Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 001 Archaeology: Window to the Human Past

This course will introduce students to the methods and theory of archaeology by exploring how we turn archaeological data into statements about cultural behavior. We will discuss the place of archaeology in the broader field of anthropology and debate issues facing the discipline today. The course will rely on case studies from around the world and from many different time periods to introduce students to the research process, field and lab methods, and essential questions of archaeological anthropology. Students will have the opportunity to work hands-on with archaeological materials through visiting the galleries and working with Penn Museum collections.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

ANTH 002 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

An introduction to the anthropological study of human social and cultural diversity throughout the world, with special emphasis on the development of the idea of culture as an analytical concept. The course includes sections on the ethnographic research method and on the library of ethnographic material relating to cultural change in different parts of the world that anthropology has produced since the 19th century.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

ANTH 003 Introduction to Human Evolution

How did humans evolve? When did humans start to walk on two legs? How are humans related to non-human primates? This course focuses on the scientific study of human evolution describing the emergence, development, and diversification of our species, Homo sapiens. First we cover the fundamental principles of evolutionary theory and some of the basics of genetics and heredity as they relate to human morphological, physiological, and genetic variation. We then examine what studies of nonhuman primates (monkeys and apes) can reveal about our own evolutionary past, reviewing the behavioral and ecological diversity seen among living primates. We conclude the course examining the "hard" evidence of human evolution - the fossil and material culture record of human history from our earliest primate ancestors to the emergence of modern Homo sapiens. You will also have the opportunity, during recitations, to conduct hands-on exercises collecting and analyzing behavioral, morphological, and genetic data on both humans and nonhuman primates and working with the Department of Anthropology's extensive collection of fossil casts.

For BA Students: Living World Sector

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

ANTH 004 The Modern World and Its Cultural Background

An introduction to the diversity of cultures in the world. This course is divided into two parts. The first briefly examines different models of understanding human diversity: ethnicities, religions, languages, political forms, economic structures, cultures, and "civilizations". Students will learn to think about the world as an interconnected whole, and know the significance of culture on a global scale. The second part is an introduction to area studies, in which we undertake a survey of the different regions of the world. We conduct the survey paying attention to the different aspects of human diversities, which we examine in the first part of this course. Students will acquire a greater appreciation and understanding of cultural differences in the more comprehensive social context.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

ANTH 005 Great Transformations

This course explores the history and archaeology of the last 20,000 years from the development of agriculture to the industrial revolution. Why did people across the world abandon foraging for farming? How and why did cities and states develop? Why did societies succeed or fail? How have humans transformed themselves and the natural world, including the landscape and the climate? We will explore the methods that archaeologists use to consider these questions and analyze evidence for social and economic change from the Middle East, the Americas, Asia, Africa, Australia and Europe. In addition, students will have a chance to conduct hands-on exercises with artifacts from the Penn Museum during practicums.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 012 Globalization And Its Historical Significance

This course describes and analyses the current state of globalization and sets it in historical perspective. It applies the concepts and methods of anthropology, history, political economy and sociology to the analysis and interpretation of what is actually happening in the course of the semester that relates to the progress of globalization. We focus on a series of questions not only about what is happening but about the growing awareness of it and the consequences of the increasing awareness. In answering these questions we distinguish between active campaigns to cover the world (e.g. Christian and Muslim proselytism, free-trade agreements, democratization) and the unplanned diffusion of new ways of organizing trade, capital flows, tourism and remote interaction via the Internet. The body of the course deals with particular dimensions of globalization, reviewing both the early and recent history of each. The overall approach is historical and comparative, setting globalization on the larger stage of the economic, political and cultural development of various parts of the modern world. The course is taught collaboratively by an anthropologist, an historian, and a sociologist, offering the opportunity to compare and contrast distinct disciplinary approaches. It seeks to develop a general social-science-based theoretical understanding of the various historical dimensions of globalization: economic, political, social and cultural.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: Spooner

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 022 World Music and Cultures

This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process. Fulfills College Cross Cultural Foundational Requirement.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Taught by: Muller, Rommen, Sykes

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Open to all students

ANTH 055 Cultural Heritage, Politics and War in the Middle East

Political upheaval in the Middle East has brought cultural heritage studies to the forefront. From playing a role in the making of national identity and economy of Middle Eastern countries to falling prey to armed conflicts, cultural heritage remains an important element of the political and social scene. This seminar will examine the relatedness of cultural heritage to questions of identity and politics in the Middle East, and the impact of recent wars on such heritage. The seminar will start by outlining the ancient and modern history of the Middle East, and reviewing the production of cultural heritage and its contemporary management in several Middle Eastern countries. It will then proceed to discuss the following major topics: 1) Cultural diversity of modern Middle Eastern societies, the perception of cultural heritage in these societies, and the survival of long-living historical places, old traditions, and material culture of all kinds. 2) The influence of ancient cultures on common fixation and beliefs of modern identity in Middle Eastern societies (e.g. particular ethnic and religious group see themselves as direct descendents of one or a number of ancient groups such as Phoenicians, Israelites, Assyrians). 3) The use of archeological and historical data to create narratives of the past that promote specific political ideologies in the modern Middle East and, in some cases fabricate novel cultural and political realities. 4) The damage done to Cultural Heritage by recent wars in Iraq, Syria, and Lebanon, and (i) how these wars are/were the makers of a new time that disrupted the living past through the destruction of cultural landscapes; and (ii) the involvement of cultural heritage institutions and archaeologists in rescuing cultural heritage in the event of war.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 056 Seeing/Hearing South Africa: Politics and History through Contemporary Performance

This course begins in the regular semester--students are provided a general introduction to South African history, politics, environment, and performance through a range of resources: scholarly literature, film, music, and online resources; with particular focus on sites, communities,and events included in the two week intensive travel to South Africa (either Fall semester Intro with winter break travel; or spring semester Intro with late spring intensive travel). Students are given guidelines for writing about and representing live performances and experiences of exhibits and heritage sites. For fall/winter travel: focus is on Cape Town's New Year's Festival performed by those historically called "Cape Coloured" a Festival that makes complicated understandings of race, slavery, and transatlantic translation of borrowed culture. For the Spring/late spring travel, the destination is music festivals in mid-May. Both classes include visits to Robben island, Kirstenbosch gardens; "Cape Malay' heritage sites; travel to KwaZulu Natal, and to Johannesburg's apartheid museum, Soweto's anti apartheid destinations, the Cradle of Humankind works heritage site, a game park, and the Union Buildings in Pretoria. En route we will stop over to view Khoisan rock art.

Taught by: Muller

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Application required through Penn Global: https://global.upenn.edu/pennabroad/pgs

ANTH 058 Freshman Seminar

This interdisciplinary course introduces students to qualitative research methods and frameworks in the social sciences and humanities. The goals of the semester will be for each student to develop their own research proposal for a specific project that they could imagine pursuing over the summer or later in their undergraduate career,and to develop a web-based exhibit of one Penn-based research collection of interest. Students will be introduced to a range of textual, archival and media collections and databases available at Penn, with particular attention to South Asia and other specific regions of interest to course participants. The class will visit the Penn Musuem object collections and archives, the Art library, the Kislak Center for Rare Books and Manuscripts, Film Archives, and other special collections on campus, and meet with a representative from the Center for Undergraduate Research Funding (CURF). Students will learn how to frame an effective research question, situate it in relation to existing research, select the most appropriate methods for addressing the question, and develop an effective research plan. Each week students will be introduced to a new set of frameworks for analysis, see specific examples of their application drawn from anthropological, historical, and related scholarship and have opportunities to practice applying and evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of specific methodological tools. Students will also have the opportunity to identify sources of funding for summer research projects and prepare applications for these opportunities as part of the course. The course is ideal as an introduction to both the excellent libraries and research collections housed at Penn, and to a wide range of intellectual frameworks for engaging with these collections - a great way to kick off your undergraduate experience at Penn!

Taught by: Mitchell

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Topic varies by semester, see subtitle and Professor

ANTH 086 Desire and Demand: Culture and Consumption in the Global Marketplace

Does consumption shape culture or does culture shape consumption? As even the most mundane purchase becomes socially symbolic and culturally meaningful we can persuasively argue that the concept of "need" has been transformed. Analyzing a variety of physical and virtual consumer venues, the goal of this seminar is to understand and to analyze historical and contemporary issues related to a culture of consumption. We investigate social and political-economic factors that impact when and how people purchase goods and argue that behavior attached to consumption includes a nexus of influences that may change periodically in response to external factors. Readings and research assignments are interdisciplinary and require a critical analysis of global/local linkages. The city of Philadelphia becomes the seminar's laboratory as we ask: how have issues of culture, consumption, and global capitalism become intertwined around the world?

Taught by: Diggs-Thompson

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Freshman Seminar

ANTH 100 Topics In Anthropology and the Modern World

This course relates anthropological models and methods to current problems in the Modern World. The overall objective is to show how the research findings and analytical concepts of anthropology may be used to illuminate and explain events as they have unfolded in the recent news and in the course of the semester. Each edition of the course will focus on a particular country or region that has been in the news.

Taught by: Spooner

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 104 Sex and Human Nature

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of sex in humans. Within an evolutionary framework, the course examines genetic, physiological, ecological, social and behavioral aspects of sex in humans. After providing the basic principles of evolutionary biology, the course delves into the development of sexual anatomy and physiology. Among the subjects to be explored are sex determination, the nature of orgasms, and the sexual development of females and males from birth to adulthood. The role of ecology and social life in shaping human mating patterns is also evaluated using ethnographic and cross-cultural materials from a variety of human cultures. In particular, the course examines why humans marry or pair bond, whether there is a biological basis of love, which biological and psychological factors produce jealousy. Finally, the course explores topics relevant to human sexuality today, such as the "hook-up culture", contraception and abortion, sex work, sexual transmitted diseases, and the ethical and legal dimensions of human sexuality.

For BA Students: Living World Sector

Taught by: Schurr

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 105 Human Adaptation

This course concerns evolutionary processes using humans (Homo sapiens) as a case study. Through a study of the anatomical, genetic, and behavioral adaptations in our species, we will explain and explore our biology through mammalian, primate, and hominid evolutionary histories. Through evolutionary theory, we explore why humans are imperfectly adapted and not an end product of evolutionary change, and how we create and modify, not just respond to, evolutionary pressures. Through this approach, we gain insights into how and why our biology functions (and sometimes malfunctions) in the way that it does. Then, we will explore topics including human birth, growth, locomotion, reproduction, and diet as part of human biocultural adaptation. This course will involve the analysis of hominid fossil casts and human skeletal material from the Penn Museum Physical Anthropology section.

Taught by: Mitchell

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 110 Water in the Middle East Throughout History

The role of water in the Middle East cannot be overstated. The Middle East is an arid region, but human and natural systems have interacted to determine relative water scarcity and abundance at different times and places. The location, accessibility, yield, and quality of natural and managed water resources significantly influenced the location and longevity of ancient and modern settlements. Control of water has always affected the economic, political, social life of the communities inhabiting these settlements. This course examines the distribution of water resources throughout the Middle East and the archaeology and anthropology of water exploitation and management over the last 9000 years. It will consider water in river valleys, deserts, highland zones, steppes, and coastal areas of Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Levant, and Arabia from environmental, political, social, cultural, and technical perspectives. We will engage with a variety of media, including academic readings, popular journalism, films, satellite imagery, and digital maps. We will examine irrigation, water supply, sanitation, and water-driven power systems known from ethnographic studies and archaeological excavations. These data will allow us to engage with debates in Middle Eastern anthropology, including those concerning the relationship between water and political power, the environment in which the earliest cities arose, and present and potential future water crises and "water wars." In our final weeks, we will discuss archaeology and historical anthropology's contribution to conceptions of water "sustainability" and examine attempts to revive traditional and ancient technologies in an effort to better manage modern water resources.

Taught by: Emily Hammer

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 111 Introduction to Mediterranean Archaeology

The cultures of Greece and Rome, what we call classical antiquity, span over a thousand years of multicultural achievement in the Mediterranean. This course tells the story of what it was like to live in the complex societies of ancient Greece and Rome. This story is told principally using the art, architecture, pottery and coins produced by these societies. We will examine both the bold and sexy, and the small and humble, from the Parthenon to wooden huts, from the Aphrodite of Knidos to the bones of a fisherman named Peter.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Bowes

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 112 Sacred Stuff: Religious Bodies, Places, and Objects

Does religion start with what's in our heads? Or are religious commitments made, shaped and strengthened by the people, places, and things around us? This course will explore how religion happens in the material world. We'll start with classical and contemporary theories on the relationship of religion to stuff. We'll then consider examples of how religion is animated not just by texts, but through interactions with objects, spaces, bodies, monuments, color, design, architecture, and film. We'll ask how these material expressions of religion move beyond private faith and connect religion to politics and identity.

Taught by: Schaefer

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 116 Caribbean Culture and Politics

This course offers anthropological perspectives on the Caribbean as a geo-political and socio-cultural region, and on contemporary Caribbean diaspora cultures. We will examine how the region's long and diverse colonial history has structured relationships between race, ethnicity, class, gender and power, as well as how people have challenged these structures. As a region in which there have been massive transplantations of peoples and their cultures from Africa, Asia, and Europe, and upon which the United States has exerted considerable influence, we will question the processes by which the meeting and mixing of peoples and cultures has occurred. Course readings include material on the political economy of slavery and the plantation system, family and community life, religious beliefs and practices, gender roles and ideologies, popular culture, and the differing ways national, ethnic, and racial identities are expressed on the islands and throughout the Caribbean diaspora.

Taught by: Thomas

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 118 Witchcraft & Possession

This course explores world witchcraft and possession from the persecutions of the early seventeenth century through the rise of Wicca in the twentieth century. The mere mention of these terms, or of such close cousins as demonology, sorcery, exorcism, magic, and the witches Sabbath, raises clear ethnographic and historical challenges. How can the analysis of witchcraft-- including beliefs, patterns of accusation, the general social position of victims, the intensity and timing of witch hunts, and its relation to religious practice, law, language, gender, social marginalization, and property--lead us to a more humane understanding of belief and action? Films such as The Exorcist, The Blair Witch Project, The Crucible, and Three Sovereigns for Sarah will focus discussion.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: St. George

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

ANTH 121 Origin and Cultures of Cities

The UN estimates that 2.9 of the world's 6.1 billion people live in cities and that this percentage is rapidly increasing in many parts of the world. This course examines urban life and urban problems by providing anthropological perspectives on this distinctive form of human association and land use. First we will examine the "origin" of cities, focusing on several of the places where cities first developed, including Mesopotamia and the Valley of Mexico. We will then investigate the internal structure of non-industrial cities by looking at case studies from around the world and from connections between the cities of the past and the city in which we live and work today.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Zettler

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 122 Becoming Human

Human evolutionary studies is a composite product of the fieldwork of both Paleolithic archaeology and human paleontology (or what we refer to as "stones and bones"). This marriage of two subdisciplines of anthropology produces a unique set of data that is intellectually managed and driven by theories within anthropology as a whole and even beyond -- to fields such as biology, psychology, and primate ethology, as we try to understand the origins of language, culture, and our unique physical characteristics. In this course, we will jointly discuss and debate the actual evidence of human evolution, describing what the actual evidence is and exploring how far can we take these interpretations.

For BA Students: Natural Science and Math Sector

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 123 Communication & Culture

The course looks at varieties of human expression -- such as art, film, language and song -- as communicative practices that connect persons together to form a common culture. Discussion is centered around particular case studies and ethnographic examples. Examination of communicative practices in terms of the types of expressive signs they employ, their capacity to formulate and transmit cultural beliefs and ideals (such as conceptions of politics, nature, and self), and to define the size and characteristics of groups and communities sharing such ideals. Discussion of the role of media, social institutions, and technologies of communication (print, electronic). Emphasis on contemporary communicative practices and the forms of culture that emerge in the modern world.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Agha

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

ANTH 124 Archaeology & The Bible

Archaeology and the Bible is a chronological survey of the long span of human occupation in the Land of the Bible, known by the names of the modern nation-states and political entities that occupy the area, as well as various short hands such as Levant and Syria-Palestine, from ca. 10,000 BCE, when humans first began to farm and herd animals through the time of the Divided Monarchy of Israel and Judah. While archaeology has moved beyond a primary concern with illuminating the Bible, NELC 155 will investigate the broader import of archaeological discoveries for our understanding of ancient Israel and its neighbors.

Taught by: Zettler

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 127 The Material Past in a Digital World

The material remains of the human past -objects and spaces- provide tangible evidence of past people's lives. Today's information technologies improve our ability to document, study, and present these materials. But what does it mean to deal with material evidence in a virtual context? In this class, students will learn basic digital methods for studying the past while working with objects, including those in the collections of the Penn Museum. This class will teach relational database design and 3d object modeling. As we learn about acquiring and managing data, we will gain valuable experience in the evaluation and use of digital tools. The digital humanities are a platform both for learning the basic digital literacy students need to succeed in today's world and for discussing the human consequences of these new technologies and data. We will discuss information technology's impact on the study and presentation of the past, including topics such as public participation in archaeological projects, educational technologies in museum galleries, and the issues raised by digitizing and disseminating historic texts and objects. Finally, we will touch on technology's role in the preservation of the past in today's turbulent world. No prior technical experience is required, but we hope students will share an enthusiasm for the past.

Taught by: Peter Cobb

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 134 Making the Natural World: An Introduction to Political Ecology

What are the limits of nature? When do natural systems become human or socio-natural systems? In this course, we examine the human construction of nature both conceptually, through ideas about environment, ecosystem, organism, and ecology; and materially, through trajectories of direct action in and on the landscape. Beginning with a consideration of foundational concepts in human ecology, we will discuss current problems and approaches, centering on political ecology. Readings and case studies are drawn from human-environmental contexts in Oceania, South Asia, Southeast Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America, Europe, and North America. We will also consider topics including a) the relationship between indigenous and technocratic knowledge and resource governance, b) environmental movements themselves as objects of ethnographic study; c) justice and sustainability as environmental goals; d) inequality, displacement and violence as environmental problems; and e) fair trade and food security or sovereignty.

Taught by: Lycett

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 139 Ancient Civilizations of the World

This course explores the archaeology (material culture) of early complex societies or civilizations in Egypt, Mesopotamia, and the Aegean. According to the traditional paradigm, civilization first emerged during the fourth millennium BCE in Egypt and Mesopotamia. In the Mediterranean, state-level societies first appeared in Crete and mainland Greece in the early second millennium BCE. This course investigates how and why these civilizations developed, as well as their appearance and structure in the early historic (or literate) phases of their existence. A comparative perspective will illustrate what these early civilizations have in common and the ways in which they are unique. This course will consist largely of lectures which will outline classic archaeological and anthropological theories on state formation, before turning to examine the available archaeological (and textual) data on emerging complexity in Egypt, Mesopotamia, and the Aegean. This course does not presuppose any knowledge of archaeology or ancient languages; the instructor will provide any background necessary. Because this is a course on material culture, some of the class periods will be spent at the Penn Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. These will consist of a guided tour of a relevant gallery, as well as a hands-on object-based lab with archaeological materials selected by the instructor. This course meets the General Education Curriculums Cross Cultural Analysis f oundational approach, whose aim is to help students understand and interpret t he cultures of peoples (even long-dead peoples) with histories different from their own; it also fulfills the History and Tradition Sector breadth requirement.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Zettler

Course offered spring; even-numbered years

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 141 Public Policy, Museums, and the Ethics of Cultural Heritage

This course will focus upon and examine the ethics of international heritage and the role that Museums play in the preservation of identity and cultural heritage. The mission of this course will be to inform and educate students about the role of Museums within the 21st century. What is the role and position of antiquities and important cultural objects in Museums? How should Museums acquire these objects and when should they be returned to countries and cultural groups? Examples from current issues will be included in the reading and discussions along with objects and issues within the Penn Museum.

Taught by: Leventhal

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 143 Being Human: Biology, Culture & Human Diversity

This course will investigate human biology from evolutionary and biocultural perspectives. Using this approach, the class will explore what it means to be human. We will examine humans as mammals, as primates, and as hominins (our own lineage). We will also study the basics of human genetics, growth and development, immune function, nutrition, life history, and adaptations to diet and disease. In addition, we will review biological variation in contemporary and past societies and the evolutionary processes that helped to shape them.

Taught by: Schurr

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 148 Food and Fire: Archaeology in the Laboratory

This course will let students explore the essential heritage of human technology through archaeology. People have been transforming their environment from the first use of fire for cooking. Since then, humans have adapted to the world they created using the resources around them. We use artifacts to understand how the archaeological record can be used to trace breakthroughs such as breaking stone and bone, baking bread, weaving cloth and firing pottery and metals. The seminar will meet in the Penn Museum's Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials. Students will become familiar with the Museum's collections and the scientific methods used to study different materials. Class sessions will include discussions, guest presentations, museum field trips, and hands-on experience in the laboratory.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: Katherine Moore

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 149 Introduction to Native American and Indigenous Studies

This course offers a broad introduction to the linked fields of Native American Studies and Indigenous Studies. Students will gain foundational understandings of the ways that Indigenous peoples and academic researchers engage with Indigenous knowledges in diverse worldwide settings, while also exploring the impacts of settler colonialism and the influence of recent decolonizing methodologies. Students will examine topics from a variety of disciplinary traditions, using historical texts, anthropological studies, oral literature, and modern media. Special case studies will focus on: links between oral traditions and archaeological research; relations among archives, museum representation, and Indigenous heritage; legal interventions and protections for Indigenous sovereignty; and language restoration and cultural recovery.

Taught by: M. Bruchac

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 151 Archaeology of American History: The Colonial Period

Over the last fifty years archaeologists have been exploring historic sites in the United States dating from both the Colonial Period and the 19th/20th centuries. What can archaeology now tell us about the origins of American society, the invasion of North America by various European peoples (Spanish, English, Dutch), the impact on native peoples, the rise of African American and Asian American cultures, major crisis (e.g. the revolution, Civil War, and the Great Depression), the settlement of the Far American West, and the final emergence of a truly national culture in the 20th century? A basic question will be how an American history based on both archaeology and archival sources is different and more complete than an image of the past drawn only from written sources.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Schuyler

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 154 Liquid Histories and Floating Archives

Climate change transforms the natural and built environments, and it is re-shaping how we understand, make sense, and care for our past. Climate changes history. This course explores the Anthropocene, the age when humans are remaking earth's systems, from an on-water perspective. In on-line dialogue and video conferences with research teams in port cities on four continents, this undergraduate course focuses on Philadelphia as one case study of how rising waters are transfiguring urban history, as well as its present and future. Students projects take them into the archives at the Independence Seaport Museum and at Bartram's Garden. Field trips by boat on the Schuylkill and Delaware Rivers and on land to the Port of Philadelphia and to the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge invite transhistorical dialogues about how colonial and then industrial-era energy and port infrastructure transformed the region's vast tidal marshlands wetlands. Excursions also help document how extreme rain events, storms, and rising waters are re-making the built environment, redrawing lines that had demarcated land from water. In dialogue with one another and invited guest artists, writers, and landscape architects, students final projects consider how our waters might themselves be read and investigated as archives. What do rising seas subsume and hold? Whose stories do they tell? What floats to the surface?

Taught by: Wiggin

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 155 Globalization: Causes & Effects

Class sessions will be devoted to discussion of the dynamics of globalization with the objective of illuminating the world-historical context of the changes that are happening around us unevenly in different parts of the world today, and developing critical approaches to the available research methodologies and explanatory theories. Weekly readings will be selected from the major researchers in the field, and students will test their ideas in short research projects of their own on questions arising from the discussions. The overall approach will be historical and comparative. Apart from weekly assigned readings and participation in class discussions, requirements for the course include three short research papers.

Taught by: Spooner

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Freshman Seminar

ANTH 158 The Neolithic Revolution

The advent of food production/agriculture in prehistory, sometimes referred to as the "Neolithic Revolution," represents key economic, social, and biological transitions for human groups. Food production was characterized by the possibility for the accumulation of food surpluses, which could be used as a form of wealth. It also resulted in the reorganization of social and ritual life as people settled more permanently in villages or were involved in pastoral lifeways. Additionally, densely packed living conditions and a close association with domesticated animals led to the spread of diseases, and new forms of labor related to farming tasks, as well as diets focused on a narrower range of foods, created biological stresses in these populations. This course examines several examples of the "Neolithic Revolution" throughout the world, including the Middle East, China, Europe, Mesoamerica, South America, and the North American Southwest.

Taught by: Olszewski

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 159 Population and Public Health in Eastern Europe

Since the collapse of communism in 1989 in Eastern Europe (and 1991 in the Soviet Union), many of the countries in the region have experienced public health crises and demographic catastrophe. Below replacement fertility rates and massive out migration have decimated the populations of these countries even as populations age and place unsustainable strains on pension systems and medical services. The demographic collapse has also been accompanied by falling male life expectancy and the rise of alcoholism, depression, domestic violence, and suicide. The economic exigencies of the transition from communism to capitalism dismantled welfare states at the exact moment when health services were most needed, leaving charities and nongovernmental organization to try to fill in the gaps. Through a combination of readings from the fields of epidemiology, demography, and medical anthropology, this course examines the public health implications of poverty and social dislocation in post-communist states. All readings and assignments are in English.

Taught by: GHODSEE

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 169 Merchants, Saints, Slaves and Sojourners: the Worlds of the Indian Ocean

Do oceans serve to divide and demarcate distinct cultures and regions? Or do they facilitate exchange, connection and cosmopolitanism? This course will explore the manner in which the Indian Ocean has played both roles throughout history, and how the nature of those divisions and connections has changed over time from the ancient to the modern world. We will reconstruct the intertwined mercantile, religious and kinship networks that spanned the Indian Ocean world, across the Middle East, East Africa, South Asia, Southeast Asia and China, illuminating the histories of Hinduism, Buddhism and Islam, while also considering the role of successive imperial political formations, from Rome to Britain. Throughout the semester we will seek to understand the Indian Ocean through the people who lived and worked in its milieu - from consuls and military commanders, to traders, brokers, sailors, prisoners and slaves. Course materials will draw on a variety of disciplines (anthropology, archaeology, material culture, religious studies) to construct the cultural, economic, and environmental history of the Indian Ocean.

Taught by: Petrie

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 190 Introduction to Africa

This course provides an introduction to the study of Africa in all its diversity and complexity. Our focus is cultural, geographical, and historical: we will seek to understand Africa's current place in the world political and economic order and learn about the various social and physical factors that have influenced the historical trajectory of the continent. We study the cultural formations and empires that emerged in Africa before European colonial invasion and then how colonialism reshaped those sociocultural forms. We'll learn about the unique kinds of kinship and religion in precolonial Africa and the changes brought about by the spread of Islam and Christianity. Finally, we'll take a close look at contemporary issues such as ethnic violence, migration, popular culture and poverty, and we'll debate the various approaches to understanding those issues.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Hasty

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 199 Independent Study in Anthropology

A study under faculty supervision of a problem area or topic not included in the formal curriculum.

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and written permission of instructor and undergraduate chair

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

Notes: See Department for Advisor

ANTH 202 Language, Migration, Diaspora

Centering on the relation between language, migration, and diaspora, this course uses linguistic anthropological approaches to understand how the 'very big' is reflected in the 'very small.' We will approach language use as a process that unfolds in the microclimate of everyday interaction, but whose effects extend to and shape large-scale social processes. We will ask a number of interrelated questions: How does language use shape global phenomena like transnationalism and diasporic populations? How do globalizing forces impact and shape language structure and use? How are mobility and (im)migration enabled or constrained through everyday communicative interaction? We begin by exploring the ideologies inherent in everyday speech, evaluating how language is linked to social identities like class, race, gender, and sexuality, and to social personae like 'the migrant,' 'the refugee,' 'the foreigner,' or to the 'diasporic subject' more generally. We then explore the cultural politics of languages in and across nation-states, attending to their uses and values in unprecedented global flows of information, goods, and people.

Taught by: Carruthers

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 204 Theoretical Foundations

Ever wonder what the point was of reading the "founding fathers" of the discipline (and yes, they were most often fathers)? Ever feel like the "old stuff" and the "old questions" have no relevance to your contemporary interests? This course, designed primarily for cultural anthropology majors, will provide clues. This is NOT a comprehensive history of the discipline. Instead, we will examine some of the main issues that have been foundational to anthropology, and will explore how approaches to these issues have changed over time. To do so, we will contextualize our analysis of transformations in anthropological knowledge production within historical and contemporary political economies. By exploring core issues that continue to inspire and inform anthropological theory and ethnographic practice, we will solidify our commitment to a holistic and relational understanding of social processes.

Course not offered every year

Prerequisite: Students should have completed at least one anthropology course before registering for ANTH 204

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 205 American Folklore

This course will examine American expressive culture, including everyday speech, narrative, music, foodways, religion, public celebrations, and material culture through an exploration of the multiple and changing avenues of diversity in the United States. Folklore can be considered the unofficial culture that exists beneath and between the institutions of power that we read about in our history books, and that is what we will be studying--the 99% of American life that goes unseen and unnoticed in other college courses. Some of the topics we will examine are: campus folklore; body art and adornment; contemporary (urban) legends and beliefs; public celebrations and rituals; and the adaptation and commodification of folk culture in popular media.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

ANTH 210 Death: Anthropological Perspectives

This course will cover the topic of DEATH from a bio/cultural perspective including the evolution of life history (aging and demography - mortality) as well as from an archaeological perspective (prehistory) and early history of mortuary practices. Nothing in the lifespan of humans is so revealing on the interface of culture and biology as is death and the experience of death. This course is not concerned specifically with how an individual experiences death, but in the ways that culture and biology have come to define and deal with physical death and the death experience.

Taught by: Monge

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 211 Religion and Ecology

This class will introduce the overlaps between religion and ecology. Rather than assuming that there is a necessary positive or negative relationship between religion and ecology, we will look at how these relationships have materialized in complicated ways at different moments in history. We'll consider perspectives and case studies from a range of different moments in history. We'll consider perspectives and case studies from a range of different traditions, with a special attention paid to the genesis of the field of Religion and Ecology in critiques of Christian attitudes toward the environment in the 1960s and 1970s.

Taught by: Covey

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 219 Archaeology Field Project

First-hand participation in research project in historical archaeology in Southern New Jersey. Transportation provided by the university. Students will assist in excavations and archival research on local archaeological sites. Class is open to all undergraduates, no previous archaeological experience is required. Attendance will involve Fridays or Saturdays, all day from 8:00 to 5:00 including travel time to the excavations and back to the University Museum. Students enroll for only one day (F or S). Enrollment is limited so specific permission of the instructor is required (Robert L. Schuyler: schuyler@sas.upenn.edu; (215)898-6965; U Museum 412). A follow up laboratory course (Anth 220 in the spring semester) will also be available during which the artifacts and documentary sources collected in the fall will be analyzed at the University Museum. Course may be repeated for credit.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: Schuyler

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Permission of instructor required

ANTH 220 Archaeology Laboratory Field Project

Follow-up for ANTH 219. Students may enroll in either or both courses, and in any sequence; however, preference will be given to those previously enrolled in ANTH 219 that Fall. Class will meet in three hour sections on Fridays or Saturdays and will involve the analysis of artifacts, documentary records, oral historic sources and period illustrations collected on Southern New Jersey historic sites that Fall. No previous archaeological or lab experience is required. (Robert L. Schuyler: schuyler@sas.upenn.edu; (215) 898-6965; UMuseum 412). Course may be repeated for credit.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: Schuyler

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Laboratory

1 Course Unit

ANTH 221 Material World in Archaeological Science

By focusing on the scientific analysis of inorganic archaeological materials, this course will explore processes of creation in the past. ANTH 221/521 will take place in the Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and will be team taught in three modules: analysis of lithics, analysis of ceramics and analysis of metals. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how the transformation of materials into objects provides key information about past human behaviors and the socio-economic contexts of production, distribution, exchange and use. Discussion topics will include invention and adoption of new technologies, change and innovation, use of fire, and craft specialization.

Taught by: Boileau/Dibble/Jansen

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 230 Forensic Anthropology

This course will investigate and discuss the various techniques of analysis that biological anthropologists can apply to forensic cases. Topics include human osteology, the recovery of bodies, the analysis of life history, the reconstruction of causes of death, and various case studies where anthropologists have contributed significantly to solving forensic cases. Discussions will include the limitations of forensic anthropology and the application of DNA recovery to skeletal/mummified materials.

Taught by: Monge

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 236 Iraq: Ancient Cities & Empires

Iraq: Ancient Cities and Empires is a chronological survey of the ancient civilization that existed in the drainage basin of the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers from the early settled village farming communities of the 7th millennium BCE to the middle of the 1st millennium BCE, when Nebuchadnezzar II ruled Babylon and much of the Middle East. Though organized period by period, NELC 241 explores various social, political, economic, and ideological topics, exposing students to various strands of evidence, including settlement survey data, excavated architectural remains, artifacts, and documentary sources, as well as an eclectic mix of theoretical perspectives. The course aims to provide students with a strong foundation for the further study of the ancient and pre-modern Middle East.

Taught by: Zettler

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 238 Introduction to Medical Anthropology

Introduction to Medical Anthropology takes central concepts in anthropology -- culture, adaptation, human variation, belief, political economy, the body -- and applies them to human health and illness. Students explore key elements of healing systems including healing technologies and healer-patient relationships. Modern day applications for medical anthropology are stressed.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: Barg

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 241 Performing History

This seminar concentrates on the ways that various peoples in the world make their history by means other than relying on written texts alone. Over the course of the semester, we therefore may be examining such different public events and civic rituals as parades, political and religious processions, local historical pageants, carnivals, historic preservation, museums, military reenactments, and history theme parks. The emphasis in each of these forms, places, and semiotic processes will be on their identity and function as key performances that transform consciousness, shift individuals alternately into both actors and spectators, reframe the everyday as the metaphysical, and intensify the status of cultural values in the histories they present to view. Course requirements: a seminar paper, the topic of which you will discuss with me no later than week five of the course; and a working annotated bibliography and statement of your paper's main thesis. I will say more about these assignments as they approach.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 244 Disease and Human Evolution

This course will explore the role played by disease in human evolution, from the emergence of the human lineage to the present day. We will evaluate both infectious and non-infectious diseases and examine the way in which populations and disease organisms have co-evolved. Related issues to be explored include the nature of the virulence and pathogenicity of infectious agents, and the impact of vaccination on pathogen evolution. In addition, we will discuss the epidemiological transition and the rise of complex diseases of modernization (e.g., diabetes, cancer) that has occurred in the past several centuries. Overall, the course will provide a broader understanding of the influence of disease processes on the evolution of the human species.

Taught by: Schurr

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 246 Molecular Anthropology

In this course, we will explore the molecular revolution in biological anthropology. In particular, we will examine how molecular data can be used to illuminate anthropological question concerning human origins, evolution and biological variation. Some of the specific topics to be covered in this course are the phylogenetic relationships among primates, kinship in apes and monkeys, the hominoid trichotomy, modern human origins and migrations, Neanderthal and Denisovan admixture with modern humans, biogenetics of skin color, and physiological, phenotypic and disease adaptations.

Taught by: Schurr

Course not offered every year

Prerequisites: ANTH 003, Intro to Human Evolution; some background in biology and genetics will also be useful.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 248 Food and Feasting: Archaeology of the Table

Food satisfies human needs on many levels. ANTH 248 explores the importance of food in human experience, starting with the nutritional and ecological aspects of food choice and going on to focus on the social and ritual significance of foods and feasts. Particular attention will be paid to the way that archaeologists and biological anthropologists find out about food use in the past. Contemporary observations about the central significance of eating as a social activity will be linked to the development of cuisines, economies, and civilizations in ancient times. The course will use lectures, discussions, films, food tastings, and fieldwork to explore the course themes.

Taught by: Moore

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 249 Evolutionary Medicine

Evolutionary medicine is the application of modern evolutionary theory to studies of health and disease in humans. In taking this approach, the course will explore the role that disease played in human evolution. We will examine both infectious and non-infectious diseases, and assess the way in which populations and disease organisms have co-evolved. Related issues to be examined are the nature of the virulence and pathogenicity of infectious agents, and their efforts to subvert the immune system's responses to infection. We will also explore the evolved responses that enable individuals to protect, heal and recuperate themselves from infections and injuries, such as fever and sickness behavior, and the fitness enhancing aspects of these processes. Finally, we will study how past adaptations of early humans to their environments now affects modern humans, who have very different diets, life expectancy, activity patterns, and hygiene than their ancestors.

Taught by: Schurr

Course not offered every year

Prerequisites: ANTH 003 and ANTH 143 (or permission for undergraduates)

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 253 Violence, Tolerance, Freedom

This seminar examines how the adjective "religious" has been used to modify the nouns "violence," "tolerance," and "freedom." It traces the historical development of liberal ideas of tolerance and human rights, interrogates the common assumption that religion exerts a perverse influence on politics and vice versa, critically examines the concept of terrorism, and connects the neoliberal ideal of unfettered free markets to the idea of being "spiritual but not religious."

Taught by: Jolyon Thomas

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 254 Archaeology of the Inca

The Inca created a vast and powerful South American empire in the high Andes Mountains that was finally conquered by Spain. Using Penn's impressive museum collections and other archaeological, linguistic, and historical sources, this course will examine Inca religion and worldview, architecture, sacred temples, the capital of Cuzco, ritual calendar, ceque system, textiles, metalworking, economic policies and expansionist politics from the dual perspectives of Inca rulers and their subjects. Our task is to explain the rise, dominance, and fall of the Incas as a major South American civilization.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Erickson

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 258 Visualizing the Past/Peopling the Past

This highly interdisciplinary course approaches fundamental issues in Anthropology and Computer Science.Using an anthropological perspective, this course focuses on the history, theory, and methods of how archaeology and visualizations of the past are created, presented and used in scholarly media (e.g., traditional publications, conference papers, and project databases), and popular culture (e.g., artists reconstructions, movies, TV documentaries, museum exhibits, games, the internet, and art), and contemporary computer technology (e.g., 3D modeling, Animation, virtual reality, and simulation). From the computer science perspective, the challenge becomes how we can transform known and often incomplete information into engaging and plausible digital models of a past culture and its people. Students gain acquisition of fundamental computer programming, data analysis, and 3D modeling and animation tools. The course material is broad and requires conceptual integration by the student. The instructors use the SEAS Open Learning Classroom for programing and the Penn Museum to explore artifact collections through Object-Based Learning and evaluate public exhibits and complete an original Final Project to people and visualize the past.

Taught by: Badler/Erickson

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CIS 106

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 260 Cultures of Science and Technology

Science and technology figure centrally in the economic, political, and socio-cultural changes that impact our worlds. Happenings in the life sciences, including the discovery of new genes, pathways, and processes, are redrawing concepts of the body and human nature and refiguring social and political relations. The seminar starts from the premise that scientific facts are made, not things existing a priori in the world and that are merely picked up by researchers and consumed by lay audiences. Likewise, technologies are created through a process of intense negotiation between producers and their sophisticated users. Focusing on the biosciences, we explore the production of science and technology and how they 1)affect individuals, self-identities, subjectivity, kinship, and social relationships; 2)have interacted with or reinforced political programs, racial classifications, unequal access to knowledge, and patterns of social injustice; 3)inform contemporary institutional structures, strategies of governance, and practices of citizenship. We will combine methods and perspectives from social and cultural anthropology, and the social studies of science and technology, and will draw from historical case studies, contemporary ethnographies of science, scientific and medical journals, documentary films and media reports.

Taught by: Petryna

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 267 Living World in Archaeological Science

By focusing on the scientific analysis of archaeological remains, this course will explore life and death in the past. It takes place in the Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and is team taught in three modules: human skeletal analysis, analysis of animal remains, and analysis of plant remains. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how organic materials provide key information about past environments, human behavior, and cultural change through discussions of topics such as health and disease, inequality, and food.

Taught by: White, Monge, Moore

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 268 Anthropology of Museums

This course examines museums as sites where issues of Indigenous identity, memory, place and power intersect. Museums have long been engaged in the selective preservation, representation, and contextualization of Indigenous objects, cultures, and histories. We will examine antiquarian impulses that inspired the collecting of curiosities, scientific studies that drove the collection of biological specimens, and nationalist ideals that shaped monuments to house imperialist memories. Museums are now sites for complex, often contentious discourse around Indigenous collections. Students will review histories of local and national collecting processes, with a particular focus on Native American collections and concerns. We will also consider how Indigenous curators and new kinds of museums have developed innovative displays and interpretations.

Taught by: Bruchac

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 271 Ancient Mexico and Central America

This course will provide an overview of the diverse cultures of ancient Mesoamerica. Across the landscape that is now Mexico and Central America, the societies that inhabited highlands and tropical lowlands developed agricultural lands, built towering pyramids and cities, and forged great civilizations all before the arrival of Europeans to the New World. In this this course, students will learn about these diverse civilizations and the many similarities and continuities among them. They will also learn about the legacy left by these cultures on today's modern peoples of Central Mexico and Central America.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 273 Global Health: Anthropological Perspectives

In some parts of the world spending on pharmaceuticals is astronomical. In others, people struggle for survival amid new and reemerging epidemics and have little or no access to basic or life-saving therapies. Treatments for infectious diseases that disproportionately affect the world's poor remain under-researched and global health disparities are increasing. This interdisciplinary seminar integrates perspectives from the social sciences and the biomedical sciences to explore 1) the development and global flows of medical technologies; 2) how the health of individuals and groups is affected by medical technologies, public policy, and the forces of globalization as each of these impacts local worlds. The seminar is structured to allow us to examine specific case material from around the world (Haiti, South Africa, Brazil, Russia, China, India, for example), and to address the ways in which social, political-economic, and technological factors -- which are increasingly global in nature -- influence basic biological mechanisms and disease outcomes and distribution. As we analyze each case and gain familiarity with ethnographic methods, we will ask how more effective interventions can be formulated. The course draws from historical and ethnographic accounts, medical journals, ethical analyses, and films, and familiarizes students with critical debates on globalization and with local responses to globalizing processes.

Taught by: Petryna

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 276 Ethnographic Approaches to Urban Athletics and Human Movement

Rooted in the rubric of public interest social science, the course focuses on bridging theory and practice motivated by a commitment to social justice through original ethnographic research. In particular, this course will focus on kinesiology and the anthropology of sports and well-being through intense analysis of the Young Quakers Community Athletics (YQCA) program, a collaboration between the Netter Center for Community Partnerships and Penn Athletics. In guest lecturers from multiple disciplines will help to round out the course. The core learning objective is to bring a broad range of specialized expertise to foster a holistic examination of a complex institutional partnership intended to promote positive social transformation and improved human health and well-being.

Taught by: Frank Johnston, Gretchen Suess

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 294 Cities of the Future: Urbanization in the Global South

This course examines the futures of urbanization in most of the world. With cities in "developing" countries set to absorb 95% of urban population growth in the next generation, the course explores the plans, spaces and social experiences of this dramatic urban century. How do proliferating urban populations sustain themselves in the cities of Latin America, Africa and Asia? What kinds of social and political claims do these populations make more just and sustainable cities? The course investigates the ongoing experiences in urban planning, infrastructure development and environmental governance in cities of the Global South. In so doing, it imagines new forms of citizenship, development and sustainability that are currently unfolding in these cities of the future.

Taught by: Anand

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 300 Research Seminar in Anthropology

ANTH 300 is a Research Seminar for anthropology majors. It defines the Penn anthropology major by bringing together and inter-relating major threads from the different subfields of the Penn anthropology curriculum. Each session includes contributions from members of the standing faculty and seminar discussions of a research theme in which anthropological knowledge is currently progressing.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Open to junior and senior anthropology majors

ANTH 301 Senior Thesis

Individual research under faculty supervision culminating in a thesis.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

Notes: Permit required

ANTH 303 Research Methods in Cultural Anthropology

This undergraduate seminar is about how ethnographers do research. It introduces fundamental concepts and techniques - research design, participant observation, interviews, questionnaires, field notes, archives, data collection and analysis. It also addresses ethical and legal issues- cultural protocols, intellectual property rights, collaborative anthropology, and institutional review boards. Students will conduct original ethnographic research in partnership with the Netter Center.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 305 Anthropology and Policy: History, Theory, Practice

From the inception of the discipline, anthropologists have applied their ethnographic and theoretical knowledge to policy issues concerning the alleviation of practical human problems. This approach has not only benefited peoples in need but it has also enriched the discipline, providing anthropologists with the opportunity to develop new theories and methodologies from a problem-centered approach. The class will examine the connection between anthropology and policy, theory and practice (or 'praxis'), research and application. We will study these connections by reading about historical and current projects. As an ABCS course, students will also volunteer in a volunteer organization of their choice in the Philadelphia area, conduct anthropological research on the organization, and suggest ways that the anthropological approach might support the efforts of the organization.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 307 Contemporary Native Americans

This course examines the social and political lives of contemporary Native American Indians in the United States and Canada. Topics include: Indigenous identity; homelands and natural resources; popular culture and media; Indigenous arts and cultural expression; museum representations; athletics; gender relations; tribal recognition and sovereignty; and resistance movements. We will consider the origins of federal programs and legislation that have become essential to the protection of Native American freedoms. Students can expect to gain an appreciation of the complexity and cultural diversity of Native communities and tribal nations and insights into their interactions with other cultures over time.

Taught by: Bruchac

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 308 Ethnohistory of the Native Northeast

Ethnohistory is a multi-disciplinary form of ethnographic study and documentary research that employs both anthropological and historical approaches. This course examines the foundations of the ethnohistorical method as a means to interpret cross-cultural colonial interactions and conflicts, and to better understand the complex histories of Native American Indian peoples from Pennsylvania and northward and eastward. Students will develop skills and strategies for interpreting and contextualizing primary and secondary source materials, oral traditions, colonial records, historical maps, and material culture. Hands-on study will include visits to local archives and historical sites to view relevant documents and landscapes.

Taught by: Bruchac

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 309 Psychoanalysis and Anthropology

This course will introduce students to the rich literature that has grown up around the encounter between psychoanalysis and anthropology, from totem and taboo, to studies of the Oedipus complex, child-rearing practices, ritual symbolism, mythology, and dreams. The class will also look to the future, endeavoring to examine as well such issues as the role of computers (are they self objects?) and the internet (including such online games as "Second Life"), dreams in space alien abduction narratives, sexuality in advertising, political psychology, and other contemporary issues. This course counts towards towards the Psychoanalytic Studies (PSYS) Minor.

Taught by: Urban/Blum

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 319 Pottery and Archaeology

Pottery is the most ubiquitous material recovered from most archaeological sites of the last 10,000 years; all archaeologists must be capable of working with it. This course presents the basics on the recovery, documentation, and analysis of archaeological pottery. Instruction includes treatment of pottery in the field, museum, and laboratory. Students will develop critical awareness of the potentials and problems of interpreting pottery within the wider social contexts of production, exchange and consumption. This course will foster an appreciation of the range and complexity of pottery studies and encourage students to understand the materials and technological processes used in the manufacture of pottery.

Taught by: Boileau

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 328 Performing Culture, Native American Arts

This course analyzes cultural performances as sites for the formation, expression, and transmission of social identity. Students will read ethnographies, critiques, and reports of performance genres including ritual, theater, music, dance, art, and spoken word, with a particular focus on Native American and Indigenous arts and expressions. Topics include: expressive culture as survivance; debates around authenticity and invented traditions; public identity and sexuality; political resistance; the effects of globalization; transnationalism and hybridity; cultural appropriation; and the transformation of folk performances in the wake of modern media.

Taught by: Bruchac

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 329 Psychoanalytic and Anthropological Perspectives on Childhood

This course will consider the interaction between culture and individual psychology, and between nature and nurture from birth to adulthood. Through through an examination of phases of human development described by psychoanalysis, and evidence concerning psychoanalytic ideas from around the world, we will consider questions such as: How do people become who they are, both similar to others and uniquely individual? How do we develop emotionally? What features are and are not universal for our species? What is and is not known about these questions. The instructors are both psychoanalysts, one a psychiatrist, one a pediatrician. This course counts towards the Psychoanalytic Studies (PSYS) Minor.

Taught by: Blum/Shapiro

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 332 Medicine and the Language of Pain

Pain can be a particularly complex and morally charged object of biomedicine. The interiority of pain- the deeply private nature of pain experience- complicates its communication. Pain, particularly its chronic form, defies purely biological explanation, troubling fundamental biomedical distinctions between mind and body, subject and object. And decisions about analgesia are fraught, as doctors and patients pursue relief from pain amidst a widespread epidemic of opiate abuse that infuses their interaction with concerns about addiction, drug seeking, culpability, and responsibility. This seminar seeks to shed light on these issues by using concepts from linguistic and medical anthropology to explore how we experience, think about, and talk about pain. As an interdisciplinary endeavor, the course is of relevance not only to anthropology but also to medical sociology, medical ethics, public health, health policy, and science and technology studies.

Taught by: Justin Clapp

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 334 Feminist Ethnography

This course will investigate the relationships among women, gender, sexuality, and anthropological research. We will begin by exploring the trajectory of research interest in women and gender, drawing first from the early work on gender and sex by anthropologists like Margaret Mead and Ruth Benedict; moving through the 1970s and 1980s arguments about gender, culture, and political economy; arriving at more current concerns with gender, race, sexuality, and empire. For the rest of the semester, we will critically read contemporary ethnographies addressing pressing issues such as nationalism, militarism, neoliberalism and fundamentalism. Throughout, we will investigate what it means not only to "write women's worlds", but also to analyze broader socio-cultural, political, and economic processes through a gendered lens. We will, finally, address the various ways feminist anthropology fundamentally challenged the discipline's epistemological certainties, as well as how it continues to transform our understanding of the foundations of the modern world.

Taught by: Thomas

Course not offered every year

Prerequisites: Should have some fundamental knowledge of Cultural Anthropology.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 337 Applying Anthropology Methods in Policy and Practice

This course will introduce students to applied anthropology methods for doing research that can change policy and practices. Examples of policy and practice change include clinical practices in health care settings, social welfare policy, and legal advocacy. Students will be trained in multiple anthropology research methods, including brief participant-observation, presentation of self in the field, entering the field in diverse cultural environments, qualitative interviewing, life story interviewing, and ethnographic content analysis of textual material. Students will also learn how to use NVivo software for analyzing qualitative and some quantitative data from their field notes, interviews, and analysis of popular articles/websites. Finally, students will practice writing products for non-academic audiences, such as policymakers, the media, and the general public. The course will emphasize using anthropology research methods to address real-world problems in policy and practice in diverse cultural contexts. This course is a service learning class affiliated with the Netter Center and a Benjamin Franklin Scholars course.

Taught by: Sahota

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 342 Dress and Fashion in Africa

Throughout Africa, social and cultural identities of ethnicity, gender, generation, rank and status were conveyed in a range of personal ornamentation that reflects the variation of African cultures. The meaning of one particular item of clothing can transform completely when moved across time and space. As one of many forms of expressive culture, dress shape and give forms to social bodies. In the study of dress and fashion, we could note two distinct broad approaches, the historical and the anthropological. While the former focuses on fashion as a western system that shifted across time and space, and linked with capitalism and western modernity; the latter approach defines dress as an assemblage of modification the body. The Africanist proponents of this anthropological approach insisted that fashion is not a dress system specific to the west and not tied with the rise of capitalism. This course will focus on studying the history of African dress by discussing the forces that have impacted and influenced it overtime, such as socio-economic, colonialism, religion, aesthetics, politics, globalization, and popular culture. The course will also discuss the significance of the different contexts that impacted the choices of what constitute an appropriate attire for distinct situations. African dress in this context is not a fixed relic from the past, but a live cultural item that is influenced by the surrounding forces.

Taught by: Ali-Dinar

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 346 GIS for the Digital Humanities and Social Sciences

This course introduces students to theory and methodology of the geospatial humanities and social sciences, understood broadly as the application of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and spatial analysis techniques to the study of social and cultural patterns in the past and present. By engaging with spatial theory, spatial analysis case studies, and technical methodologies, students will develop an understanding of the questions driving, and tools available for, humanistic and social science research projects that explore change over space and time. We will use ESRI's ArcGIS software to visualize, analyze, and integrate historical, anthropological, and environmental data. Techniques will be introduced through the discussion of case studies and through demonstration of software skills. During supervised laboratory sessions, the various techniques and analyses covered will be applied to sample data and also to data from a region/topic chosen by the student.

Taught by: Hammer

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 347 Anthropology of Corporations

Modern business corporations can be characterized as having their own internal cultures, more or less distinct from one another. They also exist within encompassing cultures and cultural flows. At the same time, corporations are producers and disseminators, and thus have effects on their surrounding environments, effects that extend from the local to the global. This course examines modern corporations from these three perspectives through theoretical and ethnographic readings, guest speakers from the corporate world, and independent research conducted by the students. Course requirements include student presentations of their research and readings; one or more take-home exams; and a final research paper.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 359 Nutritional Anthropology

This course will explore the significance as it relates to food behaviors and nutritional status in contemporary human populations. The topics covered will be examined from a biocultural perspective and include 1) definition and functions of nutrients and how different cultures perceive nutrients, 2) basic principles of human growth and development, 3) methods to assess dietary intake, 4) food taboos, 5) feeding practices of infants and children, 6) food marketing, 7) causes and consequences of under- and over-nutrition, and 8) food insecurity and hunger.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 362 Intro to Digital Archaeology

Digital methods allow archaeologists to approach research questions about the human past with increasing accuracies on larger datasets and at multiple scales. This class introduces students to the three main steps of digital archaeology: data management, analysis, and sharing. Data management involves the design, creation, and curation of digital objects that capture the archaeological process and evidence. Students will gain deep familiarity in working with the main types of digital archaeological data: structured data (relational databases), 3D models/spatial data, and raster images. The class will provide abundant hands-on experience with the latest equipment and software for working with many different kinds of data. We will learn about data analysis techniques through a close examination of a variety of case studies in the literature that demonstrate how other archaeologists have applied digital methods to their archaeological questions. Finally, we will discuss the importance of sharing data through open access data publication and we will apply our skills with structured data to existing online archaeological datasets. The goal of this class is to prepare students to make methodological decisions during future research endeavors, both in the field and in the archaeological lab.

Taught by: PETER COBB

Prerequisite: Prior archaeological classwork and/or experience preferred

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 375 Quantitative Analysis of Anthropological Data

Taught by: Dibble

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 386 Desire and Demand II: Culture, Production, and Consumption in the Global Marketplace

The goal of this course is to understand and to investigate both historical and contemporary issues related to a culture of consumption. Reading topics cover both contemporary and scholarly issues in cultural anthropology, popular culture, consumer behavior, off-shore production, social networking, media and communications, financial and real estate markets and marketing. Class distinctions are equally interdisciplinary as we focus on investigating and identifying critical global/local linkages. We analyze the various ways in which Philadelphia and other "global cities" are competing for consumer revenues. We ask what factors have led contemporary society reaching its current stage of mass consumption and how have certain goods and services been reconfigured, packaged or re-packaged to attract new consumers. In order to better understand the link between consumption and production factors we explore the relationship between outsourcing and/or offshore production and modern consumption. Approximately sixty percent of the seminar takes place in the classroom and will include lecture, class discussion, and films. The remaining portion of the class meetings will involve local and regional travel. Research assignments emphasize the use of anthropological participant-observation techniques to investigate the relationships between culture and contemporary mass consumption within the contexts of re-gentrification, urbanization, and globalization.

Taught by: Diggs-Thompson

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 402 Applied Research Skills in Global Community Health

While political borders remain, social and human borders fall with the increasing movement of people, ideas, and resources across geographies. What is global becomes local. While biomedical and counting sciences advance, the human experience and influence remain core to understanding behavior, beliefs, and awareness. What is human remains paramount. The Maya Western Highlands of Guatemala are undergoing health changes (trauma, maternal-infant health, diabetes, mental health) through economic development and continued human migration to and from the US. The Cobbs Creek neighborhood in West Philadelphia is also facing epidemics of non-communicable diseases. In this context, Applied Skills in Global Community Health will provide academic and professional skills development in comparing the role of culture, history and politics in the health of a population in transition (demographic, nutritional, epidemiologic, economic) in both settings. Classroom work will occur in the spring of each year combined with a short (1 wk) field experience in the Western Highlands of Guatemala. In addition students will examine health and community research in the Cobbs Creek neighborhood of West Philadelphia. Students may substitute 10 week field work as part of the companion course ANTH 403 for the 1 week experience.

Taught by: Barg/Bream

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 403 Field Experience in Global Community Health

The Maya Western Highlands of Guatemala are undergoing health changes (trauma, maternal-infant health, diabetes, mental health) through economic development and continued human migration to and from the US. The communities of Santiago Atitlan, Solola, San Jaun Sacatepequez, and Coatepeque have community based infrastructures (public health clinics, private NGOs, and research projects) that work to address these health changes. In this context, the Field Experience in Global Community Health will provide applied academic and professional skills development in data collection, analysis, and reporting. Field work will occur in the summer of each year combined with a campus based skills development experience.

Taught by: Barg/Bream

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Independent Study

0.5 Course Units

ANTH 404 Introduction to the Human Skeleton

An introduction to the anatomy and biology of the human skeleton. Laboratory work will be supplemented by lectures and demonstrations on the development structure, function, and evolution of the human skeleton.

Taught by: Monge

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 407 Human Evolution

An examination of fossils and other evidence documenting human evolution. Lectures and readings are supplemented with slide and fossil reproduction materials.

Course not offered every year

Prerequisite: ANTH 003

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 415 Archaeology of Animals

This course introduces the study of animal bones from archaeological sites. Faunal analysis is an interdisciplinary science which draws methods from archaeology, biology, and paleontology. Bones, shells, and other remains yield evidence for the use of animals by humans, and evidence for the biology of animals and for past environments. The course will focus on research approaches to important transitions in human-animal relationships: the development of human hunting and fishing, animal domestication, early pastoralism, and the emergence of market economies in animal products. Class presentations will include lectures and discussion concerning research design and archaeological case material, with additional videos, slidework with field and laboratory equipment, and supervised work identifying and describing archaeological materials from the University Museum's collections. This class is taught in the Zooarchaeology Laboratory of the Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials

Taught by: Moore

Course not offered every year

Prerequisites: ANTH 001 or permission from instructor.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 419 Mining Archaeology

In ancient times, materials such as stone and metals were used to produce artifacts including pigments, jewelry, tools, and weapons. This course is designed to introduce students to research on the early exploitation of mineral resources. Which techniques were used to access and process raw materials in antiquity? Which archaeological methods can be used to investigate these features and artifacts? The course will provide worldwide examples through time, ranging from Stone Age flint mining, Iron Age rock salt mining to Medieval silver mining. Ethnographic studies and hands-on activities will contribute to our understanding of mining in archaeology, and artifacts from the Museum's collections will undergo scientific analysis in the Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials.

Taught by: Jansen

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 429 Anthropology of the Environment

This seminar draws from social scientific and scientific literatures to explore current themes in the anthropology of the environment. We will investigate the links between climate change science and social science, and the ways in which anthropologists can contribute via in-depth fieldwork methodology and long engagement in issues of society-environment interactions. We will also explore how potential environmental, social, and biological impacts of global warming on the future are being assessed through conceptual paradigms linked to risk, probability, scenario forecasting, tipping points, planetary boundaries, and extinction.

Taught by: Petryna

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 433 Andean Archaeology

Consideration of the culture history of the native peoples of the Andean area, with emphasis on the pre-conquest archaeology of the Central-Andean region.

Taught by: Erickson

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 440 Plants and Society

Interactions between humans and the living landscape around us have played - and continue to play - a fundamental role in shaping our worldview. This course is designed to introduce students to the diverse ways in which humans interact with plants. We will focus on the integration of ethnographic information and archaeological case studies in order to understand the range of interactions between humans and plants, as well as how plants and people have profoundly changed one another. Topics will include the origins of agriculture; cooking and plant processing; human health and the world of ethnomedicine; and poisonous and psychoactive plants. We will examine ancient plant material firsthand at the Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and will handle botanical ecofacts from the Penn Museum's collections. Students will also carry out a substantial research project focused on an archaeological culture and plant species of their own interest.

Taught by: WHITE

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 441 Cross Cultural Approaches to Health and Illness

This course will explore the ways that health and illness-related beliefs and behaviors develop within communities. We will identify the forces that shape these beliefs and behaviors and ultimately affect who gets sick, who gets well, and the very nature of the illness experience. Emphasis will be given to the relationships among sociocultural, political and biological factors and the ways that these factors interact to produce the variation that we see in health and illness related attitudes, behaviors and outcomes across cultures.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 444 Human Growth and Development

In this course we will examine key issues and the processes involved in human growth and development. By their very nature, growth and development are biocultural processes that require an integrated analysis of social construction and biological phenomena. As such, we will incorporate insight from evolutionary theory, ecology, developmental biology, psychology, human biology, and cultural anthropology in our study of growth and development. Such an integrated perspective will help students to see that development is not just a biological unfolding from birth through adolescence and adulthood. Rather, development is best understood as process that is deeply intertwined with the environment within which the organism develops. Additionally, we will apply these biocultural and socio-ecological insights to emerging health challenges associated with various developmental stages. The study of human growth and development is useful to all students in biological, health-related, and social sciences. Course enrollment is restricted to juniors, seniors, and graduate students only.

Taught by: Hoke

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 451 Historical Archaeology

Archaeology of the Modern World from the Columbian voyage (1492) to the 20th century. Topics such as the rise of early modern Europe, European exploration and colonization, African American Archaeology, Asian American Archaeology, the rise of colonial society, contact with native peoples, the Industrial Revolution, and the archaeology of the 20th century will be covered.

Taught by: Schuyler

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 454 Quantitative Analysis of Anthropological Data

This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of how to work with and present quantitative data. Topics include graphical display of numerical data, probability, sampling, descriptive and inferential statistics (parametric and non-parametric two-and three group tests, regression and correlation). Using examples drawn from the social sciences and anthropology, the focus is on teaching the logic behind quantitative arguments and statistical tests, rather than on the mathematical formulas, making the course especially relevant for students who do not have a strong background in mathematics. This course fulfills the Colleges Quantitative Data Analysis requirement.

Taught by: Dibble

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 458 Introduction to Paleopathology

Disease evaluated in its culture context, based on findings in skeletal and mummified paleopathologic specimens. Instruction in examination of specimens. For senior anthropology majors, graduate and medical students.

Taught by: Zimmerman

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 461 Global Food Security

This is an interdisciplinary course on the problems of food demand and consumption, production and supply in our increasingly globalized and urbanizing world. Special attention will be given to the intersections of current technologies of food production, current nutritional problems, environmental change and resource degradation, and the changing quality of human social life under globalization. Where and how will sufficient nutritious food be produced sustainably and how can the politics and economics of equitable distribution in such large urban populations be achieved? (Previously ANTH 561)

Taught by: Spooner

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 508 Conservation of Archaeological Sites and Landscapes : Impossible Ruins

Archaeological sites and landscapes have long been considered places of historical and cultural significance and symbols of national and ethnic identity. More recently they have offered new opportunities for economic and touristic development in both urban and rural settings. With a unique set of physical conditions including fragmentation, illegibility, extreme environmental exposure and material deterioration, as well as contested ownership and control, their conservation, management, and interpretation as heritage places require special knowledge and methodologies for both heritage specialists and archaeologists. This seminar will address the history, theories, principles, and practices of the preservation and interpretation of archaeological sites and landscapes. The course will draw from a wide range of published material and experiences representing both national and international contexts. Topics will include site and landscape documentation and recording; site formation and degradation; intervention strategies including interpretation and display, legislation, policy, and contemporary issues of descendent community ownership and global heritage. The course will be organized as a seminar incorporating readings, lectures and discussions on major themes defining the subject of ruins and archaeological site conservation. Readings have been selected to provide exposure to seminal works in the development of theory and method as well as current expressions of contemporary practice. This will set the background for the selected case study site which will provide students the opportunity to work with primary and secondary materials related to archaeological and ruin sites: excavation reports, stabilization work, conservation and interpretation plans, etc. Students will study specific issues leading toward the critique or development of a conservation and management program in accordance with guidelines established by UNESCO/ICOMOS/ICAHM and other organizations. This year the course site will be FORT UNION NATIONAL MONUMENT, NM.

Taught by: Erickson/Matero

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For advanced undergraduates and graduate students

ANTH 511 Ethics, Archaeology, and Cultural Heritage

This seminar will explore some of the most important issues that are now a central part of archaeological, anthropological and historical research throughout the world. The identification and control of cultural heritage is a central part of the framework for research within other communities. Issues for this course will also include cultural identity, human rights, repatriation, colonialism, working with communities and many other topics. Field research today must be based upon a new series of ethical standards that will be discussed and examined within this class. Major topics include: cultural heritage - definitions and constructs, cosmopolitanism and collecting, archaeology and looting, cultural heritage preservation, museums - universal and national, museum acquisition policies, cultural identity, international conventions (including underwater issues), national laws of ownership, community based development, cultural tourism, development models, and human rights.

Taught by: Leventhal

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 514 Petrography of Cultural Materials

Introduction to thin-section petrography of stone and ceramic archaeological materials. Using polarized light microscopy, the first half of this course will cover the basics of mineralogy and the petrography of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks. The second half will focus on the petrographic description of ceramic materials, mainly pottery, with emphasis on the interpretation of provenance and technology. As part of this course, students will characterize and analyze archaeological samples from various collections. Prior knowledge of geology is not required.

Taught by: Boileau

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 519 Psychoanalysis and Anthropology

This course will introduce students to the rich literature that has grown up around the encounter between psychoanalysis and anthropology, from totem and taboo, to studies of the Oedipus complex, child-rearing practices, ritual symbolism, mythology, and dreams. The class will also look to the future, endeavoring to examine as well such issues as the role of computers (are they self objects?) and the internet (including such online games as "Second Life"), dreams in space alien abduction narratives, sexuality in advertising, political psychology, and other contemporary issues. This course counts towards towards the Psychoanalytic Studies (PSYS) Minor.

Taught by: Urban/Blum

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 521 Material World in Archaeological Science

By focusing on the scientific analysis of inorganic archaeological materials, this course will explore processes of creation in the past. ANTH 221/521 will take place in the Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and will be team taught in three modules: analysis of lithics, analysis of ceramics and analysis of metals. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how the transformation of materials into objects provides key information about past human behaviors and the socio-economic contexts of production, distribution, exchange and use. Discussion topics will include invention and adoption of new technologies, change and innovation, use of fire, and craft specialization.

Taught by: Boileau/Dibble/Jansen

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 527 Cultural Heritage and Conflict

Intentional destruction of cultural heritage is designed to erase the presence of a people in history and has become an all too familiar feature of the devastation wrought by contemporary violence and "ethnic cleansing." Recent cases appear frequently in news headlines and include such well-known examples as the 2001 demolition of the Bamiyan Buddhas in Afghanistan, the 2012 destruction of Sufi shrines in Timbuktu, Mali, and the recent obliteration of historic sites across Syria and Iraq. This course explores this phenomenon by examining such questions as: Why is cultural heritage targeted in conflict? Under what circumstances? By whom? In so doing, we will engage with readings that discuss the historical development of the international laws and norms that aim to protect cultural heritage during conflict and examples successful and unsuccessful humanitarian interventions.

Taught by: Brian Daniels

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 529 Psychoanalytic and Anthropological Perspectives on Childhood

This course will consider the interaction between culture and individual psychology, and between nature and nurture from birth to adulthood. Through through an examination of phases of human development described by psychoanalysis, and evidence concerning psychoanalytic ideas from around the world, we will consider questions such as: How do people become who they are, both similar to others and uniquely individual? How do we develop emotionally? What features are and are not universal for our species? What is and is not known about these questions. The instructors are both psychoanalysts, one a psychiatrist, one a pediatrician. This course counts towards the Psychoanalytic Studies (PSYS) Minor.

Taught by: Blum/Shapiro

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 533 Archaeobotany Seminar

In this course we will approach the relationship between plants and people from archaeological and anthropological perspectives in order to investigate diverse plant consumption, use, and management strategies. Topics will include: plants as foods and intoxicating beverages; medicines, poisons, and psychoactive plants; plants as building supplies and textiles; wild plant collection, and the origins of plant domestication. Students will learn both field procedures and laboratory methods of archaeobotany through a series of hands-on activities and lab-based experiments. The final research project will involve an original in-depth analysis and interpretation of archaeobotanical specimens. By the end of the course, students will feel comfortable reading and evaluating archaeobotanical literature and will have a solid understanding of how archaeobotanists interpret human activities of the past.

Taught by: Chantel White

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 543 Public Environmental Humanities

This broadly interdisciplinary course is designed for Graduate and Undergraduate Fellows in the Penn Program in Environmental Humanities (PPEH) who hail from departments across Arts and Sciences as well as other schools at the university. The course is also open to others with permission of the instructors. Work in environmental humanities by necessity spans academic disciplines. By design, it can also address and engage publics beyond traditional academic settings. This seminar, with limited enrollment, explores best practices in public environmental humanities. Students receive close mentoring to develop and execute cross-disciplinary, public engagement projects on the environment. In spring 2018, participants have the opportunity to participate in PPEH's public engagement projects on urban waters and environmental data. These ongoing projects document the variety of uses that Philadelphians make of federal climateand environmental data, in and beyond city government; they also shine light onclimate and environmental challenges our city faces and the kinds of data we need to address them. Working with five community partners across Philadelphia, including the City's Office of Sustainability, students in this course will develop data use stories and surface the specific environmental questions neighborhoods have and the kinds of data they find useful. The course hosts guest speakers and research partners from related public engagement projects across the planet; community, neighborhood, open data, and open science advocates; and project partners in government in the City of Philadelphia and Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Course assignments include: * 2 short-form essays (course blog posts); * a 12-hour research stay (conducted over multiple visits) with a community course partner to canvas data uses and desires; * authorship of 3 multi-media data stories; * co-organization and participation in a city-wide data storytelling event on May 2, 2018.

Taught by: Wiggin

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 547 Anthropology and Education

An introduction to the intent, approach, and contribution of anthropology to the study of socialization and schooling in cross-cultural perspective. Education is examined in traditional, colonial, and complex industrial societies.

Taught by: Hall or Posecznick

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 549 Topics in Archaeological Method and Theory

It is the stated purpose of archaeology to interpret the human past. However, this fascination with the things that came before is not new. Social memory, the construction of a collective notion about the way things used to be, looms large in the archaeological record, particularly through the material representations of these memories -- monuments. This class explores memory and monumentality, both ancient and modern, through world-wide case studies ranging from the American South to the islands of Polynesia and from 5000 BC to the present.

Taught by: Kassabaum

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 553 Archaeology of East Asia

This is an introductory survey course on the ancient societies and civilizations of East Asia, especially in the areas known today as Japan, China, and Korea. This course will explore the general lifeway of the peoples in these regions during the prehistoric periods, specifically from the Mesolithic/Neolithic periods about 8,000 BC up to the era of political unification around 700 AD in both the Japanese archipelago and the Korean peninsula. By examining primarily the art and architecture of these prehistoric societies, this course will explore important sociocultural aspects, including subsistence, sedentism, state formation, social stratification, leadership, warfare, trade, technology, population movement, and mortuary custom. The course aims to provide a thorough foundation for further study in the histories and cultures of ancient Japan, China, and Korea.

Taught by: Nishimura,Y

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 557 Seminar in Archaeological Theory and Method: Archaeology of Landscapes

Advanced seminar for potential professional archaeologists. Course will examine critically main past and present theoretical issues in archaeological research and interpretation, and consider various methodologies utilized towards these interpretive ends.

Taught by: Erickson

Course not offered every year

Prerequisites: ANTH 241 or ANTH 600 and one archaeology area course or permission from instructor

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 562 Intro to Digital Archaeology

Digital methods allow archaeologists to approach research questions about the human past with increasing accuracies on larger datasets and at multiple scales. This class introduces students to the three main steps of digital archaeology: data management, analysis, and sharing. Data management involves the design, creation, and curation of digital objects that capture the archaeological process and evidence. Students will gain deep familiarity in working with the main types of digital archaeological data: structured data (relational databases), 3D models/spatial data, and raster images. The class will provide abundant hands-on experience with the latest equipment and software for working with many different kinds of data. We will learn about data analysis techniques through a close examination of a variety of case studies in the literature that demonstrate how other archaeologists have applied digital methods to their archaeological questions. Finally, we will discuss the importance of sharing data through open access data publication and we will apply our skills with structured data to existing online archaeological datasets. The goal of this class is to prepare students to make methodological decisions during future research endeavors, both in the field and in the archaeological lab.

Taught by: Peter Cobb

Course not offered every year

Prerequisite: Prior archaeological classwork and/or experience preferred

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 567 Living World in Archaeological Science

By focusing on the scientific analysis of archaeological remains, this course will explore life and death in the past. It takes place in the Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and is team taught in three modules: human skeletal analysis, analysis of animal remains, and analysis of plant remains. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how organic materials provide key information about past environments, human behavior, and cultural change through discussions of topics such as health and disease, inequality, and food.

Taught by: White, Monge, Moore

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 575 Quantitative Analysis of Anthropological Data

Taught by: Dibble

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 581 Environmental Activism with Indigenous Communities

We are living in a moment of Environmental crisis as the oceans rise and carbon emissions warm the planet. And yet more than half the US population believes climate change will not harm them personally and 30% feel they cannot trust science. As the standoff at Standing Rock and the #NoDapl movement made clear, Native Americans' spirituality is playing a central role in galvanizing the public and providing alternative narratives to capitalist consumption. Students will work on ongoing projects to build partnerships between Penn and two Native American communities-- Sitting Bull College on the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in South Dakota and a UNESCO World Heritage Site nomination submitted by Ojibwe First Nations in Canada to preserve 24,000 sq. kms. of boreal forest through the use of Traditional Ecological Knowledge. This class will learn to build multi-media exhibits using Scalar, Omeka, Google Earth, and StoryMap. No previous experience is necessary. Students will learn about choosing a platform, creating dynamic narratives that incorporate videos and interactive features, and learning about grant writing in order to sustain digital projects and benefit Indigenous communities. Although the emphasis will be on practical applications or praxis, the course will also engage with new theories from the fields of Digital Humanities and Environmental Humanities as a basis for building new exhibits.

Taught by: Powell

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 583 Ethnographic Filmmaking

This ethnographic methodology course considers filmmaking/videography as a tool in conducting ethnographic research as well as a medium for presenting academic research to scholarly and non-scholarly audiences. The course engages the methodological and theoretical implications of capturing data and crafting social scientific accounts/narratives in images and sounds. Students are required to put theory into practice by conducting ethnographic research and producing an ethnographic film as their final project. In service to that goal, students will read about ethnography (as a social scientific method and representational genre), learn and utilize ethnographic methods in fieldwork, watch non-fiction films (to be analyzed for formal properties and implicit assumptions about culture/sociality), and acquire rigorous training in the skills and craft of digital video production. This is an ABCS course, and students will produce short ethnographic films with students in Philadelphia high schools as part of a partnership project with the School District of Philadelphia. Due to the time needed for ethnographic film production, this is a year-long course, which will meet periodically in both the fall and spring semesters.

Taught by: Hall, Kathleen & Das, Amit

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 586 Desire and Demand II: Culture, Production, and Consumption in the Global Marketplace

The goal of this course is to understand and to investigate both historical and contemporary issues related to a culture of consumption. Reading topics cover both contemporary and scholarly issues in cultural anthropology, popular culture, consumer behavior, off-shore production, social networking, media and communications, financial and real estate markets and marketing. Class distinctions are equally interdisciplinary as we focus on investigating and identifying critical global/local linkages. We analyze the various ways in which Philadelphia and other "global cities" are competing for consumer revenues. We ask what factors have led contemporary society reaching its current stage of mass consumption and how have certain goods and services been reconfigured, packaged or re-packaged to attract new consumers. In order to better understand the link between consumption and production factors we explore the relationship between outsourcing and/or offshore production and modern consumption. Approximately sixty percent of the seminar takes place in the classroom and will include lecture, class discussion, and films. The remaining portion of the class meetings will involve local and regional travel. Research assignments emphasize the use of anthropological participant-observation techniques to investigate the relationships between culture and contemporary mass consumption within the contexts of re-gentrification, urbanization, and globalization.

Taught by: Diggs-Thompson

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: See course description for ANTH 386.

ANTH 593 Natural and Cultural Heritage in Global Perspective

This seminar will explore the ideas surrounding the theories, discourses, and practices surrounding natural and cultural heritage. Heritage has become inscribed in the planning of urban and rural landscapes, designed as tourist destinations, and considered a universal good in global cosmopolitan society. But it would be well to ask: what kind of "nature" and "culture" has been labeled as heritage? What kind of organizations, economics, and politics are necessary to sustain it? How are these put in place? By whom? For whom? Over the course of the semester, students will engage with readings that discuss how cultural and natural heritage is communicated to the public and the relationship between academic critique and pragmatic social engagement. This seminar is further grounded by a partnership between the Penn Cultural Heritage Center and the U.S. Mission to UNESCO focused on the assessment of World Heritage Sites, and students will have the opportunity to learn from and participate in specific case studies.

Taught by: Daniels

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 598 The Economics of Heritage

Governmental resources for archaeological and heritage sites are declining worldwide while commercial and economic development initiatives are threatening the fabric of heritage and the larger landscape environment to ever greater degrees. As a consequence, the competition for resources to protect and preserve heritage is intensifying, as is the challenge to articulate the value of heritage resources vs. competing commercial or public projects. This is the context for understanding the issues surrounding the definition of the value of cultural heritage assets and the tools available for their measurement and management. This course explores in some depth issues relating to the economic analysis of heritage and culture. It is designed to provide students with a foundational understanding of the economics of heritage-related projects, the tools and techniques available for their analysis and the ethical and practical issues of public policy and private actions that determine the future of heritage resources. Readings and case studies will explore technical, practical and ethical issues that arise in cultural heritageeconomics. Relevant analytical techniques will be introduced and particular emphasis will be placed on commercial, government and community issues unique to heritage-related activities. Special emphasis will be placed upon developing pertinent strategies for the tourist industry. Students will produce one case-study project intended to integrate the technical and practical aspects of the course.

Taught by: Peter Gould

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 600 Contemporary Archaeology in Theory

This graduate seminar addresses contemporary anthropological archaeology and considers the varied ways inferences are made about past and present human behavior from the archaeological record. It reviews such fundamental topics as the use of analogy, Middle Range theory, symbolism and meaning, social and cultural evolution, ideology and power, feminism and gender, and indigenous (non-Western) perspectives. It also foregrounds basic issues regarding heritage, looting, and ethics.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: First-year anthropology graduate students.

ANTH 602 Evolutionary Anthropology

This course will explore various subfields of biological anthropology to better understand what it means to be human. Special attention will be paid to current issues and problems in these subfields, and the different ways in which researchers are attempting to understand and uncover the details of human evolution. Among the areas that are explored in this course are paleoanthropology, primatology, human biology, molecular anthropology, evolutionary medicine, epigenetics, and human life history. Specific issues to be explored include the primate roots of human behavior, brain and language evolution, new fossil hominins, the origins of anatomically modern humans, and modern human migration history.

Taught by: Schurr

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: First-year anthropology graduate students.

ANTH 603 Language in Culture and Society

First-year anthropology graduate students or Instructor Permission. Examination of properties of human language which enable social persons to interpret the cultural world and to act within it. Topics include: principles of lexical and grammatical organization; the role of language structure (grammar) and linguistic context (indexicality) in discursive activity; referential uses of language; social interaction; markers of social role, identity, and group-belonging; criteria by which models of linguistic form and function are formulated; the empirical limits within which different models have explanatory value.

Taught by: Agha

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: First-year anthropology graduate students.

ANTH 607 Contemporary Native Americans

This course examines the social and political lives of contemporary Native American Indians in the United States and Canada. Topics include: Indigenous identity; homelands and natural resources; popular culture and media; Indigenous arts and cultural expression; museum representations; athletics; gender relations; tribal recognition and sovereignty; and resistance movements. We will consider the origins of federal programs and legislation that have become essential to the protection of Native American freedoms. Students can expect to gain an appreciation of the complexity and cultural diversity of Native communities and tribal nations and insights into their interactions with other cultures over time.

Taught by: Bruchac

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 610 Films of Utility: Analysis, Argument and Building Block

This course explores non-fiction film as a tool in creating discourse and catalyzing progressive social change. Our specific purpose will be to understand how non-fiction filmmaking - documentary and the essay film - can be used as a cultural strategy to affect political movement. Screening and analyzing a wide range of contemporary independent films, many produced in community settings outside the commercial entertainment marketplace, class participants will explore the forms and methods of these films of utility. Part of the course work will involve applying these filmmaking approaches to a short film project in support of a movement of importance to the student participant. A permit is required to enroll in this course. Please contact the instructor at massiah@sas.upenn.edu.

Taught by: Louis Massiah

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 617 Contemporary Approaches to the Study of Culture and Society

A critical examination of recent history and theory in cultural and social anthropology. Topics include structural-functionalism; symbolic anthropology; post-modern theory. Emphasis is on major schools and trends in America, Britain, and France.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: First-year anthropology graduate students.

ANTH 620 Directed Reading and Research

To be arranged only by consultation with academic adviser and faculty member(s) to be involved; a proposed syllabus must be presented for approval, and written papers will be required without exception. On approval of these papers one copy must be presented to the Department of Anthropology office for filing.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

Notes: May be repeated for credit

ANTH 621 Directed Field Training and Research

To be arranged only by consultation with academic adviser and the faculty member(s) to be involved; a proposed syllabus must be presented for approval and written papers will be required without exception. On approval of these papers, one copy must be presented to the Department of Anthropology office for filing.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

Notes: May be repeated for credit

ANTH 628 Language in Culture and Society: Special Topics

The course is devoted to a single research topic of contemporary interest in linguistic anthropology. Topics vary from year to year. Readings locate current debates in relation to longstanding assumptions in the literature and new directions in contemporary research.

Taught by: Agha

Course not offered every year

Prerequisite: ANTH 603 or Instructor Permission

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 633 Forensic Anthropology

This course will investigate and discuss the various techniques of analysis that biological anthropologists can apply to forensic cases. Topics include human osteology, the recovery of bodies, the analysis of life history, the reconstruction of causes of death, and various case studies where anthropologists have contributed significantly to solving forensic cases. Discussions will include the limitations of forensic anthropology and the application of DNA recovery to skeletal/mummified materials.

Taught by: Monge

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 634 Feminist Ethnography

This course will investigate the relationships among women, gender, sexuality, and anthropological research. We will begin by exploring the trajectory of research interest in women and gender, drawing first from the early work on gender and sex by anthropologists like Margaret Mead and Ruth Benedict; moving through the 1970s and 1980s arguments about gender, culture, and political economy; arriving at more current concerns with gender, race, sexuality, and empire. For the rest of the semester, we will critically read contemporary ethnographies addressing pressing issues such as nationalism, militarism, neoliberalism and fundamentalism. Throughout, we will investigate what it means not only to "write women's worlds", but also to analyze broader socio-cultural, political, and economic processes through a gendered lens. We will, finally, address the various ways feminist anthropology fundamentally challenged the discipline's epistemological certainties, as well as how it continues to transform our understanding of the foundations of the modern world.

Taught by: Thomas

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 636 Iraq: Ancient Cities and Empires

Iraq: Ancient Cities and Empires is a chronological survey of the ancient civilization that existed in the drainage basin of the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers from the early settled village farming communities of the 7th millennium BCE to the middle of the 1st millennium BCE, when Nebuchadnezzar II ruled Babylon and much of the Middle East. Though organized period by period, NELC 241 explores various social, political, economic, and ideological topics, exposing students to various strands of evidence, including settlement survey data, excavated architectural remains, artifacts, and documentary sources, as well as an eclectic mix of theoretical perspectives. The course aims to provide students with a strong foundation for the further study of the ancient and pre-modern Middle East.

Taught by: Zettler

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 643 Globalization And Its Historical Significance

Globalization is one of the most comprehensive topics of our time, and also one of the most controversial. This course assesses the current state of globalization, considering it in terms of economic, political, and cultural change, and follows its progress through the semester. The class will be led through the main topics and debates, introduced to conceptual and empirical tools for framing academic discussion and research about its dynamics, how and when it began, and (most particularly) how it differs from earlier episodes of historical change.

Taught by: Spooner

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 649 Molecular Anthropology

In this course, we will explore the molecular revolution in biological anthropology. In particular, we will examine how molecular data can be used to illuminate anthropological question concerning human origins, evolution and biological variation. Some of the specific topics to be covered in this course are the phylogenetic relationships among primates, kinship in apes and monkeys, the hominoid trichotomy, modern human origins and migrations, Neanderthal and Denisovan admixture with modern humans, biogenetics of skin color, and physiological, phenotypic and disease adaptations.

Taught by: Schurr

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 654 Topics In Anthropology and the Modern World

This course relates anthropological models and methods to current problems in the Modern World. The overall objective is to show how the research findings and analytical concepts of anthropology may be used to illuminate and explain events as they have unfolded in the recent news and in the course of the semester. Each edition of the course will focus on a particular country or region that has been in the news.

Taught by: Spooner

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 655 Methods and Grantwriting for Anthropological Research

This course is designed for third- and fourth-year graduate students in anthropology who are working on their dissertation research proposals and submitting grants. Graduate students from other departments who will be submitting grant proposals that include an ethnographic component are also welcome. Students will develop their proposals throughout the course of the semester, and will meet important fall submission deadlines. They will begin by working with various databases to search funding sources relevant to the research they plan to conduct. In class sessions, they will also work with the professor and their peers to refine their research questions, their methods, the relationship of any previous research to their dissertation fieldwork, and the broader theoretical and "real-world" significance of their proposed projects. Finally, students will also have the opportunity to have live "chats" with representatives from funding agencies, thereby gaining a better sense of what particular foundations are looking for in a proposal.

Taught by: Thomas

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 658 Discourse-Centered Research Seminar

This seminar explores the interface between discourse, culture, and social processes. It is designed for graduate students in anthropology and related disciplines who (1) wish to study the current literature in linguistic anthropology concerned with discourse-centered approaches to culture; and (2) themselves have or will acquire during the semester discourse materials (texts, recordings, ethnographic data, etc.) that they wish to analyze from an anthropological point view. The instructor will spend time discussing his own past and current research. Class sessions will also include discussion of the writings of contemporary anthropologists investigating culture through discourse. The seminar is designed for maximum flexibility in accommodating students' research interests and needs.

Taught by: Urban

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 704 Culture/Power/Subjectivities

This doctoral level course will introduce students to a conceptual language and theoretical tools for analyzing and explaining the complex intersection of racialized, ethnic, gendered, sexual, and classed differences and asymmetrical social relations. The students will examine critically the interrelationships between culture, power, and subjectivity through a close reading of classical and contemporary social theory. Emphasis will be given to assessing the power of various theories for conceptualizing and explaining mechanisms of social stratification as well as the basis of social order and processes of social change.

Taught by: Hall

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 707 Craft of Ethnography

This course is designed to follow after Ethnographic Research Methods (EDUC 721). In the introductory course, students learned how to use qualitative methods in conducting a brief field study. This advanced level course focuses on research design and specifically the craft of ethnographic research. Students will apply what they learn in the course in writing a proposal for a dissertation research project.

Taught by: Hall

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: Must have completed EDUC 721 or equivalent introductory qualitative methods course.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ANTH 709 Current Research in Paleoanthropology

An intensive review of the major topics relating to Pleistocene human evolution, focusing on the integration of data from both biology and archeology.

Taught by: Dibble

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 719 Archaeology Field Project

This is a parallel course to ANTH 219, but on the graduate level. It will only be open to select graduate students (i.e. historical archaeology students and some CGS MA students). Specific permission of the instructor is required in each case.

Taught by: Schuyler

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Permission of instructor required.

ANTH 720 Archaeology Laboratory Field Project

Follow-up for ANTH 719 and parallel course to ANTH 220. Class will meet in three hour sections on Fridays and Saturdays and will involve the analysis of artifacts, documentary records, oral historic sources and period illustrations collected on Southern New Jersey historic sites that Fall. No previous archaeological or lab experience is required. (Robert L. Schuyler: schuyler@sas.upenn.edu; (215) 898-6965; UMuseum 412). Course may be repeated for credit.

Taught by: Schuyler

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Laboratory

1 Course Unit

ANTH 730 Readings & Research In Linguistic Anthropology

The course is designed for students and faculty interested in discussing current research and/or research topics in any area of linguistic or semiotic anthropology. The primary intent of the course is to familiarize students with the literature on selected research topics and to develop their own research agendas in the light of the literature. Students may enroll on an S/U basis for 0.5 CU per semester. The course may be repeated for credit up to 4 times.

Taught by: Agha

Two terms. student may enter either term.

Prerequisite: ANTH 603 OR INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 733 Colloquium Seminar

This graduate seminar is a full year course open to second year anthropology graduate students. Other interested students should contact the instructors for permission before enrolling. Topic changes each year, corresponding to the Penn Anthropology Department Colloquium series.

Taught by: Smit and Urban

Two terms. student may enter either term.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ANTH 751 Historical Archaeology

Archaeology of the Modern World from the Columbian voyage (1492) to the 20th century. Topics such as the rise of early modern Europe, European exploration and colonization, African American Archaeology, Asian American Archaeology, the rise of colonial society, contact with native peoples, the Industrial Revolution, and the archaeology of the 20th century will be covered.

Taught by: Schuyler

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: May be repeated for credit.

ANTH 752 Archaeology of American History: The Colonial Period

Over the last fifty years archaeologists have been exploring historic sites in the United States dating from both the Colonial Period and the 19th/20th centuries. What can archaeology now tell us about the origins of American society, the invasion of North America by various European peoples (Spanish, English, Dutch), the impact on native peoples, the rise of African American and Asian American cultures, major crisis (e.g. the revolution, Civil War, and the Great Depression), the settlement of the Far American West, and the final emergence of a truly national culture in the 20th century? A basic question will be how an American history based on both archaeology and archival sources is different and more complete than an image of the past drawn only from written sources.

Taught by: Schuyler

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit