this class, we will examine both with the goal of determining what types of paintings are used in houses, palaces, defensive structures, and buildings of undetermined function, as well as examining their pictorial programs and iconographic interpretations. With the recent study of Minoan-style wall paintings in Egypt and the Ancient Near East, the question of the spread of Minoan and Cycladic techniques and motifs must also be considered, along with the archaeological contexts at these non-Aegean sites. We will have class discussions of assigned readings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 522 Topics in Ancient Iranian Art

Topic varies. Spring 2018: This seminar will focus on the environmental, archaeological and textual record for settlement in the Persian/Arabian Gulf region from the Neolithic to the pre-Islamic Late Antique. Emphasis will be on the settlement history and material culture. Special attention will be paid to the close interaction of the local communities on the Arabian side of the Gulf with those on the Iranian/Indus valley side. The patterns of sea faring trade and interaction from Mesopotamia, Iran, Indus Valley and beyond will be considered. It is possible that this class will take a site trip to the UAE during the spring break, if the logistics can be arranged. Instructors: Professors Holly Pittman (Penn), Peter Magee (Bryn Mawr College).

Taught by: Pittman

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 525 Topics in Greek and Roman Art

Topic varies. Fall 2018: "Roman Provincial Art" is a very active scholarly category: we test how it might be productive, sampling visual culture outside the empire's Italian heartland from the Late Republic into Late Antiquity. Rome's arts were always in dialogue with those of neighboring cultures; imperialist expansion into the Mediterranean world and beyond meant that cultural relations across many boundaries--social, ethic, territorial--potentially became cultural politics. Of related interest are relationships between visual and material culture within the Roman world's formal boundaries, in proto-global and imperial contexts, and those of peoples along and beyond those frontiers. (In Late Antiquity some of them took up rule within the old imperial boundaries, and came to cultural terms with their new lands.) "Style" is a fraught issue: what does attributed crudeness in regional practice add up to, and what were the aims of apparently trans-Mediterranean forms of display? Do "arts" engage identity formation, enforced or discrepant viewing?

Taught by: Kuttner

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 526 Material & Methods in Mediterranean Archaeology

This course is intended to familiarize new graduate students with the collections of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology and the wide range of scholarly interests and approaches used by faculty at Penn and neighboring institutions, as well as to provide an introduction to archaeological methods and theory in a Mediterranean context. Each week, invited lecturers will address the class on different aspects of archaeological methodology in their own research, emphasizing specific themes that will be highlighted in readings and subsequent discussion. The course is divided into five sections: Introduction to the Mediterranean Section; Collections; Method and Theory in Mediterranean Archaeology; Museum Work; and Ethics. The course is designed for new AAMW graduate students, though other graduate students or advanced undergraduate students may participate with the permission of the instructor.

Taught by: Tartaron

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 529 Topics in Roman Architecture

Topic varies. Spring 2018: This seminar offers a critical assessment of digital Roman architecture studies. What has been accomplished and learned over the last generation since the Digital Turn, and where is the field of Roman architecture being taken? Points of focus include several landmark case studies, such as digital reconstructions of the city of ancient Rome, and threatened cultural heritage sites in Syria. The course will involve readings of significant texts, in class discussions and presentations lead by the seminar s participants, and testing and critiquing of a limited set of digital tools.

Taught by: Stinson

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 530 Topics in Byzantine Art

Topic varies.

Taught by: Drpic

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 531 Later Islamic Art and Architecture

Istanbul, Samarkand, Isfahan, Cairo and Delhi as major centers of art production in the fourteenth to seventeenth centuries. Attention is given to urban and architectural achievement as well as to the key monuments of painting and metalwork. The visual environment of the "gunpowder empires" is discussed.

Taught by: Holod

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 533 Topography and Monuments of Ancient Rome

An intensive exploration of Rome's urban topography during the Republican and Imperial periods (6th c. B.C. through 4th c. A.D.) Using archaeological and textual sources, including the Etruscan and Roman collections of the Penn Museum, the goal will be to reconstruct the built environment and decoration of Rome over the course of a millennium. Of interest to students of classics, archaeology, art history, and architecture. Some familiarity with Rome will be a plus, but is not required.

Taught by: Rose

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 534 Problems in Greek and Roman History: Archaeic and Classical

This seminar is designed to introduce students to the major issues and problems in the early history of Ancient Greece, from approximately 776 BC until the reign of Alexander the Great nearly four hundred and fifty years later. A number of these issues have been the subject of academic investigation for decades: the historicity of Homeric society, the origins of democracy, the reforms of Kleisthenes, the population of Athens, for example. The investigation of many of these problems, however, has received fresh impetus from newer approaches: demographic studies of the Aegean islands, the dating of 5th century inscriptions, the study of Solons poetry have all yielded new insights and transformed our understanding of Greek culture and history. In this seminar we will explore many older questions from newer perspectives, with attention to such recent topics as gender, ethnicity and subaltern studies.The result is a view of Greece that is both more familiar and yet equally more alien.

Taught by: McInerney

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 536 Archaeology of Anatolia

This class is devoted to the archaeology and history of Anatolia (ancient Turkey) from the beginning of the Bronze Age (3000 BC) to the end of the Byzantine period (1453 AD). Emphasis will be placed on the great empires in Anatolia (Hittite, Phrygian, Lydian, Urartian, Persian, Roman, and Byzantine), and on the great cities (Troy, Sardis, Ephesus, Constantinople). The course is intended to complement the major exhibit on Gordion, the Phrygians, and Anatolian archaeology that will open at the Penn Museum in February of 2016 and run for 10 months.

Taught by: Brian Rose

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 537 Topics in Art of Iran

Topic varies. Spring 2018: The pro-seminar will examine aspects of continuity and rupture in the visual culture(s) of the Iranian world. This is an opportunity for students whose preparations may be centered on other contiguous periods or regions to consider the manner in which Middle Asia and its rich visual cultures contributed to the forging of Late Antique and medieval/ Islamic visual expressions of kingship, territory and religion. The seminar will consider a range of materials from archaeological sites, rock reliefs and wall paintings to textiles, silver vessels, coins and ceramics, with special attention to materials excavated or otherwise held by the Penn Museum.

Taught by: Holod, Kuttner

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 539 Archaeobotany Seminar

In this course we will approach the relationship between plants and people from archaeological and anthropological perspectives in order to investigate diverse plant consumption, use, and management strategies. Topics will include: plants as foods and intoxicating beverages; medicines, poisons, and psychoactive plants; plants as building supplies and textiles; wild plant collection, and the origins of plant domestication. Students will learn both field procedures and laboratory methods of archaeobotany through a series of hands-on activities and lab-based experiments. The final research project will involve an original in-depth analysis and interpretation of archaeobotanical specimens. By the end of the course, students will feel comfortable reading and evaluating archaeobotanical literature and will have a solid understanding of how archaeobotanists interpret human activities of the past.

Taught by: Chantel White

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 540 Topics in Medieval Art

Topic varies. Spring 2018: The craft of ivory carving around the Mediterranean is contingent upon the availability of imported elephant tusks, from either South East Asia or, more frequently, from the African continent. The shifting winds of trade routes offer an interpretive paradigm with which to analyze ivory objects from a variety of different cultural groups: the lack or abundance of ivory and the resulting desire for or surfeit of the material shapes its meaning and use around the Mediterranean basin. The study of ivory objects as they migrate around the Mediterranean allows us to investigate the rich intercultural interactions between Eastern and Western Christians, and both of these with the Islamic world. This course focuses on an object oriented knowledge of ivory artefacts, with a strong emphasis on the collections at the PennMuseum, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and other area collections.

Taught by: Guerin

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 541 Topics in Early Medieval Architecture

Topic varies.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 542 Ancient Seafaring

This course explores ships, seafaring, and seafarers of the ancient Greek World from the Bronze Age (Minoans and Mycenaeans) to the Age of Alexander (Hellenistic period). Sources include shipwrecks and related artifacts, artistic representations, and ancient documents and literature. The emphasis is not so much on the technical aspects of shipbuilding and navigation as on the ways that seafaring shaped Greek history and connected the Greeks to a wider world through trade, warfare, colonization, and adventure.

Taught by: Tartaron

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 546 Museum Internship

The Museum Internship in the spring consists of a research project with Penn Museum collections based on a proposal designed and approved during the fall AAMW Proseminar (AAMW 526). It is offered to, and is a requirement for, first-year AAMW graduate students only.

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: AAMW-526 Material & Methods in Mediterranean Archaeology

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

AAMW 552 Archaeometallurgy Seminar

This course is designed to provide an in-depth analysis of archaeological metals. Topics to be discussed include: exploitation of ore and its transformation to metal in ancient times, distribution of metal as a raw materials, provenance studies, development and organization of early metallurgy, and interdisciplinary investigations of metals and related artifacts like slag and crucibles. Students will become familiar with the full spectrum of analytical procedures, ranging from microscopy for materials characterization to mass spectrometry for geochemical fingerprinting, and will work on individual research projects analyzing archaeological objects following the analytical methodology of archaeometallurgy.

Taught by: Moritz Jansen

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 556 Becoming a Professional Archaeologist

This course (cross-listed as ANTH556) is designed to prepare graduate students for a career in academic archaeology. Topics to be covered include project research design (including logistical planning), acquiring funding (proposal writing), managing grants (including budget planning and reconciliation), publishing, and preparing for entering the job market (writing cover letters and CVs). Students are also encouraged to suggest further topics of interest as the semester goes on. The final project will be the development of a NSF grant proposal, which will be presented and critiqued in stages throughout the semester, and which can serve as the basis for later submission. While much of the focus is on archaeology, students in other disciplines, especially those involving field research, will also benefit.

Taught by: Dibble

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: ANTH 600 and one archaeology area course or permission of instructor

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 557 Seminar in Archaeological Theory and Method: Archaeology of Landscapes

Topic varies.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 562 Introduction to Digital Archaeology

Digital methods allow archaeologists to approach research questions about the human past with increasing accuracies on larger datasets and at multiple scales. This class introduces students to the three main steps of digital archaeology: data management, analysis, and sharing. Data management involves the design, creation, and curation of digital objects that capture the archaeological process and evidence. Students will gain deep familiarity in working with the main types of digital archaeological data: structured data (relational databases), 3D models/spatial data, and raster images. The class will provide abundant hands-on experience with the latest equipment and software for working with many different kinds of data. We will learn about data analysis techniques through a close examination of a variety of case studies in the literature that demonstrate how other archaeologists have applied digital methods to their archaeological questions. Finally, we will discuss the importance of sharing data through open access data publication and we will apply our skills with structured data to existing online archaeological datasets. The goal of this class is to prepare students to make methodological decisions during future research endeavors, both in the field and in the archaeological lab.

Taught by: Cobb

Prerequisite: Prior archaeological classwork and/or experience preferred

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Please note that this is a lecture course with an undergraduate and graduate section.

AAMW 611 Greek Epigraphy

An introduction to the principles and practices of Greek Epigraphy. Study of selected Greek inscriptions.

Taught by: McInerney

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 622 Art of Ancient Iran

This course offers a survey of ancient Iranian art and culture from the painted pottery cultures of the Neolithic era to the monuments of the Persian Empire. Particular emphasis is placed on the Early Bronze Age.

Taught by: Pittman

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 624 Art of Mesopotamia

A survey of the art of Mesopotamia from 4000 B.C. through the conquest of Alexander the Great.

Taught by: Pittman

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 625 Greek Art and Artifact

This course surveys Greek art and artifacts from Sicily to the Black Sea from the 10th century BCE to the 2rd century BCE, including the age of Alexander and the Hellenistic Kingdoms. Public sculpture and painting on and around grand buildings and gardens, domestic luxury arts of jewelry, cups and vases, mosaic floors, and cult artefacts are discussed. Also considered are the ways in which heroic epic, religious and political themes are used to engage viewer's emotions and served both domestic and the public aims. We discuss how art and space was considered, along with ideas of invention and progress, the role of monuments, makers and patrons in Greek society.

Taught by: Kuttner

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 626 Hellenistic and Roman Art and Artifacts

This course surveys the political, religious and domestic arts, patronage and display in Rome's Mediterranean, from the 2nd c. BCE to Constantine's 4th-c. Christianized empire. Our subjects are images and decorated objects in their cultural, political and socio-economic contexts (painting, mosaic, sculpture, luxury and mass-produced arts in many media). We start with the Hellenistic cosmopolitan culture of the Greek kingdoms and their neighbors, and late Etruscan and Republican Italy; next we map Imperial Roman art as developed around the capital city Rome, as well as in the provinces of the vast empire.

Taught by: Kuttner

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 632 Byzantine Art and Architecture

This course offers a wide-ranging introduction to the art, architecture, and material culture of Byzantium a Christian, predominantly Greek-speaking civilization that flourished in the Eastern Mediterranean for over a thousand years. Positioned between the Muslim East and the Latin West, Antiquity and the Early Modern era, Byzantium nurtured a vibrant and highly sophisticated artistic culture. With emphasis placed upon paradigmatic objects and monuments, we will examine an array of artistic media, from mosaic and panel painting to metalwork, ivory carving, book illumination, and embroidery. We will consider the making, consumption, and reception of Byzantine art in a variety of contexts political, devotional, ritual, and domestic. Topics include the idea of empire and its visual articulation; court culture; the veneration of images and relics; patronage, piety, and self-representation; authorship and artistic agency; materiality and the sensory experience of art; the reception of the pagan Greco-Roman past; and the changing nature of Byzantium s interactions with neighboring cultures.

Taught by: Drpic

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 633 Eastern Medieval Architecture

This lecture course examines major architectural developments in the eastern Mediterranean between the 4th and 14th centuries CE. The focus is on the Byzantine Empire, with its capital at Constantinople. Lectures also devoted to related developments in the Caucasus (Armenia and Georgia), early Russia, the Balkans (Bulgaria and Serbia), Sicily and under the Normans, the Crusader states. Parallel developments in early Islamic architecture are used for comparative purposes. The course examines evidence for religious and secular buildings, as well as urbanism and settlement patterns.

Taught by: Ousterhout

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 635 Introduction to Visual Culture of the Islamic World

A one-semester survey of Islamic art and architecture which examines visual culture as it functions within the larger sphere of Islamic culture in general. Particular attention will be given to relationships between visual culture and literature, using specific case studies, sites or objects which may be related to various branches of Islamic literature, including historical, didactic, philosophical writings, poetry and religious texts. All primary sources are available in English translation.

Taught by: Holod

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 640 Medieval Art

An introductory survey, this course investigates painting, sculpture, and the "minor arts" of the Middle Ages. Students will become familiar with selected major monuments of the Late Antique, Byzantine, Carolingian, Romanesque, and Gothic periods, as well as primary textual sources. Analysis of works emphasizes the cultural context, the thematic content, and the function of objects. Discussions focus especially on several key themes: the aesthetic status of art and the theological role of images; the revival of classical models and visual modes; social rituals such as pilgrimage and crusading; the cult of the Virgin and the status of women in art; and, more generally, the ideology of visual culture across the political and urban landscapes.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 698 Prospectus Workshop

Designed to prepare graduates in any aspect of study in the ancient world to prepare for the dissertation prospectus. Course will be centered around individual presentations and group critique of prospectus' in process, as well the fundamentals of large-project research design and presentation.

Taught by: Bowes

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Graduate students in Classical Studies, Ancient History, and AAMW

AAMW 701 Proseminar In Methods in the History of Art

The meanings we ascribe to art works of any culture or time period are a direct result of our own preoccupations and methods. This colloquium will give both a broad overview of contemporary debates in the history of art-including such issues as technologies of vision, feminism, gender and sexuality studies, globalism, the pictorial turn or material/vision culture-and locate these methods within art history's own intellectual history,as well as the history of aesthetics. The course will consist of wide-ranging weekly readings and discussion, and also clarify such key terms as iconography, formalism, connoisseurship, and the Frankfurt and Vienna Schools.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 702 Greek Sanctuaries

The formation and development of key religious sites, including Olympia, Delphi, Cyrene, Selinus, Cos and Lindos.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 705 Ethnoarchaeology: Greece

Ethnoarchaeology involves distinctive theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of living societies for the explicit purpose of shedding light on archaeological questions. In this seminar, we will review the intellectual history of ethnoarchaeology in North America and Europe, and explore case studies from Greece, the wider Mediterranean, and beyond. Among the topics will be analogy, cross-cultural comparison, experimental archaeology, oral history research, and archaeologically oriented ethnographic fieldwork. Students will create a proposal for ethnoarchaeological fieldwork in their area of interest in NSF or Wenner-Gren format, to be critiqued by the instructor and their peers.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 706 Archeology of the Hellenistic Period in Italy, Greece, and Asia Minor

A survey of the archaeology of the Hellenistic period (331-31 BCE) across the Mediterranean, with a focus on Rome, Magna Graecia, Greece, and western Asia Minor. The course will stress the interactions among cities and kingdoms during the Roman Republic and Greek Hellenistic periods, especially the second century B.C. Students will work with relevant objects in the Penn Museum's Mediterranean Section.

Taught by: Rose

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 710 Curatorial Seminar: Gordion, Royal City of Midas

The course will focus on the planning for and design of an exhibit on Gordio and the Phrygians that will take place at the Penn Museum in 2016. The exhibit will feature substantial loans from museums in Turkey, including the "Midas Mound" at Gordion and the "Lydian Treasure" from the area around Sardis.

Taught by: Rose

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 715 Archaeology of Troy

An introduction to the archaeology of Troy, in northwestern Turkey. The course will focus on the results of excavations at the site in 1988, although the earlier excavations of Schliemann, Dorpfeld, and Blegen will also be considered. The course will cover a broad chronological span--from the early Bronze age through the late Roman period, and will include Greek, Roman, and Medieval attitudes toward Troy and the Trojan legend.

Taught by: Rose

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 720 Topics in Aegean Art

Topic varies. Fall 2018: The choices made by groups of people with regard to the treatment of their dead can be reflective of a society s beliefs and social structure. In this course, we will examine the burial traditions of the people of the Prehistoric Aegean from the Neolithic through the end of the Bronze Age, circa 7,000-1,100 BCE. We will focus on burial architecture, grave goods, burial rituals, mortuary variability, and the symbolic meaning of death and burial in Prehistoric Greece. Particular attention will be paid to recent discoveries on Crete, the Mainland, and the Cycladic islands. Students will write two papers, and these papers will be presented to the class. The first paper will be circa 15 pages long with footnotes, bibliography, and images (presented via powerpoint) and the second will be a 20-25 page paper with footnotes, bibliography, and images presented via powerpoint.

Taught by: Shank

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 723 Topics in the Art of the Ancient Near East

Topic varies. Spring 2015: This team taught class will extend from the lead up to the Neo Sumerian Empire through the Empire and its collapse and reorganization of the political landscape of greater Mesopotamia. It will consider the imperial period internally and from the perspective of the northern and eastern neighbors. This class is an upper level graduate research seminar that will include art historical, anthropological and historical approaches. Class participation and a major research paper are required.

Taught by: Pittman

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 725 Topics in Greek and Roman Art

Topic varies.

Taught by: Kuttner

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 726 Archaeology of Greece and Asia Minor in the Archaic and Classical Periods

An examination of new discoveries and conflicting interpretations in the archaeology of Greece and Asia Minor between the seventh and fourth centuries B.C.E. Both sides of the Aegean will receive equal attention, and emphasis will be placed on sanctuaries, settlements, and cemeteries.

Taught by: Rose

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 732 Topics in Byzantine Art and Architecture

Topic varies. Spring 2018: The recent "return" to the object across the humanities and social sciences has brought to the fore concerns with the nature of material things, their operation in the world, and their entanglement with humans. This seminar will introduce you to some of the key theoretical writings on the object and material culture and will ask you to interrogate their relevance for the discipline of art history. Our focus will be on the Middle Ages, but depending on the specific interests of the seminar s participants, we may venture into other historical periods and cultural domains. Topics to be addressed include the social life of things; agency; materiality; the relic; the gift; the miniature; and the question of the human/nonhuman divide.??

Taught by: Drpic

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 738 Topics in Islamic Archaeology

Topic varies. Spring 2017: This seminar will trace the development of the field from one that was centered largely on the recovery of major monuments to one in which issues of daily life, demography, chronology and the study of settlement patterns have come to play a major role. The seminar will review work in the major zones of the Islamic world: Central Asia, Iran, Iraq, Anatolia, Syria, Palestine, Egypt, North Africa I (Libya-Tunisia), North Africa II (Algeria- Morocco), Spain. Of special interest this semester will be the study of landscape archaeology and settlement patterns. The seminar will discuss changes in patterns of settlement, trade and material culture 650 - 1300 CE in different areas of the Islamic world, concentrating on sites in Iran, Syria and North Africa.

Taught by: Holod

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 740 Topics in Medieval Art

Topic varies. Spring 2015: Among the functional genres shaping religious imagery in the Middle Ages and Renaissance, the altarpiece is arguably the most important, and many of the most famous panel paintings that hang today in museums originated as components of altarpieces. The altarpiece in the Latin church bridged the divide between clergy and laypeople, between cult and devotion, between public acclaim and private interests. Such altarpieces developed into extraordinarily dynamic vehicles for staging the religious image, akin to mural painting (in its potential for narrative elaboration), and manuscript illumination (in its potential for interchanging and juxtaposing imagery). As an umbrella for diverse research projects in both medieval and Renaissance art, this seminar affords an overview of the origins, development and articulation of the altarpiece as a functional and pictorial genre in European art, on both sides of the Alps. It also seeks to provide students with the materials and practical training--technical, scholarly, interpretative-- required to study altarpieces as visual, narrative, and material totalities.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 751 Participation in Archaeological Excavations

Opportunities for qualified students to join in current expeditions. Credit allowed will depend on the length of time spent in the field.

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

AAMW 800 Pedagogy

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

AAMW 999 Independent Study

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

Notes: May be repeated for credit