Architecture (ARCH)

ARCH 102 Introduction to Design

An exploration of the design process utilizing drawing and model-making techniques. Skills of representation and fabrication are introduced in the context of the development of each student's capacity to observe, interpret, and translate design concepts into physical form. The course includes a weekly lecture and a biweekly studio component.

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ARCH 111 Architecture in the Anthropocene

This course will use architecture and the built environmental as a lens to investigate the emerging field of the environmental humanities. Our goal will be to analyze and understand these new intellectual frameworks in order to consider the relationship between global environmental challenges and the process of constructing the built environment. As such, we will oscillate between social and political theory, environmental history, and architectural history and theory. Issues of importance will include: theories of risk, the role of nature in political conflicts; images, design and environmental communication; and the relationship between speculative design and other narratives of the future. These conceptual frameworks will be read alongside examples of related creative projects in art, literature, and architecture, and will be amplified through presentations and discussions with studio faculty and other visitors to the course.

Taught by: Barber

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ARCH 112 Villa Gardens and Villa Life

This seminar will study the idea of villeggiature (villa life) and the ideology associated with countryside gardens and plantations. In an examination of the circularity of villa ideology across the centuries, other themes will emerge that address the relationship between urban and rural life, between architecture and natural environment and between social, cultural, economic, and political forces and landscape design. These themes will be explored through the study of selected villas and through the reading of sources drawn from villa literature, including architectural and agricultural treatises, epistolary exchanges, and drawings.

Taught by: Giannetto

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ARCH 201 Design Fundamentals I

This studio course develops drawing and model-making skills with emphasis on digital representation and digital fabrication. The capacity of nature-inspired design is explored as a foundation for the creative production of new forms of expression.

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: ARCH 102

Activity: Studio

1.5 Course Unit

ARCH 202 Design Fundamentals II

A studio course exploring the relationship between two-dimensional images and three-dimensional digital and physical models. This studio course develops advanced techniques in digital representation and fabrication through an investigation of the theme of inhabitation in architecture.

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: ARCH 201

Activity: Studio

1.5 Course Unit

ARCH 301 Design I

An introduction to the design of architecture in the city. Students explore the relationships between two- dimensional patterns and their corresponding three-dimensional interpretations through the orthographic drawings of plan, section, and elevation and three-dimensional digital and physical models.

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: ARCH 202

Activity: Studio

2 Course Units

ARCH 302 Design II

An introduction to the design of architecture in the landscape. Issues of mapping, placement, scale, and construction are explored through studio design projects, site visits, and discussions. Course work focuses on the preparation and presentation of design projects emphasizing analytical skills along with the development of imaginative invention and judgment.

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: ARCH 301

Corequisite: ARCH 312

Activity: Studio

2 Course Units

ARCH 303 Integrated Product Design Fundamentals

The creation of a successful product requires the integration of design, engineering, and marketing. The purpose of this intensive studio course is to introduce basic concepts in the design of three-dimensional products. For purposes of the course, design is understood as a creative act of synthesis expressed through various modes of 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional representation. The course develops basic design skills ranging from hand sketching to the use of digital modeling software and rapid prototyping. Fulfills the requirement for a design background course in the interdisciplinary graduate program in Integrated Product Design (IPD).

Taught by: Wesley

Course usually offered summer term only

Also Offered As: IPD 503

Activity: Studio

1 Course Unit

ARCH 311 Venice: Self-Representation, Performance, and Reception

This course focuses on the city of Venice and its elusive identity as represented in written, visual and built form. Structured as a series of topics and case studies (including primary visual and written sources; buildings and gardens) the course aims to introduce students to the material and cultural landscape of Venice and develop their ability to "read" the urban fabric and its unique physical context by identifying its various features and explaining the political, social, economic and cultural agendas that brought them into existence. The course includes visits to Venice, Van Pelt Library Library and the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Taught by: Finotti and Fabiani Giannetto

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ARCH 312 Topics in Theory I

This course examines the development of modern architecture in the early-twentieth century. Case studies and selected texts are used to explore how modern architecture responded to the challenges of the Industrial Revolution and social modernization.

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered in spring term

Corequisite: ARCH 302

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ARCH 316 Systems and Environments: Interdisciplinary History of Architectural Ideas

This seminar will discuss the emergence of 20th century environmentalist thought and practice through the lens of architectural, landscape, and urban practices and ideas. The course does not presuppose advanced knowledge in the histories of architecture, of science, or of environmentalism; rather, it will introduce students to a set of historical and intellectual frameworks broadly aware of and engaged in environmental challenges. The material covered will be relevant to those interested in architecture, art, and urban studies, and students in economics, engineering, political science, and the environmental sciences, as well as in the history of science, will find much to engage. In this sense, the course will also offer an interdisciplinary forum for inquiry and discussion around environmental issues as they are reflected in contemporary scholarly and professional practices.

Taught by: Barber

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ARCH 320 Media and Memories of the Future: Sound and Environment in Berlin.

This global cities seminar will discuss the cultural politics of memory as they develop through the spatial and sonic atmosphere of post-war Berlin. A city rich in history and focused on the future, Berlin is a laboratory for how exploration of the recent past is re-scripting the near future. The city becomes a palimpsest sonically, visually, and spatially that is available for investigation and interpretation as a means to understand historical patterns and their relationship to novel practices and methods in the present. Media, and in particular sonic cultures, as well as real estate economics and ecological design will form interrelated prisms through which to understand cities, urban practices, urban memory and the transformation of the environment. Methodologically, the course will be an experiment in the use of media to understand cities and engage with urban practices. The course also involves a mandatory, funded field trip to Berlin during spring break when students will participate in the ongoing Anthropocene Curriculum at the Haus der Kultur der Welt and will visit sound art galleries and sound design studios, as well as meeting with practitioners and researchers. Entrance to the course is via application. Music320(naomiwal@sas.upenn.edu)&ARCH320(barberda@design.upenn.edu)

Taught by: Daniel Barber and Naomi Waltham Smith

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ARCH 370 Twentieth Century New York: Theories, Images, Realities

"New York is the perfect model of a city, not the model of a perfect city." -Lewis Mumford. This course is constructed as an argument among four visionary thinkers whose differing theories of the twentieth-century city were shaped by their response to New York City's modern urban architectural, and environmental development: Lewis Mumford (1895-1990), Robert Moses (1888-1981), Jane Jacobs (1916-2006), and Rem Koolhaas (1944-). The seminar explores the central problems that preoccupied each, from civic representation and sustainability to large-scale infrastructure and urban renewal, from community and complexity to urban experience and the urban imaginary. Readings of key texts by and about the four main figures are supplemented with related material and with case studies of New York's built environment. The class includes two trips to New York to visit selected sites. The focus is double: on the role and agency of the "urban intellectual" in the production of urban culture; and on New York's material history and visual representations. New York has been called the capital of the twentieth century. The seminar aims to assess the continuing relevance of the ideas of this quartet of influential thinkers and to reflect on twenty-first-century New York in light of its evolution over the last hundred years.

Taught by: Joan Ockman and Lee Ann Custer

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ARCH 401 Advanced Design

Content and technique are explored in this studio course through the vehicle of a design project focused on the development of a critical understanding of geometries and mathematics in the representation and fabrication of contemporary architecture.

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: ARCH 302

Corequisite: ARCH 411

Activity: Studio

2 Course Units

ARCH 411 Theory II

This course examines the development of geometries in modern architecture. Primary and secondary texts are used to explore the origin and evolution of geometrical thinking in architecture.

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: ARCH 312

Corequisite: ARCH 401

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ARCH 431 Construction I

Course explores basic principles and concepts of architectural technology and describes the interrelated nature of structure, construction and environmental systems. Open to Intensive Majors only.

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

0.5 Course Units

ARCH 432 Construction II

A continuation of Construction I, focusing on light and heavy steel frame construction, concrete construction, light and heavyweight cladding systems and systems building. Open to Intensive Majors only.

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: ARCH 431

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ARCH 433 Building Systems Integration

What makes buildings livable and buildable. After the initial concept design and massing studies are complete the next step is detailing. This seminar will examine the detail, how they can inform and enhance a building's design. The primary goals of a building is that it stands up to external forces, protects inhabitants from the elements and provides a healthy environment. This course will look at the individual components of structure, skin and systems. More importantly though, it will examine the connections between them. The class will begin with lectures examining the different systems and then progress into applying these ideas as a whole to individual studio projects. The final results of this course will be a 3D wall section with accompanying details. These details will be developed in a variety of software as chosen by the student. Recommended options are Revit, Rhino, AutoCAD.

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

0.5 Course Units

ARCH 435 Structures I

Theory applied toward structural form. A review of one-dimensional structural elements; a study of arches, slabs and plates, curved surface structures, lateral and dynamic loads; survey of current and future structural technology. The course comprises both lectures and a weekly laboratory in which various structural elements, systems, materials and technical principles are explored. Open to Intensive Majors only.

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

0.5 Course Units

ARCH 436 Structures II

A continuation of the equilibrium analysis of structures covered in Structures I. The study of static and hyperstatic systems and design of their elements. Flexural theory, elastic and plastic. Design for combined stresses; prestressing. The study of graphic statics and the design of trusses. The course comprises both lectures and a weekly laboratory in which various structural elements, systems, materials and technical principles are explored. Open to Intensive Design majors only.

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: ARCH 435

Activity: Lecture

0.5 Course Units

ARCH 437 Parametic Modeling and Construction I

An introduction to the principles of construction using Building Information Modeling (BIM), a process involving the generation and manipulation of digital representations of building components defined as parameters in relation to other components. The course will explore the performance of building materials and methods of on-site and off-site assembly in load-bearing masonry structures and heavy and light wood frame construction. Topics include sustainable construction, emerging and engineered materials, and integrated building practices.

Taught by: Morgan

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

0.5 Course Units

ARCH 482 Environmental Readings

In this seminar, we will explore this green thread and analyze its influence on how we shape our environments through design and planning. The course has three parts. Throughout, the influence of literature on design and planning theory will be explored. The first part will focus on three most important theorists in environmental planning and landscape architecture: Frederick Law Olmstead Sr., Charles Eliot and Ian McHarg. The second part of the course will critically explore current theories in environmental planning and landscape architecture. The topics include: frameworks for cultural landscape studies, the future of the vernacular, ecological design and planning, sustainable and regenerative design, the languages of landscapes, and evolving views of landscape aesthetics and ethics. In the third part of the course, students will build on the readings to develop their own theory for ecological planning or, alternatively, landscape architecture. While literacy and critical inquiry are addressed throughout the course, critical thinking is especially important for this final section.

Taught by: Frederick Steiner

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ARCH 490 Independent Study

Taught by: Faculty

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

Notes: Permission of the Undergraduate Chair.

ARCH 492 Senior Thesis

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: ARCH 301

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

Notes: Permission of the Undergraduate Chair

ARCH 498 Senior Honors Thesis

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: ARCH 401

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

Notes: Permission of the Undergraduate Chair

ARCH 500 Summer Preparatory Design Studio

The Summer Preparatory Studio offers an intensive drawing and design experience to candidates for admission to the Graduate Program in Architecture who have not completed the necessary design studio prerequisites or who are required to have additional design experience to qualify for matriculation into the Master of Architecture Professional Degree Program in September. Enrollment in this program does not count towards the Master of Architecture degree. The intent of the drawing component of the course is to familiarize the student with primarily black and white mediums (pencil, charcoal, ink, etc). Exercises are designed to sharpen the student's ability to see selectively and to transform image to paper through both line and tonal renditions in freehand sketch form. Exercises will also familiarize the student with basic drafting skills necessary for architectural communication and provide an introduction to computer-aided design through applications of the intensive Rhino and Illustrator tutorials given in the Digital Navigation course. The design part of the course presents a rhythm of basic three-dimensional design studies and simple architectural studio investigations. These are intended to build fundamental skills and acquaint the student with the architectural issues of form/space, conceptualization, transformation of scale, simple functional and constructional problems and a sensitivity to context. Course enrollment is by permit only. Please contact Sarah Lam (ARCH Dept.) at sarahlam@design.upenn.edu.

Taught by: Mitnick

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Studio

2 Course Units

ARCH 501 Design Studio I

An introductory architectural design studio through which students develop critical, analytical and speculative design abilities in architecture. Students develop representational techniques for the analysis of social and cultural constructs, and formulate propositions for situating built form in the arena of the urban and suburban environment. The studio initiates innovation through a sequence of projects, spatial models and rule sets that introduce each student to rule-based design processes-- in which a reversal of expectations leads to the creation of novel spaces and structures. It introduces computation, geometric techniques, and digital fabrication. Projects explore the formation of space in relation to the body, and the developments of small scale public programs.

Taught by: Saunders and Faculty

Course usually offered in fall term

Corequisite: ARCH 521

Activity: Studio

2 Course Units

ARCH 502 Design Studio II

This studio explores urban architecture as an embodiment of cultural values. Siting, enclosure of space and tectonic definition are stressed in order to challenge students to project relevant and inventive architectural situations.

Taught by: Fierro and Faculty

Course usually offered in spring term

Corequisite: ARCH 522

Activity: Studio

2 Course Units

ARCH 511 History and Theory I

The first of three required courses in the history and theory of architecture, this is a lecture course with discussion groups that meet weekly with teaching assistants. The course explores fundamental ideas and models of architecture that have emerged over the past three hundred years.

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ARCH 512 History and Theory II

This course traces the emergence of contemporary issues in the field by exploring the architecture of the twentieth century. Buildings, projects, and texts are situated within the historical constellations of ideas, values, and technologies that inform them through a series of close readings. Rather than presenting a parade of movements or individuals, the class introduces topics as overlaying strata, with each new issue adding greater complexity even as previous layers retain their significance. Of particular interest for the course is the relationship between architecture and the organizational regimes of modernity.

Taught by: Barber

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ARCH 521 Visual Studies I

The study of analysis and projection through drawing and computer visualization

Taught by: Willems

Course usually offered in fall term

Corequisite: Arch 501

Activity: Laboratory

0.5 Course Units

ARCH 522 Visual Studies II

A continuation of the study of analysis and projection through drawing and computer visualization.

Taught by: Willems

Course usually offered in spring term

Corequisite: ARCH 502

Activity: Laboratory

0.5 Course Units

ARCH 531 Construction I

Lecture course exploring the basic principles of architectural technology and building construction. The course is focused on building material, methods of on-site and off-site preparation, material assemblies, and the performance of materials. Topics discussed include load bearing masonry structures of small to medium size (typical row house constuction), heavy and light wood frame construction, sustainable construction practices, emerging + engineered materials, and integrated building practices. The course also introduces students to Building Information Modeling (BIM) via the production of construction documents.

Taught by: Trubiano

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

0.5 Course Units

ARCH 532 Construction II

A continuation of Construction I, focusing on light and heavy steel frame construction, concrete construction, light and heavyweight cladding systems and systems building.

Taught by: Ryan

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ARCH 535 Structures I

Theory applied toward structural form. A review of one-dimensional structural elements; a study of arches, slabs and plates, curved surface structures, lateral and dynamic loads; survey of current and future structural technology. The course comprises both lectures and a weekly laboratory in which various structural elements, systems, materials and technical principles are explored.

Taught by: Farley

Course usually offered in fall term

Corequisite: Arch 535

Activity: Lecture

0.5 Course Units

ARCH 536 Structures II

A continuation of the equilibrium analysis of structures covered in Structures I. The study of static and hyperstatic systems and design of their elements. Flexural theory, elastic and plastic. Design for combined stresses; prestressing. The study of graphic statics and the design of trusses. The course comprises both lectures and a weekly laboratory in which various structural elements, systems, materials and technical principles are explored.

Taught by: Farley

Course usually offered in spring term

Corequisite: Arch 536

Activity: Lecture

0.5 Course Units

ARCH 601 Design Studio III

In this studio, students engage architecture in its role as a cultural agent and examine the way buildings establish and organize dynamic relationships between site, program and material. The design of a complex building of approximately 50,000 SF provides the pedagogical focus for this research. Students extend skills in geometrical organization, site analysis and building massing/orientation to relate to program organization, circulation and egress, building systems and materials. The conceptual focus centered on the program of dwelling and how this program can be employed to develop and promote dynamic relationships and conditions through time, both within the building and between the building and the context. Through research and experimentation students integrate ecological processes into their design methodology to support design innovations in the building's structure, its construction assemblies, environmental systems, and materials. Students work towards a high level of design resolution and visual representation, including the articulation of the building structure and its material assembly/enclosure.

Taught by: Jamelle and Faculty

Course usually offered in fall term

Corequisite: ARCH 621

Activity: Studio

2 Course Units

ARCH 602 Design Studio IV

This studio enables students to develop and resolve the design of a building in terms of program, organization, construction and the integration of structures, enclosure and environmental systems as well as life safety issues. Students select from a range of individually-directed studios within this overall framework. Each instructor develops a different approach and project for their section of this studio. Studios incorporate the expertise of external consultants in advanced areas of technology, engineering and manufacturing.

Taught by: Kolatan and Faculty

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Studio

2 Course Units

ARCH 611 History and Theory III

This is the third and final required course in the history and theory of architecture. It is a lecture course that examines selected topics, figures, projects, and theories from the history of architecture and related design fields during the 20th century. The course also draws on related and parallel historical material from other disciplines and arts, placing architecture into a broader socio-cultural-political-technological context. Seminars with teaching assistants complement the lectures.

Taught by: Barber

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ARCH 621 Visual Studies III

The final of the Visual Studies half-credit courses. Drawings are explored as visual repositories of data from which information can be gleaned, geometries tested, designs refined and transmitted. Salient strengths of various digital media programs are identified and developed through assignments that address the specific intentions and challenges of the design studio project.

Taught by: Hume

Course usually offered in fall term

Corequisite: Arch 601

Activity: Laboratory

0.5 Course Units

ARCH 631 Technology Case Studies I

A study of the active integration of various building systems in exemplary architectural projects. To deepen students' understanding of the process of building, the course compares the process of design and construction in buildings of similar type. The course brings forward the nature of the relationship between architectural design and engineering systems, and highlights the crucial communication skills required by both the architect and the engineer.

Taught by: Ryan

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

0.5 Course Units

ARCH 634 Environmental Systems II Lab

Taught by: Braham

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

0.5 Course Units

ARCH 636 Material Formations

Material Formations introduces robotic production and material dynamics as active agents in design rationalization and expression. The course investigates opportunities for designers to synthesize multiple performance criteria within architecture. Theory, Case-Studies and practical tutorials will focus on the incorporation of analytical, simulation, generative computation and robot fabrication concerns within design. While production is traditionally viewed as an explicit and final act of execution, the course explores the potential for all aspects of building production and use to participate within the creative design process, potentially producing performance and affect. Students will develop skills and experience in computer programming, physics-based simulation, and robot motion planning. A design research project will be undertaken through a number of discrete assignments that require the synthetization or structural performance along with material and robotic production constraints. The course will explore design as the outcome of materially formative processed of computation and production. Structure: the course will commence with weekly lectures and computer- based tutorials, and culminate in a series of intensive incremental learning, and prepare groups to work on a final assignment which involves the robotic fabrication of a small design prototype.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ARCH 672 Professional Practice II

A continuation of ARCH 671. Further study of the organizational structures of architectural practices today, especially those beyond the architect's office. The course is designed as a series of lectures, workshops and discussions that allows students and future practitioners the opportunity to consider and develop the analytical skills required to create buildings in the world of practice.

Taught by: Capaldi

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

0.5 Course Units

ARCH 698 Architectural Association (AA), London

An advanced Architectural Design Studio taught by Homa Farjadi in London at the Architectural Association's School of Architecture. Topics engage aspects of urban life and urban form in London, and vary from year to year. During the fifth term of the Master of Architecture program, up to fifteen students a year may enroll for the semester abroad program in London, England. This is coordinated by Prof. Homa Farjadi and is housed at the Architectural Association (AA), located on Bedford Square in the heart of Bloomsbury. Students enroll in a special design studio, ARCH 702, taught by Prof. Farjadi, and in two elective courses offered by the faculty at the AA.

Taught by: Farjadi

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ARCH 701 Design Studio V

A set of Advanced Architectural Design studios are offered from which students select through a lottery. Topics and sites vary by instructor.

Taught by: Rahim and Faculty

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Studio

2 Course Units

ARCH 702 Design Studio VI

In the final semester of the program, students select from three options: ARCH 702, an advanced design studio, ARCH 704, a research studio, the exploration of a topic or theme established by an individual faculty member or group of faculty members; or ARCH 706, an independent design thesis, the exploration of a topic or theme under the supervision of a thesis advisor.

Taught by: Rahim and Faculty

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Studio

2 Course Units

ARCH 703 Advanced Architectural Design Studio

An Advanced Architectural Design Studio specifically tailored to post-professional students. Through this studio, students engage in the challenges and opportunities presented by changes in society, technology, and urban experience. Through design projects, they explore alternative modes and markets for practice, along with new directions and new tools for design.

Taught by: Rahim and Faculty

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Studio

2 Course Units

ARCH 704 Advanced Design:Research Studio

In the final semester of the program, students select from three options: 1) An elective design studio, selected from among the advanced architectural design studios offered by the Department of Architecture; 2) a research studio, the exploration of a topic or theme established by an individual faculty member or group of faculty members; or 3) an independent thesis, the exploration of a topic or theme under the supervision of a thesis advisor.

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Studio

2 Course Units

ARCH 706 Independent Thesis

In the final semester of the program, students select from three options; 1) An elective design studio; selected from among the advanced architectural design studios offered by the Department of Architecture; 2) a research studio, the exploration of a topic or theme established by an individual faculty member or group of faculty members; or 3) an independent thesis, the exploration of a topic or theme under the supervision of a thesis advisor.

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Independent Study

2 Course Units

ARCH 708 Environmental Design Studio

An advanced design studio for the MEBD program that synthesizes the concepts and techniques of environmental building design. Topics and materials for the studio are developed in Arch 752: MEBD Research Seminar, and summarized in a research report at the end of studio.

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisites: ARCH-751, ARCH-752, ARCH-753, and ARCH-754

Activity: Studio

2 Course Units

ARCH 710 Contemporary Theory 1989-Present

A chronological overview of the approaches and attitudes adopted by architects, theorists and inter-disciplinary writers from 1993- today that havehelped shape the current discourse of architecture. This course will introduce and contextualize key projects, and polemics over the last 25 years. Central themes in this course include the impact of digital technologies and methods of design, production and materiality. These are explored through texts, movements, projects and buildings that help form an overview that has shaped the contemporary condition that we live in. There have been a myriad of different approaches and through a select set of readings and lectures students will be exposed to crucial texts, projects and buildings making students versatile and knowledgeable in the important concepts that shape our current discourse. A focus will be the organization, configuration and articulation of buildings and the conceptual and cultural arguments they are associated. Formal, organizational and material characteristics of this period will be explored. This class will develop students' knowledge and provide a platform from which they can continue the discussions surrounding architectural thought and practice. The students will learn to communicate their ideas verbally and in writing. Contemporary topics in architecture theory and projects are introduced in a weekly lecture format critical to the shaping of our discipline today. A weeklyrecitation session allows students to engage with the readings critically in the subject matter. A mid-term and final paper are required to pass this class. (Topics to be covered: Seminal projects and buildings in the last 25 years, situating the architects work within a culture of debate and discourse identifying the important readings surrounding each building/project.)

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ARCH 714 Museum as Site: Critique, Intervention and Production

In this course, we will take the museum as a site for critique, invention, and production. As architecture, cultural institution, and site of performance, the museum offers many relevant opportunities. Students will visit, analyze, and discuss a number of local exhibitions and produce their own intervention in individual or group projects. Exhibition design, design of museum, the process of curating, producing artworks ranging from paintings to installation and performance, as well as attention to conservation, installation, museum education, and the logistics and economics of exhibitions will be discussed on site and in seminar. These topics and others will be open for students to engage as part of their own creative work produced for the class and an online exhibition.

Taught by: Hornick, Andrea

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ARCH 720 Visual Literacy and its Culture

The digital turn in the creative fields resulted in profound transformations of techniques, aesthetics and underlying concepts in the development of contemporary visual culture. The dissemination and consumption of information through images through all types of media platforms influence and re-define (for better or worse) all aspects of our culture and reality. It is vital to develop a deep knowledge of the current visual concepts and techniques in arts, photography, cinema, product design and architecture to claim a critical stance through which we can positively contribute to the evolution of contemporary culture. The discipline of architecture has been deeply influenced by the digital shift in modes of design and visualization which yielded a wide array of directions within the architectural discourse, especially with questions and problems regarding representation. One clear outcome of this transformational period is the diversity of new representational strategies to seek alternative modes of visualization. It is clear that no one representational medium can be defined as the locus of architectural thought and architecture, as a cultural practice, can no longer be defined through the output of a single medium. The reality of our discipline is that we work through collective mediums and conventions of drawings, models, images, simulations, texts, prototypes and buildings to visualize architectural concepts. These mediums all require degrees of expertise in techniques that are necessary for their execution; They all involve conceptual depth that define their disciplinary positions; They all require translations across each other to enable subjective work-flows; They all require aesthetic attitudes to influence the development of visual culture in architecture. This course will introduce the AAD majors to contemporary topics of visualization in arts, photography, cinema and architecture. They will explore multiple mediums of representation to help them gain the vital visual literacy to excel in the program. Students will be introduced to discursive background and contemporary concepts of line drawing, fabricated object and constructed image as they work through 3 distinct projects during the semester. Each exercise will be initiated by a topical lecture and be followed by weekly pin ups to advance student projects. (Topics to be covered: Discourse of Contemporary Line Drawing, Multi-part 3D printing, Vacuform/CNC Milling, Digital/Analog Surface Articulation, Rendering, Abstraction and Realism, Montage/Collage/Photorealism.)

Taught by: Ayata, Kutan

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ARCH 721 Designing Smart Objects for Play and Learning

Today's children enjoy a wide array of play experiences, with stories, learning, characters and games that exist as physical stand-alone objects or toys enhanced with electronics or software. In this course, students will explore the domain of play and learning in order to develop original proposals for new product experiences that are at once tangible, immersive and dynamic. They will conduct research into education and psychology while also gaining hands-on exposure to new product manifestations in a variety of forms, both physical and digital. Students will be challenged to work in teams to explore concepts, share research and build prototypes of their experiences in the form of static objects that may have accompanying electronic devices or software. Final design proposals will consider future distribution models for product experiences such as 3D printing, virtual reality and software- hardware integration. Instruction will be part seminar and part workshop, providing research guidance and encouraging connections will subject matter experts throughout the Penn campus.

Taught by: Diana

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: IPD 521

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ARCH 724 Technology in Design

The aim of this course is to understand the new medium of architecture within the format of a research seminar. The subject matter of new media is to be examined and placed in a disciplinary trajectory of building designed and construction technology that adapts to material and digital discoveries. We will also build prototype with the new media, and establish a disciplinary knowledge for ourselves. The seminar is interested in testing the architecture-machine relationship, moving away from architecture that looks like machines into architecture that behaves like machines: An intelligence (based on the conceptual premise of a project and in the design of a system), as part of a process (related to the generative real of architecture) and as the object itself and its embedded intelligence.

Taught by: Kim, Simon

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ARCH 725 Design Thinking

Creating new product concepts was once a specialized pursuit exclusively performed by design professionals in isolation from the rest of an organization. Today's products are developed in a holistic process involving a collaboration amont many disciplines. Design thinking - incorporating processes, approaches, and working methods from traditional designers' toolkits - has become a way of generating innovative ideas to challenging problems and refining those ideas. Rapid prototyping techniques, affordable and accessible prototyping platforms, and an iterative mindset have enabled people to more reliably translate those ideas into implementable solutions. In this course, students will be exposed to these techniques and learn how to engage in a human-centered design process.

Taught by: Sarah Rotteberg

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: IPD 572

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ARCH 726 Contemporary Furniture Design

This course provides a platform, in the form of furniture, to execute and deploy architectural & engineering principles. It will be conducted as a seminar and workshop, and will introduce students to a variety of design methodologies that are unique to product design. The course will engage in many of the considerations that are affiliated with CAD/CAM production, the appropriate and innovative use of materials, and human factors. Students conduct case studies and research into industrial design processes, and will adapt these processes into techniques for designing a chair. Throughout the semester, students will experience first hand structural and material behavior, and understand ergonomic constraints by testing their design at different scales. The process will include: the production of a final design, its detailing, prototype development, Color/Material/Finishes (CMF), design for Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM), the possibility of mass customization, research of materials and fabrication methods, optimization studies, Computer Aided Design (CAD), model making, furniture case studies, and a site visit to a major furniture manufacturer.

Taught by: Mueller-Russo

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: IPD 526

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ARCH 727 Industrial Design

Industrial design (ID) is the professional service of creating and developing concepts and specifications that optimize the function, value and appearance of products and systems for the mutual benefit of both user and manufacturer. Industrial designers develop these concepts and specifications through collection, analysis and synthesis of user needs data guided by the special requirements of the client or manufacturer. They are trained to prepare clear and concise recommendations through drawings, models and verbal descriptions. The profession has evolved to take its appropriate place alongside Engineering and Marketing as one of the cornerstones of Integrated Product Design teams. The core of Industrial Design's knowledge base is a mixture of fine arts, commercial arts and applied sciences utilized with a set of priorities that are firstly on the needs of the end user and functionality, then the market and manufacturing criteria. This course will provide an overview and understanding of the theories, thought processes and metholologies employed in the daily practice of Industrial Design. This includes understanding of ethnographic research and methodologies, product problem solving, creative visual communication, human factors / ergonomics application and formal and surface development in product scale. This course will not enable one to become an industrial designer but will enable one to understand and appreciate what industrial design does, what it can contribute to society and why it is so much fun.

Taught by: Bressler

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: IPD 527

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ARCH 728 Design of Contemporary Products: Mass Customization

Personalization is quickly becoming the norm for mass production in a variety of consumer-centric industries. From retail to food, the idea of designing and making custom-made products tailored to fit one's lifestyle will be our exploration. Utilizing digital design innovations, we are able to incubate ideas, prototype, test and be entrepreneurial in design to create these individualized products. Cues from these industries will be used to shift both cultural and experiential product design from a regional discovery to a global focus. This course will embrace digital design and utilize its engagement with manufacturing solutions for a physical output. Through research and a series of design exercises, the approach will be built upon several strategies including adaptability, materiality, fabrication, modularity, and human-centric design. The final project will interpret the research and result in the creation of a design strategy for a mass customized product or system. This course will explore product design solutions through a combination of physical and digital design methods. Beginning with an examination of case studies, students will gain a sense of the breadth of product and interaction design practice as it applies to smart objects. Through a series of lectures and hands-on studio exercises, students will explore all aspects of smart object design including expressive behaviors (light, sound and movement), interaction systems, ergonomics, data networks and contexts of use. The course will culminate in a final project that considers all aspects of smart object design within the context of a larger theme.

Taught by: Diana

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: IPD 528

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ARCH 730 Techniques, Morphology, and Detailing

The course will focus on the design, morphology detailing, and the construction of "PennDesign Pavilion inspired by Russel Write Designs" which is set to be constructed in Spring 2016 on a site located at the University of Pennsylvania Campus. The course will develop through hands-on workshops and will focus on acquiring knowledge through making (Techne), understanding the morphological transformation of a given geometic packing, and building using readily available materials. The process consists of building and testing physical models that simulates the actual pavilion. In addition to digital simulation sessions to realize the desired design, which answers to the program developed by PennDesign faculty. The second half of the semester will focus on using lightweight construction materials to fabricate the pavilion's actual components, including structural elements, molded components, and joints, which are required for pavilion's final assembly. Additionally students will learn to organize design and fabrication teams, control design and production schedules, and work with set budget, which requires keeping track of construction cost and forecast for required procurements, including material quantities takeoff, ordering and schedule deliveries and receiving.

Taught by: Al Khayer, Mohamad

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ARCH 731 Experiments in Structures

This course studies the relationships between geometric space and those structural systems that amplify tension. Experiments using the hand (touch and force) in coordination with the eye (sight and geometry) will be done during the construction and observation of physical models. Verbal, mathematical and computer models are secondary to the reality of the physical model. However these models will be used to give dimension and document the experiments. Team reports will serve as interim and final examinations. In typology, masonry structures in compression (e.g., vault and dome) correlate with "Classical" space, and steel or reinforced concrete structures in flexure (e.g., frame, slab and column) with "Modernist" space. We seek the spatial correlates to tensile systems of both textiles (woven or braided fabrics where both warp and weft are tensile), and baskets (where the warp is tensile and the weft is compressive). In addition to the experiments, we will examine Le Ricolais' structural models held by the Architectural Archives.

Taught by: Al Khayer

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ARCH 732 Technology Designated Elective

Several sections are offered from which students make a selection. This year's selections include: Deployable Structures, Performance and Design, Detailed Design Studies, Daylighting, Principles of Digi/Fab, Matter and Energy, Material and Structural Intelligence.

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Please note: MSD-AAD students in their first semester are not permitted to enroll in any ARCH-732 courses.

ARCH 733 Building Product Design

As Craig Vogel notes in The Design of Things to Come, "we are in a new economic age that is in need of a new renaissance in product development, one that leverages multiple minds working in concert." With this mindset, this interdisciplinary workshop guides students through the product design process from design brief to concept generation and prototype development in one semester, working firsthand with Transwall, a leading manufacturer of demountable wall systems, to focus on a specific product need. The design opportunity looks for the next generation of pre-manufactured wall systems; getting away from field construction walls and looking at critical issues of mass-produced wall systems: flexibility, mobility, structural stability, acoustics, transparency/opacity and operability. During the workshop, students will explore the context that creates the unique need for a new product and have an opportunity to conceptualize their ideas through sketches, digital modeling and prototype development.

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: IPD 530

Prerequisite: ARCH 403/IPD 503 or ARCH major

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ARCH 734 Ecological Architecture - Contemporary Practices

Architecture is an inherently exploitive act - we take resources from the earthand produce waste and pollution when we construct and operate buildings. As global citizens, we have an ethical responsibility to minimize these negative impacts. As creative professionals, however, we have a unique ability to go farther than simply being "less bad." We are learning to design in ways that can help heal the damage and regenerate our environment. This course explores these evolving approaches to design - from neo-indigenous to eco-tech to LEED to biomimicry to living buildings. Taught by a practicing architect with many years of experience designing green buildings, the course also features guest lecturers from complementary fields - landscape architects, hydrologists, recycling contractors and materials specialists. Coursework includes in-class discussion, short essays and longer research projects.

Taught by: Woodward

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ARCH 735 Innovation in Design and Health

Health care is taking on a new role in our society - with a refocusing from episodic care for those who are ill or symptomatic to providing life-long care geared towards maintaining wellness. These changes are evident across numerous areas of design, from wearable technologies that track and analyze, to WELL building initiatives that aim to create healthier environments and improve lives through large scale planning initiatives. A concrete, phiysical representation of this paradigm shift can be found within the hospital building and in the new manner in which hospitals are looking to serve their patients and care for their clinicians. Simultaneously both public and private spaces, hospitals are complex systems in which sickness, health, hospitality, technology, emergency, and community share space and compete for resources. In the development of the new hospital pavilion complex, Penn Medicine, in partnership with HDR, Foster+Partners, and others, has created an integrated project deliver (IPD) system, named PennFIRST. Over the semester, students will work with PennFIRST as their client and focus on the design for key spaces within the new pavilion complex. Through didactic content, active design projects, and a systems level approach, this course will provide students with a strong foundation for further work in the area of design for health and wellness.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ARCH 736 Technology Designated Elective

Several sections are offered from which students make a selection. This year's selections include: Building Acoustics, Mechanisms for Design, Water Shaping Architecture, Virtual Construction and Detailing with BIM, and Architectural Workflows.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

0.5 Course Units

ARCH 737 Semi-Fictious Realms

The pursuit of immersive digital experiences has long been a goal of the computing industry. Early wearable displays designed in the 1960s depicted simple three dimensional graphics in ways that had never been seen before. Through trial and error, digital pioneers reframed the relationship between user and machine, and over the last five decades, have made strides that advanced both the input and output mechanisms we are so comfortable with today. As a field, architecture has been reliant on these advancements to design and document buildings, but these tools still leave the architect removed from the physicality of the design, with their work depicted as 2D lines or 3D planes alone. This course will study the evolutionary advancements made that now allow us to fully inhabit digital worlds through Virtual Reality. Using the HTC Vive and Unreal Engine, students will generate immersive, photorealistic models of unbuilt architectural works and explore digital/physical interactivity. From the terraces of Paul Rudolph's Lower Manhattan Expressway to Boullee s Cenotaph for Newton, the goal of this course is to breathe new life into places and spaces that have, until this time, never been built or occupied.

Taught by: McAdams, Christopher

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ARCH 738 The Modern House: Technology Then and Now

In the current age of new fabrication methodologies, methods are emerging for the conception and design of the contemporary house which have radical potential for enclosure, habitation and practices of daily life. This course begins by examining the canonical houses of the original avant-garde--Adolf Loos, Frank Lloyd Wright, Le Corbusier, Mies van der Rohe and Alvar Aalto -on the premise that their houses were working manifestos for rethinking space, form and indeed ideas of life itself -all of which were prompted by new concepts of construction. From this spectrum of issues, contemporary houses and contemporary methods and materials will be studied extensively to develop equally new ideas between matter and quotidian life. As the primary task of the course, students will work in teams to develop highly detailed constructional proposals for a portion of a speculative home.

Taught by: Fierro

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ARCH 739 New Approaches to an Architecture of Health

Health care is taking on a new role in our society - with a refocusing from episodic care for those who are ill or symptomatic to providing life- long care geared towards maintaining wellness. These changes are evident across numerous areas of design, from wearable technologies that track and analyze, to large scale building initiatives that aim to create healthier environments and improve lives through strategic planning initiatives. A concrete, physical representation of this paradigm shift can be found within the hospital building itself and in the new manner in which hospitals are looking to serve their patients and care for their clinicians. Simultaneously both public and private spaces, hospitals are complex systems in which sickness, health, hospitality, technology, emergency, and community share space and compete for resource. In order to frame our present day understanding of the role of architecture (and design) in fostering health for individuals and within communities, this seminar will begin with an exploration of the historical and contemporary perspectives on the role of the architect and built environment on health. (Parallels between design and our ever-changing understanding of the biological, social, and environmental causes of sickness and disease will also be explored.) During this conversation, students will read articles and study recently constructed projects in order to examine the ways in which the architects approached these topics through built form. Following from this foundation, students will craft arguments for a new approach to the individual, the community, health, and architecture through a written response and architecturally designed scenario that argues for their perspective on how architecture can and should shape the health of those who inhabit it. Throughout the course, students will engage in weekly readings (and discussions) of critical texts exploring ideas around the role and impact of architecture on health. Various content experts will be included in the course to provide additional insights into key areas of theory and practice in order to lend additional perspectives and ground the conversation.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ARCH 741 Architecture Design Innovation

The mastery of techniques, whether in design, production or both, does not necessarily yield great architecture. As we all know, the most advanced techniques can still yield average designs. Architects are becoming increasingly adept producing complexity & integrating digital design and fabrication techniques into their design process - yet there are few truly elegant projects. Only certain projects that are sophisticated at the level of technique achieve elegance. This seminar explores some of the instances in which designers are able to move beyond technique, by commanding them to such a degree so as to achieve elegant aesthetics within the formal development of projects.

Taught by: Rahim

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ARCH 743 Form and Algorithm

The critical parameter will be to develop the potential beyond finite forms of explicit and parametric modeling towards non-linear algorithmic processes. We will seek novel patterns of organizatio, structure, and articulation as architectural expressions within the emergent properties of feedback loops and rule based systems. This seminar will accommodate both introductory and advanced levels. No previous scripting experience is necessary. It will consist of a series of introductory sessions, obligatory intensive workshops, lectures followed by suggested readings, and will gradually focus on individual projects. Students will be encouraged to investigate the limits of algorithmic design both theoretically and in practice through a scripting environment.

Taught by: Balmond/Blasetti

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ARCH 744 Postdigital Craft

As we have entered a postdigital era, the dominance of a purely technological approach as a vehicle for design innovation has waned. Questions of substance and disciplinary autonomy have found their way back into the contemporary cultural discourse, enriching the way we examine and deploy advanced technologies towards novel expressions in architecture. This seminar will investigate, through the production of estranged objects, opportunities for design that are being generated at the intersection of machinic and human minds, and speculate on possible futures in which concepts of nature and technology have been inseparably intertwined.

Taught by: Kolatan

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: IPD 544

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ARCH 746 Cinema and Architecture in Translation

Cinema and Architecture in Translation is a seminar that will survey key cinematic moments and techniques within the history of film and find new intersections between architecture and narratives. The focus will be on the relevance of mise-en-scene, the background and building figures of architecture and future speculations of the city, yet in relation to narrative dynamics. One of the challenges in considerations and techniques that will affect both conceptualization and the production of spatial manifestations using potent visual platforms. Current pre and post-production techniques in film making methods are converging with architectural digital representation. This is an opportunity that provides fertile ground for architects to re-examine the 'digital' in a variety of scales in relation to impactful narratives and visualizations. These tools, specifically the technique of "matte-painting" will be explored in this course. There is a rich history in constructing images, speculative worlds and scenes for the film industry. We will explore the parallels between the tools and strategies of cinematic visualization as it relates to advanced architectural image making. Students will have the opportunity to analyze filmic scene making, learn advanced representation and techniques in matte painting and zbrush. Above all this course will engage students in the conceptual as well as practical complementarities of architecture and cinema, while watching some of the best films ever made and the most provocative and insightful books to help process them. An important aspect of this course will be to explore the differences between "real" architecture and the cinematic architecture. The expansive Space and Time in which cinematic architecture is located, creates an incubator where true innovated speculation can occur. This is an advanced representation course that produces 2D images and narrative texts.

Taught by: Klein and Willems

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ARCH 750 Parafictional Objects

This representation/design seminar explores the aesthetics of estrangement in realism through various mediums. The reality of the discipline is that architecture is a post-medium effort. Drawings, Renderings, Models, Prototypes, Computations, Simulations, Texts, and Buildings are all put forward by architects as a speculative proposal for the reality of the future. Students will explore the reconfiguration of a "found object" in multiple mediums and represent parafictional scenarios in various techniques of realism. At a time when rendering engines enable the production of hyper-realistic images within the discipline without any critical representational agenda, it has become ever more imperative to rigorously speculate on realism.

Taught by: Ayata, Ahemt Kutan

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ARCH 751 Ecology, Technology, and Design

This course will examine the ecological nature of design at a range of scales, from the most intimate aspects of product design to the largest infrastructures, from the use of water in bathroom to the flow of traffic on the highway. It is a first principle of ecological design that everything is connected, and that activities at one scale can have quite different effects at other scales, so the immediate goal of the course will be to identify useful and characteristic modes of analyzing the systematic, ecological nature of design work, from the concept of the ecological footprint to market share. The course will also draw on the history and philosophy of technology to understand the particular intensity of contemporary society, which is now characterized by the powerful concept of the complex, self-regulating system. The system has become both the dominant mode of explanation and the first principle of design and organization.

Taught by: Braham

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ARCH 752 MEBD Research Seminar

Directed student research of selected topics in environmental building design. These topics will be further explored in ARCH 708: MEBD Studio and will provide the basis for the research documents developed with each student's design project. Course work will include lectures, discussions, weekly readings, and in-class exercises. Each student will be required to make a presentation and submit a research report.

Taught by: Braham

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ARCH 753 Building Performance Simulation

The course provides students with an understanding of building design simulation methods, hands-on experience in using computer simulation models, and exploration of the technologies, underlying principles, and potential applications of simulation tools in architecture. Classroom lecturers are given each week, with a series of analysis projects to provide students with hands-on experience using computer models. This course is required and reserved for MEBD students.

Taught by: Yi

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ARCH 754 Performance Design Workshop

The workshop applies simulation and diagramming techniques to a series of discrete design projects at different scales. The emphasis is on refinement and optimization of performance based building design. Performance analysis techniques can provide enormous amounts of information to support the design process, acting as feedback mechanisms for improved performance, but careful interpretation and implementation are required to achieve better buildings. Energy, lighting, and air flow are the three main domains covered in the workshop. Students will learn how to utilize domain tools at an advanced level, and utilize them as applications to examine the environmental performance of existing buildings. Using the results of analytical techniques, the students will develop high-performance design strategies in all three domains.

Taught by: Yi

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ARCH 762 Design and Development

This course provides an introduction to the relationship between architectural design and real estate development. Following a discussion of fundamentals, examples focus on commercial building types, and illustrate how architectural design can contribute to real estate development. Topics include housing design commercial buildings, adaptive reuse, downtown development, mixed-use projects, and planned communities. The course consists of lectures, reading assignments, short essays, a group project, and an mid-term test. Invited lecturers include architects and real estate developers. Readings consist of a Bulkpack available from Wharton Reprographics. There is one course text: Witold Rybczynski, "Last Harvest."

Taught by: Sehnert

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

ARCH 765 Project Management

This course is an introduction to techniques and tools of managing the design and construction of large, and small, construction projects. Topics include project delivery systems, management tools, cost-control and budgeting systems, professional roles. Case studies serve to illustrate applications. Cost and schedule control systems are described. Case studies illustrate the application of techniques in the field.

Taught by: Capaldi

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ARCH 771 Professional Practice II

Taught by: Ryan

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

0.5 Course Units

ARCH 782 Architecture Study Abroad Program

A four to six week program of study in various locations. 2018: ARCH-782-001 Paris. ARCH-782-002 Greece. For additional information please contact the Architecture Department directly: arch@design.upenn.edu.

Taught by: Fierro and Faculty

Activity: Studio

1 Course Unit

ARCH 791 ARCH Summer Institute: Digiblast

This is a non-credit course for entering Master of Architecture students. The course will cover digital modeling and workflow and will prepare students for techniques used in PennDesign's 500 and 600 level design studios. Course fee: $750.00. Note: course fees applies only to students who are NOT enrolled in ARCH-500, in addition to ARCH-791. Course enrollment is by permit only. Please contact Sarah Lam (ARCH Dept.) at sarahlam@design.upenn.edu.

Taught by: Blasetti and Willems

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Studio

0 Course Units

ARCH 792 ARCH Summer Institute: Advanced Architectural Design Digital Workshop

This is a non-credit course for entering Master of Science in Design: Advanced Architectural Design students. The Digital Methods workshop provides a comprehensive introduction to four elements critical to the workflow of the graduate studios at PennDesign: 3D modeling, scripting, visualization and fabrication. Short daily lectures situating digital technologies in contemporary design practice are followed by hands-on tutorials in Maya and Rhinoceros. The first half of the workshop provides an operative knowledge of the many geometry types, modeling techniques, scripting languages and simulation tools available for studio work. Visualization techniques are also introduced, and students will learn to efficiently produce presentation-quality renderings, animations and technical line drawings from digital models. Students also learn protocols transferring data between various design software packages and how to for create data compatible with PennDesign's digital fabrication equipment. Course fee: $750.00 Course enrollment is by permit only. Please contact Sarah Lam (ARCH Dept.) at sarahlam@design.upenn.edu.

Taught by: Blasetti and Willems

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Studio

0 Course Units

ARCH 793 ARCH Summer Institute: History of Architecture

This is a non-credit course for entering Master of Architecture students. The course will cover western architecture from ancient Egypt to the modern age and will satisfy the history pre-requisite condition for matriculation in the fall. Course fee: $750.00. Course enrollment is by permit only. Please contact Sarah Lam (ARCH Dept.) at sarahlam@design.upenn.edu.

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Lecture

0 Course Units

ARCH 794 ARCH Summer Institute: Physics for Architects

This is a non-credit course for entering Master of Architecture students. The course will cover the following: mechanics, heat, light, sound and electricity. The course will satisfy the physics pre-requisite condition for matriculation in the fall. Course fee: $750.00 Course enrollment is by permit only. Please contact Sarah Lam (ARCH Dept.) at sarahlam@design.upenn.edu.

Taught by: Farley

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Lecture

0 Course Units

ARCH 811 Theories of Architecture

This course has three parts. All incoming students in the M.S. and Ph.D. programs should attend the first, and register for either the second or the third sections. The first part consists of a series of presentations by members of the Graduate Group in Architecture. The several presentations will address the topics the faculty are currently examining and will demonstrate different methods or styles of research. The other two sections of this course address basic concepts, texts, and methods in 1: history and theory, and 2) technology and simulation.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ARCH 812 Field Research

First year Ph.D. and M.S. students will use this course to register for a research elective in their field of study. Courses to be taken will be selected from a list of electives offered by members of the Graduate Group of Architecture, typically the seminars offered by those faculty at the Masters level. At the outset of the course Ph.D. and M.S. students will discuss and decide with the professor the readings, research, and writings that will be appropriate for the course, given the student's field of study.

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

ARCH 813 Qualifying Research

This is an independent study course for first year Ph.D. and M.S. students, supervised by a member of the Graduate Group in Architecture. A course of readings and advisors sessions throughout the semester will result in an independent study paper, which will also be used as the student's qualifying paper for the Qualifying Examination. This research paper will be prepared as if for scholarly publication.

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

ARCH 814 The Concept of an Avant-Garde

No historian of architecture has written as intensely about the contradictions of architecture in late-modern society or reflected as deeply on the resulting problems and tasks of architectural historiography as Manfredo Tafuri (1935-1994). For many, the Italian historian's dismissal of "hopes in design" under conditions of advanced capitalism produced a disciplinary impasse. This in turn led to call to oublier Tafuri-to move beyond his pessimistic and lacerating stance. The seminar will undertake a close reading of one of Tafuri's most complexly conceived and richly elaborated books, The Sphere and the Labyrinth: Avant- Gardes and Architecture form Piranesi to the 1970s. Initially published in Italian in 1980 and translated into English in 1987, the book represents the first effort to define and historicize the concept of an avant-garde specifically in architecture. Its content centers on the radical formal and urban experiments of the first three decades of the twentieth century. Yet Tafuri surprisingly begins his account with the eighteenth-century inventions of Piranesi, and he concludes with an examination of the "neo-avant- garde" of his own day. In addition to traversing The Sphere and the Labyrinth chapter by chapter-starting with the extraordinary methodological introduction, "The Historical 'Project'"-we shall also read a number of primary and secondary sources on the historical contexts under discussion and consider a number of important intertexts that shed light on Tafuri's position. The objectives of the course are at once historical and historiographic: we shall we shall be concerned both with actual events and with how they have been written into history. Finally, we shall reassess the role of an avant-garde in architecture and compare Tafuri's conception to that advanced in other disciplines. Is the concept of an avant- garde still viable today? Or should it be consigned to the dustbin of twentieth- century ideas? Assignment for first class: read the introduction to The Sphere and the Labyrinth, pp. 1-21, "The Historical 'Project.'" A copy of the book is on reserve at the library. Note: the book is out of print. For future classes please make every effort to purchase a used copy or obtain one via interlibrary loan. Copies of individual chapters will also be made available on our class website.

Taught by: Ockman

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ARCH 815 Research Report

The candidate for the M.S. in Architecture degree shall prepare a research report in his or her subject of study. The topic of this report must be approved by an advisor. This report will be developed in the independent study courses, undertaken after the eight units of course work has been completed, normally in the summer semester. The purpose of these courses is to give the student an opportunity to synthesize their previous coursework at Penn. Course enrollment is by permit only. Please contact Sarah Lam (ARCH Dept.) at sarahlam@design.upenn.edu.

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Independent Study

2 Course Units

ARCH 816 Advanced Topics in Architecture Culture from World War II through 2001

This seminar will be taught as an advanced section of ARCH 512. It is primarily for students who are in their first year of the PhD program in Architecture but it is open to other upper-level students with instructor permission. In addition to the weekly discussion-format seminar on Tuesday afternoons (1.5 hours), students are also expected to attend the lectures associated with ARCH 512 on Tuesday mornings (10:30-12). Assigned readings will go beyond those on the 512 syllabus to include more complex and sophisticated source material. The subject of both ARCH 512 and 812 is the evolution of the culture of architecture from World War II to the turn of the twenty-first century. Starting with the period of wartime planning and postwar reconstruction in the 1940s, we will move decade by decade up to the present century, considering the transformations of modernist culture under the impact of social, political, technological, and urban changes. We will address the challenges posed to architecture from inside as well as outside the discipline and from around the world, attending to material and ideological developments and to relations between individual protagonists and larger historical and institutional forces. Among the wide range of issues at stake are the impact of research and technology coming out of the world war; the intensifying critique of interwar functionalism and debates over monumentalhumanism, regionalism, history, aesthetics; the effects of suburbanization, expanded mobility, changing demographics, and environmental factors; the phenomena of consumer culture and mass media; the impact of the Cold War and decolonization; the emergence of a "global village" and its intensifying cultural exchanges; the rise of a new architectural avant-garde in the 1960s and the advent of postmodernism; plus more recent ramifications. At the level of theory and methodology, the seminar will be especially concerned with issues of periodization and documentation. We will discuss and debate the question of how "architecture culture" is produced and reproduced at particular moments in history. Seminar discussions will be focused around specific case studies, some to be determined by the instructor, the rest based on in-depth individual research products to be carried out by the members of the class. Each student will work on his or her case-study project over the course of the semester, leading to an in-class presentation and a term paper of 25 pages.

Taught by: Ockman

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

ARCH 851 Dissertation Bibliography

This course is essentially an independent study, undertaken by doctoral students in preparation for the Candidacy Examination. This course should be taken in conjunction with ARCH 852 after all other courses have been completed. Normally a member of the student's Dissertation Committee supervises this course.

Taught by: Faculty

Two terms. student may enter either term.

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

ARCH 852 Dissertation Proposal

This course is essentially an independent study, undertaken by doctoral students in order to write the Proposal for the Dissertation. The Proposal is prepared before and defended during the Candidacy Examination. This course should be taken in conjunction with ARCH 852 after all other courses have been completed. Normally a member of the student's Dissertation Committee supervises this course.

Taught by: Faculty

Two terms. student may enter either term.

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

ARCH 995 Dissertation

Taught by: Faculty

Two terms. student may enter either term.

Activity: Dissertation

1 Course Unit

ARCH 999 Independent Study

This course enables student to undertake a self-directed study on a topic in Architecture, under the supervision of a faculty member. Students are required to make a proposal for the study to the Department Chair, outlining the subject and method of investigation, and confirming the course supervisor at least two weeks prior to the beginning of the semester.

Taught by: Faculty

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit