Africana Studies (AFRC)

AFRC 001 Introduction to Africana Studies

The term Africana emerged in public discourse amid the social, political, and cultural turbulence of the 1960s. The roots of the field, however, are much older,easily reaching back to oral histories and writings during the early days of the Trans-Atlantic African slave trade. The underpinnings of the field continued to grow in the works of enslaved Africans, abolitionists and social critics of the nineteenth century, and evolved in the twentieth century by black writers, journalists, activists, and educators as the sought to document African descended people's lives. Collectively, their work established African Studies as a discipline,epistemological standpoint and political practice dedicated to understanding the multiple trajectories and experiences of black people in the world throughout history. As an ever-transforming field of study, this course will examine the genealogy, major discourses, and future trajectory of Africana Studies. Using primary sources such as maps and letters, as well as literature and performance, our study of Africana will begin with continental Africa, move across the Atlantic during the middle passage and travel from the coasts of Bahia in the 18th centuryto the streets of Baltimore in the 21st century. The course is constructed around major themes in Black intellectual thought including: retentions and transferal, diaspora, black power, meanings of blackness, uplift and nationalism. While attending to narratives and theories that concern African descended people in the United States, the course is uniquely designed with a focus on gender and provides context for the African diasporic experience in the Caribbean and Latin America.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: Beavers, Butler, Charles, Johnson, Hanchard,tillet

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 002 Introduction to Sociology

We live in a country which places a premium on indivi dual accomplishments. Hence, all of you worked extremely hard to get into Penn. Yet, social factors also have an impact on life chance. This class provides an overview of how membership in social groups shapes the outcomes of individuals. We will look at a range of topics from the organizational factors which promoted racial inequality in Ferguson, Mo to the refusal of (mostly elite) parents to vaccinate their children. The experience of women and men in the labor market -- and the social factors that lead women to earn less than men -- is another interesting topic taken up in the course. Who gets ahead in America? Course requirements include a midterm, research paper (five to six pages), final and recitation activities. Students are not expected to have any previous knowledge of the topic. Welcome to the course!

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Imoagene, Zuberi

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Recitation

0 Course Units

AFRC 003 Refuge: Stoires on Art and Survival

"The nomad or immigrant who learns something rightly must always ponder travel and movement, just as the grief-stricken must inevitably ponder death. As does the artist who comes from a culture that is as much about harnessing life -joyous, jubilant, resilient life-as it is about avoiding death." Edwidge Danticat, Create Dangerously: The Immigrant Artist at Work What can we learn about the current migration crisis from literature and film? This course will first introduce students to histories of migration during the 20th and 21st centuries that have emerged from Cameroon, Canada, France, Haiti, South Africa, United Kingdom, United States, among others. Students will then study how these histories shape film and literature as much as how artistic works shape these histories. From studying artistic works by Raoul Peck, Dany Laferriere, Ousmane Sembene, NoViolet Bulawayo and Edouard Duval-Carrie we will approach a few questions. What is it like to lose your home and your homeland? How can we learn from the stories of emigres, exiles, expatriates, immigrants, migrants and refugees of their search for refuge? How have these experiences of migration been affected by race, gender and class? Finally, how have "immigrant artists," to borrow from Edwidge Danticat, negotiate the zone of comfort or discomfort necessary to create and recreate? This course is open to students from all majors. No previous knowledge of literary studies or current affairs required. Course evaluations include weekly Canvas posts, oral presentations and creative, individualized projects.

Taught by: IRELE

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 006 Race and Ethnic Relations

The course will focus on race and ethnicity in the United States. We begin with a brief history of racial categorization and immigration to the U.S. The course continues by examining a number of topics including racial and ethnic identity, interracial and interethnic friendships and marriage, racial attitudes, mass media images, residential segregation, educational stratification, and labor market outcomes. The course will include discussions of African Americans, Whites, Hispanics, and Asian Americans and Multiracials.

Taught by: Charles, Kao, Zuberi

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 008 Sociology of the Black Community

This course explores a broad set of issues defining important aspects of the Black/African American experience. In addition to the "usual suspects" (e.g., race, socioeconomic status, poverty, gender, and group culture), we also think about matters of health and well-being, the family, education, and identity in Black/African American communities. Our goal is to gain a deeper sociological understanding and appreciation of the diverse and ever-changing life experiences of Blacks/African Americans.

Taught by: Charles

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Freshman Seminar

AFRC 010 Freshman Seminar

This course is cross-listed with PSCI 010 (Freshmen Seminar) when the subject matter is related to African American or other African Diaspora issues. Topics vary. A recent topic is "Race, Crime, and Punishment." See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Gottschalk

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 011 Urban Sociology

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the sociological study of urban areas. This includes more general topics as the rise of cities and theories urbanism, as well as more specific areas of inquiry, including American urbanism, segregation, urban poverty, suburbanization and sprawl, neighborhoods and crime, and immigrant ghettos. The course will also devote significant attention to globalization and the process of urbanization in less developed counties.

Taught by: Flippen

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 015 Freshman Seminar in 20TH Century History

In this First Year Seminar we will use coming-of-age autobiographies to explore some of the most significant historical developments of the 20th century. By coming of age I mean autobiographies in which the author focuses primarily on the periods of childhood and adolescence into young adulthood. We will read books by people who lived during segregation in the South, the Great Depression, Japanese Internment during World War II, and the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. We will consider many issues, including: race, racism, immigration, religion, social class, and gender. We will contemplate questions about identity, family, honesty, and memory. As we read each book we will examine an individual life in a particular place and time, and we will move out beyond the confines of a person, family, or town to explore the broader historical moment in which the individual lived. To make this deeper contextualization possible, the course is divided into segments that will allow us to study the historical context of the autobiography as well as engage in focused discussion of the texts themselves.

Taught by: Williams

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 017 Topics in Literature

SPRING 2018: This seminar will introduce students to the power of public art. Outdoor murals, painted poetry, poetry performed outdoors, anti-museum sculpture, and outdoor theater will be the focus of this seminar. How does public art make the very idea of art gain new dimensions such as art as an event (not an object) and art as a community intervention? Our starting point will be outdoor murals in Philadelphia and other very recent art reconsidering the meaning of public monuments. In addition to our focus on contemporary public art in Philadelphia, we will focus on the role of public art in the 1960s and 1970s Black Arts Movement. The seminar will unveil the power of outdoor space to create art that has urgency and the openness of radical experimentation. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Beavers, Tillet, Crawford

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Freshmen Seminar

AFRC 019 AFAM Freshman Seminar

This course will introduce students to a more hemispheric understanding of the American experience, through the writings of many authors from the New World, including the United States, on what it means to be an American. Students will read texts from many genres including but not limited to poetry, film, prose, political speeches and autobiography, to come to terms with histories of native Americans, African-Americans, Latinos, and whites in the United States, as well as peoples of South America and the Caribbean. In the process students will become familiar with scholarship across the social sciences and humanities that consider issues of race, culture, nation, freedom and inequality in the Americas, and how racial slavery and the Afro-American hemispheric experience has informed multiple American visions.

Taught by: Hanchard

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 041 Homelessness & Urban Inequality

This freshman seminar examines the homelessness problem from a variety of scientific and policy perspectives. Contemporary homelessness differs significantly from related conditions of destitute poverty during other eras of our nation's history. Advocates, researchers and policymakers have all played key roles in defining the current problem, measuring its prevalence, and designing interventions to reduce it. The first section of this course examines the definitional and measurement issues, and how they affect our understanding of the scale and composition of the problem. Explanations for homelessness have also been varied, and the second part of the course focuses on examining the merits of some of those explanations, and in particular, the role of the affordable housing crisis. The third section of the course focuses on the dynamics of homelessness, combining evidence from ethnographic studies of how people become homeless and experience homelessness, with quantitative research on the patterns of entry and exit from the condition. The final section of the course turns to the approaches taken by policymakers and advocates to address the problem, and considers the efficacy and quandaries associated with various policy strategies. The course concludes by contemplating the future of homelessness research and public policy.

Taught by: Culhane

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: This freshmen seminar is cross-listed with URBS 010 when the subject matter is related to African, African American, or other African Diaspora issues. A recent topic is "Homelessness and Urban Inequality." See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

AFRC 050 World Musics and Cultures

This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Taught by: Muller, Rommen

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 054 Sounding Poetry: Music and Literature

The music form of scat deeyoodaaadayodeedaadeedaaa is the answer to the repea question Who are we? Where are we going? What are we here for? in the 1960s Hip Generation. This course will explore the role of music in shaping the most innovative formsAfrican American literature. Forms such as jazz poetry, blues poetry, and the frupture of Hip Hop will be as central to this course as the jam sessions that sliterary movements such as the Harlem Renaissance and the Black Arts Movement. The interplay between listening and reading will shape each layer of the co Langston Hughes Ask Your Mama: 12 Moods for Jazz (1961) will be our starting p likely assigned texts include Gayl Jones Corregidora, Kevin Youngs To Repel G Remix, Sherman Alexies Reservation Blues, Paul Millers Sound Unbound, and The Poets: New American Poetry in the Age of Hip-Hop.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 056 Seeing/Hearing South Africa: Politics and History through Contemporary Performance

This course begins in the regular semester--students are provided a general introduction to South African history, politics, environment, and performance through a range of resources: scholarly literature, film, music, and online resources; with particular focus on sites, communities,and events included in the two week intensive travel to South Africa (either Fall semester Intro with winter break travel; or spring semester Intro with late spring intensive travel). Students are given guidelines for writing about and representing live performances and experiences of exhibits and heritage sites. For fall/winter travel: focus is on Cape Town's New Year's Festival performed by those historically called "Cape Coloured" a Festival that makes complicated understandings of race, slavery, and transatlantic translation of borrowed culture. For the Spring/late spring travel, the destination is music festivals in mid-May. Both classes include visits to Robben island, Kirstenbosch gardens; "Cape Malay' heritage sites; travel to KwaZulu Natal, and to Johannesburg's apartheid museum, Soweto's anti apartheid destinations, the Cradle of Humankind works heritage site, a game park, and the Union Buildings in Pretoria. En route we will stop over to view Khoisan rock art.

Taught by: Muller

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Application required through Penn Global: https://global.upenn.edu/pennabroad/pgs

AFRC 062 Land of the Pharaohs

This course provides an introduction to the society, culture and history of ancient Egypt. The objective of the course is to provide an understanding of the characteristics of the civilization of ancient Egypt and how that ancient society succeeded as one of the most successful and long-lived civilizations in world history.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 070 Colonial Latin America

This course provides an introduction to the broad literature on Latin America's rich colonial history. We will begin by tracing some of the early origins of - and points of contact between - the Indian, Iberian, and African men and women who formed the basis of colonial society. As the course progresses, we will explore the variety of ways in which colonial subjects lived, worked, ate, worshipped, and socialized. Lectures and reading assignments will draw upon a variety of sources, including court cases, artistic renderings, city maps and street plans, travel accounts of visits to the regions, and the material, cultural, and intellectual products made possible by the wealth and dynamism of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The course will conclude with an analysis of the Age of Revolutions, a period of dramatic upheaval that remains at the center of lively scholarly debates. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage the key questions driving these debates, the most important of which, perhaps, is: what is Latin America's colonial legacy?

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Farnsworth-Alvear

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Fulfills History Tradition Distribution Requirement

AFRC 075 Africa Before 1800

Survey of major themes and issues in African history before 1800. Topics include: early civilizations, African kingdoms and empires, population movements, the spread of Islam, and the slave trade. Also, emphasis on how historians use archaeology, linguistics, and oral traditions to reconstruct Africa's early history.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Babou

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

0 Course Units

AFRC 076 Africa Since 1800

Survey of major themes, events, and personalities in African history from the early nineteenth century through the 1960s. Topics include abolition of the slave trade, European imperialism, impact of colonial rule, African resistance, religious and cultural movements, rise of naturalism and pan-Africanism, issues of ethnicity and "tribalism" in modern Africa.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Cassanelli

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

AFRC 077 Jazz Style and History

This course is an exploration of the family of musical idioms called jazz. Attention will be given to issues of style development, selective musicians, and to the social and cultural conditions and the scholarly discourses that have informed the creation, dissemination and reception of this dynamic set of styles from the beginning of the 20th century to the present.

Taught by: Ramsey

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 078 Faculty-Student Collaborative Action Seminar in Urban University-Community Relations

One of the goals of this seminar is to help students develop their capacity to solve strategic, real-world problems by working collaboratively in the classroom, on campus, and in the West Philadelphia community. Research teams help contribute to the improvement of education on campus and in the community, as well as the improvement of university-community relations. Among other responsibilities, students focus their community service on college and career readiness at West Philadelphia High School and Sayre High School. Students are typically engaged in academically based community service learning at the schools for two hours each week.

Taught by: Harkavy

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 079 Literatures of Jazz

That modernism is steeped as much in the rituals of race as of innovation is most evident in the emergence of the music we have come to know as jazz, which results from collaborations and confrontations taking place both across and within the color line. In this course we will look at jazz and the literary representations it engendered in order to understand modern American culture. We will explore a dizzying variety of forms, including autobiography and album liner notes, biography, poetry, fiction, and cinema. We'll examine how race, gender, and class influenced the development of jazz music, and then will use jazz music to develop critical approaches to literary form. Students are not required to have a critical understanding of music. Class will involve visits from musicians and critics, as well as field trips to some of Philadelphia's most vibrant jazz venues. Topics vary. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Beavers

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 081 African-American Literature

This introduction to African American literature will begin with contemporary, groundbreaking texts such as Claudia Rankines Citizen: An American Lyric and Toni Morrisons A Mercy. These twenty-first century texts will lead us to the questions about freedom, beauty, struggle, pleasure, and resistance that shape the origins of African American literature. The course will be shaped around circles of influence (not a linear mapping of a literary tradition). These circles of the changing same become the art of flow, layering, and rupture. We will dive into the multidirectional flow of slave narratives/neo-slave narratives,black modernism/black postmodernism,black respectability politics/ black radicalism, and mastery of form/deformation of mastery. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Beavers, Davis, Tillet

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 085 Contemporary American Litureature

The readings for this course expose the student to a wide range of American fiction and poetry since World War II, giving considerable attention to recent work. Works may include All The King's Men by Robert Penn Warren, Herzog by Saul Bellow, On The Road by Jack Kerouac, V by Thomas Pynchon, Of Love and Dust by Ernest J.Gaines, A Flag For Sunrise by Robert Stone, The Killing Ground by Mary Lee Settle, and selected poem by Ginsberg, Plath, and Walcott. Readings vary from term to term.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: This course is cross-listed with ENGL 074 (Contemporary American Literature) when the course content is related to Afro-American issues. Topics vary. Consult the Africana Department website for a current course description.

AFRC 100 Introduction to Art

Spring 2018: Starting with the Penn Museum and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the seminar will visit major collections of Philadelphia, both to examine the works of art and artifacts (on display and in storage) and to meet with directors, curators, keepers, and collectors. Most meetings will take place in the museums, not in the classroom. While the seminar will provide an overview of the history of art, our discussions on site will focus on changing aesthetics and collecting practices, aspects of display and contextualization, the institution of the museum, thing theory, and the blurred boundaries between ethnography, archaeology, and art history

Taught by: Du Bois Shaw

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For Freshmen only. Topics Varies

AFRC 101 Study of an Author

This course introduces students to literary study through the works of a single author--often Shakespeare, but other versions will feature writers like Jane Austen, Geoffrey Chaucer, Herman Melville, and August Wilson. Readings an individual author across his or her entire career offers students the rare opportunity to examine works from several critical perspectives in a single course. What is the author's relation to his or her time? How do our author's works help us to understand literary history more generally? And how might be understand our author's legacy through performance, tributes, adaptations, or sequels? Exposing students to a range of approaches and assignments, this course is an ideal introduction to literary study for those students wishing to take an English course but not necessarily intending to major. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Taught by: Beavers

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 109 American Jesus

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 112 Discrimination: Sexual and Racial Conflict

This course is concerned with the structure, the causes and correlates, and the government policies to alleviate discrimination by race and gender in the United States. The central focus of the course is on employment differences by race and gender and the extent to which they arise from labor market discrimination versus other causes, although racial discrimination in housing is also considered. After a comprehensive overview of the structures of labor and housing markets and of nondiscriminatory reasons (that is, the cumulative effects of past discrimination and/or experiences) for the existence of group differentials in employment, wages, and residential locations, various theories of the sources of current discrimination are reviewed and evaluated. Actual governmental policies and alternative policies are evaluated in light of both the empirical evidence on group differences and the alternative theories of discrimination.This course is concerned with the structure, the causes and correlates, and the government policies to alleviate discrimination by race and gender in the United States. The central focus of the course is on employment differences by race and gender and the extent to which they arise from labor market discrimination versus other causes, although racial discrimination in housing.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Madden

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 114 Poetry Writing Workshop

This is a workshop for students who are interested in exploring a variety of approaches to poetry. Students will encounter a diverse series of readings, in-class writing activities, weekly writing assignments, and creative methods for heightening your abilities as a reader and writer.

Taught by: Beavers

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: This course is not open to freshmen. Students wishing to take this course must submit a writing sample as part of the selection process.

AFRC 115 Religious Ethics and Modern Society

Religious beliefs of Malcolm X and MLK formed their social action during the Civil Rights for African Americans. This seminar will explore the religious biographies of each leader, how religion shaped their public and private personas, and the transformative and transgressive role that religion played in the history of the Civil Rights movement in the United States and abroad. Students in this course will leave with a clearer understanding of religious beliefs of Christianity, The Nation of Islam, and Islam, as well as religiously based social activism. Other course emphases include the public and private roles of religion within the context of the shaping of ideas of freedom, democracy, and equality in the United States, the role of the "Black church" in depicting messages of democracy and freedom, and religious oratory as exemplified through MLK and Malcolm X. See Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Butler

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 117 African American Religion

The unique history and experiences of African Americans can be traced through religion and belief. Through the mediums of literature, politics, music, and film, students will plore the religious experiences of people of the African Diaspora within the context of the complex history of race in American history. The course will cover a broad spectrum of African American religious experience including Black Nationalism, urban religions, the "black church" and African religious traditions such as Santeria and Rastafarianism. Special attention will be paid to the role of race, gender, sexuality, and popular culture in the African American religious experience.

Taught by: Butler

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 120 Social Statistics

This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests.

Taught by: Charles

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Recitation

0 Course Units

AFRC 121 Writing for Children

We will read our favorite kids' books, determine the kinds of books we love to read and write, and then write them, aiming at a clear voice appropriate to the story, and as much order or misrule as each writer's kid-muse demands. For inspiration, we'll visit the Maurice Sendak Collection at the Rosenbach Museum and Library and have a nostalgia wallow in the kids' section at the library. Then students write, fast-fast, drafts of stories to workshop , mull and revise. Yes, fun is required. For sure we'll critique, but first we'll try to outrun our interior grown-up! Workshopping happens first with student writer colleagues, and then with the real kids in schools, through our partner West Philadelphia Alliance for Children. Reading to children will give studentwriters a chance to hear where children laugh, see where they look scared, or notice when they begin to fidget. Returning with revisions will be a promise fulfilled, and an important marker in the literary life of everyone involved. Our class will act as a team of editors, then, to submit stories-andillustrations by authors and/or kids-on the upcoming website, SafeKidsStories.org.

Taught by: Cary

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: This course is not open to freshmen. Students wishing to take this course must submit a writing sample as part of the selection process. May be repeated for credit with a different instructor.

AFRC 134 Creative Non-Fiction Writing

SPRING 2018:As children, we first begin to learn stories and myths that explain how the world works, what life means, and how we re the same and different. In this writing seminar, we will explore myths about race, class, gender, and sexuality that are embedded in the culture of ordinary life, as well as in systems of power and privilege. We ll examine how inequalities impact not only our opportunities, but also how we perceive ourselves and others. During this semester, students will learn how other writers including Frederick Douglass, Audre Lorde, Leslie Marmo Silko, Thandeka, Angela Davis, James Baldwin, Jimmy Santiago Baco, and Amy Tan have used language to help them convey who they are and how their experiences have shaped them. Throughout the semester, we also will mine a deep understanding of the art of writing. In addition to in-class exercises, meditation and movement, students will be asked to a maintain a daily practice of free-writing; writing responses (2-3 pages weekly) to assigned books, essays, stories, and documentaries; participate in workshop discussions and peer review, and write and revise three stories/essays (4-5 pages).

Taught by: Cary, Watterson

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 135 Law and Society

After introducing students to the major theoretical concepts concerning law and society, significant controversial societal issues that deal with law and the legal systems both domestically and internationally will be examined. Class discussions will focus on issues involving civil liberties, the organization of courts, legislatures, the legal profession and administrative agencies. Although the focus will be on law in the United States, law and society in other countries of Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America will be covered in a comparative context. Readings include research, reports, statutes and cases.

Taught by: Fetni

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 140 Elementary Zulu I in Residence

This elementary course is for beginners and it requires no prior knowledge of Zulu. The course will expose students to the Zulu language and culture and will be based in the National Standards for Foreign Language Learning. Students will be engaged in communicative language learning through interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of language learning techniques. They will gain knowledge and understanding of the Zulu culture. They will use their Zulu language and culture learning experience to connect with other disciplines and further their knowledge of these disciplines through perspectives acquired from their Zulu class. They will also develop insight into the nature of language and culture through comparisons of the Zulu language and culture and their own. Through movies, songs, and other cultural activities online students will acquire the natural use of the language which will enable them to acquire linguistic and cultural skill to become life-long learners who can participate in Zulu communities in the U.S. and overseas.

Taught by: Mbeje

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

0.05 Course Units

Notes: OBJECTIVE: Attainment of Level 1 (ceiling) in speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills on the Interagency Language Roundtable (ILR) scale.

AFRC 147 Studies in African American Music

This course explores aspects of the origins, style development, aesthetic philosophies, historiography, and contemporary conventions of African-American musical traditions. Topics covered include: the music of West and Central Africa, the music of colonial America, 19th century church and dance music, minstrelsy, music of the Harlem Renaissance, jazz, blues, gospel, hip-hop, and film music. Special attention is given to the ways that black music produces "meaning" and to how the social energy circulating within black music articulates myriad issues about American identity at specific histroical moments. The course will also engage other expressive art forms from visual and literary sources in order to better position music making into the larger framework of African American aesthetics.

Taught by: Ramsey

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 167 The New African Diaspora

This seminar will examine the experiences of recent African immigrants and refugees in Philadelphia in an historical framework. We will employ a variety of sources-newspapers, census data, legal briefs, literature and film, and diaspora internet sites-to explore the lives, aspirations, and perceptions of Philadelphia's African residents. There will be opportunities for dialogue with high school students, teachers, and parents; with representatives of African community and business organizations; and with local government and service agencies. Students will be required to do a final project which involves volunteering with an African immigrant non-profit or business and/or conducting focused research on specific African communities in Philadelphia.

Taught by: Babou

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 168 History of American Law to 1877

The course surveys the development of law in the U.S. to 1877, including such subjects as: the evolution of the legal profession, the transformation of English law during the American Revolution, the making and implementation of the Constitution, and issues concerning business and economic development, the law of slavery, the status of women, and civil rights.

Taught by: Berry

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 169 History of American Law Since 1877

This course covers the development of legal rules and principles concerning individual and group conduct in the United States since 1877. Such subjects as regulation and deregulation, legal education and the legal profession, and the legal status of women and minorities will be discussed.

Taught by: Berry

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 170 Elementary Yoruba I

This Elementary Yoruba I course can be taken to fulfull a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on Nigeria and the diaspora/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Yoruba. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable commom daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills at the mid-high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The mid-high novice level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the second semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Elementary Yoruba II course materials.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Awoyale

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through the Penn Language Center

AFRC 171 Elementary Yoruba II

The main objective of this course is to further sharpen the Yoruba linguistic knowledge that the student acquired in level I. By the end of the course, the student should be able to (1) read, write, and understand simple to moderately complex sentences in Yoruba; and, (2) advance in the knowledge of the Yoruba culure.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Awoyale

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: Completion of Elementary Yoruba I, or permission of instructor.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through the Penn Language Center

AFRC 172 The American South

This course will cover southern culture and history from 1607-1860, from Jamestown to secession. It traces the rise of slavery and plantation society, the growth of Southern sectionalism and its explosion into Civil War.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Hahn

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

AFRC 174 Capitalism, Socialism, & Crisis in Twentieth-Century Americas

From the crisis of the Great Depression through the 1970s, the United States and Latin America produced remarkable efforts to remake society and political economy. This course analyzes the Cuban and Guatemalan Guatemalan revolutions, as well as social movements that transformed the United States: the black freedom movement, the labor movement, and changing forms of Latino politics. In all three countries, Americans looked for ways to reform capitalism or build socialism; address entrenched patterns of racism; define and realize democracy; and achieve national independence. They conceived of these these challenges in dramatically different ways. Together, we'll compare national histories and analyze the relationships between national upheavals. In studying the US and Latin America together, the class allows students to explore central questions in both regions' histories. What did capitalism, solicalism, and communism amount to? What did democracy mean? What were the roots of racial inequality and how did Americans address it? Why were Americans so enticed by economic growth, and how did they pursue it? How did the Cold War shape social movements? What purposes did unions serve? How did Christianity inform movements for and against social change? Studying these regions together also allows us to explore international interactions. How did the black freedom movement in the US relate to the Cuban revolution? How did Latin American immigration shape the US labor movement? How US Cold War policy influence Latin American revolutionary movements? The goal of this class is for you to interpret the readings and decide what you think. What you learn in this class, and the quality of our experience together, depends on your reading closely, coming to class with informed ideas and questions, and being prepared to help your classmates answer theirs. We will read approximately 100 pages per week. No background is required.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 175 Society and Culture of Brazil

With its booming economy, the recent inauguration of its first female president, and its selection as host to the 2012 World Cup and Olympic games, Brazil is growing in global prestige. But amid all these exciting developments are devastating socioeconomic inequalities. Access to safe living conditions, livable wages, higher education, and overall social mobility remain painfully out of reach to many Brazilians, the majority of whom are the descendants of slaves. Why do these problems persist in a country that has had such an enduring and widespread reputation as a "racial democracy"? What are the possibilities of closing the equality gap in Brazil?

Taught by: Walker

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 176 Afro-American History 1550-1876

This course examines the experiences of Africans and African Americans in colonial America and in the United States to 1865. We will explore a variety of themes through the use of primary and secondary sources. Topics include: the development of racial slavery, labor, identity, gender, religion, education, law, protest, resistance, and abolition.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Akins, Williams

Two terms. student may enter either term.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 177 Afro-American History 1876 to Present

A study of the major events, issues, and personalities in Afro-American history from Reconstruction to the present. The course will also examine the different slave experiences and the methods of black resistance and rebellion in the various slave systems.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Harris, Savage

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 180 Elementary Swahili I

The elementary Swahili course can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on East Africa/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative compentence to enable the students to aquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Swahili. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable commom daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills at the mid-high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The mid-high level proficiency skills that the students acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the second semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Elementary Swahili II course materials.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Mshomba

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through the Penn Language Center

AFRC 181 Elementary Swahili II

This course continues to introduce basic grammar, vocabulary, and the reading and writing of Swahili to new speakers. During this term, folktales, other texts, and film selections are used to help introduce important aspects of Swahili culture and the use of the language in wide areas of Africa.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Bolger

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: Completion of Elementry Swahili I, or permission of instructor.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through the Penn Language Center

AFRC 187 Topics in Africana Studies

Topics Vary. See the Africana Studies Program's website at www.sas.upenn.edu/africana for a description of the current offerings. SPRING 2017: The history of the women and men of African Descent who have studied, taught, researched, and worked at the University of Pennsylvania provides a powerful window into the complex history of Blacks not only in America but throughout the Diaspora. This class will unpack, uncover, and present this history through close studies of texts and archived records on and at the university, as well as through first hand accounts by alumni and past and present faculty and staff members. These stories of the trials and triumphs of individuals on and around this campus demonstrate the amazing and absurd experience that Blacks have endured both at Penn and globally. Emphasis will be placed on the research process with the intent of creating a democratic classroom where all are students and all are instructors. Students will become familiar with archival historical research (and historical criticism) as well as with ethnographic research. Far more than just a survey of historical moments on campus and in the community, students will meet face to face with those who have lived and are presently living history and they will be faced with the challenge of discerning the most effective ways of documenting, protecting, and representing that history for future generations of Penn students.

Taught by: Howard, Peterson

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 190 Introduction to Africa

This course provides an introduction to the study of Africa in all its diversity and complexity. Our focus is cultural, geographical, and historical: we will seek to understand Africa s current place in the world political and economic order and learn about the various social and physical factors that have influenced the historical trajectory of the continent. We study the cultural formations and empires that emerged in Africa before European colonial invasion and then how colonialism reshaped those sociocultural forms. We ll learn about the unique kinds of kinship and religion in precolonial Africa and the changes brought about by the spread of Islam and Christianity. Finally, we ll take a close look at contemporary issues such as ethnic violence, migration, popular culture and poverty, and we'll debate the various approaches to understanding those issues.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Hasty

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 215 The World After 1800: Advanced Benjamin Franklin Seminar

This course is cross listed with HIST 214 (America after 1800: Advanced Benjamin Franklin Seminar) when the subject matter is related to African, African American or African diaspora issues. See the Africana Studies Program's website at www.sas.upenn.edu/africana for a description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 218 Diversity and the Law

The goal of this course is to study the role the law has played, and continues to play, in addressing the problems of racial discrimination in the United States. Contemporary issues such as racial profiling, affirmative action, and diversity will all be covered in their social and legal context. The basis for discussion will be assigned texts, articles, editorials and cases. In addition, interactive videos will also be used to aid class discussion. Course requirements will include a term paper and class presentations.

Taught by: Anderson

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 222 African Women's Lives: Past and Present

Restoring women to African history is a worthy goal, but easier said than done.The course examines scholarship over the past forty years that brings to light previously overlooked contributions African women have made to political struggle, religious change, culture preservation, and economic development from pre-colonial times to present. The course addresses basic questions about changing women's roles and human rights controversies associated with African women within the wider cultural and historical contexts in which their lives are lived. It also raises fundamental questions about sources, methodology, and representation, including the value of African women's oral and written narrative and cinema production as avenues to insider perspectives on African women's lives.

Taught by: Blakley

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 225 African Languages and Culture

The aim of the course is to provide an overall perspective on African languages and linguistics. No background in linguistics is necessary. Students will be introduced to theoretical linguistics-its concepts, theories, ways of argumentation, data collection, data analysis, and data interpretation. The focus will be on the languages and linguistics of Africa to provide you with the knowledge and skills required to handle the language and language-related issues typical of African conditions. We will cover topics related to formal linguistics (phonology/phonetics, morphology, syntax, and semantics), aspects of pragmatics as well as the general socio-linguistic character of African countries. We will also cover language in context, language and culture, borrowing, multilingualism, and cross-cultural communication in Africa.

Taught by: Mbeje

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 227 Media in Africa

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 229 Topics in US History

Topics vary. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Berry, Brown, Hahn

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 230 Special Topics in Sociology

Topics vary from semester to semester.

Taught by: Charles, Zuberi, Roberts

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: This course is cross-listed with SOCI 430 (Special Topics in Sociology) when the subject matter is related to African, African American, or other African Diaspora issues.

AFRC 232 Race and Ethnic Politics

This course examines the role of race and ethnicity in the political discourse through a comparative survey of recent literature on the historical and contemporary political experiences of the four major minority groups (Blacks or African Americans, American Indians, Latinos or Hispanic Americans, and Asian Americans). A few of the key topics will include assimilation and acculturation seen in the Asian American community, understanding the political direction of Black America in a pre and post Civil Rights era, and assessing the emergence of Hispanics as the largest minority group and the political impact of this demographnic change. Throughout the semester, the course will introduce students to significant minority legislation, political behavior, social movements, litigation/court ruling, media and various forms of public opinion that have shaped the history of racial and ethnic minority relations in this country. Readings are drawn from books and articles written by contemporary political scientists.

Taught by: Gillion

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

0 Course Units

AFRC 233 World History: Africa or the Middle East

SPRING 2018: African cities in the past contributed to dynamic and prosperous civilizations. What happened? This course examines Africans' aspirations of modernity through the lens of African urban history using fiction, film and current scholarship in several disciplines. Each class will explore two temporalities--the precolonial history of African cities, and the colonial and postcolonial histories of economic, social and political progress which goes by the name of development. Grounded in the case studies of both ancient and modern cities, this course explores the emergence and decline of trading centers, the rise of colonial cities, and the dilemmas of postcolonial economies and politics.

Taught by: Babou, Powell

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Topics vary: See the Africana Studies Program's website at www.sas.upenn.edu/africana for a description of the current offerings.

AFRC 234 World History: East Asia or Latin America

Topics vary. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Fabella

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 235 Law and Social Change

Beginning with discussion of various perspectives on social change and law, this course then examines in detail the interdependent relationship between changes in legal and societal institutions. Emphasis will be placed on (1) how and when law can be an instrument for social change, and (2) how and when social change can cause legal change. In the assessment of this relationship, emphasis will be on the laws of the United States. However, laws of other countries and international law relevant to civil liberties, economic, social and political progress will be studied. Throughout the course, discussions will include legal controversies relevant to social change such as issues of race, gender and the law. Other issues relevant to State-Building and development will be discussed. A comparative framework will be used in the analysis of this interdependent relationship between law and social change.

Taught by: Fetni

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 236 Topics in Transnational History

Topics vary

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 237 Undergraduate Research Seminar

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 238 Undergraduate Topics in Africana Studies

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 240 Elementary Amharic I

The Elementary Amharic I course can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on Ethiopia/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Amharic. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable commom daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writting skills at the mid-high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The mid-high novice level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the second semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Elementary Amharic II course materials.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Hailu

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through the Penn Language Center

AFRC 241 Elementary Amharic II

Continuation of Elementary Amharic I. Amharic belongs to the southern branch of Hemeto-Semitic languages, which is also referred to as "Afrasian." Amharic is the official language of Ethiopia and is spoken by 14 million native Amharas and by approximately 18 million of the other groups in Ethiopia. This course continues to introduce basic grammar, vocabulary, and the reading and writing of Amharic to new speakers.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Hailu

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: Completion of Elementary Amharic I, or permission of the instructor.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through the Penn Language Center

AFRC 242 Intermediate Amharic I

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Hailu

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through the Penn Language Center

AFRC 243 Intermediate Amharic II

For BA Students: Last Language Course

Taught by: Hailu

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through the Penn Language Center

AFRC 248 Haitian Revolution

In August 1791, enslaved Africans on the northern plain of Saint Domingue (colonial Haiti) rose up in a coordinated attack against their French colonial masters and plantation overseers, launching the initial revolt in what would come to be known as the Haitian Revolution. In the years that followed, their actions forced the legal abolition of racial discrimination, and then the abolition of slavery, throughout the French Empire. Ultimately, when Napoleon Bonaparte threatened to return slavery to Saint Domingue, they waged a war for independence. After defeating the Napoleonic army, these former slaves then declared the world's first "Black Republic," the independent state of Haiti, in1804. This seminar will examine some of the major themes and debates surrounding Haiti's colonial and revolutionary history. We will begin by considering the colonial paradox: France's leading role in the intellectual movement called the "Enlightenment" coincided with its ascent as a slaveholding colonial power. The seminar will also explore parallels and pointsof connection between the revolutionary movements in France and Saint Domingue.When the Haitian Revolution began in 1791, the French Revolution was already two years old: how did the increasingly radical ideas and widespread violence in France shape events in the Caribbean? Likewise, how did west African traditions and political ideologies influence insurgents? And how, in turn, did the revolution in Saint Domingue impact the revolution in France? From a diplomatic perspective, we will also consider relations between the Haitian Revolutionary leadership and French officials, examining their respective goals, which overlapped and diverged at different moments. Finally, we will ask how the revolution in Saint Domingue-and and the birth of Haiti--ipacted ideas about liberty, sovereignty and freedom throughout the Atlantic world. We will read a combination of primary and secondary materials each week. Students are encouraged to read primary documents in the original French if they are able. A final research paper will be required of all students, drawing on the Kislak Center's rich collection of revolutionary-era documents.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 252 Human Rights

Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and the world. We live in a world of diverse and conflicting values in which human rights and respect for human dignity have provided a platform for convergence. One important instance of such convergence has been the development of international norms prohibiting genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes and ethnic cleansing. While there is agreement on fundemental principles as reflected in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, differences in interpretation remain. A platform for convergence requires the engagement of a number of constituencies, in particular, state and inter-state entities, corporations, civil society and individuals, as well as the mutual reinforcement of their rights and duties. This course will critically cover the history, practice and social significance of human rights.

Taught by: Zuberi

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 258 Caribbean Music and Diaspora

This course considers Caribbean musics within a broad and historical framework.Caribbean musical practices are explored by illustrating the many ways that aesthetics, ritual, communication, religion, and social structure are embodied in and contested through performance. These initial inquiries open onto an investigation of a range of theoretical concepts that become particularly pertinent in Caribbean contexts--concepts such as post-colonialism, migration, ethnicity, hybridity, syncretism, and globalization. Each of these concepts, moreover, will be explored with a view toward understanding its connections to the central analytical paradigm of the course--diaspora. Throughout the course, we will listen to many different styles and repertories of music ranging from calpso to junkanoo, from rumba to merengue, and from dance hall to zouk. We will then work to understand them not only in relation to the readings that frame our discussions but also in relation to our own North-American contexts of music consumption and production.

Taught by: Rommen

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 263 Topics in Nineteenth-Century American Literature

This is an English topics course in 19th Century American Literature. The course is cross-listed with ENGL 253 when the course content includes significant African American or other African Diaspora literatures. Content varies with the instructor. A recent topic of this course was "Race, Law & Literature".

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 266 Topics in Modern American Literature

See the Africana Department's website at www.sas.upenn.edu/africana for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 268 Contemporary Issues in African Society

This course will deal with law and society in Africa. After surveying the various legal systems in Africa, the focus will be on how and to what extent the countries of Africa "re-Africanized" their legal systems by reconciling their indigenous law with western law and other legal traditions to create unified legal systems that are used as instruments of social change and development. Toward this end, the experiences of various African countries covering the various legal traditions will be included. Specific focus will be on laws covering both economic and social relations. This emphasis includes laws of contracts and civil wrongs, land law, law of succession, marriage and divorce and Africa's laws of International Relations, among other laws. Throughout this course a comparative analysis with non-African countries will be stressed.

Taught by: Imoagene, Zuberi

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 269 Constitutional Law: Public Power & Civil Rights to 1912

This course explores the creation and transformations of the American constitutional system's structures and goals from the nation's founding through the period of Progressive reforms, the rise of the Jim Crow system, and the Spanish American War. Issues include the division of powers between state and national governments, and the branches of the federal government; economic powers of private actors and government regulators; the authority of governments to enforce or transform racial and gender hierarchies; and the extent of religious and expressive freedoms and rights of persons accused of crimes. We will pay special attention to the changing role of the Supreme Court and its decisions in interpreting and shaping American constitutionalism, and we will also read legislative and executive constitutional arguments, party platforms, and other influential statements of American constitutional thought.

Taught by: Smith

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: PPE 270

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

AFRC 270 Intermediate Yoruba I

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Awoyale

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through the Penn Language Center

AFRC 271 Intermediate Yoruba II

For BA Students: Last Language Course

Taught by: Awoyale

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered throught the Penn Language Center

AFRC 274 Islam and Society in Africa

This course is designed to provide the students with a broad understanding of the history of Islam in Africa. The focus will be mostly on West Africa, but we will also look at developments in other regions of the continent. We will examine the process of islamization in Africa and the interplay between Islam and the African traditional religions and customs. Topics include conversion, Islamic education and literacy, the status of women, Muslim response to European colonial domination, Islamic mysticism and the contemporary development of Sunni movements.

Taught by: Babou

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 276 African American Life and Culture in Slavery

This course will examine the lives of enslaved African Americans in the United States, both in the North and the South. We will engage historiographical debates, and tackle questions that have long concerned historians. For example, if slaves were wrenched from families and traded, could they sustain family relationships? If slaves worked from sun-up until sun-down, how could they create music? We will engage with primary and secondary sources to expand our understandings of values, cultural practices, and daily life among enslaved people. Topics will include: literacy, family, labor, food, music and dance, hair and clothing, religion, material culture, resistance, and memories of slavery. Several disciplines including History, Archaeology, Literature, and Music, will help us in our explorations. Written, oral, and artistic texts for the course will provide us with rich sources for exploring the nuances of slave life, and students will have opportunities to delve deeply into topics that are of particular interest to them.

Taught by: Williams

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: This course will also count as the AFRC 176 requirement for the AFRC major.

AFRC 280 Intermediate Swahili I

The objectives of this course are: to strengthen students' knowledge of speaking, listening, reading, and writing Swahili and to compare it with the language of the students; to learn more about the cultures of East Africa and to compare it with the culture(s) of the students; to consider the relationship between that knowledge and the knowledge of other disciplines; and using that knowledge, to unite students with communities outside of class.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Mshomba

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through the Penn Language Center

AFRC 281 Topics in African American Literature

In this advanced seminar, students will be introduced to a variety of approaches to African American literatures, and to a wide spectrum of methodologies and ideological postures (for example, The Black Arts Movement). The course will present an assortment of emphases, some of them focused on geography (for example, the Harlem Renaissance), others focused on genre (autobiography, poetry or drama), the politics of gender and class, or a particular grouping of authors. Previous versions of this course have included "African American Autobigraphy," "Backgrounds of African American Literature," "The Black Narrative" (beginning with eighteenth century slave narratives and working toward contemporary literature), as well as seminars on urban spaces, jazz, migration, oral narratives, black Christianity, and African-American music. See Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Beavers, Davis, Jackson, Tillet

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Spaces will be reserved for English Majors.

AFRC 282 Intermediate Swahili II

At the end of the course students will be at Level 2 on the ILR (Interagency Language Roundtable) scale.

For BA Students: Last Language Course

Taught by: Mshomba

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: Intermediate Swahili 1, or permission of Instructor.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through the Penn Language Center

AFRC 284 Advanced Swahili I

This is an advanced Kiswahili course which will engage learners in extended spoken and written discourse. Advanced learners of Kiswahili will listen to, read about, write, and speak on authentic video materials, contemporary novels, and newspapers. They will also participate in various discussions on cultural and political issues.

For BA Students: Advanced Language Course

Taught by: Mshomba

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: AFST 280, LING 280, AFRC280 or permission of Instructor.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through the Penn Language Center

AFRC 285 Advanced Swahili II

The objectives are to continue to strengthen students' knowledge of speaking, listening, reading, and writing Swahili and to compare it with the language of the students; to continue learning about the cultures of East Africa and to continue making comparisons with the culture(s) of the students; to continue to consider the relationship between that knowledge and the knowledge of other disciplines; and using that knowledge, to continue to unite students with communities outside of class. Level 3 on the ILR (Interagency Language Roundtable) scale.

For BA Students: Advanced Language Course

Taught by: Mshomba

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through the Penn Language Center

AFRC 286 Topics in Race and Ethnicity - No Bench by the Road: Monuments, Memory, and the Afterlife of Slavery

SPRING 2018: In 1989, as she reflected on her magnum opus, Beloved, Toni Morrison declared "There is no place you or I can go, to think about or not think about, to summon the presences of,or recollect the absences of slaves. She went on, There is no suitable memorial, or plaque, or wreath, or wall, or park, or skyscraper lobby. There's no 300-foot tower, there's no bench by the road." And because such a place doesn't exist...the book had to." Today, there are significantly more markers of slavery in the public sphere as well as new novels, films, and television shows that directly take up the history and remnants of slavery in our lives. Looking at Colson Whitehead's novel, The Underground Railroad and WGN's tv series "The Underground," the remaking of the Whitney Plantation in Louisiana as well as considering the debates about confederate flags and monuments in places like New Orleans, Virginia, and South Carolina, this course will examine the meaning and movements behind these contemporary engagements with American slavery today. See the Africana Studies Program's website at www.sas.upenn.edu/africana for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Beavers, Tillet

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 288 Topics in Modern American Poetry

This course is cross-listed with ENGL 288 (Topics in Modern American Poetry) when the course content includes significant African American or other African Diaspora literatures. A frequent topic is "Nation and Imagination: 20th Century African American Poetry" Sometimes limiting itself to the works of one or more authors, sometimes focusing on a particular theme such as "American Poetry and Democratic culture," this course devotes itself to the study of twentieth-century American poetry.

Taught by: Beavers

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 290 Topics In Gender, Sexuality, and Literature

See the Department of Africana's website at www.sas.upenn.edu/africana for a description of the current offereings.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 294 Facing America

This course explores the visual history of race in the United States as both self-fashioning and cultural mythology by examing the ways that conceptions of Native American, Latino,and Asian identity, alongside ideas of Blackness and Whiteness, have combined to create the various cultural ideologies of class, gender, and sexuality that remain evident in historical visual and material culture. We will also investigate the ways that these creations have subsequently helped to launch new visual entertainments, inclduing museum spectacles, blackface minstrelsy, and early film, from the colonial period through the 1940s.

Taught by: Shaw

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 307 Race, Science and Justice

This course draws on an interdisciplinary body of biological and social scientific literature to explore critically the connections between race, science, and justice in the United States, including scientific theories of racial inequality, from the eighteenth century to the genomic age. After investigating varying concepts of race, as well as their uses in eugenics, criminology, anthropology, sociology, neuroscience, and medicine, we will focus on the recent expansion of genomic research and technologies that treat race as a biological category that can be identified at the molecular level, including race-specific pharmaceuticals, commercial ancestry testing, and racial profiling with DNA forensics. We will discuss the significance of scientific investigations of racial difference for advancing racial justice in the United States.

Taught by: Roberts

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Recitation

0 Course Units

AFRC 308 Religious Diversity in America

Images and beliefs about Jesus have always been a compelling part of American life. This course seeks to examine the social, political, religious and artistic ways that Jesus has been appropriated and used in American life, making him a unique figure for exploring American religious life. Special attention will be given to how Jesus is used to shape social and political concerns, including race, gender, sexuality, and culture. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Butler

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: This course is cross-listed with RELS 310 (Religious Diversity in America) when the subject matter is related to African, African American, or other African Diaspora issues. A recent topic is Religious Diversity and Social Change in West Philadelphia.

AFRC 310 Sustainable Development in Ghana

This course is mandatory for students participating in the International Development Summer Institute (IDSI). IDSI is a service learning and training program for undergraduates that provides students with the opportunity to have an applied learning and cultural experience in Ghana. The program consists of 5 weeks of pre-program preparation at Penn and a 4-week long training program on the campus of Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) in Kumasi, Ghana. More Info: http://www.seas.upenn.edu/undergraduate/service-learn/idsi/index.php

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: Participation in the International Development Summer Institute (IDSI)

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 315 Africa, Decolonization, and Internationalism

In 1955, delegates from the Gold Coast, which would soon become the independent nation of Ghana, attended the first large-scale Afro-Asian conference alongside representatives from Indonesia, India, China, and other nations. The Bandung Conference is just one example of the importance of international linkages in the era of decolonization. This course will address decolonization in Africa within an international context and examine how African nationalism was forged in an interconnected world. Students will learn how African political thinkers engaged with, contributed to, and were shaped by intercontinental currents of thought, including Pan-Africanism, Pan-Arabism, communism, socialism, and the Non-Aligned Movement.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 318 Topics in African Art

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 320 Transoceanic Encounters: East Africa and the Indian Ocean

East Africa has been linked culturally, economically, and politically to the wider Indian Ocean world for centuries. In historical scholarship, the Indian Ocean is often portrayed in overly romanticized terms-as a hybrid, cosmopolitan space. This course, which brings together some of the best work on East Africa and the Indian Ocean, will provide a more nuanced view of the region. By critically examining a variety of primary and secondary sources (including novels, photography exhibits, music, and historical texts),students will learn about the legacies of slavery, conquest, and inequality as well as the ways in which the region became a space of multicultural exchange and intercontinental interaction. We will explore the idea of African diasporas in their plurality and examine whether the theoretical tools used to study the Atlantic World can be applied to the Indian Ocean.

Taught by: Weitzberg

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 321 Understanding African Conflict

The end of colonial rule was the springboard for the start of cold wars in various regions of Africa. Where peace could not be maintained violence erupted. Even where secession has been attained, as in the new country of South Sudan, the threat of civil war lingers. While domestic politics have led to the rise of armed conflicts and civil wars in many African countries, the external factors should also not be ignored. Important in all current conflicts is the concern to international peace and security. Overall this course will: (1) investigate the general nature of armed conflicts in Africa (2) provide in-depth analysis of the underlying factors (3) and discuss the regional and the international responses to these conflicts and their implications. Special emphasis will be placed upon African conflicts and civil wars in: great Lakes area, Mali, Nigeria, Senegal, Sudan, Somalia, South Sudan, and Uganda.

Taught by: Ali-Dinar

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 322 American Slavery and the Law

In this course, we will work both chronologically and thematically to examine laws, constitutional provisions, and local and federal court decisions that established, regulated, and perpetuated slavery in the American colonies and states. We will concern ourselves both with change over time in the construction and application of the law, and the persistence of the desire to control and sublimate enslaved people. Our work will include engagement with secondary sources as well as immersion in the actual legal documents. Students will spend some time working with Mississippi murder cases from the 19th century. They will decipher and transcribe handwritten trial transcripts, and will historicize and analyze the cases with attention to procedural due process as well as what the testimony can tell us about the social history of the counties in which the murders occurred. The course will end with an examination of Black Codes that southern states enacted when slavery ended.

Taught by: Williams

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 323 Undergraduate Seminar in Africana Studies

Topics vary. See the Africana Studies Program's website at www.sas.upenn.edu/africana for a description of current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 324 Dress and Fashion in Africa

Throughout Africa, social and cultural identities of ethnicity, gender, generation, rank and status were conveyed in a range of personal ornamentation that reflects the variation of African cultures. The meaning of one particular item of clothing can transform completely when moved across time and space. As one of many forms of expressive culture, dress shape and give forms to social bodies. In the study of dress and fashion, we could note two distinct broad approaches, the historical and the anthropological. While the former focuses on fashion as a western system that shifted across time and space, and linked with capitalism and western modernity; the latter approach defines dress as an assemblage of modification the body. The Africanist proponents of this anthropological approach insisted that fashion is not a dress system specific to the west and not tied with the rise of capitalism. This course will focus on studying the history of African dress by discussing the forces that have impacted and influenced it overtime, such as socio-economic, colonialism, religion, aesthetics, politics, globalization, and popular culture. The course will also discuss the significance of the different contexts that impacted the choices of what constitute an appropriate attire for distinct situations. African dress in this context is not a fixed relic from the past, but a live cultural item that is influenced by the surrounding forces.

Taught by: Ali-Dinar

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 325 Performance in the African Diaspora

The purpose of this course is to engage students in the rigorous process of mining experiences for material that can be transformed into a public performance piece. In-class writing, group discussions, and field work in the Philadelphia area. AUGUST WILSON AND BEYOND. The people need to know the story. See how they fit into it. See what part they play. - August Wilson, King Hedley II. In this seminar, students will read groundbreaking playwright August Wilson's 20th Century Cycle: ten plays that form an iconic picture of African American traumas, triumphs, and traditions through the decades, told through the lens of Pittsburgh's Hill District neighborhood. Other readings include supporting material on Wilson's work and African American theatre, the works of contemporary playwrights whom Wilson has influenced (such as Suzan-Lori Parks and Tarell Alvin McCraney), and context on Penn's relationship with West Philadelphia. As an Academically Based Community Service (ABCS) course,this seminar gives students the opportunity to enhance their understanding of the plays, and history and culture that shaped them, by forming meaningful relationships with West Philadelphia residents. Wilson's plays provide the bridge between the two groups. The course culminates with students writing an original theatre piece inspired by the readings and relationships, which they will share at an end-of-semester performance.

Taught by: Beavers, Berger

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Formerly AFRC 3O9. Writing Out Loud.

AFRC 326 Theories in Gender and Sexuality Studies

FALL 2015: QUEER VALUES - What are queer cultural experiences and values? Many academics and social movements have noted that the radical aspirations of queer theory and activism not only disrupt but also shore up neoliberal ideologies. In this course students will explore the historical co-emergence of queer cultures and neoliberalism by examining the promises and pitfalls of queer politics over the past quarter century. The coining of queer theory by Theresa de Lauretis in 1990 was intended as a disruptive joke. Its provocation resided in joining queer, an appropriation of street slang bandied about among New York City activists and artists in the 1980s, to theory, the passport of privilege in academic life. The irreverence of her joke exemplifies a central ethic of queer experience that renders palpable the tensions between margins and centers. The course will traverse scholarship from economic and queer anthropology, history, sociology & science studies, philosophy, political theory and literary studies. This wide survey of literature will allow students to develop an understanding of the political and economic processes that have conditioned the emergence of queerness as a diverse range of ethical commitments in particular sociocultural contexts globally. Students will investigate the affective dimensions of the emergence of queer theory, studies and activism within the United States and elsewhere in the context of global neoliberal social reforms. The course is split into four units: 1) In the Place of Queer Origins; 2) Queer Values; 3) Queer Circulations and Subjectivities; and 4) Queer Temporalities.

Taught by: Keirbeck

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: A prior course in gender, sexuality and women's studies.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 332 North Africa: History, Culture, Society

This interdisciplinary seminar aims to introduce students to the countries of North Africa, with a focus on the Maghreb and Libya (1830-present). It does so while examining the region's close economic and cultural connections to sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, and the Middle East. Readings will include histories, political analysis, anthropological studies, and novels, and will cover a wide range of topics such as colonial and postcolonial experiences, developments in Islamic thought and practice, and labor migration. This class is intended for juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

Taught by: Sharkey

Course not offered every year

Prerequisites: A university-level survey course in Middle Eastern, African, or Mediterranean history.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 335 "Where My Girls At?":African American Women Performers in The 20th Century

African American women performers from blues woman Bessie Smith to Paris revue star Josephine Baker, from jazz darling Billie Holiday to rock legend Tina Turner, and from hip hop giant Lauryn Hill to millennial star Beyonc?, have constantly redefined and expanded American popular music. Using the long 20th century as our historical marker, this course will explore how African American women performers, across genres and time, have consciously and sometimes contradictorily navigated the racial and sexual limits of American popular culture in order to assert their own particular narratives of artistic and political freedom.

Taught by: Tillet

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 345 Race and Sex in Early America

This course explores the lost worlds of sinners, witches, sexual offenders, rebellious slaves, and Native American prophets from the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries. Using the life stories of unusual individuals from the past, we try to make sense of their contentious relationships with their societies. By following the careers of the trouble-makers, the criminals, and the rebels, we also learn about the foundations of social order and the impulse to reform that rocked American society during the nineteenth century.

Taught by: Brown

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

0 Course Units

AFRC 346 Gender in Modern American History

This course explores how immigration, industrialization, racial segregation, and the growing authority of science transformed the fundamental conditions of women's lives in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Building on previous effforts by female reformers to perfect society, women at the turn of the century organized large social movements dedicated to improving the lives of women and children and gaining public access to political power. We will examine the fruits of this activism as well as the consequences of subsequent events for the rise of several important social movements in the latter half of the century -- including civil rights, women's liberation, and gay rights -- in which women played a vital role. The course concludes with an assessment of feminism in the present day, with special emphasis on the responses of younger women to its legacy.

Taught by: Brown, Peiss

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

AFRC 357 Undergraduate Topics In African Studies

SPRING 2017 - UNDERSTANDING AFRICA: This course will explore the economic, social, and political realities facing sub-Saharan Africa today by placing them in historical and global contexts. Key themes will include colonial and precolonial history, nationalist movements and cold war politics, economic development and foreign aid, ethnic and political conflicts, media representation and popular culture. The course will focus on local and global dynamics that have a role in shaping the present day Africa.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 372 Africa & the Mid-East

This seminar will explore the historical relationship between these two regions from the early modern age to the present. We will examine the history of trade, particularly the slave trade, and its cultural and political legacy. We will compare the experiences of European imperalism--how the scramble for Africa dovetailed with the last decades of the Ottoman Empire--with an eye to how this shaped nationalist movements in both regions. The course will also explore the decades of independence with a special eye towards pan-Africanism and pan-Arabism. We will also study the ramifications of the Arab-Israeli conflict on the relationship between African and Middle-Eastern countries, from Uganda to Ethopia, from OPEC to Darfur. This course will pay close attention to migrations through the regions, whether forced or economic or religious. Whenever possible we will explore, through film and literature, how people in Africa and the Middle East see their connections, and their differences.

Taught by: Eve Troutt Powell, Young

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 373 The History of Foreign Aid in Africa

This course examines the history, politics, and significance of foreign aid to Africa since the late 19th century. While we do not typically think about the European colonial period in Africa in terms of 'foreign aid,' that era introduced ideas and institutions which formed the foundations for modern aid policies and practices. So we start there and move forward into more contemporary times. In addition to examining the objectives behind foreign assistance and the intentions of donors and recipients, we will look at some of the consequences (intended or unintended) of various forms of foreign aid to Africa over the past century. While not designed to be a comprehensive history of development theory, of African economics, or of international aid organizations, the course will touch on all of these topics. Previous coursework on Africa is strongly advised.

Taught by: Cassanelli

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: AFRC/HIST 076, AFRC 190, or AFRC 256

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 381 Topics in African American Literature

In this advanced seminar, students will be introduced to a variety of approaches to African American literatures, and to a wide spectrum of methodologies and ideological postures (for example, The Black Arts Movement). The course will present an assortment of emphases, some of them focused on geography (for example, The Harlem Renaissance), others focused on genre (autobiography, poetry or drama), the politics of gender and class, or a particular grouping of authors. Previous versions of this course have included "African American Autobiography," "Backgrounds of African American Literatures," "The Black Narrative" (beginning with eighteenth century slave narratives and working toward contemporary literature), as well as seminars on urban spaces, jazz, migration, oral narratives, black Christianity, and African-American music. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Benjamin Franklin Seminar

AFRC 387 Topics in Africana Studies

Topics vary: Black Feminist Approaches to History & Memory - The term black feminism emerged in public discourse amid the social, political, and cultural turbulence of the 1960s. The roots of black feminism, however, are much older, easily reaching back to the work of black women abolitionists and social critics of the nineteenth century. The concept continued to grow and evolve in the work of twentieth century black women writers, journalists, activists, and educators as they sought to document black women's lives. Collectively, their work established black feminism as a political practice dedicated to the equality of all people. More recently, black feminism has been deployed as a tool for theoretical and scholarly analysis that is characterized by an understanding that race, class, gender, and sexuality are inextricably interconnected. Using materials such as slave narratives, social criticism, and archival sources, this course will explore the theoretical and practical applications of black feminist thought in nineteenth and twentieth century North American culture and politics. In particular, we will consider the symbols and practices (storytelling, myth-making, art, archival research) that black women use to document lives. We will ask: how do these methods of documentation inform our understanding of the past and the production of historical knowledge? How can we understand black feminism as both theory and practice? And what are the implications of black feminist approaches for current research and scholarship? We will give particular attention to concepts such as gender, race, memory, the archive, and embodied knowledge to complicate our understanding of historical documentation, epistemology, and authenticity. The course material will include scholarship by Harriet Jacobs, Audre Lorde, Saidiya Hartman, Hazel Carby, Hershini Young, Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, Toni Morrison, and others. (Image: From In Praise of Shadows, Kara Walker (2009).

Taught by: Osuji, Sanders-Johnson, Willis

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 393 Cinema and Civil Rights

Topic Varies Spring 2017: This course will examine key moments in the history of civil rights through a cinematic lens. Over the course of the semester, we will explore how filmmakers have depicted the lives, aspirations, and strategies of those who have struggled for equal rights; how different struggles have intersected with each other; what aesthetic strategies have been adopted to represent freedom and the denial of it; and how effective cinematic efforts to contribute to increased freedom have been as well as what criteria we use to evaluate success or failure in the first place. Each week, we will watch a film and read a series of texts that will be drawn from a variety of arenas, including histories of civil rights; civil rights pamphlets and speeches; filmmaker interviews; film and media theory; memoirs; and theories of race, gender and sexuality. Course requirements: mutual respect; completion of all readings and screenings; participation in class discussion; weekly online responses; a final project that can be a research paper, film, art project, or community-based initiative.

Taught by: Redrobe

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 399 Independent Study

A study, under faculty supervision, of a problem, area or topic not included in the formal curriculum.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

Notes: Consult the Africana Studies Department for instructions. Suite 331A, 3401 Walnut or vist the department's webiste at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu to submit an application.

AFRC 400 Seminar in Africana Studies

This course is an examination and analysis of the changing images and achievements of African Americans in motion pictures and television. The first half of the course focuses on African-American film images from the early years of D.W. Griffith's "renegade bucks" in The Birth of a Nation (1915); to the comic servants played by Steppin Fetchit, Hattie McDaniel, and others during the Depression era; to the post-World War II New Negro heroes and heroines of Pinky (1949) and The Defiant Ones (1958); to the rise of the new movement of African American directors such as Spike Lee (Do the Right Thing), Julie Dash (Daughters of the Dust), Charles Burnett, (To Sleep With Anger) and John Singleton (Boyz N the Hood). The second half explores television images from the early sitcoms "Amos 'n Andy" and "Beulah" to the "Cosby Show," "Fresh Prince of Bel Air," and "Martin." Foremost this course will examine Black stereotypes in American films and television--and the manner in which those stereotypes have reflected national attitudes and outlooks during various historical periods. The in-class screenings and discussions will include such films as Show Boat (1936), the independently produced "race movies" of the 1930s and 1940s, Cabin in the Sky (1943), The Defiant Ones (1958), Imitation of Life (the 1959 remake) & Super Fly (1972).

Taught by: Bogle

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 405 Religion, Social Justice & Urban Development

Urban development has been influenced by religious conceptions of social and economic justice. Progressive traditions within Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Jainism, Baha'i, Humanism and other religions and systems of moral thought have yielded powerful critiques of oppression and hierarchy as well as alternative economic frameworks for ownership, governance, production, labor, and community. Historical and contemporary case studies from the Americas, Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Middle East will be considered, as we examine the ways in which religious responses to poverty, inequality, and ecological destruction have generated new forms of resistance and development.

Taught by: Lamas

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 420 Advanced topics in Africana Studies

Topics vary. See the Africana Studies Department's course list at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offering. Fall 2017:After an examination of the philosophical, legal, and political perspectives on Human Rights, this course will focus on US policies and practices relevant to Human Rights. Toward that end, emphasis will be placed on both the domestic and the international aspects of Human Rights as reflected in US policies and practices. Domestically, the course will discuss (1) the process of incorporating the International Bill of Human Rights into the American legal system and (2) the US position on and practices regarding the political, civil, economic, social, and cultural rights of minorities and various other groups within the US. Internationally, the course will examine US Human Rights policies toward Africa. Specific cases of Rwanda, Kenya, South Africa and Egypt, as well as other cases from the continent, will be presented in the assessment of US successes and failures in the pursuit of its Human Rights strategy in Africa. Readings will include research papers, reports, statutes, treaties, and cases.

Taught by: Charles, Hanchard, Fetni, Zuberi

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 431 Advanced Special Topics in Sociology

This course is cross-listed with SOCI 430 (Advanced Topics in Sociology) when the subject matter is related to African, African American, or other African Diaspora issues. Upper level advance topics vary from semester to semester. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Charles, Zuberi

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 433 Social Movement

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 435 Modern Presidency and Race

This seminar is designed to serve as a "capstone" experience for advanced undergrduates interested in American politics. It exposes students to some of the issues currently being studied and debated by the leading scholars in the field. For each topic we will read works that take competing or opposing positions on an issue; for example we will examine the current controversy over the causes and and consequences of divided government. Students will write a research paper analyzing one of the debates.

Taught by: Gillion

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 436 Africana Studies Undergraduate Seminar

On the stage of modern world history, Haiti plays the unique role as both the exceptionally victorious and tragic character. This course interrogates archival documents, oral histories, historical texts, and prose created within the nation and her diaspora in order to establish a nuanced image of the projection of Haiti's modern history. Using two classic Haitian texts, Marie Vieux-Chauvet's Love, Anger, Madness (1968) and Michel-Rolph Trouillot's Silencing the Past: Power and the Production of History (1995),this course examines how, why,and to what end Haiti's history and popular narratives about the country have served to construct and dismantle global movements, popular culture, and meanings of race, gender, and citizenship in the Americas. In our historical examination, we will question some of the iconic representations of Haiti through literature that deepen the affective historical profile of Haiti with interrogations of culture, sexuality, political, and media performance. Students will become familiar with the post -colonial history of Haiti and the region, meanings of race, and the production of history. The course is a research and historical methods seminar. Students will conduct archival research and write narratives from primary source material. This course qualifies as a "methods" course for Africana Studies undergraduate majors and minors.

Taught by: Johnson

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 437 Race & Criminal Justice

Why are African Americans and some other minority groups disproportionately incarcerated and subjected to penal sanctions? What are the political, social and economic consequences for individuals, communities, and the wider society of mass incarceration in the United States? What types of reforms of the criminal justice system are desirable and possible? This advanced seminar analyzes the connection between race, crime, punishment, and politics in the United States. The primary focus is on the role of race in explaining why the country's prison population increased six-fold since the early 1970s and why the United States today has the highest incarceration rate in the world. The class will likely take field trips to a maximum-security jail in Philadelphia and to a state prison in the Philadelphia suburbs.

Taught by: Gottschalk

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 450 Black France: History and Representations

Taught by: Moudelino

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 480 Liberation and Ownership

Who is going to own what we all have a part of creating? The history of the Americas, and of all peoples everywhere, is an evolving answer to the question of ownership. Ownership is about: the ties that bind and those that separate; production, participation, and control; the creation of community and the imposition of hierarchies--racial, sexual, and others; dreams of possessing and the burdens of debt and ecological despoliation; dependency and the slave yearning to breathe free. Of all the issues relevant to democracy, oppression, injustice, and inequality, ownership is arguably the most important and least understood. Utilizing a variety of disciplinary perspectives--with a particular emphasis on radical and critical theories of liberation, and by focusing on particular global sites and processes of capitalism, students will assess and refine their views regarding ownership and liberation in light of their own social, political, religious, aesthetic, and ethical commitments.

Taught by: Lamas

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 491 African Language Tutorial - Elementary II

Continuation of AFST 490.

For BA Students: Language Course

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: Permission of Penn Language Center

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFRC 493 African Language Tutorial - Intermediate II

Continuation of AFST 492

For BA Students: Last Language Course

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: Permission of Penn Language Center

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 495 African Language Tutor: Adv II

Continuation of AFST 494.

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: Permission of Penn Language Center

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 497 Language & Culture II

Continuation of AFST 496

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: Permission of Penn Language Center.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 499 Honors Course

Consult the Africana Studies Department for instructions. Suite 331A, 3401 Walnut or visit the department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu to submit an application.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

AFRC 517 Elementary Yoruba II

The main objective of this course is to further sharpen the Yoruba linquistic knowledge that the student acquired in level I. By the end of the course, the student should be able to (1) read, write, and understand simple to moderately complex sentences in Yoruba; and (2) advance in the knowledge of the Yoruba culture.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Awoyle

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFRC 518 Topics in American Religion

From Marvin Gaye, to Tammy Faye Baker, to Sarah Palin and James Baldwin, Pentecostalism has influenced many, including politicians, preachers, writers, and the media. One of the fastest growing religious movements in the world, Pentecostalism continues to have a profound effect on the religious landscape. Pentecostalism's unique blend of charismatic worship, religious practices, and flamboyant, media-savvy leadership, has drawn millions into this understudies and often controversial religious movement. This course will chronicle the inception and growth of Pentecostalism in the United States, giving particular attention to beliefs, practices, gender, ethnicity, and Global Pentecostalism.

Taught by: Butler

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Topics vary: This course is cross-lited with RELS 517 (Topics in American Religion) when the subject matter is related to African American or other African Diaspora issues. Recent courses include "Martin Luther King, Jr," "Pentecostalism," and "Race, Poverty and Class." Consult the Department of Africana Studies for detailed course descriptions.

AFRC 522 Psychology of the African-American

Using the Afro-centric philosophical understanding of the world, this course will focus on psychological issues related to African Americans, including the history of African American psychology, its application across the life span, and contemporary community issues.

Taught by: Stevenson

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 524 Inequality and Race Policy

Taught by: Gillion

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 527 Advanced Seminars in Africana Studies

SPRING 2017: Market Women, Madames, Mistresses & Mother Superior studies gender, labor, sexuality, and race in the Caribbean. In our historical examination of primary source documents alongside literature, and popular media, we will question some of the iconic representations of Caribbean and Latin American women in order to understand the meaning, purpose and usages of these women s bodies as objects of praise, possession, obsession and/or ridicule by communities, governments and religions within and outside of the region. Beginning in the late-18th century and ending with contemporary migration narratives, this course considers the relationship between slave society and colonial pasts on gender performance in the modern Caribbean, Latin America, and their diasporas.

Taught by: Sanders Johnson

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 528 Advanced Topics

This course is cross-listed with SWRK 528 (Advanced Topics) when the subject matter is related to African, African American, or other African Diaspora issues. Recent topics include, "Religion, Youth and Popular Culture" and "Anxious Identities." See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 533 Advanced Selected Topics

This course is cross-listed when the subject matter is related to African, African American, or other African Diaspora issues. Courses recently offered are, "Political Culture and American Cities, Social Movements and Social Change, Critical Race Theory. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings. This course brings together the vantage points of urban political economy, history and urban anthropology. Readings and discussions will cross those literatures, folding in considerations of race, ethnicity and gender in the American city life, with a focus on the relation between culture and political economy. We will reconstruct the history of the different tracks of urban studies in the U.S., beginning with its roots in sociology and anthropology in the Chicago School and in political science in reform-oriented studies of public administration. We will revisit the community power debate of the 1950s-1970s, which shook out significantly along disciplinary lines, and will examine the development of the urban political economy perspective in the 1980s and 1990s, as well as developments within U.S. urban anthropology since the 1960s. We will employ local case study materials, and at every point we will try to understand the intellectual trajectories of the urbanist discourses in relation to dynamics contemporaneously shaping urban politics and policy. Course requirements are seminar preparation which includes each student's leading discussion around specified reading assignments -- and a research paper, the topic of which must be approved by week 5.

Taught by: Charles, Zuberi, Reed, Roberts

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 534 Intermediate Yoruba II

For BA Students: Last Language Course

Taught by: Awoyale

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFRC 538 Topics in Medieval Art

The craft of ivory carving around the Mediterranean is contingent upon the availability of imported elephant tusks, from either South East Asia or, more frequently, from the African continent. The shifting winds of trade routes offer an interpretive paradigm with which to analyze ivory objects from a variety of different cultural groups: the lack or abundance of ivory and the resulting desire for or surfeit of the material shapes its meaning and use around the Mediterranean basin. The study of ivory objects as they migrate around the Mediterranean allows us to investigate the rich intercultural interactions between Eastern and Western Christians, and both of these with the Islamic world. This course focuses on an object oriented knowledge of ivory artefacts, with a strong emphasis on the collections at the PennMuseum, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and other area collections.

Taught by: Guerin

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 540 Elementary Amharic I

An introductory course for students with no previous knowledge of Amharic. Amharic belongs to the southern branch of Hemeto-Semitic languages which is also referred to as "Afrasian." Amharic is the official language of Ethiopia and is spoken by 14 million native Amharas and by approximately 19 million of the other ethnic groups in Ethiopia. The goals of this course are to introduce students to the culture, customs, and traditions of the Amharas. Students will develop communicative skills through listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Hailu

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through the Penn Language Center

AFRC 541 Elementary Amharic II

Continuation of Elementary Amharic I.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Hailu

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through the Penn Language Center

AFRC 543 Intermediate Amharic I

Offered through the Penn Language Center

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Hailu

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 544 Intermediate Amharic II

Offered through the Penn Language Center

For BA Students: Last Language Course

Taught by: Hailu

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 545 Understanding Minority Serving Institutions

Students taking this course will learn about the historical context of HBCUs in educating African Americans, and how their role has changed since the mid- 1800's. Specific contemporary challenges and successes related to HBCUs will be covered and relate to control, and enrollment, accreditation, funding, degree completionk, and outreach/retention programming. Students will become familiar with MBCUs in their own right, as well as in comparison to other postsecondary institutions.

Taught by: Gasman

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 547 Topics in Religion

Religions of the African Diaspora - Religion shapes and defines the lives of many persons in the Africans Diaspora. This course will explore both the historical and present day manifestations of religions practices by those in the African Diaspora, including Voodu, Candomble, Obeah, Rastafari, African Initiated Churches, Pentecostalism, and Catholicism. Theoretical issues including sexuality, gender, and material culture will also be covered in the course.

Taught by: Butler

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 563 Old Egyptian

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFRC 569 Topics in 20th-Century American Literature

This course covers topics in 20th-century literature, its emphasis varying with instructor.

Taught by: Beavers

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: This is an English topics course in 20th Century American Literature. The course is cross-listed with English 569 when the course content includes significant African American or other African Diaspora literatures. Content varies with the instructor. A frequent topic is "A Love Supreme: Literatures of Jazz"

AFRC 570 Topics in Afro-American Literature

Spring 2018: The aim of this seminar can be described as trying to figure out how poetry and poetics figure into the effort to theorize the African American subject in the 21st Century. At a time when the sheer number of African American poets publishing today (to say nothing of the major prizes they are winning) has exploded exponentially, why does poetry continue to be so marginalin African American literary and cultural studies? As we make our way through recently published anthologies of African American poetry, then turn to works of individual poets, we will consider issues of influence,intertextual periodization, stylization, and tradition as they impact approaches to form, structure, and craft. Ultimately, however, we will focus on the question of why are these poets writing these poems at this particular time? Technologies like PennSound and You Tube will provide time? Technologies like PennSound and You Tube will provide important critical tools in our endeavors and at various points during the term, guest lecturers will join our discussions.

Taught by: Beavers, Tillet

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 571 Visualizing W.E.B.DUBOIS

This seminar will focus on a project that views history as a result of our contemporary society in which biographical truths are constantly shifting. So the historical biographers write about the way they remembered and visualize the past, and not about the way that it happened. We will take Du Bois's biography in his own words and interrogate his narrative with the visual narratives of his life and influence produced by others. "Visualizing W.E.B Du Bois" focuses on photographic, film, and video representations intended to present some aspect of Du Bois's reality, primarily for the purposes of instruction or maintaining a historical record. Such projects include photos, materials originally shot on film stock, and digital images that can be either displayed in a book or magazine, and moving images made into a film or video for a TV show or released for screening in cinemas, or other broadcast mediums like YouTube and Vimeo.

Taught by: ZUBERI

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 572 Topics in African Literature

This course is based on a selection of representative texts written in English, as well as a few texts in English translation. It involves, a study of themes relating to social change and the persistence of cultural traditions, followed by an attempt at sketching the emergence of literary tradition by identifying some of the formal conventions of established writers in their use of old forms and experiments with new. See the Department's website at www.africana.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 575 TPE: Qualitative Studies of Developmental Interventions

This course is designed to introduce students to innovative approaches to the psychology of education, especially with regard to populations from at-risk contexts, sociocultural dimensions of education, and social-emotional learning.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 587 Race, Nation, Empire

This graduate seminar examines the dynamic relationships among empires, nations and states; colonial and post-colonial policies; and anti-colonial strategies within a changing global context. Using the rubrics of anthropology, history, cultural studies, and social theory, we will explore the intimacies of subject formation within imperial contexts- past and present- especially in relation to ideas about race and belonging. We will focus on how belonging and participation have been defined in particular locales, as well as how these notions have been socialized through a variety of institutional contexts. Finally, we will consider the relationships between popular culture and state formation, examining these as dialectical struggles for hegemony.

Taught by: Thomas

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 590 Introduction to Francophone Studies

An introduction to major literary movements and authors from five areas of Francophonie: the Maghreb, West Africa, Central Africa, the Caribbean and Quebec.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 591 Francophone Postcolonial Studies

Please see the department's website for current course description: https://africana.sas.upenn.edu

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: An introduction to major literary movements and authors from five areas of Francophonie: the Maghreb, West Africa, Central Africa, the Caribbean and Quebec.

AFRC 594 Post-Colonialism Literature

This course covers topics in Post-Colonial literature with emphasis determined by the instructor. The primary focus will be on novels that have been adapted to film. See the Department's website at www.africana.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 605 Anthropology of Music

Topics may include the intellectual history of ethnomusicology, current readings in ethnomusicology, a consideration of theoretical principles based upon the reading and interpretation of selected monographs, and area studies. Please see department website for current course term description.

Taught by: Muller, Rommen, Sykes

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Open to graduate students from all departments

AFRC 610 Topics in American History

This course is cross-listed with HIST 610 (Colloquium in American History) when the subject matter is related to African, African American, or other African Diaspora issues. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edufor a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Savage

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 620 Advanced Topics in Africana Studies

This course will deal with Law and Society in Africa. After surveying the various legal systems in Africa, the focus will be on how and to what extent the countries of Africa re-Africanized their legal systems by reconciling their legal systems that are used as instruments of social change and development. Toward this end, the experiences of various African countries covering the various legal traditions will be included. Specific focus will be on laws covering both economic and social relations. This emphasis includes laws of marriage, divorce and inheritance, laws of contracts and civil wrongs and African's law of investments and International Relations, among other laws. Throughout this course a comparative analysis with non-African countries will be stressed. Readings include research papers, reports, statutes, treaties, and cases.

Taught by: Charles, Zuberi, Fetni

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: See the Africana Studies Department's course list at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offering.

AFRC 630 Advanced Special Topics in Sociology

This course will examine demographic and statistical methods used to capture the impact of racial stratification in society. This course covers the skills and insights used by demographers and social statisticians in the study of racial data. A key challenge facing researchers is the interpretation of the vast amount of racial data generated by society. As these data do not directly answer important social questions, data analysis and statistics must be used to interpret them. The course will examine the logic used to communicate statistical results from racial data in various societies. We will question the scientific claims of social science methodology by extending the critical perspective to biases that may underlie research methods. We will discuss good and bad practices within the context of the historical developments of the methods. This advanced special topics course and course description is for Fall 2017 only.

Taught by: Zuberi

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: This course is cross-listed with SOCI 630 (Advanced Topics in Sociology) when the subject matter is related to African American or other African Diaspora issues. A frequent topic of this course is "Race, Colonialsim and Methods"

AFRC 632 North Africa: History, Culture, Society

This interdisciplinary seminar aims to introduce students to the countries of North Africa, with a focus on the Maghreb and Libya (1830-present). It does so while examining the region's close economic and cultural connections to sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, and the Middle East. Readings will include histories, political analyses, anthropological studies, and novels, and will cover a wide range of topics such as colonial and postcolonial experiences, developments in Islamic thought and practice, and labor migration. This class is intended for juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 638 Race and Criminal Justice

Taught by: Gottschalk

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 640 Proseminar in Africana Studies

This course focuses on the historical and cultural relationship between Africans and their descendants abroad.

Taught by: Beavers, Butler, Charles, Rommen, Savage, Thomas, Williams, Zuberi

Two terms. student must enter first term.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 641 Topics in African American History

Topics vary. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Williams, Savage

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 645 Graduate Research Seminar

SPRING 2017: This seminar is suitable for graduate students in any discipline in which historical research may be relevant. We will work with both secondary and primary sources, and students will have the opportunity to visit and undertake research in an archive.

Taught by: Williams

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 650 Topics in African History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in African history.

Taught by: Babou, Cassanelli

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 670 Topics in Trans Regional History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in Transregional History See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 693 Topics Postcolonia Studies

Topics will vary. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 701 African Studies Seminar

Interdisciplinary seminar for discussion of issues of special interest to graduate students and faculty in Africana Studies. Topics vary according to the interests and expertise of instructors. SPRING 2017 - Readings in African American Religion: Traditional narratives of African American Religion go from slavery to civil rights to "freedom" without taking into account the complex religious lives and intellectual production of people of African descent in the Americas. This course will focus on African American Religion and the historical and theoretical frameworks that have shaped the study of this field. Readings will cover religious studies, anthropology history, and African American studies in order to provide an understanding of the varieties of religion and religious experiences with this particular segment of the African Diaspora.

Taught by: Butler

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 705 Seminar in Ethnomusicology

Topics in Ethnomusicology. Please see department website at www.africana.upenn.edu for current term course descriptions.

Taught by: Muller, Rommen,Sykes

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Open to graduate students from all departments.

AFRC 706 Introduction to Africa and African Diaspora Thought

This course examines the processes by which African peoples have established epistemological, cosmological, and religious systems both prior to and after the institution of Western slavery.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 708 Cultural and Literary Theory of Africa and the African Diaspora

This course introduces students to the theoretical strategies underlying the construction of coherent communities and systems of representation and how those strategies influence the uses of expressive culture over time. Topics vary. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana Studies.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 710 Political Economy and Social History of Africa and the African Diaspora

This course provides the opportunity for students to investigate the relationship between the emergence of African peoples as historical subjects and their location within specific geopolitical and economic circumstances. Topics vary. FALL 2017: FASCISM AND RACISM: A LOVE STORY- What is the relationship between fascism and racism in modern politics, and how have black political thinkers and organizations understood this relationship? This graduate level course is designed to familiarize students with the historical and contemporary literature on fascism as a phenomena of modern politics, and the importance of racial politics and ideologies to its constitution. Students will become familiar with the contributions of Black political actors, organizations and thinkers in Europe, Africa, Asia and the New World to fascism's defeat in the 1920's and 1930's, as well as more contemporary efforts to curb more contemporary fascist movements, regimes and aesthetics in late modernity. Antonio Gramsci, Robert Paxton, Michael Mann, C.L.R. James, George Padmore, Aime Cesaire, Suzanne Cesaire and Hannah Arendt are among the thinkers, theorists and activists students will encounter in this course. The overarching aim of his course is to identify fascism in both historical and contemporary contexts as a very specific form of political organization and rule, and its interrelationship with racism, nationalism and xenophobia.

Taught by: Hanchard, Zuberi

Two terms. student must enter first term.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 712 Comprehensive School Reform as Applied Public Policy

This course examines how K-12 education policy is designed and implemented in the United States. It uses a systems analysis as the framework for looking at who makes what kinds of demands on the education policy system, how these demands are placed on the policy agenda, the decision making process, and resulting education policies and policy outcomes. The course pays particular attention to the roles of federal, state and local governments in education policy, and the impact of our intergovernmental system on the design and implementation of policy. Students will also examine major education policies and debate key education policy issues that arise at each level of government.

Taught by: Hershberg

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 720 Graduate Prospectus and Grant-Writing Seminar

This course is intended to help students to write a strong dissertation proposal/prospectus. A proposal is a detailed plan for a long journey of of conceptualization, research, and writing that will lead to the first major, independent scholarly contribution. Students will work closely with advisors, peers, and the professor in the course, to develop the questions, methodological approaches, and theoretical perspectives that will guide their research and writing. At the end of the semester, each student will have completed a proposal, and will be ready to defend it.

Taught by: Williams

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Graduate student must be "All But Dissertation" (ABD).

AFRC 740 Research Seminar in Middle Eastern History

Taught by: Troutt-Powell

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Research seminar on selected topics in Middle Eastern history.

AFRC 770 Afro-American American Literature

How does Elizabeth Alexanders poem Praise Song for the Day, written for the inauguration of Barack Obama, relate to Amiri Barakas 9/11 poem Somebody Blew America? This seminar will explore the unnaming and experimentation that shape African American literature and theory in the early years of the 21st century. frameworks of the seminar will include the post-9/11 novel, the poetics of the black, black abstraction, twenty-first century practices of the black diaspora Age of Obama turn to the satirical. Critical texts such as How to See a Work Total Darkness and Abstractionist Aesthetics will be as central as cutting edgesuch as The Psychic Hold of Slavery and signature essays such as On Failing to the Past Present. This course will focus on the new literary voices that have the 21st century and, also, writers whose 21st century art is the late stage ofliterary trajectory. Special attention will be given to Toni Morrison, Colson Whitehead,Octavia Butler, Claudia Rankine, Mat Johnson, and Paul Beatty.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 771 Seminar in Afro-American Music

This seminar treats selected aspects of the history, aesthetics, criticism and historiography of African-American music. Topics vary. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Ramsey

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 777 Special Topics

Topics vary from semester to semester. Topics vary: See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 797 Advance Topics in Africana Studies

Topic varies.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 798 Advanced Topics

This course is cross-listed with SWRK 798 (Advanced Topics) when the subject matter is related to African, African American, or other African Diaspora issues. Recent topics are "Difference" and Social Policy," and "Critical Race Theory." See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFRC 799 Topics in American Literature

An advanced topics course in American literature, with the curriculum fixed by the instructor. See the Africana Studies website at www.africana.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit