Africana Studies (AFRC)

AFRC 001 Introduction to Africana Studies

The term Africana emerged in public discourse amid the social, political, and cultural turbulence of the 1960s. The roots of the field, however, are much older,easily reaching back to oral histories and writings during the early days of the Trans-Atlantic African slave trade. The underpinnings of the field continued to grow in the works of enslaved Africans, abolitionists and social critics of the nineteenth century, and evolved in the twentieth century by black writers, journalists, activists, and educators as they sought to document African descended people's lives. Collectively, their work established African Studies as a discipline,epistemological standpoint and political practice dedicated to understanding the multiple trajectories and experiences of black people in the world throughout history. As an ever-transforming field of study, this course will examine the genealogy, major discourses, and future trajectory of Africana Studies. Using primary sources such as maps and letters, as well as literature and performance, our study of Africana will begin with continental Africa, move across the Atlantic during the middle passage and travel from the coasts of Bahia in the 18th century to the streets of Baltimore in the 21st century. The course is constructed around major themes in Black intellectual thought including: retentions and transferal, diaspora, black power, meanings of blackness, uplift and nationalism. While attending to narratives and theories that concern African descended people in the United States, the course is uniquely designed with a focus on gender and provides context for the African diasporic experience in the Caribbean and Latin America.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: Beavers, Butler, Charles, Johnson, Hanchard

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 002 Introduction to Sociology

Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Imoagene, Zuberi

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: SOCI 001

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 006 Race and Ethnic Relations

The course will focus on race and ethnicity in the United States. We begin with a brief history of racial categorization and immigration to the U.S. The course continues by examining a number of topics including racial and ethnic identity, interracial and interethnic friendships and marriage, racial attitudes, mass media images, residential segregation, educational stratification, and labor market outcomes. The course will include discussions of African Americans, Whites, Hispanics, and Asian Americans and Multiracials.

Taught by: Charles, Kao, Zuberi

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ASAM 006, SOCI 006, URBS 160

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 008 Sociology of the Black Community

This course explores a broad set of issues defining important aspects of the Black/African American experience. In addition to the "usual suspects" (e.g., race, socioeconomic status, poverty, gender, and group culture), we also think about matters of health and well-being, the family, education, and identity in Black/African American communities. Our goal is to gain a deeper sociological understanding and appreciation of the diverse and ever-changing life experiences of Blacks/African Americans.

Taught by: Charles

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: SOCI 028

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: Freshman Seminar

AFRC 010 Freshman Seminar: The World After 1800

This course is cross-listed with PSCI 010 (Freshmen Seminar) when the subject matter is related to African American or other African Diaspora issues. Topics vary. A recent topic is "Race, Crime, and Punishment." See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Gottschalk

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HIST 106

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 011 Urban Sociology

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the sociological study of urban areas. This includes more general topics as the rise of cities and theories urbanism, as well as more specific areas of inquiry, including American urbanism, segregation, urban poverty, suburbanization and sprawl, neighborhoods and crime, and immigrant ghettos. The course will also devote significant attention to globalization and the process of urbanization in less developed counties.

Taught by: Flippen

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: SOCI 011, URBS 112

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 012 Freshman Seminar

Also Offered As: LALS 107, PSCI 010

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 015 Freshman Seminar in 20TH Century History

In this First Year Seminar we will use coming-of-age autobiographies to explore some of the most significant historical developments of the 20th century. By coming of age I mean autobiographies in which the author focuses primarily on the periods of childhood and adolescence into young adulthood. We will read books by people who lived during segregation in the South, the Great Depression, Japanese Internment during World War II, and the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. We will consider many issues, including: race, racism, immigration, religion, social class, and gender. We will contemplate questions about identity, family, honesty, and memory. As we read each book we will examine an individual life in a particular place and time, and we will move out beyond the confines of a person, family, or town to explore the broader historical moment in which the individual lived. To make this deeper contextualization possible, the course is divided into segments that will allow us to study the historical context of the autobiography as well as engage in focused discussion of the texts themselves.

Taught by: Williams

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 017 Topics in Literature

SPRING 2018: This seminar will introduce students to the power of public art. Outdoor murals, painted poetry, poetry performed outdoors, anti-museum sculpture, and outdoor theater will be the focus of this seminar. How does public art make the very idea of art gain new dimensions such as art as an event (not an object) and art as a community intervention? Our starting point will be outdoor murals in Philadelphia and other very recent art reconsidering the meaning of public monuments. In addition to our focus on contemporary public art in Philadelphia, we will focus on the role of public art in the 1960s and 1970s Black Arts Movement. The seminar will unveil the power of outdoor space to create art that has urgency and the openness of radical experimentation. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Beavers, Tillet, Crawford

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: COML 016, ENGL 016

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: Freshman Seminar

AFRC 019 AFAM Freshman Seminar

This course will introduce students to a more hemispheric understanding of the American experience, through the writings of many authors from the New World, including the United States, on what it means to be an American. Students will read texts from many genres including but not limited to poetry, film, prose, political speeches and autobiography, to come to terms with histories of native Americans, African-Americans, Latinos, and whites in the United States, as well as peoples of South America and the Caribbean. In the process students will become familiar with scholarship across the social sciences and humanities that consider issues of race, culture, nation, freedom and inequality in the Americas, and how racial slavery and the Afro-American hemispheric experience has informed multiple American visions.

Taught by: Hanchard

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 041 Homelessness & Urban Inequality

This freshman seminar examines the homelessness problem from a variety of scientific and policy perspectives. Contemporary homelessness differs significantly from related conditions of destitute poverty during other eras of our nation's history. Advocates, researchers and policymakers have all played key roles in defining the current problem, measuring its prevalence, and designing interventions to reduce it. The first section of this course examines the definitional and measurement issues, and how they affect our understanding of the scale and composition of the problem. Explanations for homelessness have also been varied, and the second part of the course focuses on examining the merits of some of those explanations, and in particular, the role of the affordable housing crisis. The third section of the course focuses on the dynamics of homelessness, combining evidence from ethnographic studies of how people become homeless and experience homelessness, with quantitative research on the patterns of entry and exit from the condition. The final section of the course turns to the approaches taken by policymakers and advocates to address the problem, and considers the efficacy and quandaries associated with various policy strategies. The course concludes by contemplating the future of homelessness research and public policy.

Taught by: Culhane

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: SOCI 013, URBS 010

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 047 That's My Song!: Musical Genre as Social Contract

Music in American history has been fundamental to identity formation because, as one scholar notes, it comprises "the deepest feelings and qualities that make a group unique. Through moving and sounding together in synchrony, people can experience a feeling of oneness with others." This course examines how various musical genres have served as "social contracts" among audiences throughout the process of this country's nation building process. Within America's melting pot ideal, communities of listeners have asserted their powerful convictions about social identity through musical praxis and its "rules of engagement." The discourses surrounding the notion of "genre" have often made these meanings legible, audible and powerful for many. From Protestant church performance practices, to minstrelsy, to Tin Pan Alley to rock and hip-hop, the social agreements of musical genres help us understand the dynamism of American identities.

Taught by: Ramsey

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: MUSC 047

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 050 World Musics and Cultures

This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Taught by: Muller, Rommen

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ANTH 022, FOLK 022, MUSC 050

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 053 Music of Africa

African Contemporary Music: North, South, East, and West. Come to know contemporary Africa through the sounds of its music: from South African kwela, jazz, marabi, and kwaito to Zimbabwean chimurenga; Central African soukous and pygmy pop; West African Fuji, and North African rai and hophop. Through reading and listening to live performance, audio and video recordings, we will examine the music of Africa and its intersections with politics, history, gender, and religion in the colonial and post colonial era. (Formerly Music 053).

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Taught by: Muller

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 053, MUSC 051

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 054 Sounding Poetry: Music and Literature

Never before has poetry been so inescapable. Hip hop, the soundtrack of our times, has made rhyme, meter, and word-play part of our daily lives. How did this happen? This course begins not on the page, but in the bardic traditions of Homer's Iliad, which encoded many of the values of its time in oral formulas. Poetry was, however, no mere encyclopedia, but also a source of risk, as we will read in Plato's warning against its hypnotic powers, and in the excesses of the Bacchae. We continue through 19th and 20th century attempts to recover these classic traditions (Wordsworth, Longfellow, Pound). Yet Europe was not the only center of poetic production. How does the Homeric tradition relate to living traditions of West African singing poets (griots) and Southern African praise songs? And what traces of these traditions can we hear in the blues? We will listen to early blues recordings and discuss the politics of collecting folklore, and the genius of African American modernists (Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, Georgia Douglas Johnson) who bought vernacular speech onto the page. We will read and listen to a number of 20th century poets inspired when page meets stage in jazz poetry, dub poetry, spoken word, and hip hop. Assignments will include 2 papers, 2 small-group performances, memorization exercises, and a creative adaptation of one poem. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of current offerings.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Taught by: TBD

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: COML 054, ENGL 054

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 056 Seeing/Hearing Globally: Knowing People, Culture, and Places through Travel

Students are provided a general introduction to a country's history, politics, environment, and performance through a range of resources: scholarly literature, film, music, and online resources; with particular focus on sites, communities, and events included in the 12 day intensive travel to that country (either Fall semester Intro with winter break travel; or spring semester Intro with late spring intensive travel). Students are given guidelines for writing about and representing live performances and experiences of exhibits and heritage sites for journaling and are expected to produce a written/creative project at the end of the travel. The itinerary and specific course content will vary according to the travel site and focus of each class.

Taught by: Muller

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANTH 056, COML 056, MUSC 056

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: Application required through Penn Global: https://global.upenn.edu/pennabroad/pgs

AFRC 062 Land of the Pharaohs

This course provides an introduction to the society, culture and history of ancient Egypt. The objective of the course is to provide an understanding of the characteristics of the civilization of ancient Egypt and how that ancient society succeeded as one of the most successful and long-lived civilizations in world history.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Also Offered As: NELC 062

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 066 African American Drama: From the 1920's to the present

This course will introduce students to Pulitzer-prize winning plays such as Lynn Nottage's Sweat, groundbreaking plays such as Ntozake Shange's For Colored Girls, as well as less known plays that show the wide range of form and themes in 20th and 21st century African American drama. We will focus on performance as a mode of interpreting a script and performance as a way of understanding the intersections of race, class, and gender. In-class viewings of selected scenes in recorded productions of the plays will energize our analysis of the scripts. Short creative, performance-oriented writing assignments will produce the questions explored in the two critical essays. In addition to Sweat and For Colored Girls, our line-up may include Zora Neale Hurston's Color Struck, Anna Deavere Smith's Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992, Suzan-Lori Parks' 100 Plays for the First Hundred Days, August Wilson's Radio Golf, Lydia Diamond's Harriet Jacobs, Amiri Baraka's The Slave, and Claudia Rankine's The White Card.

Taught by: Crawford

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ENGL 066, THAR 066

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 070 Colonial Latin America

The year 1492 was pivotal in the history of the world. It precipitated huge population movements within the Americas and across the Atlantic - a majority of them involuntary as in the case of indigenous and African people who were kidnapped and enslaved. It led to cataclysmic cultural upheavals, including the formation of new cultures in spaces inhabited by people of African, European and indigenous descent. This course explores the processes of destruction and creation in the region known today as Latin America in the period 1400 - 1800. Class readings are primary sources and provide opportunities to learn methods of source analysis in contexts marked by radically asymmetrical power relationships.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Norton

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: HIST 070, LALS 070

Activity: Recitation

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: Fulfills History Tradition Distribution Requirement

AFRC 073 The African Diaspora: Global Dimensions

This class examines the cultural and social ramifications of the African diaspora on a global level. It is divided into two major sections. The first section provides the historical background to the African diaspora by focusing on the forced migration of Africans to Spanish and Portuguese colonies in the Americas. We will then delve into the black experience in French and British colonial spaces. In this section, we will also endeavor to move beyond the Atlantic-centric paradigm in studies of the African diaspora by examining free and unfree migrations of African people across the Indian Ocean to places as far away as India and the Philippines. The second half of the class devotes significant attention to the historical legacy of slavery and colonialism in places like Brazil, Cuba and the United States. In this section, we will discuss such issues as race relations, the struggle for civil rights for African-descent people as well as the emergence and the implementation of affirmative action policies in places like Brazil and the US.

Taught by: Ferreira

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: HIST 078, LALS 078

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 075 Africa Before 1800

Survey of major themes and issues in African history before 1800. Topics include: early civilizations, African kingdoms and empires, population movements, the spread of Islam, and the slave trade. Also, emphasis on how historians use archaeology, linguistics, and oral traditions to reconstruct Africa's early history.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Babou

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: HIST 075

Activity: Recitation

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 076 Africa Since 1800

Survey of major themes, events, and personalities in African history from the early nineteenth century through the 1960s. Topics include abolition of the slave trade, European imperialism, impact of colonial rule, African resistance, religious and cultural movements, rise of naturalism and pan-Africanism, issues of ethnicity and "tribalism" in modern Africa.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Cassanelli

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: HIST 076

Activity: Recitation

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 077 Jazz Style and History

This course is an exploration of the family of musical idioms called jazz. Attention will be given to issues of style development, selective musicians, and to the social and cultural conditions and the scholarly discourses that have informed the creation, dissemination and reception of this dynamic set of styles from the beginning of the 20th century to the present. Fulfills Cultural Diversity in the U.S.

Taught by: Ramsey

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: MUSC 035

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 078 Faculty-Student Collaborative Action Seminar in Urban University-Community Rltn

This seminar helps students develop their capacity to solve strategic, real-world problems by working collaboratively in the classroom, on campus, and in the West Philadelphia community. Students develop proposals that demonstrate how a Penn undergraduate education might better empower students to produce, not simply "consume," societally-useful knowledge, as well as to function as caring, contributing citizens of a democratic society. Their proposals help contribute to the improvement of education on campus and in the community, as well as to the improvement of university-community relations. Additionally, students provide college access support at Paul Robeson High School for one hour each week.

Taught by: Harkavy

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HIST 173, URBS 178

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 081 African-American Literature

An introduction to African-American literature, typically ranging across a wide spectrum of moments, methodologies, and ideological postures, from Reconstruction and the Harlem Renaissance to the Civil Rights Movement. Most versions of this course will begin in the 19th century; some versions of the course will concentrate only on the modern period. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ENGL 081, GSWS 081

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 085 Contemporary American Literature

The readings for this course expose the student to a wide range of American fiction and poetry since World War II, giving considerable attention to recent work. Works may include All The King's Men by Robert Penn Warren, Herzog by Saul Bellow, On The Road by Jack Kerouac, V by Thomas Pynchon, Of Love and Dust by Ernest J.Gaines, A Flag For Sunrise by Robert Stone, The Killing Ground by Mary Lee Settle, and selected poem by Ginsberg, Plath, and Walcott. Readings vary from term to term.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CIMS 074, ENGL 074

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: This course is cross-listed with ENGL 074 (Contemporary American Literature) when the course content is related to Afro-American issues. Topic vary. Consult the Africana Department website for a current course description.

AFRC 101 Study of an Author

This course introduces students to literary study through the works of a single author--often Shakespeare, but other versions will feature writers like Jane Austen, Geoffrey Chaucer, Herman Melville, and August Wilson. Readings an individual author across his or her entire career offers students the rare opportunity to examine works from several critical perspectives in a single course. What is the author's relation to his or her time? How do our author's works help us to understand literary history more generally? And how might be understand our author's legacy through performance, tributes, adaptations, or sequels? Exposing students to a range of approaches and assignments, this course is an ideal introduction to literary study for those students wishing to take an English course but not necessarily intending to major. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Taught by: Beavers

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ENGL 101, GSWS 101

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 109 American Jesus

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: RELS 110

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 112 Discrimination: Sexual and Racial Conflict

This course is concerned with the structure, the causes and correlates, and the government policies to alleviate discrimination by race and gender in the United States. The central focus of the course is on employment differences by race and gender and the extent to which they arise from labor market discrimination versus other causes, although racial discrimination in housing is also considered. After a comprehensive overview of the structures of labor and housing markets and of nondiscriminatory reasons (that is, the cumulative effects of past discrimination and/or experiences) for the existence of group differentials in employment, wages, and residential locations, various theories of the sources of current discrimination are reviewed and evaluated. Actual governmental policies and alternative policies are evaluated in light of both the empirical evidence on group differences and the alternative theories of discrimination.This course is concerned with the structure, the causes and correlates, and the government policies to alleviate discrimination by race and gender in the United States. The central focus of the course is on employment differences by race and gender and the extent to which they arise from labor market discrimination versus other causes, although racial discrimination in housing.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Madden

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: GSWS 114, SOCI 112

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 114 Poetry Writing Workshop

This is a workshop for students who are interested in exploring a variety of approaches to poetry. Students will encounter a diverse series of readings, in-class writing activities, weekly writing assignments, and creative methods for heightening your abilities as a reader and writer. Maybe repeated for credit with different instructor.

Taught by: Beavers

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ENGL 113

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: This course is not open to freshmen. Students wishing to take this course must submit a writing sample as part of the selection process.

AFRC 115 Religious Ethics and Modern Society

Religious beliefs of Malcolm X and MLK formed their social action during the Civil Rights for African Americans. This seminar will explore the religious biographies of each leader, how religion shaped their public and private personas, and the transformative and transgressive role that religion played in the history of the Civil Rights movement in the United States and abroad. Students in this course will leave with a clearer understanding of religious beliefs of Christianity, The Nation of Islam, and Islam, as well as religiously based social activism. Other course emphases include the public and private roles of religion within the context of the shaping of ideas of freedom, democracy, and equality in the United States, the role of the "Black church" in depicting messages of democracy and freedom, and religious oratory as exemplified through MLK and Malcolm X.

Taught by: Butler

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: RELS 112

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 116 Caribbean Culture and Politics

This course offers anthropological perspectives on the Caribbean as a geo-political and socio-cultural region, and on contemporary Caribbean diaspora cultures. We will examine how the region's long and diverse colonial history has structured relationships between race, ethnicity, class, gender and power, as well as how people have challenged these structures. As a region in which there have been massive transplantation of peoples and their cultures from Africa, Asia, and Europe, and upon which the United States has exerted considerable influence, we will question the processes by which the meeting and mixing of peoples and cultures has occurred. Course readings include material on the political economy of slavery and the plantation system, family and community life, religious beliefs and practices, gender roles and ideologies, popular culture, and the differing ways national, ethnic, and racial identities are expressed on the islands and throughout the Caribbean diaspora.

Taught by: Thomas

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANTH 116, LALS 116

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 120 Social Statistics

This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests.

Taught by: Charles

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: SOCI 120

Activity: Recitation

0.0 Course Units

AFRC 121 Writing for Children

We will read our favorite kids' books, determine the kinds of books we love to read and write, and then write them, aiming at a clear voice appropriate to the story, and as much order or misrule as each writer's kid-muse demands. For inspiration, we'll visit the Maurice Sendak Collection at the Rosenbach Museum and Library and have a nostalgia wallow in the kids' section at the library. Then students write, fast-fast, drafts of stories to workshop , mull and revise. Yes, fun is required. For sure we'll critique, but first we'll try to outrun our interior grown-up! Workshopping happens first with student writer colleagues, and then with the real kids in schools, through our partner West Philadelphia Alliance for Children. Reading to children will give studentwriters a chance to hear where children laugh, see where they look scared, or notice when they begin to fidget. Returning with revisions will be a promise fulfilled, and an important marker in the literary life of everyone involved. Our class will act as a team of editors, then, to submit stories-andillustrations by authors and/or kids-on the upcoming website, SafeKidsStories.org.

Taught by: Cary

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ENGL 121

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: This course is not open to freshmen. Students wishing to take this course must submit a writing sample as part of the selection process. May be repeated for credit with a different instructor.

AFRC 122 Popular Culture and Youth in Africa

All across the continent, Africa is alive with the energies of young people, expressed in music, art, fashion, drama, video, poetry, protest, and urban legends. In this course, we take a close look at the wide variety of popular forms produced and consumed by young people in a diversity of contexts, urban and rural, elite and marginal, mainstream and transgressive. We will examine how popular culture draws from African tradition to craft innovative versions of modernity and futurity. We will explore themes of democracy, inequality, and social justice threaded through popular genres as well as experiences of joy, anger, fear, and hilarity. We will see how popular culture provides escape and entertainment for young people while also working to transform African societies.

Taught by: Hasty

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: ANTH 120

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 124 Writing and Politics

This is a course for students who are looking for ways to use their writing to participate in the 2020 election. Student writers will use many forms--short essay, blogs, social media posts, mini video- or play scripts, podcasts--and consider lots of topics as they publish work, in real time, with #VoteThatJawn. This multi-media platform popped up in 2018 to support youth registration and voting in Philadelphia's 2018 mid-term elections. Registration of 18-year-olds that year doubled: from 3,300 to nearly 7,000. This year university, high school, and media partners across the city aim to hit 10K. Imagine that. Imagine a Creative Writing class that answers our desire to live responsibly in the world and to have a say in the systems that govern and structure us. Plus learning to write with greater clarity, precision, and whatever special-sauce Jawn your voice brings. The course is designed as an editorial group sharing excellent, non-partisan, fun, cool, sometimes deadly earnest content for and about fresh voters. In addition, you will gain experience in activities that writers in all disciplines need to know: producing an arts-based event, a social media campaign, working with multi-media content, and collaborating with other artists. English 124 will sometimes work directly with diverse populations of youth from other colleges and high schools throughout the city. Because you will engage with a common reading program about the ground-breaking Voting Rights Act of 1965, the class is cross-listed with Africana Studies 124. In addition, the work of #VoteThatJawn performs a civic service; therefore it is listed as an an Academically Based Community Service (ABCS) course with the university. Don't sit out this momentous electoral season because you have so much work. Use your work to bring other youth to the polls.

Taught by: Cary

Also Offered As: ENGL 124

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 134 Creative Non-Fiction Writing

A workshop course in the writing of creative nonfiction. Topics may include memior, family history, travel writing, documentary, and other genres in which literary structures are brought to bear on the writing of nonfiction prose. May be repeated for credit with a different instructor.

Taught by: Cary, Watterson

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ENGL 135, GSWS 135, URBS 135

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 135 Law and Society

After introducing students to the major theoretical concepts concerning law and society, significant controversial societal issues that deal with law and the legal systems both domestically and internationally will be examined. Class discussions will focus on issues involving civil liberties, the organization of courts, legislatures, the legal profession and administrative agencies. Although the focus will be on law in the United States, law and society in other countries of Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America will be covered in a comparative context. Readings include research, reports, statutes and cases.

Taught by: Fetni

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: SOCI 135

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 141 Histories of Race and Science in Philadelphia

The history of race and science has its American epicenter in Philadelphia. Throughout this Academically-Based Community Service (ABCS) course, we will interrogate the past and legacy of racial science in the United States; the broad themes we broach will be met concretely in direct engagement with Penn and the Philadelphia community. As an extended case study, students will undertake independent research projects using primary source documents from local archives, tracing the global history of hundreds of human skulls in the 19th century Samuel G. Morton cranial collection at the Penn Museum, a foundational and controversial anthropological collection in the scientific study of race. These projects will be formed through an ongoing partnership with a Philadelphia high school in which Penn students will collaborate with high school students on the research and design of a public-facing website on the Morton collection and the legacy of race and science in America. In our seminar, we will read foundational texts on the study of racial difference and discuss anti-racist responses and resistance to racial science from the 19th century to the present. Throughout, we will work directly with both primary and secondary sources, critically interrogating how both science and histories of science and its impacts on society are constructed. Throughout this course, we will explore interrelated questions about Penn and Philadelphia's outsize role in the history of racial science, about decolonization and ethics in scholarly and scientific practice, about the politics of knowledge and public-facing scholarship, and about enduring legacies of racial science and racial ideologies. All students are welcome and there are no prerequisites, save for intellectual curiosity and commitment to the course. This course will be of particular interest to those interested in race, American history and the history of science, anthropology, museum studies, education, and social justice.

Taught by: Mitchell

Also Offered As: ANTH 140, HIST 154, STSC 140

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 147 Studies in African American Music

This course explores aspects of the origins, style development, aesthetic philosophies, historiography, and contemporary conventions of African-American musical traditions. Topics covered include: the music of West and Central Africa, the music of colonial America, 19th century church and dance music, minstrelsy, music of the Harlem Renaissance, jazz, blues, gospel, hip-hop, and film music. Special attention is given to the ways that black music produces "meaning" and to how the social energy circulating within black music articulates myriad issues about American identity at specific histroical moments. The course will also engage other expressive art forms from visual and literary sources in order to better position music making into the larger framework of African American aesthetics.

Taught by: Ramsey

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: MUSC 235

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 168 History of American Law to 1877

The course surveys the development of law in the U.S. to 1877, including such subjects as: the evolution of the legal profession, the transformation of English law during the American Revolution, the making and implementation of the Constitution, and issues concerning business and economic development, the law of slavery, the status of women, and civil rights.

Taught by: Berry

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: HIST 168

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 169 History of American Law Since 1877

This course covers the development of legal rules and principles concerning individual and group conduct in the United States since 1877. Such subjects as regulation and deregulation, legal education and the legal profession, and the legal status of women and minorities will be discussed.

Taught by: Berry

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: HIST 169

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 172 The American South

This course will cover southern culture and history from 1607-1860, from Jamestown to secession. It traces the rise of slavery and plantation society, the growth of Southern sectionalism and its explosion into Civil War.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Hahn

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HIST 170

Activity: Recitation

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 175 Society and Culture of Brazil

With its booming economy, the recent inauguration of its first female president, and its selection as host to the 2012 World Cup and Olympic games, Brazil is growing in global prestige. But amid all these exciting developments are devastating socioeconomic inequalities. Access to safe living conditions, livable wages, higher education, and overall social mobility remain painfully out of reach to many Brazilians, the majority of whom are the descendants of slaves. Why do these problems persist in a country that has had such an enduring and widespread reputation as a "racial democracy"? What are the possibilities of closing the equality gap in Brazil?

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: HIST 175, LALS 175

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 176 Afro-American History 1550-1876

This course examines the experiences of Africans and African Americans in colonial America and in the United States to 1865. We will explore a variety of themes through the use of primary and secondary sources. Topics include: the development of racial slavery, labor, identity, gender, religion, education, law, protest, resistance, and abolition.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Akins, Williams

Two terms. student may enter either term.

Also Offered As: HIST 176

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 177 Afro-American History 1876 to Present

A study of the major events, issues, and personalities in Afro-American history from Reconstruction to the present. The course will also examine the different slave experiences and the methods of black resistance and rebellion in the various slave systems.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Harris, Savage

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HIST 177

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 186 Africa and the Transatlantic Slave Trade

This course focuses on the history of selected African societies from the sixteenth through the mid-nineteenth centuries. The primary goal is to study the political, economic, social, and cultural history of a number of peoples who participated in the Atlantic slave trade or were touched by it during the era of their involvement. The course is designed to serve as an introduction to the history and culture of African peoples who entered the diaspora during the era of the slave trade. Its audience is students interested in the history of Africa, the African diaspora, and the Atlantic world, as well as those who want to learn about the history of the slave trade. Case studies will include the Yoruba, Akan, and Fon, as well as Senegambian and West-central African peoples.

Taught by: Ferreira

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HIST 187

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 187 Topics in Africana Studies

Topics Vary. See the Africana Studies Program's website at www.sas.upenn.edu/africana for a description of the current offerings. SPRING 2017: The history of the women and men of African Descent who have studied, taught, researched, and worked at the University of Pennsylvania provides a powerful window into the complex history of Blacks not only in America but throughout the Diaspora. This class will unpack, uncover, and present this history through close studies of texts and archived records on and at the university, as well as through first hand accounts by alumni and past and present faculty and staff members. These stories of the trials and triumphs of individuals on and around this campus demonstrate the amazing and absurd experience that Blacks have endured both at Penn and globally. Emphasis will be placed on the research process with the intent of creating a democratic classroom where all are students and all are instructors. Students will become familiar with archival historical research (and historical criticism) as well as with ethnographic research. Far more than just a survey of historical moments on campus and in the community, students will meet face to face with those who have lived and are presently living history and they will be faced with the challenge of discerning the most effective ways of documenting, protecting, and representing that history for future generations of Penn students.

Taught by: Howard, Peterson

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 190 Introduction to Africa

This course provides an introduction to the study of Africa in all its diversity and complexity. Our focus is cultural, geographical, and historical: we will seek to understand Africa s current place in the world political and economic order and learn about the various social and physical factors that have influenced the historical trajectory of the continent. We study the cultural formations and empires that emerged in Africa before European colonial invasion and then how colonialism reshaped those sociocultural forms. We ll learn about the unique kinds of kinship and religion in precolonial Africa and the changes brought about by the spread of Islam and Christianity. Finally, we ll take a close look at contemporary issues such as ethnic violence, migration, popular culture and poverty, and we'll debate the various approaches to understanding those issues.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Hasty

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: ANTH 190

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 201 Divinities, Diviners and Divinations: Religions of the African Diaspora

This undergraduate course is designed to provide students with a broad introduction to major themes within African Diasporic Religions. This is an interdisciplinary course. We will be drawing upon various theoretical methods, i.e. historical, ethnographical, and autobiographical. Additionally, we will be examining visual media to understand the presence and value of African Diasporic Religions in the 20th/21st century. Special attention will be given to Vodou, Santeria, and Candomble in the Americas. Thematically, we will work through concepts of the diaspora; memory, myth and authenticity; ritual and material practices; borders, migration, gender and sexuality, religious commodities and exchange. As we traverse through these various religious traditions, it is through the readings, lectures, invited speakers, films and class discussions that we will develop a complex understanding of integrative religious worldviews that impacts every aspect of life: family structure, gender relations, education, healing, economics, politics, arts, and so on. It is with the hopes that we can apprehend how these traditions are indeed an American Religion.

Taught by: Nwokocha

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: GSWS 201

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 202 Spirit possession in Caribbean Religions

This course is designed to provide students with a broad introduction to possession experiences in Caribbean Religions. Through historical, ethnographic, autobiographical, literary and visual texts this course examines complex, gendered practices within the possession process, the vibrant spiritual energy that sustains communal connections during religious ceremonies, and the transnational imaginations that animate Caribbean religious practices in the Americas. Special attention will be given to Santeria, Candomble, Vodou, Myal, Palo Monte, and Revival Zion in the Americas. Possession is a process through which gender and sexuality can be performed, contesting national and regional discourses of sexuality, gender, and race in the Caribbean. Thematically, we will work through concepts of memory, community, adornment, ritual, borders, and the senses. We will investigate religious ritual practices to understand various religious worldviews that shape communities' religious and social lives.

Taught by: Nwokocha

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: GSWS 202

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 215 The World After 1800: Advanced Benjamin Franklin Seminar

This course is cross listed with HIST 214 (America after 1800: Advanced Benjamin Franklin Seminar) when the subject matter is related to African, African American or African diaspora issues. See the Africana Studies Program's website at www.sas.upenn.edu/africana for a description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HIST 216, JWST 216, URBS 220

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 218 Diversity and the Law

The goal of this course is to study the role the law has played, and continues to play, in addressing the problems of racial discrimination in the United States. Contemporary issues such as racial profiling, affirmative action, and diversity will all be covered in their social and legal context. The basis for discussion will be assigned texts, articles, editorials and cases. In addition, interactive videos will also be used to aid class discussion. Course requirements will include a term paper and class case presentations.

Taught by: Anderson

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: LGST 218

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 222 African Women's Lives: Past and Present

Restoring women to African history is a worthy goal, but easier said than done.The course examines scholarship over the past forty years that brings to light previously overlooked contributions African women have made to political struggle, religious change, culture preservation, and economic development from pre-colonial times to present. The course addresses basic questions about changing women's roles and human rights controversies associated with African women within the wider cultural and historical contexts in which their lives are lived. It also raises fundamental questions about sources, methodology, and representation, including the value of African women's oral and written narrative and cinema production as avenues to insider perspectives on African women's lives.

Taught by: Blakley

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: GSWS 222

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 225 African Languages and Culture

The aim of the course is to provide an overall perspective on African languages and linguistics. No background in linguistics is necessary. Students will be introduced to theoretical linguistics-its concepts, theories, ways of argumentation, data collection, data analysis, and data interpretation. The focus will be on the languages and linguistics of Africa to provide you with the knowledge and skills required to handle the language and language-related issues typical of African conditions. We will cover topics related to formal linguistics (phonology/phonetics, morphology, syntax, and semantics), aspects of pragmatics as well as the general socio-linguistic character of African countries. We will also cover language in context, language and culture, borrowing, multilingualism, and cross-cultural communication in Africa.

Taught by: Mbeje

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 229 Topics in US History

Topics vary. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Berry, Brown, Hahn

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: ASAM 203, HIST 231

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 232 Race and Ethnic Politics

This course examines the role of race and ethnicity in the political discourse through a comparative survey of recent literature on the historical and contemporary political experiences of the four major minority groups (Blacks or African Americans, American Indians, Latinos or Hispanic Americans, and Asian Americans). A few of the key topics will include assimilation and acculturation seen in the Asian American community, understanding the political direction of Black America in a pre and post Civil Rights era, and assessing the emergence of Hispanics as the largest minority group and the political impact of this demographic change. Throughout the semester, the course will introduce students to significant minority legislation, political behavior, social movements, litigation/court rulings, media, and various forms of public opinion that have shaped the history of racial and ethnic minority relations in this country. Readings are drawn from books and articles written by contemporary political scientists.

Taught by: Gillion

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: LALS 232, PSCI 231

Activity: Recitation

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 233 World History: Africa or the Middle East

SPRING 2018: African cities in the past contributed to dynamic and prosperous civilizations. What happened? This course examines Africans' aspirations of modernity through the lens of African urban history using fiction, film and current scholarship in several disciplines. Each class will explore two temporalities--the precolonial history of African cities, and the colonial and postcolonial histories of economic, social and political progress which goes by the name of development. Grounded in the case studies of both ancient and modern cities, this course explores the emergence and decline of trading centers, the rise of colonial cities, and the dilemmas of postcolonial economies and politics.

Taught by: Babou, Powell

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: GSWS 232, HIST 232, NELC 282

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: Topics vary: See the Africana Studies Program's website at www.sas.upenn.edu/africana for a description of the current offering.

AFRC 234 World History: East Asia or Latin America

Topics vary. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Fabella

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: ARTH 369, EALC 141, GSWS 233, HIST 233, LALS 233

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 235 Law and Social Change

Beginning with discussion of various perspectives on social change and law, this course then examines in detail the interdependent relationship between changes in legal and societal institutions. Emphasis will be placed on (1) how and when law can be an instrument for social change, and (2) how and when social change can cause legal change. In the assessment of this relationship, emphasis will be on the laws of the United States. However, laws of other countries and international law relevant to civil liberties, economic, social and political progress will be studied. Throughout the course, discussions will include legal controversies relevant to social change such as issues of race, gender and the law. Other issues relevant to State-Building and development will be discussed. A comparative framework will be used in the analysis of this interdependent relationship between law and social change.

Taught by: Fetni

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: SOCI 235

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 236 Topics in Transnational History

Topics vary

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HIST 234, URBS 234

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 238 Modalities of Black Freedom and Escape: Ships

The course circulates around ships and boats. The course combines methods from environmental humanities, visual arts and history to consider multi-modal practices of black freedom and escape. From free black sailors in the eighteenth century Caribbean Sea, to twentieth and twenty-first century West African fishing boats, notions of Haitian "boat people," Parliament Funkadelic's mothership, and sinking boats with Somali and Ethiopian migrants off Yemen's coast, ships have been and remain technologies of containment and freedom for communities of African descent. In the face of environmental vulnerabilities and the reality of water ways as systems of sustenance and imminent death, this course asks: how do black people use the ship and the process and practice of shipping as vessels for freedom, escape, and as a site to experiment with futures? Using the city of Philadelphia and the Schuylkill and Delaware rivers as our primary site of interrogation, the course attends to the threats that black people experience following natural disaster (New Orleans, Haiti, Puerto Rico) and everyday engagement with the local and global state structures regarding water (Flint, MI). In this context, we also look to shipping as a site to theorize and account for black innovation, meanings of (non-)sovereignty, and alternative futures.

Taught by: Johnson

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANTH 231

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 245 Dancing the African Diaspora

This seminar/studio course introduces students to theories, debates, and critical frameworks in African Diaspora Dance Studies. It asks: What role does dance play throughout the African diaspora? What makes a dance 'black'? How do conceptualizations of gender and sexuality inform our reading of dancing bodies? Using African diaspora, critical dance, performance, and black feminist frameworks, we will examine the history, politics, and aesthetics of "black dance". Through a keywords format, we'll construct both a vocabulary: a body of words used to describe a phenomena, and a grammar: a body of rules that lay bare the operations between terms. This course recognizes the fluidity of meaning between words depending on the context, geography, and circumstance of their evocation. Our key terms will allow us to examine a number of dancers, choreographers, companies, and movement practices. Moving across an African diasporic map, this course explores the politics of black choreography, and the political significance of black bodies in motion.

Taught by: Johnson

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 248 The Haitian Revolution

In August 1791, enslaved Africans on the northern plain of Saint Domingue (colonial Haiti) rose up in a coordinated attack against their French colonial masters and plantation overseers, launching the initial revolt in what would come to be known as the Haitian Revolution. In the years that followed, their actions forced the legal abolition of racial discrimination, and then the abolition of slavery, throughout the French Empire. Ultimately, when Napoleon Bonaparte threatened to return slavery to Saint Domingue, they waged a war for independence. After defeating the Napoleonic army, these former slaves then declared the world's first "Black Republic," the independent state of Haiti, in1804. This seminar will examine some of the major themes and debates surrounding Haiti's colonial and revolutionary history. We will begin by considering the colonial paradox: France's leading role in the intellectual movement called the "Enlightenment" coincided with its ascent as a slaveholding colonial power. The seminar will also explore parallels and pointsof connection between the revolutionary movements in France and Saint Domingue.When the Haitian Revolution began in 1791, the French Revolution was already two years old: how did the increasingly radical ideas and widespread violence in France shape events in the Caribbean? Likewise, how did west African traditions and political ideologies influence insurgents? And how, in turn, did the revolution in Saint Domingue impact the revolution in France? From a diplomatic perspective, we will also consider relations between the Haitian Revolutionary leadership and French officials, examining their respective goals, which overlapped and diverged at different moments. Finally, we will ask how the revolution in Saint Domingue-and and the birth of Haiti--ipacted ideas about liberty, sovereignty and freedom throughout the Atlantic world. We will read a combination of primary and secondary materials each week. Students are encouraged to read primary documents in the original French if they are able. A final research paper will be required of all students, drawing on the Kislak Center's rich collection of revolutionary-era documents.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HIST 248, LALS 248

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 253 Music and Performance of Africa

This class provides an overview of the most popular musical styles and discussion of the cultural and political contexts in which they emerged in contemporary Africa. Learning to perform a limited range of African music/dance will be part of this course. No prior performance experience required.

Taught by: Muller

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANTH 263, MUSC 256

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 258 Latin American Music

This survey course considers Latin American musics within a broad cultural and historical framework. Latin American musical practices are explored by illustrating the many ways that aesthetics, ritual, communication, religion, and social structure are embodied in and contested through performance. These initial inquiries open onto an investigation of a range of theoretical concepts that become particularly pertinent in Latin American contexts--concepts such as post-colonialism, migration, ethnicity, and globalization. Throughout the course, we will listen to many different styles and repertories of music and then work to understand them not only in relation to the readings that frame our discussions but also in relation to our own, North American contexts of music consumption and production. (Formerly Music 158).

Taught by: Rommen

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: LALS 158, MUSC 258

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 268 Contemporary Issues in African Society

This course will deal with law and society in Africa. After surveying the various legal systems in Africa, the focus will be on how and to what extent the countries of Africa "re-Africanized" their legal systems by reconciling their indigenous law with western law and other legal traditions to create unified legal systems that are used as instruments of social change and development. Toward this end, the experiences of various African countries covering the various legal traditions will be included. Specific focus will be on laws covering both economic and social relations. This emphasis includes laws of contracts and civil wrongs, land law, law of succession, marriage and divorce and Africa's laws of International Relations, among other laws. Throughout this course a comparative analysis with non-African countries will be stressed.

Taught by: Imoagene, Zuberi

Also Offered As: SOCI 268

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 269 Constitutional Law: Public Power & Civil Rights to 1912

This course explores the creation and transformations of the American constitutional system's structures and goals from the nation's founding through the period of Progressive reforms, the rise of the Jim Crow system, and the Spanish American War. Issues include the division of powers between state and national governments, and the branches of the federal government; economic powers of private actors and government regulators; the authority of governments to enforce or transform racial and gender hierarchies; and the extent of religious and expressive freedoms and rights of persons accused of crimes. We will pay special attention to the changing role of the Supreme Court and its decisions in interpreting and shaping American constitutionalism, and we will also read legislative and executive constitutional arguments, party platforms, and other influential statements of American constitutional thought.

Taught by: Smith

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: PSCI 271

Activity: Recitation

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 274 Faces of Jihad in African Islam

This course is designed to provide the students with a broad understanding of the history of Islam in Africa. The focus will be mostly on West Africa, but we will also look at developments in other regions of the continent. We will explore Islam not only as religious practice but also as ideology and an instrument of social change. We will examine the process of islamization in Africa and the different uses of Jihad. Topics include prophetic jihad, jihad of the pen and the different varieties of jihad of the sword throughout the history in Islam in sub-Saharan Africa.

Taught by: Babou

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HIST 275

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 276 African American Life and Culture in Slavery

This course will examine the lives of enslaved African Americans in the United States, both in the North and the South. We will engage historiographical debates, and tackle questions that have long concerned historians. For example, if slaves were wrenched from families and traded, could they sustain family relationships? If slaves worked from sun-up until sun-down, how could they create music? We will engage with primary and secondary sources to expand our understandings of values, cultural practices, and daily life among enslaved people. Topics will include: literacy, family, labor, food, music and dance, hair and clothing, religion, material culture, resistance, and memories of slavery. Several disciplines including History, Archaeology, Literature, and Music, will help us in our explorations. Written, oral, and artistic texts for the course will provide us with rich sources for exploring the nuances of slave life, and students will have opportunities to delve deeply into topics that are of particular interest to them. This course will also count as the AFRC 176 requirement for the AFRC major.

Taught by: Williams

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: HIST 274

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: This course will also count as the AFRC 176 requirement for the AFRC major.

AFRC 277 Penn Slavery Project Research Seminar

This research seminar provides students with instruction in basic historical methods and an opportunity to conduct collaborative primary source research into the University of Pennsylvania's historic connections to slavery. After an initial orientation to archival research, students will plunge in to doing actual research at the Kislak Center, the University Archives, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, the American Philosophical Society, the Library Company, and various online sources. During the final month of the semester, students will begin drafting research reports and preparing for a public presentation of the work. During the semester, there will be opportunities to collaborate with a certified genealogist, a data management and website expert, a consultant on public programming, and a Penn graduate whose research has been integral to the Penn Slavery Project.

Taught by: Brown

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HIST 273

Activity: Field Work

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 279 (T)rap Music

This course examines the coming to pass of trap music from several perspectives: 1) that of its technological foundations and innovations (the Roland 808, Auto-tune, FL Studio (FruityLoops), etc.); 2) that of its masters/mastery (its transformation of stardom through the figures of the producer (Metro Boomin) and the rock star (Future)); 3) that of its interpretability and effects (what does the music say and do to us). We will thus engage with this music as a practice of art and form of techno-sociality that manifests uncanny and maximal attunement with the now.

Taught by: White

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ENGL 282

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 281 Topics in African American Literature

In this advanced seminar, students will be introduced to a variety of approaches to African American literatures, and to a wide spectrum of methodologies and ideological postures (for example, The Black Arts Movement). The course will present an assortment of emphases, some of them focused on geography (for example, the Harlem Renaissance), others focused on genre (autobiography, poetry or drama), the politics of gender and class, or a particular grouping of authors. Previous versions of this course have included "African American Autobigraphy," "Backgrounds of African American Literature," "The Black Narrative" (beginning with eighteenth century slave narratives and working toward contemporary literature), as well as seminars on urban spaces, jazz, migration, oral narratives, black Christianity, and African-American music. See Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Beavers, Davis, Jackson, Tillet

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ENGL 281

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: Spaces will be reserved for English Majors.

AFRC 283 Modern Art

The history of modern art is closely tied to and largely unfolds from the history of Western Imperialism. While the technologies made possible by colonial resource extraction produced new ways of looking, modern conceptions of the self and how to represent it developed in dialogue with racialized notions of the other. This course focuses on encounters between the cultures of Africa and Europe, from 1880 to 1960, and on the visual practices that emerged on both continents as a result. Topics of special interest will include racial difference and the birth of photography, colonial masquerade, impressionism, symbols of power in royal arts, cubism, mass marketing and colonial self-fashioning, West African studio photography, world's fairs and the Musee de l'Homme, Dada and surrealism, Negritude and interwar Paris, anti-aesthetics, colonial arts education, National art schools in the age of African independence, humanism and South African photography under Apartheid.

Taught by: Roach

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 285, ARTH 685

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 286 Topics in Race and Ethnicity - No Bench by the Road: Monuments, Memory, and the Afterlife of Slavery

SPRING 2018: In 1989, as she reflected on her magnum opus, Beloved, Toni Morrison declared "There is no place you or I can go, to think about or not think about, to summon the presences of,or recollect the absences of slaves. She went on, There is no suitable memorial, or plaque, or wreath, or wall, or park, or skyscraper lobby. There's no 300-foot tower, there's no bench by the road." And because such a place doesn't exist...the book had to." Today, there are significantly more markers of slavery in the public sphere as well as new novels, films, and television shows that directly take up the history and remnants of slavery in our lives. Looking at Colson Whitehead's novel, The Underground Railroad and WGN's tv series "The Underground," the remaking of the Whitney Plantation in Louisiana as well as considering the debates about confederate flags and monuments in places like New Orleans, Virginia, and South Carolina, this course will examine the meaning and movements behind these contemporary engagements with American slavery today. See the Africana Studies Program's website at www.sas.upenn.edu/africana for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Beavers, Tillet

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ENGL 284

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 287 Religion and Society in Africa

In recent decades, many African countries have perennially ranked very high among the most religious. This course serves as an introduction to major forms of religiosity in sub-Saharan Africa. Emphasis will be devoted to the indigenous religious traditions, Christianity and Islam, as they are practiced on the continent. We will examine how these religious traditions intersect with various aspects of life on the continent. The aim of this class is to help students to better understand various aspects of African cultures by dismantling stereotypes and assumptions that have long characterized the study of religions in Africa. The readings and lectures are will be drawn from historical and a few anthropological, and literary sources.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Amponsah

Also Offered As: HIST 287, RELS 288

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 290 Topics In Gender, Sexuality, and Literature

See the Department of Africana's website at www.sas.upenn.edu/africana for a description of the current offereings.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: COML 290, ENGL 290, GSWS 290

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 294 Facing America

This course explores the visual history of race in the United States as both self-fashioning and cultural mythology by examining the ways that conceptions of Native American, Latino, and Asian identity, alongside ideas of Blackness and Whiteness, have combined to create the various cultural ideologies of class, gender, and sexuality that remain evident in historical visual and material culture. We also investigate the ways that these creations have subsequently helped to launch new visual entertainments, including museum spectacles, blackface minstrelsy, and early film, from the colonial period through the 1940s.

Taught by: Shaw, Staff

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 274, ARTH 674, ASAM 294, CIMS 293, LALS 274

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 302 Sustainable Entrepreneurship

This course is designed to introduce students to the multiple methods of engaging Africana entrepreneurship, public service and philanthropy. Alongside a thorough review of both popular and independent activist media, students will be trained to use accessible technology to participate in international communications networks. "Big ideas," will be translated into succinct artistic statements. We will look intimately at the architecture of David Adjaye, Adjaye Associates; the initiatives of Majora Carter for Sustainable South Bronx and Majora Carter Group; the philanthropic equity of Vista Equity Partners and C.E.O. Robert Smith, and the political work of Mayor Ras Baraka, City of Newark among other examples from the public and private sector throughout the African Diaspora. Prior to the development of our own app ideas, we will focus on the urban market advertising strategies of majority companies that are lauded for their sustainable initiatives including Nike, Hewlett-Packard and Apple. We will also use as secondary resources macro approaches to sustainability from the United Nations Foundation. This course makes an argument for inclusion of race, class and gender equity in the evolving definition of sustainability. Our argument, consistent with the growth of so many of these professionals inside of and clearly influenced by hip-hop culture, is that they are best prepared, culturally, to "make something out of nothing."

Taught by: Gilliam

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 305 Housing, Race, and Community in the United States

One's home is the first site of self-identity, socialization, and notions of citizenship. In the United States, neighborhoods are the basic units of political organization, educational options, and familial wealth. This course explores the intersections between race and housing in the United States with a specific focus on the experiences of African-Americans in urban centers. The intersectional housing experiences of Asian, Latinx, first-generation immigrants, Arab, and indigenous communities will also be analyzed. This course represents both a timely and nuanced opportunity to address housing as a focal point of existing racial tensions and deepening socio-economic inequalities in the U.S. Increasingly, housing has become a contested subject, with heated debates concerning its status as a human, and potentially constitutional, right. Students will explore urban governance values, the commodification of urban landscapes, and the institutional dimensions of race in the United States. Students will develop a critical understanding of the underlying structural causation for the issues faced by minority populations seeking adequate, affordable, and safe housing in the U.S. Prior knowledge of urban planning, housing, or social policy is not necessary for this course. Students will finish the course equipped with a broad knowledge base of associated development topics including globalization, commodification, and social justice.

Taught by: Redden

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 307 Race, Science and Justice

This course draws on an interdisciplinary body of biological and social scientific literature to explore critically the connections between race, science, and justice in the United States, including scientific theories of racial inequality, from the eighteenth century to the genomic age. After investigating varying concepts of race, as well as their uses in eugenics, criminology, anthropology, sociology, neuroscience, and medicine, we will focus on the recent expansion of genomic research and technologies that treat race as a biological category that can be identified at the molecular level, including race-specific pharmaceuticals, commercial ancestry testing, and racial profiling with DNA forensics. We will discuss the significance of scientific investigations of racial difference for advancing racial justice in the United States.

Taught by: Roberts

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: SOCI 307

Activity: Recitation

0.0 Course Units

AFRC 311 Medicine, Health, and Healing in Africa

This seminar course will examine how sub-Saharan Africans have interpreted and dealt with issues of health, healing, and medicine under colonial and postcolonial regimes. It will also look at how various social, economic, religious, and political factors have impacted health and healing on the continent and shaped African responses. Class discussions will center around both general themes affecting health and healing in Africa as well as case studies drawn from historical and anthropological works.

Taught by: Amponsah

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HIST 376

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 316 Africa and Roman Literature

In this course, we will explore race and ethnicity in the Roman world by focusing on the life and works of Roman Africans and the ways in which non-African Romans engaged with and presented the peoples of Africa. The course covers Roman literature in translation from the comedies of Plautus produced in the late 3rd - 2nd centuries BCE, to African Christian writing of the 5th century CE. It also covers a wide range of genres: we will examine how Roman writers articulate questions of race in comedy and satire, epic, history, biography, and elegy among others. We will read African writers (Apuleius, Augustine) and ask how their Africanness influences their works. We will read Roman accounts of journeys to Africa, wars with Africa, and encounters with Africans to ask how the Romans saw themselves as different from or similar to Africans. The course will also explore in more general terms how Romans talk about race: did racism exist? What aspects of different cultures and peoples did Romans choose to emphasize when they talked of non-Romans?

Taught by: Lewis

Also Offered As: ANCH 316, CLST 316

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 318 Topics in African Art

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 318

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 321 Understanding African Conflict

The end of colonial rule was the springboard for the start of cold wars in various regions of Africa. Where peace could not be maintained violence erupted. Even where secession has been attained, as in the new country of South Sudan, the threat of civil war lingers. While domestic politics have led to the rise of armed conflicts and civil wars in many African countries, the external factors should also not be ignored. Important in all current conflicts is the concern to international peace and security. Overall this course will: (1) investigate the general nature of armed conflicts in Africa (2) provide in-depth analysis of the underlying factors (3) and discuss the regional and the international responses to these conflicts and their implications. Special emphasis will be placed upon African conflicts and civil wars in: great Lakes area, Mali, Nigeria, Senegal, Sudan, Somalia, South Sudan, and Uganda.

Taught by: Ali-Dinar

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 322 American Slavery and the Law

In this course, we will work both chronologically and thematically to examine laws, constitutional provisions, and local and federal court decisions that established, regulated, and perpetuated slavery in the American colonies and states. We will concern ourselves both with change over time in the construction and application of the law, and the persistence of the desire to control and sublimate enslaved people. Our work will include engagement with secondary sources as well as immersion in the actual legal documents. Students will spend some time working with murder cases from the 19th century South. They will decipher and transcribe handwritten trial transcripts, and will historicize and analyze the cases with attention to procedural due process as well as what the testimony can tell us about the social history of the counties in which the murders occurred. Students will have the opportunity to choose a topic and conduct original research using both primary and secondary sources, resulting in a 20-page research paper. We will spend a good deal of time throughout the semester learning how to research, write, and re-write a paper of this length. At the end of the semester students will present the highlights of their research to the class.

Taught by: Williams

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: HIST 322

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 324 Dress and Fashion in Africa

Throughout Africa, social and cultural identities of ethnicity, gender, generation, rank and status were conveyed in a range of personal ornamentation that reflects the variation of African cultures. The meaning of one particular item of clothing can transform completely when moved across time and space. As one of many forms of expressive culture, dress shape and give forms to social bodies. In the study of dress and fashion, we could note two distinct broad approaches, the historical and the anthropological. While the former focuses on fashion as a western system that shifted across time and space, and linked with capitalism and western modernity; the latter approach defines dress as an assemblage of modification the body. The Africanist proponents of this anthropological approach insisted that fashion is not a dress system specific to the west and not tied with the rise of capitalism. This course will focus on studying the history of African dress by discussing the forces that have impacted and influenced it overtime, such as socio-economic, colonialism, religion, aesthetics, politics, globalization, and popular culture. The course will also discuss the significance of the different contexts that impacted the choices of what constitute an appropriate attire for distinct situations. African dress in this context is not a fixed relic from the past, but a live cultural item that is influenced by the surrounding forces.

Taught by: Ali-Dinar

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: ANTH 342, ARTH 324

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 325 Performance in the African Diaspora

The purpose of this course is to engage students in the rigorous process of mining experiences for material that can be transformed into a public performance piece. In-class writing, group discussions, and field work in the Philadelphia area. AUGUST WILSON AND BEYOND. The people need to know the story. See how they fit into it. See what part they play. - August Wilson, King Hedley II. In this seminar, students will read groundbreaking playwright August Wilson's 20th Century Cycle: ten plays that form an iconic picture of African American traumas, triumphs, and traditions through the decades, told through the lens of Pittsburgh's Hill District neighborhood. Other readings include supporting material on Wilson's work and African American theatre, the works of contemporary playwrights whom Wilson has influenced (such as Suzan-Lori Parks and Tarell Alvin McCraney), and context on Penn's relationship with West Philadelphia. As an Academically Based Community Service (ABCS) course,this seminar gives students the opportunity to enhance their understanding of the plays, and history and culture that shaped them, by forming meaningful relationships with West Philadelphia residents. Wilson's plays provide the bridge between the two groups. The course culminates with students writing an original theatre piece inspired by the readings and relationships, which they will share at an end-of-semester performance.

Taught by: Beavers, Berger

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ENGL 380

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: Formerly AFRC 3O9. Writing Out Loud.

AFRC 327 Fashioning the Black Body

The fundamental query underlying this course is what is the relationship between dress, adornment, and corporeal figuring and race, specifically blackness? This course will draw upon a number of disciplines and fields including history, performance theory, cultural studies, gender studies, and queer studies to examine how blackness is fashioned, and refashioned within the United States and globally. Throughout the course we will investigate how not only race--but attendant issues of gender, sexuality and citizenship have all been constructed and contested through dress. Finally, we will explore what new and more nuanced insights might fashion, dress, adornment, and corporeal figuring offer us for understanding black subjectivities more broadly.

Taught by: Bush

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 332 North Africa: History, Culture, Society

This interdisciplinary seminar aims to introduce students to the countries of North Africa, with a focus on the Maghreb and Libya (1830-present). It does so while examining the region's close economic and cultural connections to sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, and the Middle East. Readings will include histories, political analyses, anthropological studies, and novels, and will cover a wide range of topics such as colonial and postcolonial experiences, developments in Islamic thought and practice, and labor migration. This class is intended for juniors, seniors, and graduate students. Prerequisite: A university-level survey course in Middle Eastern, African, or Meditterranean history.

Taught by: Sharkey

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 632, HIST 370, NELC 332, NELC 632

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 336 Africa and the Indian Ocean World

The Indian Ocean region represents an area with interwoven centuries of interactions, politically, historically, geographically and culturally. This area has witnessed continuous migrations of peoples, the circulation of goods and ideas, and the interaction with foreign forces. The Indian Ocean world has served as an epicenter of global economy in pre-modern world and as such, it gave rise to trading networks and political empires. As part of the Indian Ocean World, the eastern and southern shores of Africa are both the recipients and the transmitters of cultural and political icons. The existence of many islands that separate Africa from Asia stand as hybrid cultures that are influenced by forces from different continents. Political and cultural relations between African regions and the rest of the Indian Ocean world are evident with the presence of African-descent populations in these places, as well as the prevalent of cultural practices of African origin. Signs of interaction between the Indian Ocean world and the African shores are apparent in several archeological sites, as well as in the cultural practices of religion, language, architecture and modes of dress. The European colonial expansion, has allowed the populations in the Indian Ocean world to share strategies during their independence movements to thwart western political hegemony. With the current advanced forms of globalization, this region is moving more towards economic and political cooperation and in addressing the transnational natural and man-made threats.

Taught by: Ali-Dinar

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 338 Exhibiting Black Bodies

This course concerns the exhibiting of Black Bodies in Museums and gallery spaces. We will trace the evolution of public history from the "Cabinets of Curiosity" in 18th and 19th Century Europe, through to the current institutional confirmation of the vindications traditions represented by Museu Afro Brasil (Sao Paulo, Brazil), National Museum of African American History and Culture (Washington,D.C.), and the Museum of Black Civilization (Dakar, Senegal). We will give particular attention to "why these representations at these times in these places?." In the process of addressing these questions we will give voice to the figures who conceived the curatorial content from those with the colonial mentality, to those with the abolitiionist and nationalist and Pan-African visions.

Taught by: Zuberi

Also Offered As: AFRC 620, SOCI 338, SOCI 660

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 340 Money, Power, Respect: Funding Social Change

This course is about how to apply a race, gender and LGBTQ lens to support contemporary social justice movements in the U.S. and globally, including Black Lives Matter, #MeToo, transgender equality, and disability justice. We will explore intersectionality as a theoretical framework, and how it is practically applied to support social justice organizations and leaders, and fund social change. Over the course of the semester, Professor of Practice Roz Lee, a black lesbian feminist and lifelong racial, gender, LGBTQ and economic justice advocate, and who currently serves as Vice President of Strategy and Programs at the Ms. Foundation for Women, will be joined by movement leaders and philanthropy colleagues to discuss and analyze what's happening on the frontlines of movements for equity, justice and freedom.

Taught by: Lee

Also Offered As: GSWS 340

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 343 Global Engagement Seminar

This course is a Global Seminar which includes a travel component; topics vary. Topics and locations may include Chile, Ghana, or China. For more information and to apply: https://global.upenn.edu/pennabroad/pgs.

Also Offered As: NURS 543

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: All students must apply through the Penn Global Seminar Webiste between Oct. 29 and Nov.14 at https://global.upenn.edu/pennabroad/pgs for permission to register for this course. Those who are accepted will receive a permit to register.

AFRC 345 Sinners, Sex and Slaves: Race and Sex in Early America

This course explores the lost worlds of sinners, witches, sexual offenders, rebellious slaves, and Native American prophets from the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries. Using the life stories of unusual individuals from the past, we try to make sense of their contentious relationships with their societies. By following the careers of the trouble-makers, the criminals, and the rebels, we also learn about the foundations of social order and the impulse to reform that rocked American society during the nineteenth century.

Taught by: Brown

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: GSWS 345, HIST 345

Activity: Lecture

0.0 Course Units

AFRC 346 Bodies, Race and Rights: Sex and Citizenship in Modern American History

What did it mean to be a man or woman in the post-Civil War United States? Was being a man the same as being a citizen? If African-American men were to be fully embraced as both men and citizens in the aftermath of slavery, where did that leave women, white and black? Why did a nation built on immigration become so hostile to certain groups of immigrants during this period? In this course, we consider how the meanings and experiences of womanhood, manhood, citizenship, and equality before the law changed from the period immediately after the Civil War until the present day. We look at political battles over the meaning of citizenship, the use of terror to subdue African Americans politically and economically, and the fears of white Americans that they would lose their political and economic dominance to immigrant groups they deemed irreconcilably different from themselves. We also consider the repercussions of these conflicts for medical, legal, and economic efforts to regulate the bodies of women, children, poor people, immigrants, working class laborers, military men, and African Americans. Throughout the course, we will follow the state's changing use of racial, sexual, and economic categories to assess the bodily and intellectual capacities of different groups of citizens. We will also note some of the popular cultural expressions of manhood, womanhood, and citizenship. The lectures and reading assignments are organized around a series of historical problems, dynamic leaders, and controversies that illuminate these issues.

Taught by: Brown

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: GSWS 346, HIST 346

Activity: Recitation

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 357 Undergraduate Topics In African Studies

SPRING 2017 - UNDERSTANDING AFRICA: This course will explore the economic, social, and political realities facing sub-Saharan Africa today by placing them in historical and global contexts. Key themes will include colonial and precolonial history, nationalist movements and cold war politics, economic development and foreign aid, ethnic and political conflicts, media representation and popular culture. The course will focus on local and global dynamics that have a role in shaping the present day Africa.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 368 Kinesthetic Anthropology

This class, team-taught by CEE Visiting Fellow Reggie Wilson and Deborah Thomas, investigates various forms of contemporary performance in relationship to Africanist forms and functions of dance, movement and action. We will concern ourselves with how the body knows, and with how we learn to identify the structures of movement that provide context, meaning and usefulness to various Africanist communities across time and space. Grounding ourselves within a history of ethnographic analyses of the body in motion, and within Africana theorizing about the affective power of the body, we will consider what people are doing when they are dancing. In other words, we will train ourselves to recognize the cultural values, social purposes, and choreographic innovations embedded in bodily action and motion. While we will attend to these phenomena in a range of locations throughout the African diaspora, we will also highlight aspects of the Shaker and Black Shout traditions in Philadelphia. The course will be divided between discussions centered on close reading of primary and secondary material (both text and video) and creative writing/movement exploration (no previous movement experience necessary).

Taught by: Wilson

Also Offered As: ANTH 368, ANTH 668, COMM 368, FNAR 368

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 372 Africa and the Mid-East

This seminar will explore the historical relationship between these two regions from the early modern age to the present. We will examine the history of trade, particularly the slave trade, and its cultural and political legacy. We will compare the experiences of European imperalism--how the scramble for Africa dovetailed with the last decades of the Ottoman Empire--with an eye to how this shaped nationalist movements in both regions. The course will also explore the decades of independence with a special eye towards pan-Africanism and pan-Arabism. We will also study the ramifications of the Arab-Israeli conflict on the relationship between African and Middle-Eastern countries, from Uganda to Ethopia, from OPEC to Darfur. This course will pay close attention to migrations through the regions, whether forced or economic or religious. Whenever possible we will explore, through film and literature, how people in Africa and the Middle East see their connections, and their differences.

Taught by: Eve Troutt Powell, Young

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HIST 371, NELC 334

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 373 The History of Foreign Aid in Africa

This course examines the history, politics, and significance of foreign aid to Africa since the late 19th century. While we do not typically think about the European colonial period in Africa in terms of 'foreign aid,' that era introduced ideas and institutions which formed the foundations for modern aid policies and practices. So we start there and move forward into more contemporary times. In addition to examining the objectives behind foreign assistance and the intentions of donors and recipients, we will look at some of the consequences (intended or unintended) of various forms of foreign aid to Africa over the past century. While not designed to be a comprehensive history of development theory, of African economics, or of international aid organizations, the course will touch on all of these topics. Previous coursework on Africa is strongly advised.

Taught by: Cassanelli

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HIST 372

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 377 Black Speculative Futures

Why do black cultural producers turn to the speculative? What, in turn, is speculative about blackness? These questions frame this seminar's exploration of how black artists, theorists, and activists imagine different futures, often in the service of critiquing power asymmetries and creating radical transformation in the present. We will explore how the speculative works differently across black literature, visual culture and performance. Additionally, inspired by the multi-disciplinary work that we encounter in the course, we will experiment with crafting our own embodied speculative art in order to better understand its function as both art practice and politics. The course will be divided between discussions centered on close reading of primary and secondary material and creative writing/movement exploration (no previous movement experience necessary). Occasional guest lectures with visiting artists will provide additional fodder for our critical and creative work.

Taught by: Knight

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 677, ANTH 377, ANTH 677, ENGL 500, FNAR 377

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 384 Cuban Visual Culture

This course will focus on the urban history and cultural politics of contemporary Cuba with an emphasis on contemporary art and contemporary developments in the city of Havana. Students will learn about the Spanish influence on early colonial art, the development of formal academic art training and the changes to art instruction and the form and content of art created since the Revolution.

Taught by: Shaw, Schmenner

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 384, LALS 384

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 387 Topics in Africana Studies

Topics vary: Black Feminist Approaches to History & Memory - The term black feminism emerged in public discourse amid the social, political, and cultural turbulence of the 1960s. The roots of black feminism, however, are much older, easily reaching back to the work of black women abolitionists and social critics of the nineteenth century. The concept continued to grow and evolve in the work of twentieth century black women writers, journalists, activists, and educators as they sought to document black women's lives. Collectively, their work established black feminism as a political practice dedicated to the equality of all people. More recently, black feminism has been deployed as a tool for theoretical and scholarly analysis that is characterized by an understanding that race, class, gender, and sexuality are inextricably interconnected. Using materials such as slave narratives, social criticism, and archival sources, this course will explore the theoretical and practical applications of black feminist thought in nineteenth and twentieth century North American culture and politics. In particular, we will consider the symbols and practices (storytelling, myth-making, art, archival research) that black women use to document lives. We will ask: how do these methods of documentation inform our understanding of the past and the production of historical knowledge? How can we understand black feminism as both theory and practice? And what are the implications of black feminist approaches for current research and scholarship? We will give particular attention to concepts such as gender, race, memory, the archive, and embodied knowledge to complicate our understanding of historical documentation, epistemology, and authenticity. The course material will include scholarship by Harriet Jacobs, Audre Lorde, Saidiya Hartman, Hazel Carby, Hershini Young, Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, Toni Morrison, and others. (Image: From In Praise of Shadows, Kara Walker (2009). See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Osuji, Sanders-Johnson, Willis

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: GSWS 387, HIST 387, LALS 387

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 388 Topics in Modern and Contemporary Art

Topic varies from semester to semester. For the Spring 2021 semester, the topic will be: Postmodern, Postcolonial, Post-Black. The end of the last century saw a shift in the way contemporary artistic practice was conceived. This class will consider the work and writings of key artists and thinkers of the last 50 years who have tackled issues of race, class, consumption, marginality, nationality, and modernism.

Taught by: Shaw

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 388, LALS 389

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 392 Queering North African Subjectivities

This seminar will explore the ways in which literary and visual representations of sexual difference and gender roles disrupt the cultural imagination of everyday life in North Africa and its Diasporas. Special attention will be given to representations of Arab women and queer subjectivities as sites of resistance against dominant masculinity. We will analyze the ways in which representations of gender have allowed for a redeployment of power, a reconfiguration of politics of resistance, and the redrawing of longstanding images of Islam in France. Finally, we will question how creations that straddle competing cultural traditions, memories and material conditions can queer citizenship. Course taught in English.

Taught by: Gueydan-Turek

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: COML 393, FREN 392, GSWS 392

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 393 Cinema and Civil Rights

Topic Varies Spring 2017: This course will examine key moments in the history of civil rights through a cinematic lens. Over the course of the semester, we will explore how filmmakers have depicted the lives, aspirations, and strategies of those who have struggled for equal rights; how different struggles have intersected with each other; what aesthetic strategies have been adopted to represent freedom and the denial of it; and how effective cinematic efforts to contribute to increased freedom have been as well as what criteria we use to evaluate success or failure in the first place. Each week, we will watch a film and read a series of texts that will be drawn from a variety of arenas, including histories of civil rights; civil rights pamphlets and speeches; filmmaker interviews; film and media theory; memoirs; and theories of race, gender and sexuality. Course requirements: mutual respect; completion of all readings and screenings; participation in class discussion; weekly online responses; a final project that can be a research paper, film, art project, or community-based initiative.

Taught by: Redrobe

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 393, CIMS 393, ENGL 301, GSWS 394

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 399 Independent Study

A study, under faculty supervision, of a problem, area or topic not included in the formal curriculum. Consult the Africana Studies Department for instructions. Suite 331A, 3401 Walnut or visit the department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu to submit an application.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: Consult the Africana Studies Department for instructions. Suite 331A, 3401 Walnut or visit the department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu to submit an application.

AFRC 400 Seminar in Africana Studies

This course is an examination and analysis of the changing images and achievements of African Americans in motion pictures and television. The first half of the course focuses on African-American film images from the early years of D.W. Griffith's "renegade bucks" in The Birth of a Nation (1915); to the comic servants played by Steppin Fetchit, Hattie McDaniel, and others during the Depression era; to the post-World War II New Negro heroes and heroines of Pinky (1949) and The Defiant Ones (1958); to the rise of the new movement of African American directors such as Spike Lee (Do the Right Thing), Julie Dash (Daughters of the Dust), Charles Burnett, (To Sleep With Anger) and John Singleton (Boyz N the Hood). The second half explores television images from the early sitcoms "Amos 'n Andy" and "Beulah" to the "Cosby Show," "Fresh Prince of Bel Air," and "Martin." Foremost this course will examine Black stereotypes in American films and television--and the manner in which those stereotypes have reflected national attitudes and outlooks during various historical periods. The in-class screenings and discussions will include such films as Show Boat (1936), the independently produced "race movies" of the 1930s and 1940s, Cabin in the Sky (1943), The Defiant Ones (1958), Imitation of Life (the 1959 remake) & Super Fly (1972).

Taught by: Bogle

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: CIMS 370

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 404 Black Geographies and the Meaning of Land Rights

This course will interweave issues of land dispossession and land rights, both in Africa and in the Americas, with endogenous concepts and practices of space and place. Specifically, this course will trace the the concept of property, as developed among Europeans and European descendants, and explore how this concept interacted with the formation of the concept of race in order to established forms of social control and domination. The first part of this course will focus on Africa generally using Kenya as a case study. The material will cover the impact of colonialism and its legacy on land rights after independence. This first part will also explore contemporary forms of land dispossession happening through international land investments, often termed land grabs. The second part of the course will turn to the experiences of African descendants in the Americas. Using a few case studies, this section will examine different countries, histories, and rural and urban areas to unravel how different types of control over land interact with social relationships and specifically with the formation of race and racism. In both sections, we will also look at forms of resistance and resilience as local populations demand not only access to and control over land, but also impose their own ideologies of what it means to occupy space. By the end of this course, students should be able to more fully articulate the significance of control over land as it impacts and effects social relationships and specifically how it relates to the formation and continuation of inequalities along racial lines. Students will apply the concepts learned throughout the course to their own independent research done on an area in Philadelphia or Pennsylvania.

Taught by: Franzen

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 405 Religion, Social Justice & Urban Development

Urban development has been influenced by religious conceptions of social and economic justice. Progressive traditions within Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Jainism, Baha'i, Humanism and other religions and systems of moral thought have yielded powerful critiques of oppression and hierarchy as well as alternative economic frameworks for ownership, governance, production, labor, and community. Historical and contemporary case studies from the Americas, Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Middle East will be considered, as we examine the ways in which religious responses to poverty, inequality, and ecological destruction have generated new forms of resistance and development.

Taught by: Lamas

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: RELS 439, URBS 405

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 406 Existence in Black

Racial, colonial, and other political formations have encumbered Black existence since at least the fifteenth-century. Black experiences of and reflections on these matters have been the subject of existential writings and artistic expressions ranging from the blues to reggae, fiction and non-fiction. Reading some of these texts alongside canonical texts in European existential philosophy, this class will examine how issues of freedom, self, alienation, finitude, absurdity, race, and gender shape and are shaped by the global Black experience. Since Black aliveness is literally critical to Black existential philosophy, we shall also engage questions of Black flourishing amidst the potential for pessimism and nihilism.

Taught by: Amponsah

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AFRC 506, HIST 406, PHIL 555

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 420 Advanced Topics in Africana Studies

Topics vary. See the Africana Studies Department's course list at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offering. After an examination of the philosophical, legal, and political perspectives on Human Rights, this course will focus on US policies and practices relevant to Human Rights. Toward that end, emphasis will be placed on both the domestic and the international aspects of Human Rights as reflected in US policies and practices. Domestically, the course will discuss (1) the process of incorporating the International Bill of Human Rights into the American legal system and (2) the US position on and practices regarding the political, civil, economic, social, and cultural rights of minorities and various other groups within the US. Internationally, the course will examine US Human Rights policies toward Africa. Specific cases of Rwanda, Kenya, South Africa and Egypt, as well as other cases from the continent, will be presented in the assessment of US successes and failures in the pursuit of its Human Rights strategy in Africa. Readings will include research papers, reports, statutes, treaties, and cases.

Taught by: Charles, Hanchard, Fetni, Zuberi

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: LALS 420, SOCI 460

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 431 Mobilizing Decolonial Arts and Practice in the Black Atlantic and Beyond

This course will define CHOICE by looking at the transnational linkages connecting artistic, curatorial, personal, and political choices. An overarching question of the course will be "how do artists, activist, curators, and communities, question, select, translate, and disseminate the information needed to incite large-scale movements and global change and how can we, as a class, do the same through our own choices?" Students will examine the significance of theories arising from museum studies, curatorial studies, global social justice movements, as well as dance and diaspora studies. As a way of emphasizing the perspectives, artistic practices, the political engagement of marginalized groups, and the work of activists in the global south, this class will explore rituals, performances, and visual and expressive cultures. Looking closely at altar-making practices, ritual performances, religious coalitions, and resistant narratives, we will learn how artists, activists, and communities seek economic gain, resist oppression, express political opinions, and create tenable lives in difficult situations. The class is divided into sections including: Geographies, Bodies, Spaces, Words, Futures so that students can begin to deconstruct the colonial frameworks that structure their thinking in these areas. The assignments of the class will also afford students opportunities to learn from the work of local curators, activists, artists, exhibitions, and initiatives, including those at the Penn Museum, The Philadelphia Museum of Art, and Philadelphia Assembled.

Taught by: Hill

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AFRC 531

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 433 Social Movement

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: PSCI 433

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 435 Modern Presidency and Race

This seminar is designed to serve as a "capstone" experience for advanced undergrduates interested in American politics. It exposes students to some of the issues currently being studied and debated by the leading scholars in the field. For each topic we will read works that take competing or opposing positions on an issue; for example we will examine the current controversy over the causes and and consequences of divided government. Students will write a research paper analyzing one of the debates.

Taught by: Gillion

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: PSCI 434

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 436 Africana Studies Undergraduate Seminar

On the stage of modern world history, Haiti plays the unique role as both the exceptionally victorious and tragic character. This course interrogates archival documents, oral histories, historical texts, and prose created within the nation and her diaspora in order to establish a nuanced image of the projection of Haiti's modern history. Using two classic Haitian texts, Marie Vieux-Chauvet's Love, Anger, Madness (1968) and Michel-Rolph Trouillot's Silencing the Past: Power and the Production of History (1995),this course examines how, why,and to what end Haiti's history and popular narratives about the country have served to construct and dismantle global movements, popular culture, and meanings of race, gender, and citizenship in the Americas. In our historical examination, we will question some of the iconic representations of Haiti through literature that deepen the affective historical profile of Haiti with interrogations of culture, sexuality, political, and media performance. Students will become familiar with the post -colonial history of Haiti and the region, meanings of race, and the production of history. The course is a research and historical methods seminar. Students will conduct archival research and write narratives from primary source material. This course qualifies as a "methods" course for Africana Studies undergraduate majors and minors.

Taught by: Johnson

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: GSWS 436, HIST 436, LALS 437

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 437 Race & Criminal Justice

Why are African Americans and some other minority groups disproportionately incarcerated and subjected to penal sanctions? What are the political, social and economic consequences for individuals, communities, and the wider society of mass incarceration in the United States? What types of reforms of the criminal justice system are desirable and possible? This advanced seminar analyzes the connection between race, crime, punishment, and politics in the United States. The primary focus is on the role of race in explaining why the country's prison population increased six-fold since the early 1970s and why the United States today has the highest incarceration rate in the world. The class will likely take field trips to a maximum-security jail in Philadelphia and to a state prison in the Philadelphia suburbs.

Taught by: Gottschalk

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 638, PSCI 437, PSCI 638

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 440 African Art, 600-1400

This course examines the flourishing civilizations of the African continent between the Fall of the Roman Empire and the dawn of the "Age of Discovery." Although material remains of the complex cultures that created exceptional works of art are rare, current archaeology is bringing much new information to the fore, allowing for the first time a preliminary survey of the burgeoning artistic production of the African continent while Europe was building its cathedrals. Bronze casting, gold work, terracotta and wood sculpture, and monumental architecture - the course takes a multi-media approach to understanding the rich foundations of African cultures and their deep interconnection with the rest of the world before the disruptive interventions of colonialism.

Taught by: Guerin

Also Offered As: ARTH 440

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 450 Black France: History and Representations

Taught by: Moudelino

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: FREN 490

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 465 Race and Racism in the Contemporary World

This undergraduate seminar is for advanced undergraduates seeking to make sense of the upsurge in racist activism, combined with authoritarian populism and neo-fascist mobilization in many parts of the world. Contemporary manifestations of the phenomena noted above will be examined in a comparative and historical perspective to identify patterns and anomalies across various multiple nation-states. France, The United States, Britain, and Italy will be the countries examined.

Taught by: Hanchard

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: LALS 465, PSCI 410

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 480 Liberation and Ownership

Who is going to own what we all have a part of creating? The history of the Americas, and of all peoples everywhere, is an evolving answer to the question of ownership. Ownership is about: the ties that bind and those that separate; production, participation, and control; the creation of community and the imposition of hierarchies--racial, sexual, and others; dreams of possessing and the burdens of debt and ecological despoliation; dependency and the slave yearning to breathe free. Of all the issues relevant to democracy, oppression, injustice, and inequality, ownership is arguably the most important and least understood. Utilizing a variety of disciplinary perspectives--with a particular emphasis on radical and critical theories of liberation, and by focusing on particular global sites and processes of capitalism, students will assess and refine their views regarding ownership and liberation in light of their own social, political, religious, aesthetic, and ethical commitments.

Taught by: Lamas

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: URBS 480

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 499 Honors Course

Consult the Africana Studies Department for instructions. Suite 331A, 3401 Walnut or visit the department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu to submit an application.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Independent Study

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 506 Existence in Black

Racial, colonial, and other political formations have encumbered Black existence since at least the fifteenth-century. Black experiences of and reflections on these matters have been the subject of existential writings and artistic expressions ranging from the blues to reggae, fiction and non-fiction. Reading some of these texts alongside canonical texts in European existential philosophy, this class will examine how issues of freedom, self, alienation, finitude, absurdity, race, and gender shape and are shaped by the global Black experience. Since Black aliveness is literally critical to Black existential philosophy, we shall also engage questions of Black flourishing amidst the potential for pessimism and nihilism.

Taught by: Amponsah

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AFRC 406, HIST 406, PHIL 555

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 514 Africa and the Indian Ocean

The Indian Ocean region represents an area with interwoven centuries of interactions, politically, historically, geographically and culturally. This area has witnessed continuous migrations of peoples, the circulation of goods and ideas, and the interaction with foreign forces. The Indian Ocean world has served as an epicenter of global economy in pre-modern world and as such, it gave rise to trading networks and political empires. As part of the Indian Ocean World, the eastern and southern shores of Africa are both the recipients and the transmitters of cultural and political icons. The existence of many islands that separate Africa from Asia stand as hybrid cultures that are influenced by forces from different continents. Political and cultural relations between African regions and the rest of the Indian Ocean world are evident with the presence of African-descent populations in these places, as well as the prevalent of cultural practices of African origin. Signs of interaction between the Indian Ocean world and the African shores are apparent in several archeological sites, as well as in the cultural practices of religion, language, architecture and modes of dress. The European colonial expansion, has allowed the populations in the Indian Ocean world to share strategies during their independence movements to thwart western political hegemony. With the current advanced forms of globalization, this region is moving more towards economic and political cooperation and in addressing the transnational natural and man-made threats.

Taught by: Ali-Dinar

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 518 Topics in American Religion

From Marvin Gaye, to Tammy Faye Baker, to Sarah Palin and James Baldwin, Pentecostalism has influenced many, including politicians, preachers, writers, and the media. One of the fastest growing religious movements in the world, Pentecostalism continues to have a profound effect on the religious landscape. Pentecostalism's unique blend of charismatic worship, religious practices, and flamboyant, media-savvy leadership, has drawn millions into this understudies and often controversial religious movement. This course will chronicle the inception and growth of Pentecostalism in the United States, giving particular attention to beliefs, practices, gender, ethnicity, and Global Pentecostalism.

Taught by: Butler

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: RELS 517

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: Topics vary: This course is cross-lited with RELS 517 (Topics in American Religion) when the subject matter is related to African American or other African Diaspora issues. Recent courses include "Martin Luther King, Jr," "Pentecostalism," and "Race, Poverty and Class." Consult the Department of Africana Studies for detailed course descriptions.

AFRC 522 Psychology of the African-American

Using an Afro-centric philosophical understanding of the world, this course will focus on psychological issues related to African Americans, including the history of African American psychology, its application across the life span, and contemporary community issues.

Taught by: Stevenson

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: EDUC 522

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 524 Inequality and Race Policy

Taught by: Gillion

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: PSCI 535

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 527 Market Women and Madames

Market Women, Madames, Mistresses & Mother Superior studies gender, labor, sexuality, and race in the Caribbean. In our historical examination of primary source documents alongside literature, and popular media, we will question some of the iconic representations of Caribbean and Latin American women in order to understand the meaning, purpose and usages of these women s bodies as objects of praise, possession, obsession and/or ridicule by communities, governments and religions within and outside of the region. Beginning in the late-18th century and ending with contemporary migration narratives, this course considers the relationship between slave society and colonial pasts on gender performance in the modern Caribbean, Latin America, and their diasporas.

Taught by: Sanders Johnson

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: GSWS 527, LALS 527

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 530 Black Performance Theory

In his 1995 documentary Black Is, Black Ain t Marlon Riggs traces a black cultural tradition while simultaneously destabilizing the very notion of blackness itself. He testifies that: Black is black, and black is blue. Black is bright. Black is you. Black can do you in. In Riggs configuration, black is a color, black is a feeling, black is a sound, black is materiality, and black is a life sentence. In an effort to raise critical questions around blackness, performance, race, and feeling, this course follows in the tradition of Riggs work. In other words, this graduate level course examines the notion of blackness through theorizations of performance. It pursues the following questions: What is blackness? How is blackness embodied, felt, heard, represented, and seen through performance? How is black performance political? Discussions and written work will interrogate the slipperiness of, desire for, and policing of blackness in order to trouble conceptions of race as a biological essence. Organized by keywords in the field of Black Performance Theory - and exploring varying performance forms (the play, the dance, the film, the photograph, the performance of everyday life, the television program, the exhibit, and even the tweet) - This course foregrounds the micro-politics through which black racialized subjects are shaped in the realm of culture. Performances will be consulted each meeting which we will use to interpret and complicate the day's readings. In examining blackness through a number of performance mediums, we will consider the politics of black creative labor and the processes of racialization produced through black bodies.

Taught by: Jasmine Johnson

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 531 Mobilizing Decolonial Arts and Practice in the Black Atlantic and Beyond

This course will define CHOICE by looking at the transnational linkages connecting artistic, curatorial, personal, and political choices. An overarching question of the course will be "how do artists, activist, curators, and communities, question, select, translate, and disseminate the information needed to incite large-scale movements and global change and how can we, as a class, do the same through our own choices?" Students will examine the significance of theories arising from museum studies, curatorial studies, global social justice movements, as well as dance and diaspora studies. As a way of emphasizing the perspectives, artistic practices, the political engagement of marginalized groups, and the work of activists in the global south, this class will explore rituals, performances, and visual and expressive cultures. Looking closely at altar-making practices, ritual performances, religious coalitions, and resistant narratives, we will learn how artists, activists, and communities seek economic gain, resist oppression, express political opinions, and create tenable lives in difficult situations. The class is divided into sections including: Geographies, Bodies, Spaces, Words, Futures so that students can begin to deconstruct the colonial frameworks that structure their thinking in these areas. The assignments of the class will also afford students opportunities to learn from the work of local curators, activists, artists, exhibitions, and initiatives, including those at the Penn Museum, The Philadelphia Museum of Art, and Philadelphia Assembled.

Taught by: Hill

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AFRC 431

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 532 Political Culture and American Cities

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: PSCI 534

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 535 Sociology of Race and Ethnicity

Race and ethnicity are, above all, both converge as system of ideas by which men and women imagine the human body and their relationships within society. In this course we will question the concept of race and ethnicity and their place in modern society (1500 - 2020). While the course reviews the pre-1500 literature our focus will be on the last 500 years. This course reviews the research that has contributed to the ideas about ethnicity and race in human society. The review covers the discourse on race in political propaganda, religious doctrine, philosophy, history, biology and other human sciences.

Taught by: Zuberi

Also Offered As: SOCI 533

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 538 Topics in Medieval Art

Topic varies from semester to semester. For the Fall 2020 semester, the topic will be Migrating Materiality: Ivory Carving Around the Mediterranean. The craft of ivory carving around the Mediterranean is contingent upon the availability of imported elephant tusks, from either South East Asia or, more frequently, from the African continent. The shifting winds of trade routes offer an interpretive paradigm with which to analyze ivory objects from a variety of different cultural groups: the lack or abundance of ivory and the resulting desire for or surfeit of the material shapes its meaning and use around the Mediterranean basin. The study of ivory objects as they migrate around the Mediterranean allows us to investigate the rich intercultural interactions between Eastern and Western Christians, and both of these with the Islamic world. This course focuses on an object-oriented knowledge of ivory artifacts, with a strong emphasis on the collections at the Penn Museum, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and other area collections.

Taught by: Guerin

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AAMW 540, ARTH 540

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 542 Archiving Jazz: Visuality And Materiality In The Phila Jazz Community 1945-2019

This seminar will be organized around three distinct pathways. First, it will serve as an introduction to Jazz Studies and thus be attentive to the ways that jazz music has sparked an interdisciplinary conversation that is wide-ranging and ongoing. Second, we will be partnering with the African American Museum of Philadelphia to consider jazz within the realm of visual art. In light of efforts to map the "black interior," how have visual artists (e.g. painters, sculptors, filmmakers, and photographers) sought to represent jazz? Third, we will endeavor to develop partnerships with the Philadelphia (and beyond) jazz community, especially as it pertains to creating and sustaining an archive that serves as way to understand jazz as an instrument of placemaking and also as a vehicle for jazz musicians to take ownership of their narratives. The seminar will meet at the African American Museum of Philadelphia and be team taught with members of the Museum staff. The course will culminate with a virtual exhibit of visual works and archival materials centering on Philadelphia's jazz community and (if funding is available) a free concert to be held at AAMP. Undergraduates are welcome to register for the course with permission of the instructor.

Taught by: Beavers

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 519, ENGL 541, MUSC 542, URBS 542

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 547 Topics in the Study of Religion

This course deals with various religious topics, such as Mass Religious Conversion.

Taught by: Butler

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: RELS 501

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 550 Critical Ethnography

"This graduate course introduces students to theories, practices, and critiques of critical ethnography. Ethnography -- an approach to the study of culture which anthropologist James Clifford described as a process that "translates experiences into text" - will have our full attention. This process of translation, although seemingly straightforward, requires layers of interpretation, selection, and the imposition of a viewpoint or politics. While ethnography is often narrowly conceived of as a methodology, this course considers ethnography as a mode of inquiry, as a philosophy, as an ongoing question and performance. We wrestle with notions of "the self" and "the other" at the intersection of imbricated cultural and performance worlds. Together we'll ask: How is ethnography both critical and performative? What is the relationship between theory and method? How can we evaluate ethnographic work? And finally, what kinds of ethnographers do we want to be? This course considers a range of ethnographic examples in order to analyze both the craft and the stakes of "translating experiences into text."

Taught by: Johnson

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANTH 560

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 552 Existence in Black

Racial, colonial, and other political formations have encumbered Black existence since at least the fifteenth-century. Black experiences of and reflections on these matters have been the subject of existential writings and artistic expressions ranging from the blues to reggae, fiction and non-fiction. Reading some of these texts alongside canonical texts in European existential philosophy, this class will examine how issues of freedom, self, alienation, finitude, absurdity, race, and gender shape and are shaped by the global Black experience. Since Black aliveness is literally critical to Black existential philosophy, we shall also engage questions of Black flourishing amidst the potential for pessimism and nihilism.

Taught by: Amponsah

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 563 Old Egyptian

This course is an introduction to the language of the Egyptian Old Kingdom. The grammar of the period will be introduced during the early part of the semester, using Ededl's ALTAGYPTISCHE GRAMMATIK as the basic reference. Other grammatical studies to be utilized will include works by Allen, Baer, Polotsky, Satzinger, Gilula, Doret, and Silverman. The majority of time in the course will be devoted to reading varied textual material: the unpublished inscriptions in the tomb of the Old Kingdom offical Kapure--on view in the collection of the University Museum; several autobiographical inscriptions as recorded by Sethe in URKUNDEN I; and a letter in hieratic (Baer, ZAS 93, 1966, 1-9).

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ANEL 563

Prerequisite: ANEL 460

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 569 Topics in 20th-Century American Literature

This course covers topics in 20th-century literature, its emphasis varying with instructor.

Taught by: Beavers

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ENGL 569

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: This is an English topics course in 20th Century American Literature. The course is cross-listed with English 569 when the course content includes significant African American or other African Diaspora literatures. Content varies with the instructor. A frequent topic is "A Love Supreme: Literatures of Jazz"

AFRC 570 African-American Literature

Spring 2018: The aim of this seminar can be described as trying to figure out how poetry and poetics figure into the effort to theorize the African American subject in the 21st Century. At a time when the sheer number of African American poets publishing today (to say nothing of the major prizes they are winning) has exploded exponentially, why does poetry continue to be so marginalin African American literary and cultural studies? As we make our way through recently published anthologies of African American poetry, then turn to works of individual poets, we will consider issues of influence,intertextual periodization, stylization, and tradition as they impact approaches to form, structure, and craft. Ultimately, however, we will focus on the question of why are these poets writing these poems at this particular time? Technologies like PennSound and You Tube will provide time? Technologies like PennSound and You Tube will provide important critical tools in our endeavors and at various points during the term, guest lecturers will join our discussions.

Taught by: Beavers, Tillet

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ENGL 570, GSWS 570

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 571 Visualizing W.E.B.DUBOIS

This seminar will focus on a project that views history as a result of our contemporary society in which biographical truths are constantly shifting. So the historical biographers write about the way they remembered and visualize the past, and not about the way that it happened. We will take Du Bois's biography in his own words and interrogate his narrative with the visual narratives of his life and influence produced by others. "Visualizing W.E.B Du Bois" focuses on photographic, film, and video representations intended to present some aspect of Du Bois's reality, primarily for the purposes of instruction or maintaining a historical record. Such projects include photos, materials originally shot on film stock, and digital images that can be either displayed in a book or magazine, and moving images made into a film or video for a TV show or released for screening in cinemas, or other broadcast mediums like YouTube and Vimeo.

Taught by: ZUBERI

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 572 Topics in African Literature

This course is based on a selection of representative texts written in English, as well as a few texts in English translation. It involves, a study of themes relating to social change and the persistence of cultural traditions, followed by an attempt at sketching the emergence of literary tradition by identifying some of the formal conventions of established writers in their use of old forms and experiments with new. See the Department's website at www.africana.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CIMS 572, COML 575, ENGL 572

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 575 Topics of Psychology in Education: Qualitative Studies of Developmental Interventions

This course is designed to introduce students to innovative approaches to the psychology of education, especially with regard to populations from at-risk contexts, sociocultural dimensions of education, and social-emotional learning.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EDUC 575

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 581 Learning from James Baldwin (1924-1987)

James Baldwin, one of the greatest writers of the twentieth century, spoke to the issues of his times as well as to our own. This class will examine the intellectual legacy that Baldwin left to present-day writers such as Toni Morrison, Charles Johnson, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Thulani Davis, Caryl Phillips and others. We will spend time reading and discussing Baldwin's novels, short stories, plays and essays. In doing so, we will be considering the complex assumptions and negotiations that we make in our day-to-day lives around our identities and experiences built upon gender, sexual preference, the social-constructs called "race," and more. James Baldwin's life and work will be the touchstone that grounds our discussions. We will read Go Tell It on the Mountain, Another Country, The Fire Next Time, and Giovanni's Room and see films I Am Not Your Negro, The Price of the Ticket and The Murder of Emmett Till. Students will research subjects of their own choosing about Baldwin's life and art. For example, they may focus on the shaping influences of Pentecostalism; segregation; racism; homophobia; exile in Paris; the Civil Rights Movement; Black Power, Baldwin's faith, or his return to America.

Taught by: Watterson

Also Offered As: ENGL 581, GSWS 580

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 587 Race, Nation, Empire

This graduate seminar examines the dynamic relationships among empires, nations and states; colonial and post-colonial policies; and anti-colonial strategies within a changing global context. Using the rubrics of anthropology, history, cultural studies, and social theory, we will explore the intimacies of subject formation within imperial contexts- past and present- especially in relation to ideas about race and belonging. We will focus on how belonging and participation have been defined in particular locales, as well as how these notions have been socialized through a variety of institutional contexts. Finally, we will consider the relationships between popular culture and state formation, examining these as dialectical struggles for hegemony.

Taught by: Thomas

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: ANTH 587, GSWS 587, LALS 588

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 591 Introduction to Francophone Studies

An introduction to major literary movements and authors from five areas of Francophonie: the Maghreb, West Africa, Central Africa, the Caribbean and Quebec.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 596, FREN 590

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: An introduction to major literary movements and authors from five areas of Francophonie: the Maghreb, West Africa, Central Africa, the Carribean and Quebec.

AFRC 594 Post-Colonialism Literature

This course covers topics in Post-Colonial literature with emphasis determined by the instructor. The primary focus will be on novels that have been adapted to film. See the Department's website at www.africana.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CIMS 595, ENGL 595

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 602 Stereotype Threat, Impostor Phenomenon, and African Americans

This course critically examines stereotype threat and impostor phenomenon as they relate to African Americans. Both stereotype threat and impostor phenomenon negatively affect African Americans. The apprehension experienced by African Americans that they might behave in a manner that confirms an existing negative cultural stereotype is stereotype threat, which usually results in reduced effectiveness in African Americans' performance. Stereotype threat is linked with impostor phenomenon. Impostor phenomenon is an internal experience of intellectual phoniness in authentically talented individuals, in which they doubt their accomplishments and fear being exposed as a fraud. While stereotype threat relies on broad generalization, the impostor phenomenon describes feelings of personal inadequacy, especially in high-achieving African Americans. This course will explore the evolving meanings connected to both stereotype threat and impostor phenomenon in relation to African Americans.

Taught by: Abiola

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: EDUC 538

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 606 The Interpretation of Oral Traditions

Topics may draw on methodologies derived from jazz studies, chant studies, and ethnomusicology. See department website (under course tab) for current term course description: https://music.sas.upenn.edu

Taught by: Ramsey

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: MUSC 606

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 620 Exhibiting Black Bodies

This course concerns the exhbiting of Black Bodies in Museums and gallery spaces. We will trace the evolution of public history from the "Cabinets of Curiosity" in 18th and 19th Century Europe, through to the current institutional confirmation of the vindications traditions represented by Museu Afro Brasil (Sao Paulo, Brazil), National Museum of African American History and Culture (Washington,D.C.), and the Museum of Black Civilization (Dakar, Senegal). We will give particular attention to "why these representations at these times in these places?." In the process of addressing these questions we will give voice to the figures who conceived the curatorial content from those with the colonial mentality, to those with the abolitiionist and nationalist and Pan-African visions.

Taught by: Zuberi

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 338, SOCI 338, SOCI 660

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: See the Africana Studies Department's course list at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offering.

AFRC 624 Race, Poverty, & Place

In recent years, long-disinvested cities have become the site of renewed investment, population growth, and economic development in a phenomenon often described as gentrification. Nonetheless, socioeconomic inequality between races, ethnicities, genders, and places within the larger metropolitan area continue to persist, suggesting that a rising tide does not raise all boats. Planners must grapple with these issues of inequality and inequity, particularly the implementation of plans and policies that may in theory provide benefits to all, but in practice continue to accumulate benefits for a select few. This course examines the construction of race, the making of a place, and the persistence of poverty in racialized places in the city. This course will engage in a critical discussion of the aforementioned themes, such that the normative notions of race, capitalism, urbanism, gender, power, and space are upended to privilege more marginalized perspectives of these processes.

Taught by: Drake-Rodriguez

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 632 North Africa: History, Culture, Society

This interdisciplinary seminar aims to introduce students to the countries of North Africa, with a focus on the Maghreb and Libya (1830-present). It does so while examining the region's close economic and cultural connections to sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, and the Middle East. Readings will include histories, political analyses, anthropological studies, and novels, and will cover a wide range of topics such as colonial and postcolonial experiences, developments in Islamic thought and practice, and labor migration. This class is intended for juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 332, HIST 370, NELC 332, NELC 632

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 638 Race & Criminal Justice

Taught by: Gottschalk

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 437, PSCI 437, PSCI 638

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 640 Proseminar in Africana Studies

This course focuses on the historical and cultural relationship between Africans and their descendants abroad.

Taught by: Beavers, Butler, Charles, Rommen, Savage, Thomas, Williams, Zuberi

Two terms. student must enter first term.

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 641 Topics in African American History

Topics vary. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Williams, Savage

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: HIST 641

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 645 Graduate Research Seminar

SPRING 2019: This seminar is suitable for graduate students in any discipline in which historical research may be relevant. We will work with both secondary and primary sources, and students will have the opportunity to visit and undertake research in an archive.

Taught by: Williams

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HIST 645

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 655 Topics in Black Political Thought: Difference And Community

This course is designed to familiarize graduate students with some of the key texts and debates in Africana Studies concerning the relationship between racial slavery, modernity and politics. Beginning with the Haitian Revolution, much of black political thought (thinking and doing politics) has advocated group solidarity and cohesion in the face of often overwhelming conditions of servitude, enslavement and coercion within the political economy of slavery and the moral economy of white supremacy. Ideas and practices of freedom however, articulated by political actors and intellectuals alike, have been as varied as the routes to freedom itself. Thus, ideas and practices of liberty, citizenship and political community within many African and Afro-descendant communities have revealed multiple, often competing forms of political imagination. The multiple and varied forms of political imagination, represented in the writings of thinkers like Eric Williams, Richard Wright, Carole Boyce Davies and others, complicates any understanding of black political thought as having a single origin, genealogy or objective. Students will engage these and other authors in an effort to track black political thought's consonance and dissonance with Western feminisms, Marxism, nationalism and related phenomena and ideologies of the 20th and now 21st century.

Taught by: Hanchard

Also Offered As: GSWS 655, LALS 656, PSCI 612

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 677 Black Speculative Futures

Why do black cultural producers turn to the speculative? What, in turn, is speculative about blackness? These questions frame this seminar s exploration of how black artists, theorists, and activists imagine different futures, often in the service of critiquing power asymmetries and creating radical transformation in the present. We will explore how the speculative works differently across black literature, visual culture and performance. Additionally, inspired by the multi-disciplinary work that we encounter in the course, we will experiment with crafting our own embodied speculative art in order to better understand its function as both art practice and politics. The course will be divided between discussions centered on close reading of primary and secondary material and creative writing/movement exploration (no previous movement experience necessary). Occasional guest lectures with visiting artists will provide additional fodder for our critical and creative work.

Taught by: Knight

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 377, ANTH 377, ANTH 677, ENGL 500, FNAR 377

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 701 African Studies Seminar

Interdisciplinary seminar for discussion of issues of special interest to graduate students and faculty in Africana Studies. Topics vary according to the interests and expertise of instructors. SPRING 2017 - Readings in African American Religion: Traditional narratives of African American Religion go from slavery to civil rights to "freedom" without taking into account the complex religious lives and intellectual production of people of African descent in the Americas. This course will focus on African American Religion and the historical and theoretical frameworks that have shaped the study of this field. Readings will cover religious studies, anthropology history, and African American studies in order to provide an understanding of the varieties of religion and religious experiences with this particular segment of the African Diaspora.

Taught by: Butler

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: RELS 701

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 706 Introduction to Africa and African Diaspora Thought

This course examines the processes by which African peoples have established epistemological, cosmological, and religious systems both prior to and after the institution of Western slavery.

Taught by: Amponsah

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HIST 706

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 708 Cultural and Literary Theory of Africa and the African Diaspora

This course introduces students to the theoretical strategies underlying the construction of coherent communities and systems of representation and how those strategies influence the uses of expressive culture over time. Topics vary. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana Studies.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 710 Political Economy and Social History of Africa and the African Diaspora

This course provides the opportunity for students to investigate the relationship between the emergence of African peoples as historical subjects and their location within specific geopolitical and economic circumstances. Topics vary.

Taught by: Hanchard, Zuberi

Two terms. student must enter first term.

Also Offered As: COML 710, LALS 710, PSCI 711

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 720 Graduate Prospectus and Grant-Writing Seminar

Prerequisite: Graduate student must be "All But Dissertation" (ABD). This course is intended to help students to write a strong dissertation proposal/prospectus. A proposal is a detailed plan for a long journey of of conceptualization, research, and writing that will lead to the first major, independent scholarly contribution. Students will work closely with advisors, peers, and the professor in the course, to develop the questions, methodological approaches, and theoretical perspectives that will guide their research and writing. At the end of the semester, each student will have completed a proposal, and will be ready to defend it.

Taught by: Williams

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: Graduate student must be "All But Dissertation" (ABD).

AFRC 723 Multicultural Issues in Education

This course examines critical issues, problems, and perspectives in multicultural education. Intended to focus on access to literacy and educational opportunity, the course will engage class members in discussions around a variety of topics in educational practice, research, and policy. Specifically, the course will (1) review theoretical frameworks in multicultural education, (2) analyze the issues of race, racism, and culture in historical and contemporary perspective, and (3) identify obstacles to participation in the educational process by diverse cultural and ethnic groups. Students will be required to complete field experiences and classroom activities that enable them to reflect on their own belief systems, practices, and educational experiences.

Taught by: Gadsden

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: EDUC 723

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 770 Afro-American American Literature

How does Elizabeth Alexanders poem Praise Song for the Day, written for the inauguration of Barack Obama, relate to Amiri Barakas 9/11 poem Somebody Blew America? This seminar will explore the unnaming and experimentation that shape African American literature and theory in the early years of the 21st century. frameworks of the seminar will include the post-9/11 novel, the poetics of the black, black abstraction, twenty-first century practices of the black diaspora Age of Obama turn to the satirical. Critical texts such as How to See a Work Total Darkness and Abstractionist Aesthetics will be as central as cutting edgesuch as The Psychic Hold of Slavery and signature essays such as On Failing to the Past Present. This course will focus on the new literary voices that have the 21st century and, also, writers whose 21st century art is the late stage ofliterary trajectory. Special attention will be given to Toni Morrison, Colson Whitehead,Octavia Butler, Claudia Rankine, Mat Johnson, and Paul Beatty.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ENGL 770

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 771 Seminar in African-American Music

Seminar on selected topics in African American Music. See department website (under course tab) for current term course description: https://music.sas.upenn.edu

Taught by: Ramsey

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: MUSC 770

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 775 African Literature

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 700, ENGL 775

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 791 African Film and Media Pedagogy

This graduate seminar offers an intensive, critical, and collaborative study of contemporary African film and media production. The past three decades have seen an unprecedented shift in the African media landscape. Not only has the wide availability of satellite media across the continent made international film and television programing part of African popular culture, but moreover the growing film industries within the continent, most notably Nollywood, have altered how Africans are carving an image of themselves on the big and small screens. In partnership with local, regional, and international film and media centers, we will study a range of films--features, shorts, documentaries, and television shows--paying close attention to the means and sites of production as well as the formal qualities that distinguish these works. Many of the films we will analyze stand out both for their exceptional aesthetic quality as well as their remarkable ability to confront pressing political and social themes. But we will also think about trash: what counts as trashy media, and for whom? Who watches it, where, and why? Other questions we will ask include: What particular indigenous modes of storytelling do African films employ? What categories begin to emerge under the umbrella category of "African film and media," and where do diasporan film and media practitioners and critics fit in this landscape? How are these films tackling some of the urgent questions of our times, including migration and globalization; ethnic, political, and economic polarization; gender and sexuality; and massive urbanization and industrialization sweeping Africa and other parts of the Global South? What role do festivals in various countries play in shaping media production and distribution? How important is the concept of authorship in this context? And how do these films challenge the dominant western trope of Africa as a spectacle, instead offering novel ways of picturing everyday African experiences that we rarely glimpse in western media? To explore these questions, we will visit multiple sites of film production, distribution, exhibition, and education, including Scribe Video Center in Philadelphia, Sankofa Films in Washington, D.C., and the College of Performing and Visual Art at Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia. Location and knowledge production are inextricably connected, and by considering African media production from these multiple sites, and collaborating with multiple stakeholders, this course offers a directly engaged pedagogy of the complex artistic, cultural, social, and political dynamics of African audiovisual creation. The travel component of this course entails a day trip to Washington, D.C. during the semester (tentative date: April 2, 2020) and a week-long trip to Addis Ababa at the end of the spring term (students applying for this course should be prepared to travel to Addis Ababa May 30, 2020-June 7, 2020). All expenses for travel, accommodation, and food will be covered, but students will need to hold a passport. Ultimately, this course aims to use film and media production to intervene in a larger discourse on how Africa is figured in the global humanities, not as an absent or passive actor but one actively engaged in producing art and humanistic knowledge that has much to teach us and the world. Admission to the course will be by permission only and students are required to submit a short statement of interest (max. 250 words) to dagw@english.upenn.edu and redkaren@sas.upenn.edu. Students must be prepared to travel to Addis Ababa and Washington D.C. as described in the syllabus, and must hold a passport.

Taught by: Redrobe/Woubshet

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 791, CIMS 791, COML 791, ENGL 777

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

AFRC 799 Topics in American Literature

An advanced topics course in American literature, with the curriculum fixed by the instructor. See the Africana Studies website at www.africana.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ENGL 799

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit