Cinema and Media Studies (CIMS)

CIMS 005 In Dark Times: The Dystopian Imagination in Literature and Film

This CWiC course will offer a guided introduction to the one of the most resilient genres of the human imagination: dystopian and apocalyptic fiction. Like a group of survivors huddled around a campfire, we will turn to literature and cinema to debate some of the big questions about the future of science, technology, religion, and capitalism. This course is designed as a Critical Speaking Seminar, and the majority of class assignments will be devoted to oral presentations: including a Parliamentary-style debate and a video essay. We will begin by reading some of the early, influential works in the dystopian genre by authors like Mary Shelley, H.G. Wells, and Aldous Huxley. Next, we will explore the paranoid, schizophrenic world of Cold-War-era dystopias by J.G Ballard, Philip K. Dick and Octavia Butler. We will conclude by reading contemporary climate fiction by the likes of Margaret Atwood and Kim Stanley Robinson. Alongside the literary material, we will also track the changing nature of dystopian cinema-- from classics like Metropolis (1927) and La Jetee (1962) to the latest Zombie film. By the end of course, students will have a firm grasp of the history of the genre and will be able to draw on this knowledge to effectively debate issues related to privacy, big business, animal rights, climate change, migration etc.

Taught by: Dadawala

Also Offered As: ENGL 005

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 009 Introduction to Digital Humanities

This course provides an introduction to foundational skills common in digital humanities (DH). It covers a range of new technologies and methods and will empower scholars in literary studies and across humanities disciplines to take advantage of established and emerging digital research tools. Students will learn basic coding techniques that will enable them to work with a range data including literary texts and utilize techniques such as text mining, network analysis, and other computational approaches.

Taught by: Trettien

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: COML 009, ENGL 009, HIST 009

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 014 Topics: Freshman Seminar

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: COML 107, ITAL 100

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 015 Topics in Literature

An introduction to Writing about Literature, with emphasis on a particular theme, genre, or period. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: CLST 019, ENGL 015, GSWS 017, LALS 016

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 016 Freshman Seminar in Cinema and Media Studies

The primary goal of the freshman seminar program is to provide every freshman the opportunity for a direct personal encounter with a faculty member in a small sitting devoted to a significant intellectual endeavor. Specific topics be posted at the beginning of each academic year. Please see the College Freshman seminar website for information on current course offerings https://www.college.upenn.edu/node/403.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ARTH 100, ENGL 017, URBS 106

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 024 Introduction to American and British Film and Media

This topic course explores multiple and different aspects of Cinema Studies. Specific course topics vary from year to year. See the Cinema Studies website at cinemastudies.sas.upenn.edu/courses for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Decherney

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ENGL 024

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 036 The Middle East through Many Lenses

This freshman seminar introduces the contemporary Middle East by drawing upon cutting-edge studies written from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. These include history, political science, and anthropology, as well as studies of mass media, sexuality, religion, urban life, and the environment. We will spend the first few weeks of the semester surveying major trends in modern Middle Eastern history. We will spend subsequent weeks intensively discussing assigned readings along with documentary films that we will watch in class. The semester will leave students with both a foundation in Middle Eastern studies and a sense of current directions in the field.

Taught by: Sharkey H

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: NELC 036

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 039 Perspectives on International Cinema (Cannes Film Festival)

Penn-in-Cannes is designed for students interested in the film industry and international cinema. Using the Cannes Film Festival as its focal point, the program examines the ways in which international film functions in the context of celebrity, marketing, and festivals. The scope and substance of the festival provide a unique opportunity, not only for students of cinema, but also for liberal arts students studying cultural diversity and international relations. In preparation for fieldwork at the Cannes Film Festival in May, two three-hours introductory lectures will be held in late March and April on Penn's campus to enable students to establish a critical vocabulary for film study. The lectures and subsequent discussions will examine: a) The Business and Art of the Film Festival; b) Contemporary International Cinema. Those introductory lectures will be coordinated with the Philadelphia Film Festival, which is held on April 5-18, 2007. During both the Philadelphia Film Festival and the Cannes Film Festival, students attend screenings of current international films, applying the critical tools and knowledge of the film industry gained from their earlier work. Students research and critique both the artistic aspects and the commercial p

Course usually offered summer term only

Also Offered As: ENGL 039

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 061 Video I

In this studio based course, students are introduced to video production and postproduction as well as to selected historical and theoretical texts addressing the medium of video. Students will be taught basic camera operation, sound recording and lighting, as well as basic video and sound editing and exporting using various screening and installation formats. In addition to a range of short assignment-based exercises, students will be expected to complete three short projects over the course of the semester. Critiques of these projects are crucial to the course as students are expected to speak at length about the formal, technical, critical and historical dimensions of their works. Weekly readings in philosophy, critical theory, artist statements and literature are assinged. The course will also include weekly screenings of films and videos, introducing students to the history of video art as well as to other contemporary practices.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: FNAR 061, FNAR 661, VLST 261

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 062 Video II

Video II offers opportunities to further explore the role of cinematic narrative technique, non-narrative forms, digital video cinematography, editing, and screen aesthetics. Through a series of several video projects and a variety of technical exercises, students will refine their ability to articulate technically and conceptually complex creative projects in digital cinema. In addition, one presentation on a contemporary issue related to the application of cinematic storytelling and/or the cultural context of digital video is required.

Taught by: Reynolds/Novack

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: FNAR 062, FNAR 662

Prerequisite: FNAR 061

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 063 Documentary Video

Documentary Video is an intensive production course involving the exploration of concepts, techniques, concerns, and aesthetics of the short form documentary. Building on camera, sound, and editing skills acquired in Video I, students will produce a portfolio of short videos and one longer project over the course of the semester using advanced level camera and sound equipment. One short presentation on a genre, technique, maker, or contemporary concern selected by the student is required.

Taught by: Reynolds

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: FNAR 063, FNAR 663

Prerequisite: FNAR 061

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 065 Cinema Production

This course focuses on the practices and theory of producing narrative based cinema. Members of the course will become the film crew and produce a short digital film. Workshops on producing, directing, lighting, camera, sound and editing will build skills necessary for the hands-on production shoots. Visiting lecturers will critically discuss the individual roles of production in the context of the history of film.

Taught by: Mosley

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: FNAR 065, FNAR 665

Prerequisite: FNAR 061

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 073 Literature and the Visual Art

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 299, COML 073, ENGL 073, LALS 073, THAR 073

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 074 Contemporary American Literature

The readings for this course expose the student to a wide range of American fiction and poetry since World War II, giving considerable attention to recent work. Works may include All The King's Men by Robert Penn Warren, Herzog by Saul Bellow, On The Road by Jack Kerouac, V by Thomas Pynchon, Of Love and Dust by Ernest J.Gaines, A Flag For Sunrise by Robert Stone, The Killing Ground by Mary Lee Settle, and selected poem by Ginsberg, Plath, and Walcott. Readings vary from term to term.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 085, ENGL 074

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 075 Image and Sound Editing

This course presents an in-depth look at the storytelling power of image and sound in both narrative and documentary motion pictures. Students apply a theoretical framework in ongoing workshops, exploring practical approaches to picture editing and sound design. Students edit scenes with a variety of aesthetic approaches, and create story-driven soundtracks with the use of sound FX, dialogue replacement, foleys, music and mixing. Students not only learn critical skills that expand creative possibilities, but also broaden their understanding of the critical relationship between image and sound.

Taught by: Novack/Novack

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: FNAR 075, FNAR 675

Prerequisite: FNAR 061

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 081 Film Music in Post 1950 Italy: Nino Rota and Ennio Morricone

An exploration of cinematic sound through the lens of specific composer/director collaborations in post-1950 Italy, examining scores, soundtracks, and the interaction of diegetic and non-diegetic music with larger soundscapes. Composers Nino Rota and Ennio Morricone serve as case studies, in partnership with directors Fellini, Visconti, Leone, Pontecorve, Pasolini, and Coppola. Highlights include several excerpts form the Fellini/Rota collaboration, including The White Sheik, I vitelloni, The Road, Nights of Cabiria, La dolce vita, 8 1/2, Juliet of the Spirits, Satyricon, The Clowns, Roma, Amarcord, Casanova, and Orchestra Rehearsal. Rota's music for Visconti will be examined in Senso, the Leopard, and Rocco and his Brothers, along with his Transatlantic collaboration for The Godfather. Morricone's work with various directors will be discussed in The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly, The Battle of Algiers, and Teorema, as well as for American films such as Malick's Days of Heaven and Tarantino's The Hateful Eight. Weekly screenings required. Open to all: music majors, minors, and non-majors; will count toward requirements for music minor. Knowledge of music and Italian helpful but not required. All readings and lectures in English.

Taught by: Samuel

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ITAL 081, MUSC 081

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 093 Introduction to Postcolonial Literature

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 093, ENGL 093

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 101 World Film History to 1945

This course surveys the history of world film from cinema s precursors to 1945. We will develop methods for analyzing film while examining the growth of film as an art, an industry, a technology, and a political instrument. Topics include the emergence of film technology and early film audiences, the rise of narrative film and birth of Hollywood, national film industries and movements, African-American independent film, the emergence of the genre film (the western, film noir, and romantic comedies), ethnographic and documentary film, animated films, censorship, the MPPDA and Hays Code, and the introduction of sound. We will conclude with the transformation of several film industries into propaganda tools during World War II (including the Nazi, Soviet, and US film industries). In addition to contemporary theories that investigate the development of cinema and visual culture during the first half of the 20th century, we will read key texts that contributed to the emergence of film theory. There are no prerequisites. Students are required to attend screenings or watch films on their own.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Taught by: Decherney

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ARTH 108, COML 123, ENGL 091

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 102 World Film History 1945-Present

Focusing on movies made after 1945, this course allows students to learn and to sharpen methods, terminologies, and tools needed for the critical analysis of film. Beginning with the cinematic revolution signaled by the Italian Neo-Realism (of Rossellini and De Sica), we will follow the evolution of postwar cinema through the French New Wave (of Godard, Resnais, and Varda), American movies of the 1950s and 1960s (including the New Hollywood cinema of Coppola and Scorsese), and the various other new wave movements of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s (such as the New German Cinema). We will then selectively examine some of the most important films of the last two decades, including those of U.S. independent film movement and movies from Iran, China, and elsewhere in an expanding global cinema culture. There will be precise attention paid to formal and stylistic techniques in editing, mise-en-scene, and sound, as well as to the narrative, non-narrative, and generic organizations of film. At the same time, those formal features will be closely linked to historical and cultural distinctions and changes, ranging from the Paramount Decision of 1948 to the digital convergences that are defining screen culture today. There are no perquisites. Requirements will include readings in film history and film analysis, an analytical essay, a research paper, a final exam, and active participation.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Taught by: Corrigan

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ARTH 109, COML 124, ENGL 092

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 103 Television and New Media

How and when do media become digital? What does digitization afford and what is lost as television and cinema become digitized? As lots of things around us turn digital, have we started telling stories, sharing experiences, and replaying memories differently? What has happened to television and life after New Media ? How have television audiences been transformed by algorithmic cultures of Netflix and Hulu? How have (social) media transformed socialities as ephemeral snaps and swiped intimacies become part of the "new" digital/phone cultures? This is an introductory survey course and we discuss a wide variety of media technologies and phenomena that include: cloud computing, Internet of Things, trolls, distribution platforms, optical fiber cables, surveillance tactics, social media, and race in cyberspace. We also examine emerging mobile phone cultures in the Global South and the environmental impact of digitization. Course activities include Tumblr blog posts and Instagram curations. The final project could take the form of either a critical essay (of 2000 words) or a media project.

Taught by: Mukherjee

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: ARTH 107, COML 099, ENGL 078

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 104 Study of A Period

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: COML 104, ENGL 104

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 109 New Korean Cinema

In 2019, Bong Joon-ho's Parasite won the Palme d'Or at the 72nd Cannes Film Festival. This event marked the apex of South Korean cinematic renaissance, having steadily become a tour de force in the international film festival scene since 1997 onwards. This course explores the major auteurs, styles, themes, and currents of the so-called "New Korean Cinema" that emerged in the mid-to-late 1990s to continue to this day. Drawing from texts on critical film and Korean studies, we will pay particular attention to how the selected works re-present, resist, and interweave the sociopolitical climate they concern and are born out of. Using cinema as a lens with which to see the society, we will touch upon major events of the twentieth century including national division, military dictatorship and democratization movements, IMF economic crisis, youth culture, hallyu (the Korean wave), and damunhwa (multiculturalism initiative). In so doing, we will closely examine how each cinematic medium addresses the societal power structure and the role of the "Other" it represents in terms of class, race, gender, and sexuality in the construction of contemporary Korean society. We will also briefly survey the history of South Korean cinema that has evolved hand-in-hand with the history of modern Korea itself, walking through its five different phases (1945-Korean War era;1955-1972 "Golden Age"; 1973-1979 censorship era; 1980-1996 democratization era; and 1997 onwards). No prior experience of Korean studies courses necessary; all films will be screened with English subtitles. IMPORTANT: This class has TWELVE total Monday evening film screenings, of which you are required to attend AT LEAST SEVEN. Screening times are Mondays 5:20-7:30 PM, Williams Hall 440.

Taught by: Lee

Also Offered As: EALC 109

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 111 Poetics of Screenwriting

This course studies scriptwriting in a historical, theoretical and artistic perspective. We discuss the rules of drama and dialogue, character development, stage vs. screen-writing, adaptation of nondramatic works, remaking of plots, author vs. genre theory of cinema, storytelling in silent and sound films, the evolvement of a script in the production process, script doctoring, as well as screenwriting techniques and tools. Coursework involves both analytical and creative tasks.

Taught by: Todorov

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 118, REES 111

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 112 Study of a Theme

This topic course explores multiple and different aspects of Cinema Studies. Specific course topics vary from year to year. See the Cinema Studies website at cinemastudies.sas.upenn.edu/courses for a description of the current offerings.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: COML 245, ENGL 102, GSWS 102

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 113 Religion and Cinema in India

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: RELS 118, SAST 112

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 116 Screenwriting Workshop

This is a workshop-style course for those who have thought they had a terrific idea for a movie but didn't know where to begin. The class will focus on learning the basic tenets of classical dramatic structure and how this (ideally) will serve as the backbone for the screenplay of the aforementioned terrific idea. Each student should, by the end of the semester, have at least thirty pages of a screenplay completed. Classic and not-so-classic screenplays will be required reading for every class, and students will also become acquainted with how the business of selling and producing one's screenplay actually happens. Students will be admitted on the basis of an application by email briefly describing their interest in the course to the instructor.

Taught by: Kathy DeMarco Van Cleve

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ENGL 116

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 118 Iranian Cinema: Gender, Politics and Religion

This seminar explores Iranian culture, art, history and politics through film in the contemporary era. We will examine a variety of works that represent the social, political, economic and cultural circumstances of post-revolutionary Iran. Along the way, we will discuss issues pertaining to gender, religion, nationialism, ethnicity, and the function of cinema in present day Iranian society. Films to be discussed will be by internationally acclaimed filmmakers, such as Abbas Kiarostami, Mohsen Makhmalbaf, Rakhshan Bani-Etemad, Tahmineh Milani, Jafar Panahi, Bahman Ghobadi, among others.

Taught by: Entezari

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 120, GSWS 118, NELC 118, NELC 618

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 125 Sex and Representation

This course explores literature that resists normative categories of gender and sexuality. By focusing on figures writing from the margins, we will explore how radical approaches to narrative form and subject-matter invite us to think in new ways about desire and identity. We will read texts that blur the boundaries between fact and fiction, hybridizing the genres of poetry, drama, and autobiography to produce new forms of expression, such as the graphic novel, auto-fiction, and prose poetry. From Viriginia Woolf's gender-bending epic, Orlando, to Tony Kushner's Angels in America, this course traces how non-normative desire is produced and policed by social and literary contexts - and how those contexts can be re-imagined and transformed.

Taught by: Halstead

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: COML 127, GSWS 125

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 130 Advanced Screenwriting

This is a workshop style course for students who have completed a screenwriting class, or have a draft of a screenplay they wish to improve or want to learn everything in one shot and are ready to do a lot of writing, and even more rewriting.

Taught by: Kathleen DeMarco Van Cleve

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ENGL 130

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 142 Duchamp is My Lawyer

This course examines the impact of copyright law on artists and creative industries. Looking at publishing, music, film, and software, we will ask how the law drives the adoption of new media, and we will consider how regulation influences artistic decisions. A mix of the theoretical with the practical, we will be using UbuWeb (the largest and oldest site dedicated to the free distribution of the avant-garde) as our main case study. The course will cover both the history of copyright law and current debates, legislation, and cases. We will also follow major copyright stories in the news. Readings cover such diverse topics as the player piano, Disney films, YouTube, video game consuls, hip hop, the Grateful Dead, file sharing, The Catcher in the Rye, and many more. We will also examine the critical role of "shadow libraries," (free culture hubs) in regards how the cultural artifact is produced and distributed in the digital age, alongside today's gatekeepers of algorithmic culture, such as Netflix, Amazon, and Spotify.

Taught by: Decherney

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: ENGL 142

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 150 Water Worlds: Cultural Responses to Sea Level Rise & Catastrophic Flooding

As a result of climate change, the world that will take shape in the course of this century will be decidedly more inundated with water than we're accustomed to. The polar ice caps are melting, glaciers are retreating, ocean levels are rising, polar bear habitat is disappearing, countries are jockeying for control over a new Arctic passage, while low-lying cities and small island nations are confronting the possibility of their own demise. Catastrophic flooding events are increasing in frequency, as are extreme droughts. Hurricane-related storm surges,tsunamis, and raging rivers have devastated regions on a local and global scale. In this seminar we will turn to the narratives and images that the human imagination has produced in response to the experience of overwhelming watery invasion, from Noah to New Orleans. Objects of analysis will include mythology, ancient and early modern diluvialism, literature, art, film, and commemorative practice. The basic question we'll be asking is: What can we learn from the humanities that will be helpful for confronting the problems and challenges caused by climate change and sea level rise?

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Taught by: Richter, Simon

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 151, ENVS 150, GRMN 150

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 151 Contemporary Fiction & Film in Japan

This course will explore fiction and film in contemporary Japan, from 1945 to the present. Topics will include literary and cinematic representation of Japan s war experience and post-war reconstruction, negotiation with Japanese classics, confrontation with the state, and changing ideas of gender and sexuality. We will explore these and other questions by analyzing texts of various genres, including film and film scripts, novels, short stories, manga, and academic essays. Class sessions will combine lectures, discussion, audio-visual materials, and creative as well as analytical writing exercises. The course is taught in English, although Japanese materials will be made available upon request. No prior coursework in Japanese literature, culture, or film is required or expected; additional secondary materials will be available for students taking the course at the 600 level. Writers and film directors examined may include: Kawabata Yasunari, Hayashi Fumiko, Abe Kobo, Mishima Yukio, Oe Kenzaburo, Yoshimoto Banana, Ozu Yasujiro, Naruse Mikio, Kurosawa Akira, Imamura Shohei, Koreeda Hirokazu, and Beat Takeshi.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Taught by: Kano

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 256, EALC 151, EALC 551, GSWS 257

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 152 Forest Worlds: Mapping the Arboreal Imaginary in Literature and Film

Can the humanities help us think differently about the forest? What happens if we imagine forests as the agents of their stories? At a time when humans seem unable to curb the destructive practices that place themselves, biodiversity, and the forests at risk, the humanities give us access to a record of the complex inter-relationship between forests and humanity. The course places a wide range of literature and film in which forests are strongly featured in relation to environmental history and current environmental issues.

Taught by: Richter

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 154, ENVS 151, GRMN 151

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 156 Queer German Cinema

Taught in English. This course offers an introduction into the history of German-language cinema with an emphasis on depictions of lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and queer themes. The course provides a chronological survey of Queer German Cinema from its beginnings in the Weimar Republic to its most recent and current representatives, accompanied throughout by a discussion of the cultural-political history of gay rights in the German-speaking world. Over the course of the semester, students will learn not only cinematic history but how to write about and close-read film. No knowledge of German or previous knowledge required.

Taught by: Fleishman

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 156, GRMN 156, GSWS 156

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 159 Modern Hebrew Literature and Film in Translation: Autobiography

This course examines cinematic and literary portrayals of childhood. While Israeli works constitute more than half of the course's material, European film and fiction play comparative roles. Many of the works are placed, and therefore discussed, against a backdrop of national or historical conflicts. Nonetheless, private traumas (such as madness, abuse, or loss) or an adult s longing for an idealized time are often the central foci of the stories. These issues and the nature of individual and collective memory will be discussed from a psychological point of view. Additionally, the course analyzes how film, poetry and prose use their respective languages to reconstruct the image of childhood; it discusses the authors and directors struggle to penetrate the psyche of a child and to retrieve fragments of past events.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Taught by: Gold

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: COML 282, JWST 154, NELC 159

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 164 Russian and East European Film from the October Revolution to World War II

This course presents the Russian contribution to world cinema before WWII - nationalization of the film industry in post revolutionary Russia, the creation of institutions of higher education in filmmaking, film theory, experimentation with the cinematic language, and the social and political reflex of cinema. Major themes and issues involve: the invention of montage, Kuleshov effect, the means of visual propaganda and the cinematic component to the communist cultural revolutions, party ideology and practices of social-engineering, cinematic response to the emergence of the totalitarian state. Great filmmaker and theorist in discussion include Vertov, Kuleshov, Eisenstein, Pudovkin, Medvedkin and others.

Taught by: Todorov

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: REES 164

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 165 Russian and East European Film after World War II

This course examines the Russian and East European contribution to world cinema after WWII - Stalinist aesthetics and desalinization, WWII in film, the installation of totalitarianism in Eastern Europe and the Cold War in film, the fall of the Berlin Wall, the collapse of the Soviet Union and the post-soviet condition, cinematic representations of Yugoslavia's violent breakup; the new Romanian waive. Major filmmakers in discussion include Kalatozov, Tarkovsky, Wajda, Polanski, Forman, Mentzel, Sabo, Kusturitsa, Konchalovsky, Mikhalkov and others.

Taught by: Todorov

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: REES 165

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 166 Arab/Israeli Conflict in Literature and Film

This course will explore the origins, the history and, most importantly, the literary and cinematic art of the struggle that has endured for a century over the region that some call the Holy Land, some call Eretz Israel and others call Palestine. We will also consider religious motivations and interpretations that have inspired many involved in this conflict as well as the political consequences of world wars that contributed so greatly to the reconfiguration of the Middle East after the fall of the Ottoman Empire, and after the revelations of the Holocaust in Western Europe. While we will rely on a textbook for historical grounding. the most significant material we will use to learn this history will be films, novels, and short stories. Can the arts lead us to a different understanding of the lives lived through what seems like unending crisis?

Taught by: Troutt-Powell

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HIST 166, NELC 137

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 180 Film Culture in Residence

Taught by: Gentili, Donovan

Two terms. student must enter first term.

Activity: Seminar

0.5 Course Units

CIMS 200 Virtual Reality Lab

In this collaboration between Penn and the Philadelphia Museum of Art (PMA), students will work with with curators to create virtual reality projects connected to the museum's collections. This course mixes virtual reality theory, history, and practice. We will read a wide range of scholarship, manifestoes, and memoirs that examine virtual reality and other immersive technologies, stretching from the 18th century to today. We will explore virtual reality projects, including narrative and documentary films, commercial applications, and games. We will work with many different virtual reality systems. And we will learn the basics of creating virtual reality, making fully immersive 3-D, 360-degree films with geospatial soundscapes. Finally, we will take what we have learned out of the classroom, working with the Philadelphia Museum of Art curators to create virtual realty experiences based around the museum's objects and exhibits. Students will gain an understanding of the unique approaches needed to appeal to museum visitors in a public setting, so we can make viable experiences for them. No previous knowledge of VR or experience is necessary. Interested students should email Prof. Peter Decherney to obtain a permit for the course.

Taught by: Decherney

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ENGL 201

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 201 Topics in Film History

This topic course explores aspects of Film History intensively. Specific coursetopics vary from year to year. See the Cinema Studies website at <http://cinemastudies.sas.upenn.edu/> for a description of the current This offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 391, COML 201, ENGL 291

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 202 Topics in Film Studies

This topic course explores aspects of Film Practice intensively. Specific course topics vary from year to year. See the Cinema Studies website at <http://cinemastudies.sas.upenn.edu/> for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 289, COML 292, ENGL 292

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 204 Sicily on Page and Screen

What images come to mind when we hear the words Sicily and Sicilians? Often our thoughts range from scenic vacation spots, delicious seafood and cannoli, and sweet grandmothers dressed in black, to mafia violence, vendettas, and the deep-rooted code of silence, omerta. But, how did these ideas get to us? Is there truth in them? Is there more to this island and its people? Through careful analysis of literary and cinematic representations of this Italian region, and those that do and have inhabited it, we will trace and analyze how Sicilians have represented themselves, how mainland Italians have interpreted Sicilian culture, how outsiders have understood these symbols, how our own perceptions shaped what we thought we knew about this place and, finally, how our own observations will have evolved throughout our studies. We will watch films such as Tornatore's Cinema paradiso and Coppola's The Godfather II, and read texts such as Lampedusa's The Leopard and Maraini's Bagheria. This course aims to increase students' understanding and knowledge of the Sicilian socio-cultural system. It will help students develop their ability to understand and interpret Sicilian culture through close analysis of its history, values, attitudes, and experiences, thereby allowing them to better recognize and examine the values and practices that define their own, as well as others', cultural frameworks.

Taught by: Broccia

Course usually offered summer term only

Also Offered As: COML 208, ENGL 083, ITAL 205

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 206 Italian History on Screen: How Movies Tell the Story of Italy

How has our image of Italy arrived to us? Where does the story begin and who has recounted, rewritten, and rearranged it over the centuries? In this course, we will study Italy's rich and complex past and present. We will carefully read literary and historical texts and thoughtfully watch films in order to attain an understanding of Italy that is as varied and multifacted as the country itself. Group work, discussions and readings will allow us to examine the problems and trends in the political, cultural and social history from ancient Rome to today. We will focus on: the Roman Empire, Middle Ages, Renaissance, Unification, Turn of the Century, Fascist era, World War II, post-war and contemporary Italy.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Taught by: Veneziano

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: COML 206, ITAL 204

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 218 Media and Culture in Contemporary Iran

This course offers a comprehensive introduction to the culture and media of modern Iran, with a critical perspective on issues such as identity formation, ethnicity, race, and nation-building. It focuses on how these issues relate to various aspects of modern Iranian culture -- such as religion, gender, sexuality, war, and migration -- through the lens of media, cinema, and literature.

Taught by: Esmaeili

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: NELC 218, NELC 518, SAST 218

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 223 Post War Japanese Cinema

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 290, ARTH 690, EALC 156, EALC 556

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 225 Topics Theatre & Cinema

This topic course explores aspects of Film and Theater intensively. Specific course topics vary from year to year. See the Cinema Studies website at <http://cinemastudies.sas.upenn.edu/> for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ENGL 276, THAR 275, URBS 274

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 232 Topics in Brazilian Culture

Taught by: Flannery

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: LALS 240, PRTG 240

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 240 Modern Italian Culture: Italian American Experiences

Please check the website for a current course description at: http://www.sas.upenn.edu/italians/courses

Taught by: Veneziano Broccia

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ITAL 288

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 244 Metropolis: Culture of the City

An exploration of modern discourses on and of the city. Topics include: the city as site of avant-garde experimentation; technology and culture; the city as embodiment of social order and disorder; traffic and speed; ways of seeing the city; the crowd; city figures such as the detective, the criminal, the flaneur, the dadny; film as the new medium o the city. Special emphasis on Berlin. Readings by, among others, Dickens, Poe, Baudelaire, Rilke, Doeblin, marx, Engels, Benjamin, Kracauer. films include Fritz Lang's Metropolis and Tom Tykwer's Run Lola Run. All lectures and reading in English.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 254, GRMN 244, URBS 244

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 245 French Cinema

This course will introdue students to key films of the French film canon, selected over a period ranging from the origins of French cinema to the present. Students will also be introduced to the key critical concepts (such as the notion of the "auteur" film genre) informing the discussion of films in France. The films will be studied in both a historical and theoretical coontext, related to their period styles (e.g. "le realisme poetique," "la Nouvelle Vague," etc.), their "auteurs," the nature of the French star system, the role of the other arts, as well to the critical debated they have sparked among critics and historians. Students will acquire the analytical tools in Frencd to discuss films as artistic and as cultural texts.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Taught by: Met

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: FREN 230

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 250 German Cinema

Andrei Tarkovsky is universally acknowledged to be the greatest Soviet filmmaker of the last half of the twentieth century. In Kurosawas assessment following Tarkovskys death in the late 1980s, he had no equal among film directors alive now. In Ingmar Bergmans words, Tarkovskys work was a miracle. His films are beautiful, intellectually challenging, and spiritually profound. They range from Ivans Childhood, an exploration of wartime experience through the eyes of a child; to Solaris, a philosophical essay in the form of a science-fiction thriller; to Andrei Rublev, an investigation of the power of art and spirituality. In this course, we will study Tarkovskys films and life, with attention both to his formal and artistic accomplishments, his thought and writings concerning art and film, and the cultural and political contexts of his work.

Taught by: Richter, MacLeod

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: REES 250

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 257 Fascist Cinemas

Cinema played a crucial role in the cultural life of Nazi Germany and other fascist states. As cinema enthusiasts, Goebbels and Hitler were among the first to realize the important ideological potential of film as a mass medium and saw to it that Germany remained a cinema powerhouse producing more than 1000 films during the Nazi era. In Italy, Mussolini, too, declared cinema "the strongest weapon." This course explores the world of "fascist" cinemas ranging from infamous propaganda pieces such as The Triumph of the Will to popular entertainments such as musicals and melodramas. It examines the strange and mutually defining kinship between fascism more broadly and film. We will consider what elements mobilize and connect the film industries of the Axis Powers: style, genre, the aestheticization of politics, the creation of racialized others. More than seventy years later, fascist cinemas challenge us to grapple with issues of more subtle ideological insinuation than we might think. Weekly screenings with subtitles. All readings and discussions in English.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 269, GRMN 257, ITAL 257

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 258 German Cinema

An introduction to the momentous history of German film, from its beginnings before World War One to developments following the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 and German reunification in 1990. With an eye to film's place in its historical and political context, the course will explore the "Golden Age" of German cinema in the Weimar Republic, when Berlin vied with Hollywood; the complex relationship between Nazi ideology and entertainment during the Third Reich; the fate of German film-makers in exile during the Hitler years; post-war film production in both West and East Germany; the call for an alternative to "Papa's Kino" and the rise of New German Cinema in the 1960's. All readings and discussions in English.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 270, GRMN 258

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 259 Topics German Cinema

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 261, GRMN 259, GRMN 550

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 261 Topics In 20th-Century Literature

This topic course explores multiple and different aspects of Cinema Studies. Specific course topics vary from year to year. See the Cinema Studies website at <http://cinemastudies.sas.upenn.edu/> for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ENGL 261, JWST 262

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 266 Topics Law & Literature

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ENGL 266

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 267 Computer Animation

Through a series of studio projects this course introduces techniques of 2D and 3D computer animation. Emphasis is placed on time-based design and storytelling through animation performance and montage. Students will develop new sensitivities to movement, composition, cinematography, editing, sound, color and lighting.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: FNAR 267, FNAR 567

Prerequisite: FNAR 264

Activity: Studio

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 271 American Musical Theatre

The American musical is an unapologetically popular art form, but many of the works that come from this tradition have advanced and contributed to the canon of theatre as a whole. In this course we will focus on both music and texts to explore ways in which the musical builds on existing theatrical traditions, as well as alters and reshapes them. Finally, it is precisely because the musical is a popular theatrical form that we can discuss changing public tastes, and the financial pressures inherent in mounting a production. Beginning with early roots in operetta, we will survey the works of prominent writers in the American musical theatre, including Kern, Berlin, Gershwin, Porter, Rodgers, Hart, Hammerstein, Bernstein, Sondheim and others. Class lecture/discussions will be illustrated with recorded examples.

Taught by: Fox

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ENGL 285, THAR 271

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 272 Topics In Asian American Literature

This topic course explores aspects of Asian-American Literature and Cinema intensively. Specific course topics vary from year to year. See the Cinema Studies website at <http://cinemastudies.sas.upenn.edu/> for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ASAM 202, ENGL 272

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 273 American Theatre and Performance

This course examines the development of the modern American theatre from the turn of the century to the present day. Progressing decade by decade the course investigates the work of playwrights such as Eugene O'Neil, Arthur Miller, Tennessee Williams, Edward Albee, David Mamet, August Wilson and Tony Kushner, theatre companies such as the Provincetown Players and the Group Theatre, directors, actors, and designers. Some focus will also be given to major theatrical movements such as the Federal Theatre Project, Off-Broadway, regional theatre, experimental theatre of the Sixties, and feminist theatre.

Taught by: Schlatter and Malague

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ENGL 067, THAR 272

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 274 Dark Comedy in Theatre and Film

This course will examine the troublesome genre of dark comedy by looking at the ways in which theatre and film use comic and tragic structures and traditions to explore concepts and stories seemingly at odds with those traditions. Although not always organized chronologically in time, we will examine the formal and structural characteristics of tragicomedy by tracing its development, from some of its earliest roots in Roman comedy, to its manifestation in contemporary films and plays. Aside from close readings of plays and analysis of films, we will read selected critical essays and theory to enhance our understanding of how dark comedies subvert categories and sections of plays aloud in class. Issues to be considered include comparing the way the genre translates across theatre and film (adaptation) and examining the unique placement of the genre at the heart of contemporary American culture. Students will have the opportunity to experiment with creating tragicomic effect through performance in their presentations. The class is a seminar, with required participation in discussions. Other assignments include an 8-10 page paper and a presentation. We will read plays by authors as diverse as Plautus, Anton Chekhov, and Lynn Nottage, and filmmakers including Charlie Chaplin, Sofia Coppola, and Bong Joon-ho.

Taught by: Ferguson

Also Offered As: ENGL 014, THAR 273

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 275 Russian History in Film

This course draws on fictional, dramatic and cinematic representations of Russian history based on Russian as well as non-Russian sources and interpretations. The analysis targets major modes of imagining, such as narrating, showing and reenacting historical events, personae and epochs justified by different, historically mutating ideological postulates and forms of national self-consciousness. Common stereotypes of picturing Russia from "foreign" perspectives draw special attention. The discussion involves the following themes and outstanding figures: the mighty autocrats Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, and Catherine the Great; the tragic ruler Boris Godunov; the brazen rebel and royal impostor Pugachev; the notorious Rasputin, his uncanny powers, sex-appeal, and court machinations; Lenin and the October Revolution; images of war; times of construction and times of collapse of the Soviet Colossus.

Taught by: Todorov

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: REES 275

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 279 Jewish Films and Literature

From the 1922 silent film "Hungry Hearts" through the first "talkie," "The JazzSinger," produced in 1927, and beyond "Schindler's List," Jewish characters have confronted the problems of their Jewishness on the silver screen for a general American audience. Alongside this Hollywood tradition of Jewish film, Yiddish film blossomed from independent producers between 1911 and 1939, and interpreted literary masterpieces, from Shakespeare's "King Lear" to Sholom Aleichem's "Teyve the Dairyman," primarily for an immigrant, urban Jewish audience. In this course, we will study a number of films and their literary sources (in fiction and drama), focusing on English language and Yiddish films within the framework of three dilemmas of interpretation: a) the different ways we "read" literature and film, b) the various ways that the media of fiction, drama, and film "translate" Jewish culture, and c) how these translations of Jewish culture affect and are affected by their implied audience. All readings and lectures in English.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Taught by: Hellerstein

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 265, ENGL 279, GRMN 261, JWST 263

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 285 Art and Business of Film

The course will explore how a screenplay is conceptualized and developed, the role of agency relationships in the film business, and - casting as wide a net as possible - the financing, production, direction, distribution, exhibition and marketing of both independent and studio films. A combination of lectures by instructors and practitioners, case studies, film screenings, and consulting projects with independent and Hollywood creators, packagers, financiers, exhibitors, distributors and publicists will illustrate the relationship between the art of film and the business of film. Guests will include screenwriters, agents, producers, directors, distributors, film festival curators and film critics. In short, we will try to cover all aspects of making a film, and explore that often-tricky intersection of art and commerce.

Taught by: DeMarco & Van Cleve

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 289 Mixed Media Animation

Mixed Media Animation is a contemporary survey of stop-motion animation concepts and techniques. Students use digital SLR cameras, scanners and digital compositing software to produce works in hand-drawn animation, puppet and clay animation, sand animation, and multiplane collage animation. Screenings and discussions in the course introduce key historical examples of animation demonstrating how these techniques have been used in meaningful ways. Students then learn how to composite two or more of these methods with matte painting, computer animation or video.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: FNAR 289, FNAR 589

Prerequisite: FNAR 123 AND FNAR 264

Activity: Studio

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 293 Facing America

This course explores the visual history of race in the United States as both self-fashioning and cultural mythology by examining the ways that conceptions of Native American, Latino, and Asian identity, alongside ideas of Blackness and Whiteness, have combined to create the various cultural ideologies of class, gender, and sexuality that remain evident in historical visual and material culture. We also investigate the ways that these creations have subsequently helped to launch new visual entertainments, including museum spectacles, blackface minstrelsy, and early film, from the colonial period through the 1940s.

Taught by: Shaw, Staff

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 294, ARTH 274, ARTH 674, ASAM 294, LALS 274

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 295 Topics in Cultural Studies

This topic course explores aspects of Film Cultural Studies intensively. Specific course topics vary from year to year. See the Cinema Studies website at <http://cinemastudies.sas.upenn.edu/> for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Decherney

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 293, COML 295, ENGL 295

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 300 Topics in Italian History, Literature, and Culture

This topic course explores aspects of Film in others arts intensively. Specific course topics vary from year to year. See the Cinema Studies website at <http://cinemastudies.sas.upenn.edu/> for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 300, ENGL 231, ITAL 300

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 301 French Identity in the Twentieth Century

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: FREN 301, GSWS 301

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 303 Queer Cinema

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 303, GSWS 302

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 304 Japanese Cinema

This course is a survey of Japanese cinema from the silent period to the present. Students will learn about different Japanese film genres and histories, including (but not limited to) the benshi tradition, jidaigeki (period films), yakuza films, Pink Film, experimental/arthouse, J-horror, and anime. Although the course will introduce several key Japanese auteurs (Mizoguchi, Ozu, Kurosawa, Oshima, Suzuki, etc), it will emphasize lesser known directors and movements in the history of Japanese film, especially in the experimental, arthouse, and documentary productions of the 1960s and 1970s. Finally, in addition to providing background knowledge in the history of Japanese cinema, one of the central goals of the course will be to interrogate the concept of "national" cinema, and to place Japanese film history within a international context.

Taught by: Alekseyeva

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: EALC 268, ENGL 304

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 305 Cinema and Media

This course will provide an introduction to some of the most important film theory debates, and allow us to explore how writers and filmmakers from different countries and historical periods have attempted to make sense of the changing phenomenon known as "cinema," to think cinematically. Topics under consideration may include: spectatorship, authorship, the apparatus, sound, editing, realism, race, gender and sexuality, stardom, the culture industry, the nation and decolonization, what counts as film theory and what counts as cinema, and the challenges of considering film theory in a global context, including the challenge of working across languages. There will be no screenings for this course. No knowledge of film theory is presumed. Course requirements: attendance at lecture and participation in lecture and section discussions; canvas postings; 1 in-class mideterm; 1 take-home final.

Taught by: Redrobe

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 295, ARTH 695, COML 299, ENGL 305, GSWS 295

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 320 Topics in Animation

This topic course explores multiple and different aspects of Animation. Specific course topics vary from year to year. See the Cinema Studies website at <http://cinemastudies.sas.upenn.edu/> for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 387, ENGL 302, FNAR 320

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 344 Documentary Experiments in Urban Research

What can video art, experimental documentary, and sensory ethnography teach us about the practice of urban research? How can we build on the traditions of first person and essay cinema to produce compelling documents of our own questions and findings? This course surveys a range of film and video works on themes such as the production of space, urban nature, infrastructure, and collective memory. Taken as a genre, these time-based works provide a powerful model for training scholars' observational skills, conceptualizing scales of analysis, and engaging broader publics in urban research. In this course, we will explore this audiovisual genre in dialogue with selected theoretical, ethnographic, and case study readings in urban studies. As an advanced theory-practice course, it combines seminar readings and discussion with regular screenings and a series of workshops on photo, video, audio, and postproduction skills. The course will provide a general fluency in contemporary urban research, with particular emphasis on urban political ecology. In dialogue with this scholarship, students will develop and situate their own experimental documentary research projects.

Taught by: Mendelsohn

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANTH 344, URBS 344

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 347 Gender History and American Film

More than any other medium, the motion pictures fostered new ideals and images of modern womanhood and manhood in the United States. Throughout the twentieth century, gender representations on the screen bore a complex relationship to the social, economic, and political transformations marking the lives and consciousness of American men and women. This course explores the history of American gender through film. It treats the motion pictures as a primary source that, juxtaposed with other kinds of historical evidence, opens a window onto gendered work, leisure, sexuality, family life, and politics. We will view a wide range of Hollywood motion pictures since 1900, as well as films by blacklisted artists, feminists, and independent producers.

Taught by: Peiss

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: GSWS 347, HIST 347

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 365 Russian Cinema and Culture

What's so funny, Mr. Chekhov? This question is often asked by critics and directors who still are puzzled with Chekhovs definition of his four major plays as comedies. Traditionally, all of them are staged and directed as dramas, melodramas, or tragedies. Should we cry or should we laugh at Chekhovian characters who commit suicide, or are killed, or simply cannot move to a better place of living? Is the laughable synonymous to comedy and the comic? Should any fatal outcome be considered tragic? All these and other questions will be discussed during the course. The course is intended to provide the participants with a concept of dramatic genre that will assist them in approaching Chekhovs plays as comedies. In addition to reading Chekhovs works, Russian and western productions and film adaptations of Chekhovs works will be screened. Among them are, Vanya on 42nd Street with Andre Gregory, and Four Funny Families. Those who are interested will be welcome to perform and/or direct excerpts from Chekhovs works.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: REES 426

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 370 Blacks in American Film and Television

An examination and analysis of the changing images and achievements of African Americans in motion pictures and television. The first half of the course focuses on African-American film images from the early years of D.W. Griffith's "renegade bucks" in The Birth of a Nation (1915); to the comic servants played by Steppin Fetchit, Hattie McDaniel, and others during the Depression era; to the post-World War II New Negro heroes and heroines of Pinky (1949) and The Defiant Ones (1958); to the rise of the new movement of African American directors such as Spike Lee (Do the Right Thing), Julie Dash (Daughters of the Dust), Charles Burnett, (To Sleep With Anger) and John Singleton (Boyz N the Hood). The second half explores television images from the early sitcoms "Amos 'n Andy" and "Beulah" to the "Cosby Show," "Fresh Prince of Bel Air," and "Martin." Foremost this course will examine Black stereotypes in American films and television--and the manner in which those stereotypes have reflected national attitudes and outlooks during various historical periods. This course will also explore the unique "personal statements" and the sometimes controversial "star personas" of such screen artists as Sidney Poitier, Dorothy Dandridge, Paul Robeson, Richard Pryor, Oscar Micheaux, Spike Lee, Bill Cosby, Eddie Murphy, and Whoopi Goldberg. The in-class screenings and discussions will include such films as Show Boat (1936), the independently produced "race movies" of the 1930s and 1940s, Cabin in the Sky (1943), The Defiant Ones (1958), Imitation of Life (the 1959 remake), Super Fly (1972), and She's Gotta Have It (1986) and such television series as "I Spy," "Julia," "Good Times," "The Jeffersons," "Roots," "A Different World," "I'll Fly Away," "LA Law," and "Hangin' With Mr. Cooper."

Taught by: Bogle

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 400

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 378 Global Media

This course explores a broad media landscape through new critical and conceptual approaches. It is designated as a Benjamin Franklin Seminar. This course maps the footprints of television at a global scale. Adopting comparative approaches, we will be studying TV's formation of national and global discourses, and thereby recognizing not only television's impact on processes of globalization, but also the ability of television to matter globally. Working through concepts of "broadcasting," "flow," "circulation," and "circumvention," the course examines the movement of (and blocks encountered by) television programs and signals across national borders and cultures. The course particularly focuses on how global television cultures have been transformed due to shifts from broadcasting technologies to (Internet) streaming services? Navigating from United States and Cuba to India and Egypt, the readings in the course illuminate how particular televisual genres, institutions, and reception practices emerged in various countries during specific historical periods. We shall be addressing a range of questions: what kind of global phenomenon is television? Can we study television in countries where we do not know the existing local languages? In what different ways (through what platforms, interfaces, and screens) do people in different continents access televisual content? What explains the growing transnational exports of Turkish and Korean TV dramas? What is the need to historically trace the infrastructural systems like satellites (and optical fiber cables) that made (and continue to make) transmission of television programming possible across the world? How do fans circumvent geo-blocking to watch live sporting events? Assignments include submitting weekly discussion questions and a final paper. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Mukherjee

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ARTH 379, ENGL 378

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 380 Contemporary Spanish Literature

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: SPAN 380

Prerequisite: SPAN 219 OR SPAN 223

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 382 Horror Cinema

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the history and main themes of the supernatural/horror film from a comparative perspective. Films considered will include: the German expressionists masterworks of the silent era, the Universal classics of the 30's and the low-budget horror films produced by Val Lewton in the 40's for RKO in the US, the 1950's color films of sex and violence by Hammer studios in England, Italian Gothic horror or giallo (Mario Brava) and French lyrical macabre (Georges Franju) in the 60's, and on to contemporary gore. In an effort to better understand how the horror film makes us confront our worst fears and our most secret desires alike, we will look at the genre's main iconic figures (Frankenstein, Dracula, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, etc.) as well as issues of ethics, gender, sexuality, violence, spectatorship through a variety of critical lenses (psychoanalysis, socio-historial and cultural context, aesthetics...). Prerequisite: Two 200-level French courses taken at Penn or equivalent are required for FREN 382. There are no pre-requisites for CIMS 382. This course will be taught in English.

Taught by: Met

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: FREN 382

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 385 Studies in Spanish Culture

This course covers topics in contemporary Spanish Culture, its specific emphasis varying with the instructor. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: LALS 386, SPAN 386

Prerequisite: SPAN 219 OR SPAN 223

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 386 Paris in Film

Latter-day examples like Christophe Honore's Dans Paris, Cedric Klapisch's Paris or the international omnibus Paris, je t'aime (with each director paying homage to a distinctive "arrondissement" of the capital), not to mention American blockbusters like The Da Vinci Code and Inception or Woody Allen's Midnight in Paris, are there to remind us that there is somehing special -- indeed, a special kind of magic -- about Paris in and on film. Despite the extreme polarization between Paris and provincial France in both cultural and socio-economic terms, cultural historians have argued that Paris is a symbol of France (as a centralized nation), more than Rome is of Italy and much more than Madrid is of Spain or Berlin of Germany, for example. The prevalence of the City of Lights on our screens, Gallic and otherwise, should therefore come as no surprise, be it as a mere backdrop or as a character in its own right. But how exactly are the French capital and its variegated people captured on celluloid? Can we find significant differences between French and non-French approaches, or between films shot on location that have the ring of "authenticity" and studio-bound productions using reconstructed sets? Do these representations vary through time and perhaps reflect specific historical periods or zeitgeists?

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: FREN 386

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 387 The Holocaust in Italian Literature and Film

Please check the website for a current course description at: http://www.sas.upenn.edu/italians/courses

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ITAL 384

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 388 Topics in Spanish and Latin American Cinema

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: LALS 388, SPAN 388

Prerequisite: SPAN 219 OR SPAN 233

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 390 Introduction to Spanish American Literature

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www/sas/upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 390, GSWS 391, LALS 396, SPAN 390

Prerequisite: SPAN 219 OR SPAN 223

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 392 Topics In Film Studies

This topic course explores aspects of Cinema Studies intensively. Specific course topics vary from year to year. See the Cinema Studies website at <http://cinemastudies.sas.upenn.edu/> for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Corrigan

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 389, COML 391, ENGL 392

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 393 Topics in Cinema & Media

Specific course topics vary from year to year. See the Cinema Studies website at <http://cinemastudies.sas.upenn.edu/> for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Redrobe

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 393, ARTH 393, ENGL 301, GSWS 394

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 396 Studies in Spanish American Culture

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: GSWS 396, LALS 397, SPAN 396

Prerequisite: SPAN 219 OR SPAN 223

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 397 History of Spanish American Culture

Topics vary. Please see the panish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu.hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: GSWS 397, LALS 398, SPAN 397

Prerequisite: SPAN 219 OR SPAN 223

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 430 Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict in Film

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: REES 430

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 432 Fate and Chance in Literature and Film

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 196, REES 432

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 498 Cinema Studies Honor Thesis

Completion of 13 Cinema Studies courses, a GPA of 3.5 or higher in the major, and a grade of A- or above for the senior thesis. This is a year-long course. 1 c.u. will be awarded upon completion.

Two terms. student must enter first term.

Prerequisites: Completion of 13 Cinema Studies courses, a GPA of 3.5 or higher in the major, and a grade of A- or above for the senior thesis.

Activity: Independent Study

0.5 Course Units

CIMS 500 MLA Seminars in Cinema

This topic course explores multiple and different aspects of Cinema Studies. Specific course topics vary from year to year. See the Cinema Studies website at cinemastudies.sas.upenn.edu/courses for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ENGL 466

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 501 Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict in Film

This course studies political violence, terrorism, civil wars, ethnic conflicts, and genocidal policies as represented in the social media, cable news, documentaries, feature films. We discuss various techniques and strategies of the propaganda wars, post-truth media environment, etc. The regions of interest are Former Soviet Union, Russia, the Caucasus, and the Balkans, US homegrown political violence, and the Middle East. The students are expected to develop and demonstrate a critical approach to different aspects of the cinematic, news, and social media representation of ethnic conflict. We focus on the violent developments that took place in Russia and the Balkans after the collapse of the Soviet Bloc, conditioned by the geopolitical dynamics that the fall of communism had created. We study media broadcasts, documentaries, feature films representing both, the Eastern and the Western perspective.

Taught by: Todorov

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: REES 501

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 502 Masters in Liberal Arts Seminar

This MLA course in the history of art explores an aspect of Art History and Theory, specific course topics vary. Please see the College of Liberal and Professional Studies Course Guide for a description of current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 505, COML 510, GSWS 574

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 505 Electronic Literary Studies Proseminar

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ARTH 506, COML 504, ENGL 505

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 506 Religion & Cinema

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: RELS 505

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 515 Topics in Criticism and Theory

Topic for Fall 2017: "Object Theory". This seminar will investigate the rise of and ongoing scholarly concern with "objects" and "things," which has emerged from fields such as anthropology and art history as a category of renewed interest for literary scholars, too. We will investigate key contributions to theories of the object by thinkers such as: Mauss, Barthes, Heidegger, Latour, Benjamin, Bill Brown, Jane Bennett, among others. Literary readings will accompany these theoretical texts.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 573, COML 570, ENGL 573, GRMN 573, REES 683

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 528 Modern Spain and Hispanic America

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: SPAN 528

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 539 Penn-In-Kenya

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 555 Terrorism

This course studies the emergence of organized terrorism in nineteenth-century Russia and its impact on public life in the West, the Balkans, and America. We investigate the political and cultural origins of terrorism, its conspiratorial routine, structures, methods, manuals, and manifestoes. Historical and cultural approaches converge in the discussion of intellectual movements that forged the formula of terrorism and influenced the professionalization of the underground, such as nihilism, anarchism, and populism. We discuss the stern terrorist personality, self-denial, revolutionary martyrdom, and conspiratorial militancy. The theatricals of terrorism are of particular interest, its bombastic acts, mystification, and techniques of spreading disorganizing fear in the global media environment. We trace the creation of counterterrorism police in late imperial Russia and its methods to infiltrate, demoralize, and dismantle the terrorist networks, and reengineer their social base. First Red Scare and the formation of the FBI constitutes a unique case of managing rampant political violence and countering the asymmetrical threat of terrorism.

Taught by: Todorov

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: REES 555

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 572 Topics in African Literature

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 572, COML 575, ENGL 572

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 575 Russian History in Film

Also Offered As: REES 574

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 580 Rec Issue in Crit Theory

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 590, ENGL 590, GSWS 589, LALS 590

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 584 20th-Century Italian Fiction and Film

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ITAL 584

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 590 Topics in Cinema & Media

This topic course explores multiple and different aspects of Cinema and Media. Specific course topics vary from year to year. See the Cinema Studies website at <http://cinemastudies.sas.upenn.edu/> for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 593, COML 599, ENGL 593

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 592 20th Century Lit & Theory

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 592, ENGL 592

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 595 Copyright and Culture

This graduate topic course explores aspects of copyright in Cinema Studies. Specific course topics vary from year to year. See the Cinema Studies website at <http://cinemastudies.sas.upenn.edu/> for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Decherney

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 594, ENGL 595

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 596 Topics in Contemporary Art

Topic varies. An experimental class for artists and scholars. Organized around a series of case studies of artists, collectives, infrastructures, and curatorial projects, the course includes: in-class discussion and viewing; workshops with class visitors; site visits; participation in small reading groups. In the first half of the class, students will complete some short assignments. In addition, students will complete a final project that is intentionally open in terms of form. The project, which can be collective or individual in nature, will enable an in-depth material investigation of one of the threads of the class.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ARTH 596, ENGL 596, FNAR 605, GSWS 596

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 599 Independent Study

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 612 Film Noir

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: FREN 612

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 682 Topics: Literature and Film

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 680, GSWS 682, ITAL 682

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 694 Mexican Cinema

This seminar will address the specificity and uniqueness of Spanish America's cultural production, that is, those elements that make the Spanish American case differ from the paradigmatic postcolonial situation, and which make recent developments in postcolonial studies not fully applicable to it. We will explore these issues in the context of the literary production of the twentieth century in Spanish America from roughly the twenties to the present, that is, the epoch encompassing the larger metropolitan cultural phenomena of Modernism and Postmodernism.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: LALS 694, SPAN 694

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 791 African Film and Media Pedagogy

This graduate seminar offers an intensive, critical, and collaborative study of contemporary African film and media production. The past three decades have seen an unprecedented shift in the African media landscape. Not only has the wide availability of satellite media across the continent made international film and television programing part of African popular culture, but moreover the growing film industries within the continent, most notably Nollywood, have altered how Africans are carving an image of themselves on the big and small screens. In partnership with local, regional, and international film and media centers, we will study a range of films--features, shorts, documentaries, and television shows--paying close attention to the means and sites of production as well as the formal qualities that distinguish these works. Many of the films we will analyze stand out both for their exceptional aesthetic quality as well as their remarkable ability to confront pressing political and social themes. But we will also think about trash: what counts as trashy media, and for whom? Who watches it, where, and why? Other questions we will ask include: What particular indigenous modes of storytelling do African films employ? What categories begin to emerge under the umbrella category of "African film and media," and where do diasporan film and media practitioners and critics fit in this landscape? How are these films tackling some of the urgent questions of our times, including migration and globalization; ethnic, political, and economic polarization; gender and sexuality; and massive urbanization and industrialization sweeping Africa and other parts of the Global South? What role do festivals in various countries play in shaping media production and distribution? How important is the concept of authorship in this context? And how do these films challenge the dominant western trope of Africa as a spectacle, instead offering novel ways of picturing everyday African experiences that we rarely glimpse in western media? To explore these questions, we will visit multiple sites of film production, distribution, exhibition, and education, including Scribe Video Center in Philadelphia, Sankofa Films in Washington, D.C., and the College of Performing and Visual Art at Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia. Location and knowledge production are inextricably connected, and by considering African media production from these multiple sites, and collaborating with multiple stakeholders, this course offers a directly engaged pedagogy of the complex artistic, cultural, social, and political dynamics of African audiovisual creation. The travel component of this course entails a day trip to Washington, D.C. during the semester (tentative date: April 2, 2020) and a week-long trip to Addis Ababa at the end of the spring term (students applying for this course should be prepared to travel to Addis Ababa May 30, 2020-June 7, 2020). All expenses for travel, accommodation, and food will be covered, but students will need to hold a passport. Ultimately, this course aims to use film and media production to intervene in a larger discourse on how Africa is figured in the global humanities, not as an absent or passive actor but one actively engaged in producing art and humanistic knowledge that has much to teach us and the world. Admission to the course will be by permission only and students are required to submit a short statement of interest (max. 250 words) to dagw@english.upenn.edu and redkaren@sas.upenn.edu. Students must be prepared to travel to Addis Ababa and Washington D.C. as described in the syllabus, and must hold a passport.

Taught by: Redrobe/Woubshet

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 791, ARTH 791, COML 791, ENGL 777

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 793 Topics in Cinema and Media

Topic varies

Taught by: Beckman

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 793

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CIMS 899 Independent Study

Course not offered every year

Activity: Independent Study

1.0 Course Unit