Classical Studies (CLST)

CLST 010 Archaeology & Technology

This seminar explores how humans apply and modify technologies in contexts as diverse as everyday life, major politico-economic undertakings, or scholarly research. We investigate this through a comparison of technologies of the past with technologies of the present used to study the past. We will dig into the details of topics like building pyramids and tombs, the function of ancient astronomical devices, pre-telegraph long-distance communication, tools for cutting and carving stone, and kilns for firing pottery. Archaeologists study these issues by examining the material remains of past societies: the cut-marks on stone blocks, extant tomb structures, the debris of manufacturing activities, and much more. Today's technologies enable the detailed scientific examination of the evidence, improving our understanding of the past. Thus, in parallel with our investigation of past technologies, we will also study the history of the application of present technologies to research on the archaeological record. We will dig into topics like the first uses of computers and databases, the development of statistical methods, early digital 3d modeling of objects and architecture, the adoption of geophysical prospection and geographic information systems, and the emerging uses of machine learning. In some cases, we can even compare old and new technologies directly, such as with land measurement and surveying techniques. Throughout the class we will engage in readings and discussions on the theory of humans and technology, to gain a better understanding of how processes such as innovation function in all time periods.

Taught by: Peter Cobb

Also Offered As: ANTH 010, ARTH 010, NELC 010

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 011 The Iliad and its Afterlife

As the first work in the western tradition, Homer's Trojan War epic, the Iliad, has been a constant point of reference for thinking about heroism, friendship, the search for meaning in the face of mortality, and the effects of war on individuals and societies. We will begin with a close reading of the Iliad in English translation, paying attention both to the story of its hero Achilles as he experiences disillusionment, frustration, anger, triumph, revenge, and reconciliation and to the poem's broader portrait of a society at war; this portrait incorporates the diverse perspectives of invaders and defenders, men and women, old and young, gods and mortals, along with tantalizing glimpses of peacetime life. We will then consider how later writers and artists have drawn on the Iliad to present a range of perspectives of their own -- whether patriotic, mock heroic, romantic, or pacifist -- with particular attention to 20th and 21st century responses by such figures as W.H. Auden, Simone Weil, Jonathan Shay, Cy Twombly, David Malouf, Alice Oswald, and Adrienne Rich. No previous knowledge of the Iliad is required. The course is intended for anyone who is interested in how cultures use their shared myths both to affirm and to question their central values.

Taught by: Murnaghan

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 012 Private Life in Ancient Rome

What was it like to live in the Roman world? What did that world look, taste and smell like? How did Romans raise their families, entertain themselves, understand death, and interact with their government? What were Roman values and how did they differ from our own? This course takes as its subject the everyday lives of individuals and explores those lives using the combined tools of archaeology, art and written sources. In doing so, it seeks to integrate the well-known monuments of Roman civilization into a world of real people. Some of the topics explored will include Roman houses, diet, leisure, gender and sexuality, slavery, and poverty.

Taught by: Bowes

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 014 Classical Antiquity and the Modern World

The ancient Greek and Roman civilizations, whether individually, together, or in relation to other ancient civilizations, have frequently been seen as ancestors of the modern world. This ancestry has been seen both as a common and unifying heritage and as one that divides. This course will consider the relationship between Classical Antiquity and the modern world in the light of different themes, including those of Civilization, Empire, Race, Ethnicity, Simplicity and Complexity, Morality, Religion, and Universality. Classes will focus on discussion of readings with an emphasis on coming to grips with multiple and conflicting points of view. Students will write a research paper related to one of the themes mentioned above or to another one of similar importance.

Taught by: Farrell

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 015 Town and Country in Ancient Greece

The ancient city of Athens, Greece, is renowned as the birthplace of democracy; Sparta is famous for its warlike society; Olympia for the Olympic Games; and Delphi for its famed oracle. But the Greek landscape was dotted with hundreds of other cities, towns, villages, sanctuaries, and hamlets. This seminar is a journey through town and country in ancient Greece, from dense urban spaces to vast forests and agro-pastoral countrysides. We will examine many lines of evidence: (1) ancient texts (e.g., Homeric epics, Hesiod's depiction of rural life, the histories of Herodotus and Thucydides, the tragedies and comedies of the great playwrights, the geography of Strabo, the travel writing of Pausanias); (2) inscriptions that record details of life and death ; and (3) archaeology (site discovery and excavation, recovery of the material remains of everyday life). These sources will reveal much information about how urban and rural life were organized. A central aim of this seminar is to address this question: is the past a foreign country, or is there nothing new under the sun?

Taught by: Tartaron

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 019 Topics in Literature

An introduction to Writing about Literature, with emphasis on a particular theme, genre, or period. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: CIMS 015, ENGL 015, GSWS 017, LALS 016

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 026 Ancient Greece

The Greeks enjoy a special place in the construction of western culture and identity, and yet many of us have only the vaguest notion of what their culture was like. A few Greek myths at bedtime when we are kids, maybe a Greek tragedy like Sophokles' Oidipous when we are at school: these are often the only contact we have with the world of the ancient Mediterranean. The story of the Greeks, however, deserves a wider audience, because so much of what we esteem in our own culture derives from them: democracy, epic poetry, lyric poetry, tragedy, history writing, philosophy, aesthetic taste, all of these and many other features of cultural life enter the West from Greece. The oracle of Apollo at Delphi had inscribed over the temple, "Know Thyself." For us, that also means knowing the Greeks. We will cover the period from the Late Bronze Age, c. 1500 BC, down to the time of Alexander the Great, concentrating on the two hundred year interval from 600-400 BC.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: McInerney

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: ANCH 026, HIST 026

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 027 Ancient Rome

The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Grey

Course offered spring; odd-numbered years

Also Offered As: ANCH 027, HIST 027

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 029 Rome & America

This course explores a range of social structures and contexts, cultural understandings and intellectual practices where the influence of Roman exemplars is discernible in both historical and present-day America. It presents students with Roman and American materials placed in explicit or implicit dialog with one another: e.g., descriptions and discussions of political processes and structures; attitudes towards games, public entertainments, and communal cohesion; rhetorics and vocabularies of public space. Among other tasks and projects, students will stage a 'reimagination' of the Constitutional (Philadelphia) Convention of 1787, which resulted in the United States Constitution. They will also emulate ancient moralists and satirists, who attacked Rome's 'Bread and Circuses' culture, by focusing their attention upon comparable practices in modern America.

Taught by: Grey

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 100 Greek & Roman Mythology

Myths are traditional stories that have endured many years. Some of them have to do with events of great importance, such as the founding of a nation. Others tell the stories of great heroes and heroines and their exploits and courage in the face of adversity. Still others are simple tales about otherwise unremarkable people who get into trouble or do some great deed. What are we to make of all these tales, and why do people seem to like to hear them? This course will focus on the myths of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as a few contemporary American ones, as a way of exploring the nature of myth and the function it plays for individuals, societies, and nations. We will also pay some attention to the way the Greeks and Romans themselves understood their own myths. Are myths subtle codes that contain some universal truth? Are they a window on the deep recesses of a particular culture? Are they entertaining stories that people like to tell over and over? Are they a set of blinders that all of us wear, though we do not realize it? We investigate these questions through a variety of topics creation of the universe between gods and mortals, religion and family, sex, love, madness, and death.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Taught by: Struck

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: COML 108

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 101 Sex and Gender in Ancient Greece and Rome

What is being a man, being a woman, being masculine, being feminine, being neither, being both? Is sex about pleasure, domination, identity, reproduction, or something else? Are sexual orientation and gender identity innate? How can words, myths and stories inform cultural assumptions about sex and gender? Did people in ancient times have a concept of sexuality? How do gendered English terms (like "girly", "effeminate", or "feisty") compare to gendered ancient Greek and Latin terms, like virtus, which connotes both "virtue" and "masculinity"? Why did the Roman and English speaking worlds have to borrow the word "clitoris" from the ancient Greeks? How did people in antiquity understand consent? Can we ever get access to the perspectives of ancient women? In this introductory undergraduate course, we will learn about sex and gender in ancient Greece and Rome. We will discuss similarities and differences between ancient and modern attitudes, and we will consider how ancient texts, ancient art, ancient ideas and ancient history have informed modern western discussions, assumptions and legislation. Our main readings will be of ancient texts, all in English translation; authors studied will include Ovid, Aristophanes, Plato, Euripides, and Sappho. Class requirements will include participation in discussion as well as quizzes, reading responses, and a final exam.

Taught by: Wilson

Also Offered As: COML 105, GSWS 104

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 102 Classical Traditions

A broad consideration of the ways in which writers and artists from the early modern era to the present day have responded to the classical tradition, borrowing from, imitating, questioning, and challenging their classical predecessors. Through modern reworkings of ancient epic, tragedy, biography, and lyric by authors ranging from Shakespeare and Racine to contemporary poets, painters, and filmmakers, we will ask what the terms "classical" and "tradition" might mean and will track the continuities and differences between antiquity and the modern world. Should we see ancient Greek and Roman culture as an inheritance, a valuable source of wealth bequeathed to the modern age? Or is there something wrong with that picture? How do ancient texts have to be adapted and transformed if they are to speak to modern conditions and concerns? This is an introductory-level course open to anyone who cares about the relationship between the present and the past.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ENGL 029

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 103 History of Ancient Philosophy

"What is philosophy? How does it differ from science, religion, literature, and other modes of human discourse? This course traces the origins of philosophy as a discipline in the Western tradition, looking to thinkers of Ancient Greece and Rome. We will examine how natural philosophers such as Thales, Anaximander, and Heraclitus distinguished their inquiries from the teachings of poets such as Homer and Hesiod; how ancient atomism had its origins in a response to Parmenides' challenge to the assumption that things change in the world; how Socrates reoriented the focus of philosophy away from the natural world and toward the fundamental ethical question, how shall I live? We will also examine how his pupil, Plato, and subsequently Aristotle, developed elaborate philosophical systems that address the nature of reality, knowledge, and human happiness. Finally, we will examine the ways in which later thinkers such as the Epicureans and Stoics transformed and extended the earlier tradition."

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: S.Meyer

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: PHIL 003

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 104 Race and Ethnicity in the Classical World

This course uses ancient literature, historical sources and archaeological sources to explore how concepts of race and ethnicity operated in the ancient Greek and Roman worlds, and how people of minority races/ethnicites were perceived and lived. The course begins by asking how the discipline of classics has approached or avoided these subjects, and the role of race in contemporary debates about the study of the classical past. It then interrogates how ancient Greeks and Romans thought about race, and the allied but distinct category of ethnicity, and how these correspond, or not, to modern notions of race and racism. No knowledge of the ancient world is required. Structured, active in-class learning

Taught by: Bowes

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANCH 104

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 107 Ancient Drama

This course will introduce students to some of the greatest works of dramatic literature in the western canon. We will consider the social, political, religious and artistic functions of drama in ancient Greece and Rome, and discuss both differences and similarities between ancient drama and modern art forms. The course will also pursue some broader goals: to improve students skills as readers and scholarly critics of literature, both ancient and modern; to observe the implications of form for meaning, in considering, especially, the differences between dramatic and non-dramatic kinds of cultural production: to help students understand the relationship of ancient Greek and Roman culture to the modern world; and to encourage thought about some big issues, in life as well as in literature: death, heroism, society, action and meaning.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 106

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 111 Introduction to Mediterranean Archaeology

The cultures of Greece and Rome, what we call classical antiquity, span over a thousand years of multicultural achievement in the Mediterranean. This course tells the story of what it was like to live in the complex societies of ancient Greece and Rome. This story is told principally using the art, architecture, pottery and coins produced by these societies. We will examine both the bold and sexy, and the small and humble, from the Parthenon to wooden huts, from the Aphrodite of Knidos to the bones of a fisherman named Peter.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Bowes

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: ANTH 111, ARTH 227, ARTH 627

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 123 Great Discoveries in Archaeology

In this course, we examine famous (Pompeii, Troy, Machu Picchu) and not-so-famous (Uluburun, Kalamianos) archaeological sites, mainly in the Old World of the Mediterranean, Near East, and Asia, but also in the New World of North and South America. We adopt a thematic and comparative approach to delve deeper to explore these societies and examine cultural similarities and differences across the ancient world. A typical sequence of meetings will begin with lecture on a particular theme, such as Writing Systems or Sacred Spaces and Places, followed by the presentation of relevant monuments, sites, or regions from different parts of the world, with discussion and assessment of the cross-cultural similarities and differences. In this way, both the great diversity of culture in our world, as well as our underlying similarities, can be revealed. How different are we from our ancestors who lived hundreds or thousands of years ago? Museum visits and exercises will allow students to engage with the material creations of these civilizations. CLST 123 is a non-technical introduction for students interested in archaeology, history, art history, anthropology, or related subjects. There are no prerequisites. The course fulfills the Cross Cultural Analysis foundational requirement.

Taught by: Tartaron

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 127 The Material Past in a Digital World

The material remains of the human past -objects and spaces- provide tangible evidence of past people's lives. Today's information technologies improve our ability to document, study, and present these materials. But what does it mean to deal with material evidence in a virtual context? In this class, students will learn basic digital methods for studying the past while working with objects, including those in the collections of the Penn Museum. This class will teach relational database design and 3D object modeling. As we learn about acquiring and managing data, we will gain valuable experience in the evaluation and use of digital tools. The digital humanities are a platform both for learning the basic digital literacy students need to succeed in today's world and for discussing the human consequences of these new technologies and data. We will discuss information technology's impact on the study and presentation of the past, including topics such as public participation in archaeological projects, educational technologies in museum galleries, and the issues raised by digitizing and disseminating historic texts and objects. Finally, we will touch on technology's role in the preservation of the past in today's turbulent world. No prior technical experience is required, but we hope students will share an enthusiasm for the past.

Also Offered As: ANTH 127, ARTH 127, HIST 127, NELC 187

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 129 The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire?

The Roman Empire, teetering under the weight of its bureaucracy, oppressed by the demands of its soldiers, weakened by wave after wave of barbarian invasions, and, with the rise of Christianity, confronted by its own immorality, finally fell when the last Roman emperor, Romulus Augustulus, was sent into exile in 476 CE. That, at least, is one version of the story. In truth, there are many stories that can be told of the period between the apogee of the Roman empire in the 2nd c. AD and the rise of Christianity and Islam and origins of the so-called Barbarian Kingdoms in the 7th and 8th centuries AD. This course will explore this period of 600 years, using methodologies from history, archaeology, social science and the sciences to understand the complex problem of empire and its evolutions. No previous knowledge of ancient or medieval history required.

Taught by: Bowes, Grey

Also Offered As: ANCH 129

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 136 The Ancient Economy

This class presents an introduction to economies before economics, a study of economic activity in the Greco-Roman world. Ancient Greece and Rome have been called some of the first "global" economies - they engaged in long-distance trade, introduced the first coinage systems, and built and manufactured at large scales. At the same time, they remained agrarian societies, with majority peasant populations, high levels of inequality and social systems that often placed social capital ahead of profit. Using textual sources, archaeology and techniques from the natural and social sciences, this class will not only look at basic elements of economic activity in the ancient world - demographics, trade, monetization, industry - but also ask critical questions about how - or if -modern economic methods can be applied to the distant past. No previous knowledge of the ancient world or economics is necessary.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: Bowes

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ANCH 136

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 140 Scandalous Arts in Ancient and Modern Communities

What do the ancient Greek comedian Aristophanes, the Roman satirist Juvenal, have in common with Snoop Dogg and Eminem? Many things, in fact, but perhaps the most fundamental is that they are all united by a stance that constantly threatens to offend prevailing social norms, whether through obscenity, violence or misogyny. This course will examine our conceptions of art (including literary, visual and musical media) that are deemed by certain communities to transgress the boundaries of taste and convention. It juxtaposes modern notions of artistic transgression, and the criteria used to evaluate such material, with the production of and discourse about transgressive art in classical antiquity. Students will consider, among other things, why communities feel compelled to repudiate some forms of art, while others into classics."

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: Rosen

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 141

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 143 Great Books of Greece and Rome

The literature of ancient Greece and Rome has been foundational for the national literatures of Europe and the Americas, and in the modern period it remains one of the most influential and widely read world literatures. This course introduces many of the most representative works that define the Greek and Roman canon from Homer to Augustine, along with the most characteristic issues that they examine. In the process, students will become familiar not only with the works themselves, but with the idea of a literary canon consisting of "great books," and will consider differing perspectives both on that idea and those of what constitutes a "foundational" or a "classical" literature, of literary influence, and of a community or culture defined in part by such a literature.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 146 Ancient Mediterranean Empires

What constituted an empire in antiquity and how was imperialism legitimized? Which measures were used to maintain and organize imperial power? How did foreign rule affect the daily life of people all over the Mediterranean? In this course we will discuss and compare ancient empires from Achaemenid Persia to Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic kingdoms of his successors to the emergence of Rome as one of the most successful and influential empires in world history. Topics that will be discussed include ancient ideas and concepts of imperial rule, patterns of political, economic and cultural power and their interrelations as well as imperial crises and local resistance. All texts will be discussed in translation. There are no prerequisites.

Taught by: Wilker

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: ANCH 146

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 148 Food and Fire: Archaeology in the Laboratory

This course will let students explore the essential heritage of human technology through archaeology. People have been transforming their environment from the first use of fire for cooking. Since then, humans have adapted to the world they created using the resources around them. We use artifacts to understand how the archaeological record can be used to trace breakthroughs such as breaking stone and bone, baking bread, weaving cloth and firing pottery and metals. The seminar will meet in the Penn Museum's new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials. Students will become familiar with the Museum's collections and the scientific methods used to study different materials. Class sessions will include discussions, guest presentations, museum field trips, and hands-on experience in the laboratory.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: Katherine Moore

Also Offered As: ANTH 148, NELC 183

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 185 Ancient Political Thought

The way in which the Greeks understood and expressed their political institutions, activities and challenges has deeply impressed our own conception of politics. This course will trace the history of this ancient heritage from its inception to today, first through a close analysis of key texts from Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, and Polybius, and then by considering several important moments in the reception of the Greek political tradition, from the Renaissance and American Revolution to the crisis of modernity and the Neo-Conservative Movement. We evaluate the relationship between distant and recent past as well as the influence of both on our own day.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: PSCI 180

Activity: Recitation

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 191 World Literature: Classics of the World I

This course will introduce students to a wide array of literary works from across the world. It operates on the assumption that cultures have never been isolated from each other and that literature has always been in motion across national boundaries; it has been translated, adapted, and circulated. We will explore the genres, forms, and thematic preoccupations of major works that strive to imagine a wider world, while also studying the critical debates around the concept of world literature, from its origins with Goethe's essay on Weltliteratur to contemporary arguments about cosmopolitanism and globalization.

Taught by: Premoli/Irele

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: COML 191, ENGL 277

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 199 Independent Study

Coursework and/or research undertaken independently by the student, supervised by a faculty member.

Activity: Independent Study

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 202 Cleopatra

Cleopatra VII (70/69 30 BCE) is one of the most famous women in world history She has been remembered, admired, and reproached as a power-hungry Hellenistic queen, as the last pharaoh of Egypt, as a self-confident female ruler, and as the vicious seductress of Julius Caesar and Mark Antony. Her supposedly extravagant lifestyle, her political schemes, but also her integrity in choosing suicide over submission have inspired poets, artists, and historians from her own time to our modern world. In this seminar, we will take a closer look at some of the common perceptions and stereotypes that have shaped the image of Cleopatra for more than 2000 years. The main focus, however, will be on the historical queen, her biography, and the political and cultural contexts of her life. We will use ancient literary texts, papyri, inscriptions, coins, and archaeological evidence to analyze Cleopatras rise to power, how she presented herself to her subjects and how she was perceived by others, as well as her role in the tumultuous events that led to the end of the Hellenistic period and the rise of imperial Rome under the rule of Augustus.

Taught by: Wilker

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANCH 202

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 211 Ancient Moral Philosophy

A survey of the ethical theories debated by philosophers in Classical Greece and Rome. Plato, Aristotle, Stoics, Epicureans and Pyrrhonist Sceptics offer competing answers to the fundamental question raised by Socrates: How are we to live? That is, what is the best life for a human being? These philosophers generally agree that virtue is an important part of the best human life, but disagree about whether it is the greatest good (Epicurus, for example claims that pleasure is the highest good), or whether there are any other goods (for example, health, wealth, family). Much attention is paid in their theories to accounts of the virtues of character, and to the place of wisdom in the best sort of human life.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Meyer

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: PHIL 211

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 217 Periclean Athens

Athens in the 5th Century BCE is often viewed as a high point of human civilization. We will assess this claim by looking at the period's cultural achievements (in such areas as drama, architecture, and oratory) within their social and political contexts. Topics for discussion include: the structure and workings of the Athenian democracy; the interplay between pro-democratic and anti-democratic positions in Athenian political life; the connections between democracy and imperialism; conceptions of citizenship and relations between citizens and non-citizens (women, slaves, and resident foreigners); the role of the law courts in both dispute resolution and elite competition; sexual politics; and the civic significance of religious ritual.

Taught by: MURNAGHAN

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANCH 217

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 220 Greek Art and Artifact

This course surveys Greek art and artifacts from Sicily to the Black Sea from the 10th century BCE to the 2nd century BCE, including the age of Alexander and the Hellenistic Kingdoms. Public sculpture and painting on and around grand buildings and gardens, domestic luxury arts of jewelry, cups and vases, mosaic floors, and cult artefacts are discussed. Also considered are the ways in which heroic epic, religious and political themes are used to engaged viewers' emotions and served both domestic and the public aims. We discuss the relationships of images and things to space and structure, along with ideas of invention and progress, and the role of monuments, makers and patrons in Greek society.

Taught by: Kuttner

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AAMW 625, ARTH 225, ARTH 625

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 221 Hellenistic and Roman Art and Artifacts

An intensive introduction to the art and architecture of Rome and her empire from Republican and later Hellenistic to Constantinian times. Variable emphasis on topics ranging from major genres, styles, and programs of commemorative and decorative art, historical narrative, and political iconography to building types and functions and the specific Etrusco-Roman notion of space, land division, and city planning.

Taught by: Kuttner

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AAMW 626, ARTH 226, ARTH 626

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 223 The Archaeology of Homer's World

Did you ever wonder what the world of the Iliad and Odyssey was really like? This illustrated lecture course surveys the prehistory and early history of the Greek world through texts and material remains, with the aim of bringing to life the society, economy, and politics of this ancient era. Among the topics are the rise and fall of the great Bronze Age civilizations of the Aegean area, the Minoans of Crete and the Mycenaeans of the Greek mainland; the cataclysmic volcanic eruption on the island of Thera (modern Santorini) and its long-term consequences; the Trojan War (myth or history??); the world of the Dark Age that followed the collapse of the Mycenaean palaces; and the Greek renaissance of the eighth century B.C. - including the adoption of the alphabet, the great colonizing movement, and the great Panhellenic sanctuaries like Olympia and Delphi - that laid the foundation for the Classical world to come. There are no prerequisites, and no prior knowledge of archaeology or the Greek world is assumed.

Taught by: Tartaron

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 227 Age of Caesar

A course on Roman culture and society in a period of tumultuous political change, the lifetime of Julius Caesar (100-44BCE). Focuses on the interplay between shifting political and military realities and developments in social organization and literary production at Rome and in the wider Mediterranean world. The reception of Caesar in later ages will also be considered. Readings (all in translation) will include Catullus, Cicero, Lucretius, Plutarach, Sallust, Suetonius, and, of course, Caesar himself.

Taught by: Damon

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANCH 227

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 228 Excavating Ancient Cities: Troy & Gordion

The instructor has spent the last 30 years excavating the Turkish sites of Troy and Gordion, the latter of which has been explored under Penns sponsorship. The former was famous in antiquity as the site of the Trojan War; the latter served as the capital of the Phrygian Kingdom, ruled by Midas. Both of these are multi-period sites, with nine settlements built above each other during more than four millennia, and determining the chronology and appearance of each settlement has consistently been controversial. In this course we will examine the history of both sites, focusing on the problems of archaeological interpretation. Students will be placed in the position of the archaeologist and charged with re-interpreting the existing archaeological evidence.

Taught by: Rose

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 244 Material World in Archaeological Science

By focusing on the scientific analysis of inorganic archaeological materials, this course will explore processes of creation in the past. clst 244 will take place in the new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and will be team taught in three modules: analysis of lithics, analysis of ceramics and analysis of metals. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how the transformation of materials into objects provides key information about past human behaviors and the socio-economic contexts of production, distribution, exchange and use. Discussion topics will include invention and adoption of new technologies, change and innovation, use of fire, and craft specialization.

Taught by: Boileau/Dibble

Also Offered As: ANTH 221, ANTH 521, ARTH 230, NELC 284, NELC 584

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 251 Greek and Roman Universe

This course covers the history of Greek and Roman exploration and mapping of the earth and the cosmos from the Bronze Age to Late Antiquity, together with advances in timekeeping and the measurement of time. Readings include poetic, historical, and scientific texts.

Taught by: Farrell

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 267 The Ancient Novel

The ancient Greek and Roman novels include some of the most enjoyable and interesting literary works from antiquity. Ignored by ancient critics, they were until fairly recently dismissed by classical scholars as mere popular entertainment. But these narratives had an enormous influence on the later development of the novel, and their sophistication and playfulness, they often seem peculiarly modern--or even postmodern. They are also an important source for any understanding of ancient culture or society. In this course, we will discuss the social, religious and philosophical contexts for the ancient novel, and we will think about the relationship of the novel to other ancient genres, such as history and epic. Texts to be read will include Lucian's parodic science fiction story about a journey to the moon; Longus' touching pastoral romance about young love and sexual awakening; Heliodorus' gripping and exotic thriller about pirates and long-lost children; Apuleius' Golden Ass, which contains the story of Cupid and Psyche; and Petronius' Satyricon, a hilarious evocation of an orgiasic Roman banquet.

Taught by: Wilson

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 268 Living World in Archaeological Science

By focusing on the scientific analysis of archaeological remains, this course will explore life and death in the past. It takes place in the new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and is team taught in three modules: human skeletal analysis, analysis of animal remains, and analysis of plant remains. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how organic materials provide key information about past environments, human behavior, and cultural change through discussions of topics such as health and disease, inequality, and food.

Taught by: Kassabaum, Monge, Moore

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANTH 267, ANTH 567, CLST 568, NELC 286, NELC 586

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 271 Greek & Roman Medicine

This course will examine the ways in which the Greeks, and then the Romans, conceptualized the body, disease, and healing, and will compare these to medical culture of our time. We will consider sources from Hippocrates, Plato, and Aristotle to Galen and Soranus, and will juxtapose these writings with modern discourse about similar topics. We will also pay some attention to ancient pharmacology and religious healing, and will visit the Penn Museum to see their collection of ancient medical instruments. All readings will be in English and no previous background in Classical Studies is required. This course will be especially appealing (and useful) to Pre-med and Nursing students, and to students interested in the History of Science, Ancient Philosophy, and Classics.

Taught by: Rosen

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: HSOC 271

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 300 Lies My Ancient History Teacher Taught Me

The neat, comforting narratives that we construct of the histories of ancient Greece and Rome cover up a collection of controversies and debates that continue to rage in contemporary scholarship. Can we use the Homeric epics as sources of early Greek history? Who was responsible for the Peloponnesian War? How can we best explain Rome's acquisition of empire? How new was the political revolution of Augustus? What were the main reasons for the rise of Christianity? In this course, we explore these and other controversies, focusing on both modern scholarship and the ancient sources. All texts will be discussed in translation. No prior knowledge of Ancient History is required, although it would be useful to have taken ANCH 026 and/or ANCH 027.

Taught by: Cam Grey

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANCH 301

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 310 Ancient and Modern Constitution Making

Constitutionmaking reemerged as an urgent issue with the transformation of colonial empires after World War II, the collapse of the Soviet empire in 1991, and nationalist movements in the Balkans, the British Isles, and the European Union. It has remained important as competition for control of Central Asia, the Middle East, and Northern Africa has reintensified. The written constitution has been hailed by some as the vehicle for changing long established cultures, but its success has been uneven when it comes to reducing political conflict and to reforming if not improving customs, character, habits, and actions. What might explain this uneven success? Is an explanation to be found by going back to what appear to be the roots of constitutionmaking? This course builds on contemporary scholarship to reconstruct what we may call the constitutionmaking tradition as it develops in the main ancient texts, which are read in English translation. The course traces this tradition through the classically trained thinkers of the Seventeenth Century, the American colonial compacts and covenants, the so-called state constitutions, and the debates in the U.S. Constitutional Convention up to recent efforts in, for example, Zimbabwe (2013) or Egypt (2014).

Taught by: Mulhern

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 311 Disasters in the Ancient World

Natural disasters occupy a powerful place in our imagination. Stories of floods, plagues, earthquakes and storms excite and horrify us, and communities mobilize their resources quickly in response to these events. In the ancient Mediterranean world, natural disasters could take on potent meaning, indicating the anger or disfavor of the gods, acting as warnings against certain courses of action, or confirmations of individuals' fears or suspicions about the world in which they lived. In this course, we explore the evidence for some disasters in the ancient Mediterranean world, the ways in which contemporaries reacted to those disasters and interpreted their causes. This project is, of necessity, multidisciplinary, involving textual, archaeological, geological, and comparative materials and drawing on methodologies from history, political and archaeological science, and the emerging field of disaster studies. In the process, we will gain an appreciation of the socialstructures of communities in the period, the thought-world in which they operated, and the challenges and opportunities thatattend a project of this sort. No prior knowledge of Ancient History is required, although it would be useful to have taken an introductory survey course. Texts will be discussed in translation.

Taught by: Grey

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANCH 311, ANTH 311

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 312 Writing History in Greece and Rome

What constituted history in ancient Greece and Rome? What claims to knowledge did history make, and how did these differ from other forms of knowledge? How did historians envision their task, and how did they go about performing it? We will read the works of the major Greek and Roman historians in translation in an attempt to answer those questions. Other issues to consider include the origins and development of historical writing, the place of history within the ancient literary tradition, and the similarities and differences between the ancient and modern practice of history.

Taught by: Damon

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 315 Kinship and Connectivity in the Roman World

An individual's life course is often reflected, enhanced, and defined by their relations to other individuals. This course will investigate the concept of kinship in the Roman world through textual, visual, and archaeological evidence. We will explore relationships at all levels of society from the imperial family to the slaves and freedmen who were part of larger households, in order to understand how different relationships shaped and structured interactions in Roman society. Together, we will explore the following questions: how were relationships and bonds represented in the ancient world? What structures were in place for families to perpetuate themselves through biological or adoptive means? How could non-Roman citizens create family connections through formal and informal channels? How could relationships be celebrated in life and commemorated in death? We will use written evidence from ancient historians, visual evidence like the Altar of Peace, and archaeological evidence from cemeteries to examine how Roman notions of kinship shaped life and death in different social milieu.

Taught by: Brent

Also Offered As: AAMW 514, ANCH 315, ANTH 315, CLST 515

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 316 Africa and Roman Literature

In this course, we will explore race and ethnicity in the Roman world by focusing on the life and works of Roman Africans and the ways in which non-African Romans engaged with and presented the peoples of Africa. The course covers Roman literature in translation from the comedies of Plautus produced in the late 3rd - 2nd centuries BCE, to African Christian writing of the 5th century CE. It also covers a wide range of genres: we will examine how Roman writers articulate questions of race in comedy and satire, epic, history, biography, and elegy among others. We will read African writers (Apuleius, Augustine) and ask how their Africanness influences their works. We will read Roman accounts of journeys to Africa, wars with Africa, and encounters with Africans to ask how the Romans saw themselves as different from or similar to Africans. The course will also explore in more general terms how Romans talk about race: did racism exist? What aspects of different cultures and peoples did Romans choose to emphasize when they talked of non-Romans?

Taught by: Lewis

Also Offered As: AFRC 316, ANCH 316

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 325 Topics in Roman Art and Architecture

Topic varies from semester to semester. For the Fall 2020 semester, the topic will be "The Last Days of Pompeii." Pompeii is one of the most famous archaeological sites in the world. Not fully excavated and only partially understood, it seems to offer a tantalizing cross-section of Roman architecture, art and society, preserved as it was when the volcano Mount Vesuvius erupted on 24 August 79 CE. At the same time, the rediscovery of Pompeii since the eighteenth century has had a profound impact on western culture. This course will look at the discovery, reception and reinvention as well as "original" character of Pompeii and other settlements around Vesuvius destroyed at the same time as Pompeii, such as Herculaneum and Stabiae. We will examine the evidence that these Campanian sites provide for Roman architecture, art and society, and the difficulties we face in trying to use it. The course will include a range of material, from the architecture of houses and public areas of the city, tackling the notions of public and private in Roman society, the wall painting in Pompeian houses, examining the forms and functions of Roman frescoes as well as the ways in which they have been viewed in antiquity and modern times, to the shops, workshops and taverns that populated the ancient city and provide evidence for its economy. The approach is thematic, addressing the urban planning and development of the city, the domestic spaces and activities, the public spaces and buildings, and economy of the city, concentrating on case studies, such as the Forum, the House of the Vettii, the textile industry and the Villa of the Papyri. No special prior knowledge of antiquity is assumed.

Taught by: Zarmakoupi

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ARTH 329

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 328 Topography and Monuments of Ancient Rome

An intensive exploration of Rome's urban topography during the Republican and Imperial periods (6th c. B.C. through 4th c. A.D.) Using archaeological and textual sources, including the Etruscan and Roman collections of the Penn Museum, the goal will be to reconstruct the built environment and decoration of Rome over the course of a millennium. Of interest to students of classics, archaeology, art history, and architecture. Some familiarity with Rome will be a plus, but is not required.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AAMW 533, CLST 533

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 329 Topics in Classicism and Literature

This advanced seminar will examine the classical backgrounds to English poetry, in particular the Biblical and Greco-Roman antecedents to Renaissance lyric verse and verse drama (such as, preeminently, Shakespeare). Different versions of this course will have different emphases on Biblical or Hellenist backgrounds.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ENGL 329

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 332 The Rise and Decline of Macedonia

In this course, we will study the rise and development of Macedonia from a tiny kingdom on the northern fringes of the Greek world to one of the major powers of the region and beyond. Regarded by the Greeks as an at least semi-barbarian culture on the periphery, Macedonia became the dominant power in the Greek world during the fourth century BC and its king Alexander the Great set out to conquer the world. After his death, Macedonia was one of the Hellenistic kingdoms competing for power and influence in the Mediterranean until it finally came under Roman control. Topics that will be discussed include questions of ethnicity and identity, Macedonian kingship, culture and society (including the role of women) and the role of Macedonian traditions in the Hellenistic era in general. Special emphasis will therefore be laid on critical reading and interpretation of ancient literary texts, documentary evidence and archaeological material. that will be discussed include questions of ethnicity and identity, Macedonian kingship, culture and society (including the role of women) and the role of Macedonian traditions in the Hellenistic era in general.

Taught by: Wilker

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANCH 330

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 335 Etruscan Art & Archaeology in the Penn Museum

The Etruscans, who spoke a language unlike any others known, were cast by their Greek and Roman rivals as outsiders and enemies: pirates, lovers of luxury, loose women. Today we must rely on the archaeological evidence of painted tombs, decorated Tuscan temples and massive engineering works to correct the picture. The course will survey a millennium (1st millennium BCE) of Etruscan culture through archaeological sites, works of art and everyday material culture, especially illustrated with objects in the collection of the Penn Museum. An additional insight into Italic culture comes from tomb groups excavated for the Museum at the Faliscan settlement of Narce. Students will gain familiarity with the societies of pre-Roman Italy through close study of their vases, jewels, arms, armor, textiles and tools, and even their very bones, and discover a surprising amount of Etruscan heritage surviving today.

Taught by: Turfa

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AAMW 630, CLST 635

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 336 Archaeology of Anatolia

This class is devoted to the archaeology and history of Anatolia (ancient Turkey) from the beginning of the Bronze Age (3000 BC) to the end of the Byzantine period (1453 AD). Emphasis will be placed on the great empires in Anatolia (Hittite, Phrygian, Lydian, Urartian, Persian, Roman, and Byzantine), and on the great cities (Troy, Sardis, Ephesus, Constantinople). The course is intended to complement the major exhibit on Gordion, the Phrygians, and Anatolian archaeology that will open at the Penn Museum in February of 2016 and run for 10 months.

Taught by: Brian Rose

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AAMW 536, ARTH 421, NELC 121, NELC 521

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 337 Iliad

Homer's Iliad presents a dark and difficult vision of the world, but one that nonetheless inspires. Casual cruelty, divine caprice, and savage violence test heroes and lesser folk and provoke a reckoning with the stark realities of both human vulnerability and capability. It inspires kind of terror, but still also somehow provides a kind of comfort, albeit one whose character seems almost beyond comprehension. By a close and careful reading of Homer's text, along with some reflections and readings drawn from more contemporary wars, including the current ones, we will try to examine these issues with one eye on the past and one on the present. Our goal will be to achieve some further understanding of war and human experience. This course will be offered online.

Taught by: Struck

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 338 Power and Peril: The Paradox of Monarchy among Ancient Greeks, Romans, and Jews

We imagine ancient Greece and Rome as the cradles of democracy and republicanism, early Judea as a pious theocracy, but monarchy was the most common and prevalent form of government in antiquity (and the premodern world in general). In this class, we will take a special look at kinship among the Jews, Greeks, and Romans to assess and discuss similarities, differences, and mutual influences. In all these cultures, the king was a polarizing figure in reality and in conception. On the one hand, some revered the monarch as ideal leader, and monarchy provided the language with which to describe and even imagine the very gods. On the other, monarchs were widely reviled in both theory and practice, from the Greek tyrants to biblical Saul. The Emperor Augustus loudly denied his own affinity to the office of king, even as he ruled alone and was revered as a god. In other words, kings stood both for the ideal and the worst form of government. This class confronts the paradox of monarchical rule and will, through the lens of the king, explore ideas of god, government, human frailty, and utopianism.

Taught by: Wilker and Dohrmann

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANCH 303, JWST 303, RELS 303

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 341 Topics in Greco-Roman Art

Topic Varies

Taught by: Kuttner

Also Offered As: ARTH 325

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 343 The Iliad and its Afterlife

As the earliest work in the western tradition, the Iliad has been a constant point of reference for later considerations of heroism, friendship, the search for meaning in the face of mortality, and the effects of war on individuals and societies. We will begin with a close reading of the Iliad in translation, with attention both to the story of its hero Achilles as he experiences disillusionment, frustration, anger, triumph, revenge, and reconciliation and to the poems broader portrait of a society at war, which incorporates the diverse perspectives of invaders and defenders, men and women, old and young, gods and mortals, along with tantalizing glimpses of peacetime life. We will then consider how later writers and artists have drawn on the Iliad to present a range of perspectives of their own -- whether patriotic, mock heroic, romantic, or pacifist -- with particular attention to 20th and 21st century responses by such figures as W.H. Auden, Simone Weil, Cy Twombly, David Malouf, Alice Oswald, and Adrienne Rich. There are no specific prerequisites, but the course can serve as a complement to CLST 302, The Odyssey and its Afterlife or CLST 331 Reading the Iliad in a Time of War.

Taught by: Murnaghan

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 344 Curiosity: Ancient and Modern Thinking about Thinking

This course will examine two approaches to the still unanswered question of what happens when we humans come up with new knowledge. How should we describe the impulse, or set of impulses, that leads us to seek it? What is happening when we achieve it? And how do we describe the new state in which we find ourselves after we have it? We will study the work of contemporary physicists and cognitive scientists on these questions along side the approaches developed by the two most powerful thinkers from antiquity on the topic, Plato and Aristotle.

Taught by: Struck

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EAS 244, INTG 344

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 345 Ancient Epic Poetry

Admission to this course is by application only. It is a collaboration between Penn and Yale-NUS in Singapore. It will require travel to study in Singapore during Penn's Spring Break 2019. Seminars on both campuses will focus on five complete epics, Gilgamesh, the Iliad, Odyssey, Ramayana, and Aeneid. In addition to regular class times, it will also require additional evening meetings for plenary sessions via teleconference with Singapore. We will work with a mix of lectures, discussions, and group work with teams drawn from both campuses. Yale-NUS will travel to Philadelphia to join Penn students in face-to-face class sessions, and in additional cultural of events, at Penn and in Philadelphia, including work in the Penn Museum. Penn students will also fly over to meet Yale-NUS students for a week that mirrors the Philadelphia experience, with attendance in classes, and cultural events, including the Asian Civilizations Museum. Part of the expectation for the class is that each group will help host the others as they visit. Course grades will consist in a combination of sole-authored papers and collaborative projects. There will be a limited amount of grant money available to subvene travel for students. We will work with financial aid to determine need. Up-to-date passports are required for the course. Prerequisite: IMPORTANT - APPLICATION REQUIRED: Use the link in "Additional course information".

Taught by: Struck

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 360 Troy Stories: Classical Epic and Medieval Romance

This advanced seminar will examine the classical backgrounds to English poetry, in particular the Biblical and Greco-Roman antecedents to renaissance lyric verse and verse drama (such as, preeminently, Shakespeare). Different versions of this course will have different emphases on Biblical or Hellenist backgrounds. Prerequisite: Spaces will be reserved for english majors. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Copeland

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 304, ENGL 229, GSWS 228

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 362 Intro to Digital Archaeology

Digital methodologies are now an integral part of archaeological practice and archaeologists are now expected to possess basic computing skills and be familiar with a range of data collection, analysis and visualization techniques. This course will use case studies and applied learning opportunities centered on a course project to explore a broad array of digital approaches in archaeology. The technological underpinnings, professional procedures, and influences on archaeological practice and theory will be discussed for each method covered in the course. Applied learning opportunities in digital data collection methods will include aerial and satellite image analysis, global navigation satellite system (GNSS) survey, 3D scanning methods, close-range photogrammetry, and near-surface geophysical prospection. Students will also have opportunities for practical experience in digital database design and management, geographic information science (GIS) and 3D visualization. Students will communicate the results of the course project in a digital story that will be presented at the end of the term. Prior archaeological classwork and/or experience preferred.

Taught by: Herrmann

Also Offered As: AAMW 562, ANTH 362, ANTH 562, CLST 562, NELC 362

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 363 Penn Museum Curatorial Seminar: Reconfiguring the Classical World Galleries

The Greek galleries in the Penn Museum were opened in 1994, and the Etruscan and Roman galleries in 2003. The world was very different them, and many of the themes used to frame the artifacts in the galleries are not especially relevant to contemporary students, scholars, and visitors. In this course we will completely reorganize and reinstall the galleries digitally, creating a series of websites that will highlight the new layout and themes. We will work extensively with the Greek Etruscan, and Roman artifacts themselves to reconfigure the galleries, which will highlight the connections between antiquity and the contemporary world, focusing on themes such as armed conflict, trauma, migration, xenophobia, and wealth and poverty.

Taught by: Rose

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 364 Foreigners in Rome

According to the stories the Romans told about the origins of their city, Rome began as a community of immigrants. As a growing metropolis and, eventually, the center of an empire, the city remained a magnet for people from other parts of the Empire and beyond. Foreigners came to the city as merchants and travelers, they settled here seeking a different and better life, pursuing a career, or escaping hardships in their home communities. Others were brought to Rome against their will, as prisoners or slaves. In this seminar, we will explore the different communities of foreigners and immigrants that shaped Rome. How and why did they move to the city? How did they experience their new home? How did they adapt to life in Rome and how, in turn, did they influence what we define as "Roman" today? Finally, what can the legal, social, political, and social status of immigrants tell us about Roman society in general? To answer these questions (and more), we will look at a wide array of primary sources, including literary texts, inscriptions, and material culture.

Taught by: Wilker

Also Offered As: ANCH 363

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 369 Literary Translation

This course is for graduate students and undergraduates with permission of the instructor. All students enrolled must have knowledge of at least one language other than English. We will study the history, theory and practice of literary translation, and participate in it. Readings will include theoretical works in translation studies, using selections from Lawrence Venuti's Translation Studies Reader and Schulte/Biguenet's Translation Theory Reader, with some supplemental readings; we will also look at comparative cases of multiple translations of the same original, and analyze how different translators make different interpretative/formal/aesthetic choices. Course assignments will include both a research paper, on the history and/or theory of translation, and an extended practical translation exercise, to be workshopped over the course of the semester, consisting of a literary translation of a text of the student's choice.

Taught by: Wilson

Also Offered As: CLST 569, COML 369

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 370 Classics & American Government

Before the universities established public-service programs in the twentieth century, many Americans prepared themselves for public life by studying Greek and Latin authors in school and college. In this course, using English translations, students survey an eighteenth-century classical curriculum and trace its influence in the political activity of Madison and others who guided the development of American governmental institutions.

Taught by: John Mulhern

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 396 History of Literary Criticism

This is a course on the history of literary theory, a survey of major debates about literature, poetics, and ideas about what literary texts should do, from ancient Greece to examples of modern European thought. The first half of the course will focus on early periods: Greek and Roman antiquity, especially Plato and Aristotle; the medieval period (including St. Augustine, Dante, and Boccaccio), and the early modern period (such as Philip Sidney and Giambattista Vico). In the second half of the course we will turn to modern concerns by looking at the literary (or "art") theories of some major philosophers and theorists: Kant, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, and Walter Benjamin. We end the course in the mid-twentieth century. The purpose driving this course is to consider closely how this tradition generated questions that are still with us, such as: what is the act of interpretation; what is the "aesthetic"; what is "imitation" or mimesis; and how are we to know an author's intention. During the semester there will be four short writing assignments in the form of analytical essays (3 pages each). Students may use these small essays to build into a long piece of writing on a single text or group of texts at the end of the term. Most of our readings will come from a published anthology of literary criticism and theory; a few readings will be on Canvas.

Taught by: Copeland

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 396, ENGL 396

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 399 Independent Study

This course is taken by students doing independent work with a faculty advisor, such as students approved to work on a senior research paper in pursuit of honors in the major.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 402 Post-Baccalaureate Studies in Greek

Intensive Greek reading course for students in the Post-Baccalaureate Program in Classical Studies. Readings are chosen to expose students to a variety of prose and poetry texts during their program experience. The Fall course includes some grammar review and analysis as well as translation. Permission of instructor required for non-Post-Baccalaureate students.

Two terms. student may enter either term.

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 403 Post-Baccalaureate Studies in Latin

Intensive Latin reading course for students in the Post-Baccalaureate Program in Classical Studies. Readings are chosen to expose students to a variety of prose and poetry texts during their program experience. The Fall course includes some grammar review and analysis as well as translation. Permission of instructor required for non-Post-Baccalaureate students.

Two terms. student may enter either term.

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 419 Mining Archaeology

In ancient times, materials such as stone and metals were used to produce artifacts including pigments, jewelry, tools, and weapons. This course is designed to introduce students to research on the early exploitation of mineral resources. Which techniques were used to access and process raw materials in antiquity? Which archaeological methods can be used to investigate these features and artifacts? The course will provide worldwide examples through time, ranging from Stone Age flint mining, Iron Age rock salt mining to Medieval silver mining. Ethnographic studies and hands-on activities will contribute to our understanding of mining in archaeology, and artifacts from the Museum's collections will undergo scientific analysis in the Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials. Prerequisite: Desired but not mandatory: ANTH 221/521 Material World in Archaeological Science

Taught by: Jansen

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: ANTH 419, NELC 419

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 425 Late Antique Arts

What is 'Late Antiquity'? In 312 when Roman emperor Constantine inaugurated a Christian empire, 'Roman' culture was centuries old. The period ca. 200-650 CE saw profound transformations that launched Medieval, Byzantine and Islamic traditions. In this epoch of economic and political upheaval destruction was frequent but partial: Rome long survived, Constantine's 'new Rome,' Constantinople flourished, and around the Empire both proto-global visual culture and local forms prospered. Roman cultural models authorized both innovation and passion for tradition, in forms and styles: we critique art-historical models for Late Antique 'decline', analyse habits of material reuse and curation, and look at new Christian and Jewish roles for Roman things as well as polytheist visual survival. Foreign allies and enemies, and new peoples invading an already polyethnic Empire, interacted with Greco-Roman Late Antiquity: we visit arts of Sasanian and Islamic empires east and south, and 'barbarian' domains in Africa, Europe, Britain. Media discussed, for sacred, courtly, domestic, funerary, political and civic spaces and structures include not just 'monumental' painting, mosaic, sculpture, but also objects of silver, ceramic, ivory, figural textile, glass; painted books; jewelry; mass-media artifacts like coins and pilgrimage tokens. We also study Late Antique texts on art, objects, space and viewership.

Taught by: Ann Kuttner

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AAMW 425, ARTH 425

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 427 Roman Sculpture

Survey of the Republican origins and Imperial development of Roman sculpture - free-standing, relief, and architectural - from ca. 150 BC to 350 AD. We concentrate on sculpture in the capital city and on court and state arts, emphasizing commemorative public sculpture and Roman habits of decorative display; genres examined include relief, portraits, sarcophagi, luxury and minor arts (gems, metalwork, coinage). We evaluate the choice and evolution of styles with reference to the functions of sculptural representation in Roman culture and society.

Taught by: Kuttner, Rose

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AAMW 427, ARTH 427

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 441 Plants and Society

Interactions between humans and the living landscape around us have played - and continue to play - a fundamental role in shaping our worldview. This course is designed to introduce students to the diverse ways in which humans interact with plants. We will focus on the integration of ethnographic information and archaeological case studies in order to understand the range of interactions between humans and plants, as well as how plants and people have profoundly changed one another. Topics will include the origins of agriculture; cooking and plant processing; human health and the world of ethnomedicine; and poisonous and psychoactive plants. We will examine ancient plant material firsthand at the Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and will handle botanical ecofacts from the Penn Museum's collections. Students will also carry out a substantial research project focused on an archaeological culture and plant species of their own interest.

Taught by: White

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANTH 440

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 500 Materials and Methods, proseminar in CLASSICAL STUDIES AND ANCIENT HISTORY

This is the required proseminar for first-year graduate students in Classical Studies and Ancient History. It will introduce you to some key methodological, practical and theoretical tools for beginning a scholarly career in these fields.

Taught by: Ker

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 503 Historical Grammar of Greek

Investigation of the grammar of Classical Greek from the viewpoint of historical linguistics. The course will offer historical explanations for numerous structural peculiarities of the Greek language and anomalies of Greek grammar, touch on the relationship of Greek with other languages, and incidentally introduce the student to some basic concepts of language analysis likely to be useful in teaching Greek and learning other languages. Prerequisite: A fluent reading knowledge of ancient Greek.

Taught by: Ringe

Course not offered every year

Prerequisite: A fluent reading knowledge of ancient Greek

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 512 Petrography of Cultural Materials

Introduction to thin-section petrography of stone and ceramic archaeological materials. Using polarized light microscopy, the first half of this course will cover the basics of mineralogy and the petrography of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks. The second half will focus on the petrographic description of ceramic materials, mainly pottery, with emphasis on the interpretation of provenance and technology. As part of this course, students will characterize and analyze archaeological samples from various collections. Prior knowledge of geology is not required.

Taught by: Boileau

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AAMW 512, ANTH 514

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 515 Kinship and Connectivity in the Roman World

An individual's life course is often reflected, enhanced, and defined by their relations to other individuals. This course will investigate the concept of kinship in the Roman world through textual, visual, and archaeological evidence. We will explore relationships at all levels of society from the imperial family to the slaves and freedmen who were part of larger households, in order to understand how different relationships shaped and structured interactions in Roman society. Together, we will explore the following questions: how were relationships and bonds represented in the ancient world? What structures were in place for families to perpetuate themselves through biological or adoptive means? How could non-Roman citizens create family connections through formal and informal channels? How could relationships be celebrated in life and commemorated in death? We will use written evidence from ancient historians, visual evidence like the Altar of Peace, and archaeological evidence from cemeteries to examine how Roman notions of kinship shaped life and death in different social milieu.

Taught by: Brent

Also Offered As: AAMW 514, ANCH 315, ANTH 315, CLST 315

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 517 MLA Proseminar: Reading the Iliad in an Age of War

Homer's Iliad presents a dark and difficult vision of the world, but one that nonetheless inspires. Casual cruelty, divine caprice, and savage violence test heroes and lesser folk and provoke a reckoning with the stark realities of both human vulnerability and capability. It inspires kind of terror, but still also somehow provides a kind of comfort, albeit one whose character seems almost beyond comprehension. By a close and careful reading of Homer's text, along with some reflections and readings drawn from more contemporary wars, including the current ones, we will try to examine these issues with one eye on the past and one on the present. Our goal will be to achieve some further understanding of war and human experience. This course will be offered online.

Taught by: Struck/Reinhardt

Activity: Online Course

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 521 Topics in Greek and Roman Art

Topics varies from semester to semester. For the Spring 2020 semester, the topic will be Violence and Ancient Mediterranean Art. The Greek and Roman world was fascinated by representing humans and beasts enduring physical and psychological pain, and images of violence inflicted by mortal and supernatural beings alike. These images occur in art of all kinds, consumed both privately and publicly, emerging in the domestic, religious, military and political sphere. They had a range of aims, from affording emotional catharsis, building political cohesion or enforcing social norms, to generating religious awe or confidence in empire -- and giving entertainment. As we explore this corpus, we can ask: what might be the roots of such preoccupation with the art of violence and pain in the 'Classical tradition' and its post-antique legacy? Many modern cultures exhibit similar fascination: how far can modern reactions to and theories about such images be guides to reconstructing ancient viewership? How can ancient texts and histories help us in this interdisciplinary project?

Taught by: Kuttner

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AAMW 525, ARTH 525

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 523 Narrative in Ancient Art

Art history, and its cousins in religious, social, political and literary studies, have long been fascinated with the question of narrative: how do images engage time, tell stories? These are fundamental questions for ancient Near Eastern, Egyptian and Mediterranean art history and archaeology, whose rich corpus of narrative images is rarely considered in the context of "Western" art. Relations between words and things, texts and images, were as fundamental to the ancient cultures we examine as they are to modern studies. As we weigh classic modern descriptions of narrative and narratology, we will bring to bear recent debates about how (ancient) images, things, monuments, and designed spaces engage with time, space, and event, and interact with cultural memory. We will ask "who is the story for, and why?" for public and private narratives ranging from political histories to mythological encounters. Our case studies will be drawn from the instructors' expertise in Mesopotamian visual culture, and in the visual cultures of the larger Mediterranean world from early Greek antiquity to the Hellenistic, Roman, and Late Antique periods. One central and comparative question, for instance, is the nature of recording history in pictures and texts in the imperial projects of Assyria, Achaemenid Persia, the Hellenistic kingdoms, and Rome.

Taught by: Kuttner/Pittman

Also Offered As: AAMW 523, ARTH 523, NELC 523

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 524 Penn Museum Curatorial Seminar: Reconfiguring the Classical World Galleries

The Greek galleries in the Penn Museum were opened in 1994, and the Etruscan and Roman galleries in 2003. The world was very different them, and many of the themes used to frame the artifacts in the galleries are not especially relevant to contemporary students, scholars, and visitors. In this course we will completely reorganize and reinstall the galleries digitally, creating a series of websites that will highlight the new layout and themes. We will work extensively with the Greek Etruscan, and Roman artifacts themselves to reconfigure the galleries, which will highlight the connections between antiquity and the contemporary world, focusing on themes such as armed conflict, trauma, migration, xenophobia, and wealth and poverty.

Taught by: Rose

Also Offered As: AAMW 524

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 526 Material & Methods in Mediterranean Archaeology

This course is intended to familiarize new graduate students with the collections of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology and the wide range of scholarly interests and approaches used by faculty at Penn and neighboring institutions, as well as to provide an introduction to archaeological methods and theory in a Mediterranean context. Each week, invited lecturers will address the class on different aspects of archaeological methodology in their own research, emphasizing specific themes that will be highlighted in readings and subsequent discussion. The course is divided into five sections: Introduction to the Mediterranean Section; Collections; Method and Theory in Mediterranean Archaeology; Museum Work; and Ethics. The course is designed for new AAMW graduate students, though other graduate students or advanced undergraduate students may participate with the permission of the instructor.

Taught by: Tartaron

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AAMW 526

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 532 Ancient Greek Colonies

This seminar examines the archaeology of Greek colonization from the Late Bronze Age to ca. 500 B.C. These colonies were highly diverse in their motivations, physical settings, and political and social structures, as well as in their relationships with mother cities and the new worlds they inhabited. Emphasis is placed on the colonial experience as a cross-cultural and negotiated process; several streams of the changing theoretical and conceptual approaches to Greek colonization are explored. In addition to archaeological and epigraphic evidence, literary and historical traditions are examined. Colonies from the southern Balkan peninsula, Black Sea, Ionia, northern Africa, and Magna Graecia will be the focus of reading and reports. Seminar meetings will consist of oral reports and discussion of these reports and other topics. Depending on the number of participants, each person will be responsible for two or three reports of approximately 30-45 minutes length. Accompanying the oral report will be a PowerPoint document (in most cases), a synopsis/summary of one to two pages, and a bibliography. These will all be posted on the course Canvas site. No later than one week before an oral presentation, the presenter will identify one or two key readings for all to read, in consultation with the instructor. These will be posted, in PDF format, on the Canvas site. One or more visits to the Penn Museum may be built into the course.

Taught by: Tom Tartaron

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AAMW 519

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 533 Topography and Monuments of Ancient Rome

An intensive exploration of Rome's urban topography during the Republican and Imperial periods (6th c. B.C. through 4th c. A.D.) Using archaeological and textual sources, including the Etruscan and Roman collections of the Penn Museum, the goal will be to reconstruct the built environment and decoration of Rome over the course of a millennium. Of interest to students of classics, archaeology, art history, and architecture. Some familiarity with Rome will be a plus, but is not required.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AAMW 533, CLST 328

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 541 Tpcs Rennaisance Cltr

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: HIST 540, ITAL 540

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 543 Archaeobotany Seminar

In this course we will approach the relationship between plants and people from archaeological and anthropological perspectives in order to investigate diverse plant consumption, use, and management strategies. Topics will include: archaeological formation processes, archaeobotanical sampling and recovery, lab sorting and identification, quantification methods, and archaeobotany as a means of preserving cultural heritage. Students will learn both field procedures and laboratory methods of archaeobotany through a series of hands-on activities and lab-based experiments. The final research project will involve an original in-depth analysis and interpretation of archaeobotanical specimens. By the end of the course, students will feel comfortable reading and evaluating archaeobotanical literature and will have a solid understanding of how archaeobotanists interpret human activities of the past.

Taught by: Chantel White

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AAMW 539, ANTH 533, NELC 585

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 562 Intro to Digital Archaeology

Digital methodologies are an integral part of contemporary archaeological practice, and demand that archaeologists to hold a new set of skills and knowledge fundamentals. This course will expose students to a broad range of digital approaches through a review of relevant literature and through applied learning opportunities centered on a course project. The technological underpinnings, best practices, and influences on archaeological practice and theory will be discussed for each method covered in the course. Applied learning opportunities in digital data collection methods will include: aerial and satellite remote sensing, global navigation satellite system (GNSS) survey, 3D scanning methods, close-range photogrammetry, and near-surface geophysical prospection. Students will also have opportunities for practical experience in digital database design and management, geographic information science (GIS) and 3D modeling and visualization. Students will communicate the results of the course project in a digital story that will be presented at the end of the term. Prior archaeological classwork and/or experience preferred.

Taught by: Herrmann

Also Offered As: AAMW 562, ANTH 362, ANTH 562, CLST 362, NELC 362

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 563 Penn Museum Curatorial Seminar: Reconfiguring the Classical World Galleries

The Greek galleries in the Penn Museum were opened in 1994, and the Etruscan and Roman galleries in 2003. The world was very different them, and many of the themes used to frame the artifacts in the galleries are not especially relevant to contemporary students, scholars, and visitors. In this course we will completely reorganize and reinstall the galleries digitally, creating a series of websites that will highlight the new layout and themes. We will work extensively with the Greek Etruscan, and Roman artifacts themselves to reconfigure the galleries, which will highlight the connections between antiquity and the contemporary world, focusing on themes such as armed conflict, trauma, migration, xenophobia, and wealth and poverty.

Taught by: Rose

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 568 Living World in Archaeological Science

By focusing on the scientific analysis of archaeological remains, this course will explore life and death in the past. It takes place in the new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and is team taught in three modules: human skeletal analysis, analysis of animal remains, and analysis of plant remains. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how organic materials provide key information about past environments, human behavior, and cultural change through discussions of topics such as health and disease, inequality, and food.

Taught by: Kassabaum, Monge, Moore

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANTH 267, ANTH 567, CLST 268, NELC 286, NELC 586

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 569 Literary Translation

This course is for graduate students and undergraduates with permission of the instructor. All students enrolled must have knowledge of at least one language other than English. We will study the history, theory and practice of literary translation, and participate in it. Readings will include theoretical works in translation studies, using selections from Lawrence Venuti's Translation Studies Reader and Schulte/Biguenet's Translation Theory Reader, with some supplemental readings; we will also look at comparative cases of multiple translations of the same original, and analyze how different translators make different interpretative/formal/aesthetic choices. Course assignments will include both a research paper, on the history and/or theory of translation, and an extended practical translation exercise, to be workshopped over the course of the semester, consisting of a literary translation of a text of the student's choice.

Taught by: Wilson

Also Offered As: CLST 369, COML 369

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 572 Geophysical Prospection for Archaeology

Near-surface geophysical prospection methods are now widely used in archaeology as they allow archaeologists to rapidly map broad areas, minimize or avoid destructive excavation, and perceive physical dimensions of archaeological features that are outside of the range of human perception. This course will cover the theory of geophysical sensors commonly used in archaeological investigations and the methods for collecting, processing, and interpreting geophysical data from archaeological contexts. We will review the physical properties of common archaeological and paleoenvironmental targets, the processes that led to their deposition and formation, and how human activity is reflected in anomalies recorded through geophysical survey through lectures, readings, and discussion. Students will gain experience collecting data in the field with various sensors at archaeological sites in the region. A large proportion of the course will be computer-based as students work with data from geophysical sensors, focusing on the fundamentals of data processing, data fusion, and interpretation. Some familiarity with GIS is recommended.

Taught by: Herrmann

Course offered spring; even-numbered years

Also Offered As: AAMW 572, ANTH 572, NELC 572

Activity: Laboratory

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 598 Language Pedagogy Workshop

The Workshop is intended to serve as a forum for first-time teachers of Latin or Greek. This will include discussing course-plans and pedagogical theories and strategies, collaborating on course materials, and addressing any concerns in the language courses presently being taught.

Taught by: James Ker

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 600 Graduate Seminar

Topics will vary

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 604 Troy and Homer

An interdisciplinary seminar focusing on the city of Troy both as an archaeological site and as the setting of the legendary Trojan War. We will consider Homer's Iliad (with selected sections read in Greek) together with the topography and archaeology of the site of Troy in order to address a series of interrelated questions: What are the points of continuity and discontinuity between the stories told by the literary tradition and the material record? How do both types of evidence contribute to our understanding of political relations and cultural interactions between Greece and Anatolia in the Bronze Age? How do Hittite sources bear on our reconstruction of the events behind the Troy legend? How have the site and the poem contributed to each other's interpretation in the context of scholarly discovery and debate? We will give some attention to modern receptions of the Troy legend that deliberately combine material and textual elements, such as Cy Twombly's "Fifty Days at Iliam" and Alice Oswald's "Memorial: An Excavation of Homer's Iliad." The seminar will include a visit to the site of Troy during the Spring Break.

Taught by: Murnaghan

Also Offered As: AAMW 604, GREK 604

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 610 Middle English Literature

This seminar will study a number of selected Middle English texts in depth. Attention will be paid to the textual transmission, sources, language, genre, and structure of the works. Larger issues, such as the influence of literary conventions (for example, "courtly love"), medieval rhetoric, or medieval allegory will be explored as the chosen texts may require.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 714, ENGL 715

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 611 Greek Epigraphy

Scholars have long debated the nature of the ancient economy, the terms in which it can best be approached, and the decision-making processes that underpinned economic behavior in antiquity. In particular, controversy has surrounded the extent to which the economies of Greco-Roman antiquity can be modeled using contemporary tools of analysis. In recent scholarship, many of the tenets laid down by Moses Finley in his "Ancient Economy" have been re-evaluated, with the result that the field is currently in a state of intellectual ferment. It is the purpose of this course to explore the terms in which contemporary debates over ancient economic systems are formulated, with reference to a variety of societies and periods, from the palace economies of the Mycenaean period to the system of taxation introduced in the early fourth century by the emperor Diocletian and his colleagues in the Tetrarchy.

Taught by: Bowes

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AAMW 611, ANCH 611, GREK 611

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 612 The Flavian Era

The time of the Flavians (69-96 BCE) holds a special place in Roman history and culture as it marks the transition from the Julio-Claudian period to the High Empire. Historically, the rule of Rome's second dynasty saw a stabilization of the imperial power system, the consolidation of social and political hierarchies, and an increasing integration of the empire. Major construction projects reshaped the city of Rome, topographically and ideologically. The literary production in various genres reached a new peak, developed new forms, and explored new topics. The unusually high number of Greek and Latin texts and documents preserved allow us to analyze such changes closely; our focus will be on the interrelation and conjunction of these developments. Final projects will take the form of papers suitable for presentation at the SCS Annual Meeting.

Taught by: Wilker, Damon

Also Offered As: ANCH 612

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 616 Ancient Economies

Scholars have long debated the nature of the ancient economy, the terms in which it can best be approached, and the decision-making processes that underpinned economic behavior in antiquity. In particular, controversy has surrounded the extent to which the economies of Greco-Roman antiquity can be modeled using contemporary tools of analysis. In recent scholarship, many of the tenets laid down by Moses Finley in his The Ancient Economy have been re-evaluated, with the result that the field is currently in a state of intellectual ferment. It is the purpose of this course to explore the terms in which contemporary debates over ancient economic systems are formulated, with reference to a variety of societies and periods, from the palace economies of the Mycenaean period to the system of taxation introduced in the early fourth century by the emperor Diocletian and his colleagues in the Tetrarchy.

Taught by: Bowes and Grey

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AAMW 503, ANCH 616

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 623 The (Mostly) Latin Epigram

In this seminar we will explore the themes and aesthetics of the Latin epigram, a genre (or is it?) best known for its brevity and wit but one whose precise nature is tantalizingly elusive. After orienting ourselves in the epigrams of Hellenistic Greek epigrammatists and late Republican authors like the so-called Neoterics (Catullus, Cinna, Calvus, Caesar), we will turn our attention to the poetry of Martial, whose accounts of Rome, its inhabitants, and their foibles exerted a profound influence on subsequent epigrammatists. Among the themes we will engage are: epigram as a genre; persona in tessellated textual collections; the interaction of refined and obscene language; and the artistic and intellectual implications of replication, anthology, and remix.

Taught by: Mulligan

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 635 Etruscan Art & Archaeology in the Penn Museum

The Etruscans, who spoke a language unlike any others known, were cast by their Greek and Roman rivals as outsiders and enemies: pirates, lovers of luxury, loose women. Today we must rely on the archaeological evidence of painted tombs, decorated Tuscan temples and massive engineering works to correct the picture. The course will survey a millennium (1st millennium BCE) of Etruscan culture through archaeological sites, works of art and everyday material culture, especially illustrated with objects in the collection of the Penn Museum. An additional insight into Italic culture comes from tomb groups excavated for the Museum at the Faliscan settlement of Narce. Students will gain familiarity with the societies of pre-Roman Italy through close study of their vases, jewels, arms, armor, textiles and tools, and even their very bones, and discover a surprising amount of Etruscan heritage surviving today.

Taught by: Turfa

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AAMW 630, CLST 335

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 636 Approaches to Literary Texts

Most seminars focus on literary texts composed during a single historical period;this course is unusual in inviting students to consider the challenges of approaching texts from a range of different historical eras. Taught by a team of literary specialists representing diverse periods and linguistic traditions and conducted as a hands-on workshop, this seminar is designed to help students of literature gain expertise in analysis and interpretation of literary works across the boundaries of time, geography, and language, from classic to modern. Students will approach literature as a historical discipline and learn about key methodological issues and questions that specialists in each period and field ask about texts that their disciplines study. The diachronic and cross-cultural perspectives inform discussions of language and style, text types and genres, notions of alterity, fictionality, literariness, symbolism, intertextuality, materiality, and interfaces with other disciplines. This is a unique opportunity to learn in one course about diverse literary approaches from specialists in different fields. Master classes are taught by Kevin Brownlee, Linda Chance, Eva del Soldato, Huda Fakhreddine, Scott Francis, Nili Gold, Bridget Murnghan, Deven Patel, Kevin Platt, Michael Solomon, Emily Steiner, Julia Verkholantsev, and Emily Wilson.

Taught by: Verkholantsev

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 616, EALC 715, ENGL 616, REES 616, ROML 616

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 698 Prospectus Workshop

Designed to prepare graduates in any aspect of study in the ancient world to prepare for the dissertation prospectus. Course will be centered around individual presentations and group critique of prospectus' in process, as well the fundamentals of large-project research design and presentation.

Taught by: Bowes

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AAMW 698

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 700 GEOARCHAEOLOGY

In this course, students will learn the basic concepts of earth systems and explore the ways that archaeologists use various environmental sciences (e.g., geomorphology, limnology, palynology, and dendroclimatology) and paleoecological modeling in their research. The course will include lectures and laboratory activities on the basics of geology, including surficial geology, rock and mineral identification, geomorphology and soils, sedimentation and stratigraphy, as well as a systematic review of depositional environments and their archaeological potential. A series of archaeological case studies will illustrate the application of these concepts in real-world field archaeology.

Taught by: Tartaron & Magee

Also Offered As: AAMW 700

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 702 Greek Sanctuaries

Sanctuaries remain an important focal point for the study of Greek religion. Both as sites for worship, dedication, oracular activity and other cult activity and as sites for the mediation of elite and state competition sanctuaries are, along with the polis, the most essential structuring institutions of Greek life. This seminar takes a selection of larger and smaller extra-urban sanctuaries and examines their growth, articulation and function.

Taught by: McInerney

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AAMW 702, ANCH 702

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 705 Ethnoarchaeology Greece

Ethnoarchaeology involves distinctive theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of living societies for the explicit purpose of shedding light on archaeological questions. In this seminar, we will review the intellectual history of ethnoarchaeology in North America and Europe, and explore case studies from Greece, the wider Mediterranean, and beyond. Among the topics will be analogy, cross-cultural comparison, experimental archaeology, oral history research, and archaeologically oriented ethnographic fieldwork. Students will create a proposal for ethnoarchaeological fieldwork in their area of interest in NSF or Wenner-Gren format, to be critiqued by the instructor and their peers.

Taught by: Tartaron

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AAMW 705

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 706 Archaeology of the Hellenistic Period in Italy, Greece, and Asia Minor

A survey of the archaeology of the Hellenistic period (331-31 BCE) across the Mediterranean, with a focus on Rome, Magna Graecia, Greece, and western Asia Minor. The course will stress the interactions among cities and kingdoms during the Roman Republic and Greek Hellenistic periods, especially the second century B.C. Students will work with relevant objects in the Penn Museums Mediterranean Section.

Taught by: Brian Rose

Also Offered As: AAMW 706, ARTH 706

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 707 TOPICS IN AEGEAN ARCHAEOLOGY

Topics vary. This course explores current topics in Aegean archaeology. It is designed to inform and prompt debate and discussion on substantive, methodological, and theoretical matters of current interest, within a geographical and/or chronological framework. Spring 2017 topic TBA.

Taught by: Tom Tartaron

Also Offered As: AAMW 707

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 711 The Archaeology of Greece and Asia Minor in the Archaic and Classical Periods

An examination of new discoveries and conflicting interpretations in the archaeology of Greece and Asia Minor between the seventh and fourth centuries B.C.E. Both sides of the Aegean will receive equal attention, and emphasis will be placed on sanctuaries, settlements, and cemeteries.

Taught by: C. Brian Rose

Also Offered As: AAMW 726, ARTH 726

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 715 Archaeology of Troy

An introduction to the archaeology of Troy, in northwestern Turkey. The course will focus on the results of excavations at the site in 1988, although the earlier excavations of Schliemann, Dorpfeld, and Blegen will also be considered. The course will cover a broad chronological span--from the early Bronze age through the late Roman period, and will include Greek, Roman, and Medieval attitudes toward Troy and the Trojan legend.

Taught by: Rose

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AAMW 715

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 720 Topics in Aegean Art

Fall 2018: The choices made by groups of people with regard to the treatment of their dead can be reflective of a society s beliefs and social structure. In this course, we will examine the burial traditions of the people of the Prehistoric Aegean from the Neolithic through the end of the Bronze Age, circa 7,000-1,100 BCE. We will focus on burial architecture, grave goods, burial rituals, mortuary variability, and the symbolic meaning of death and burial in Prehistoric Greece. Particular attention will be paid to recent discoveries on Crete, the Mainland, and the Cycladic islands. Students will write two papers, and these papers will be presented to the class. The first paper will be circa 15 pages long with footnotes, bibliography, and images (presented via powerpoint) and the second will be a 20-25 page paper with footnotes, bibliography, and images presented via powerpoint.

Taught by: Shank

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AAMW 720, ARTH 720

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 990 Masters Thesis

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Masters Thesis

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 995 Dissertation

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Dissertation

1.0 Course Unit

CLST 999 Independent Study and Research

For doctoral candidates.

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Permission of Graduate Chair and instructor required.

Activity: Independent Study

1.0 Course Unit