Classical Studies (CLST)

CLST 010 Archaeology & Technology

This seminar explores how humans apply and modify technologies in contexts as diverse as everyday life, major politico-economic undertakings, or scholarly research. We investigate this through a comparison of technologies of the past with technologies of the present used to study the past. We will dig into the details of topics like building pyramids and tombs, the function of ancient astronomical devices, pre-telegraph long-distance communication, tools for cutting and carving stone, and kilns for firing pottery. Archaeologists study these issues by examining the material remains of past societies: the cut-marks on stone blocks, extant tomb structures, the debris of manufacturing activities, and much more. Today's technologies enable the detailed scientific examination of the evidence, improving our understanding of the past. Thus, in parallel with our investigation of past technologies, we will also study the history of the application of present technologies to research on the archaeological record. We will dig into topics like the first uses of computers and databases, the development of statistical methods, early digital 3d modeling of objects and architecture, the adoption of geophysical prospection and geographic information systems, and the emerging uses of machine learning. In some cases, we can even compare old and new technologies directly, such as with land measurement and surveying techniques. Throughout the class we will engage in readings and discussions on the theory of humans and technology, to gain a better understanding of how processes such as innovation function in all time periods.

Taught by: Peter Cobb

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 020 Plato: Democracy and the Power of Rhetoric

If you aspired to a political career in ancient Athens, public speaking was an essential skill. Athens was a direct democracy, which meant that having the ability to win over your fellow citizens was tantamount to political success. Young, ambitious citizens would therefore pay handsomely to study with rhetoricians, who professed to teach this all-important skill. Plato, however, was famously wary of the power of rhetoric. In this class, we will read selections from Plato's dialogues in which many of the most prominent rhetoricians are engaged in discussion with Socrates about the nature of rhetoric, as well as its potential benefits and pitfalls. Students will then assume the role of citizens charged with speaking before the Athenian Assembly on various subjects. This will likely include a recreation of the trial of Socrates, who was himself accused of using rhetoric to make the weaker argument the stronger. By examining democracy at its threshold, and the power wielded by rhetoricians within a democracy, this CWiC seminar aims to provide both the context and the perspective to consider its later evolution. Grades will be based on at least two oral presentations, as well as general participation in other classroom activities.

Taught by: Reese

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 026 Ancient Greece

The Greeks enjoy a special place in the construction of western culture and identity, and yet many of us have only the vaguest notion of what their culture was like. A few Greek myths at bedtime when we are kids, maybe a Greek tragedy like Sophokles' Oidipous when we are at school: these are often the only contact we have with the world of the ancient Mediterranean. The story of the Greeks, however, deserves a wider audience, because so much of what we esteem in our own culture derives from them: democracy, epic poetry, lyric poetry, tragedy, history writing, philosophy, aesthetic taste, all of these and many other features of cultural life enter the West from Greece. The oracle of Apollo at Delphi had inscribed over the temple, "Know Thyself." For us, that also means knowing the Greeks. We will cover the period from the Late Bronze Age, c. 1500 BC, down to the time of Alexander the Great, concentrating on the two hundred year interval from 600-400 BC.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: McInerney

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CLST 027 Ancient Rome

The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Grey

Course offered spring; odd-numbered years

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CLST 029 Rome & America

This course explores a range of social structures and contexts, cultural understandings and intellectual practices where the influence of Roman exemplars is discernible in both historical and present-day America. It presents students with Roman and American materials placed in explicit or implicit dialog with one another: e.g., descriptions and discussions of political processes and structures; attitudes towards games, public entertainments, and communal cohesion; rhetorics and vocabularies of public space. Among other tasks and projects, students will stage a 'reimagination' of the Constitutional (Philadelphia) Convention of 1787, which resulted in the United States Constitution. They will also emulate ancient moralists and satirists, who attacked Rome's 'Bread and Circuses' culture, by focusing their attention upon comparable practices in modern America.

Taught by: Grey

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Freshman Seminar

CLST 100 Greek & Roman Mythology

Myths are traditional stories that have endured many years. Some of them have to do with events of great importance, such as the founding of a nation. Others tell the stories of great heroes and heroines and their exploits and courage in the face of adversity. Still others are simple tales about otherwise unremarkable people who get into trouble or do some great deed. What are we to make of all these tales, and why do people seem to like to hear them? This course will focus on the myths of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as a few contemporary American ones, as a way of exploring the nature of myth and the function it plays for individuals, societies, and nations. We will also pay some attention to the way the Greeks and Romans themselves understood their own myths. Are myths subtle codes that contain some universal truth? Are they a window on the deep recesses of a particular culture? Are they entertaining stories that people like to tell over and over? Are they a set of blinders that all of us wear, though we do not realize it? We investigate these questions through a variety of topics creation of the universe between gods and mortals, religion and family, sex, love, madness, and death.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Taught by: Struck

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CLST 102 Classical Traditions

A broad consideration of the ways in which writers and artists from the early modern era to the present day have responded to the classical tradition, borrowing from, imitating, questioning, and challenging their classical predecessors. Through modern reworkings of ancient epic, tragedy, biography, and lyric by authors ranging from Shakespeare and Racine to contemporary poets, painters, and filmmakers, we will ask what the terms "classical" and "tradition" might mean and will track the continuities and differences between antiquity and the modern world. Should we see ancient Greek and Roman culture as an inheritance, a valuable source of wealth bequeathed to the modern age? Or is there something wrong with that picture? How do ancient texts have to be adapted and transformed if they are to speak to modern conditions and concerns? This is an introductory-level course open to anyone who cares about the relationship between the present and the past.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CLST 103 History of Ancient Philosophy

An introduction to the major philosophical thinkers and schools of ancient Greece and Rome (The Presocratics, Plato, Aristotle, Stoics, Epicureans, and Sceptics). Topics to be covered include: nature of the universe, the relation between knowledge and reality, and the nature of morality and the good life. We will also examine some of the ways in which non-philosophical writers (e.g., Homer, Hesiod, Aristophanes, and Thucydides) treat the issues discussed by the philosophers.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Meyer

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CLST 107 Ancient Drama

This course will introduce students to some of the greatest works of dramatic literature in the western canon. We will consider the social, political, religious and artistic functions of drama in ancient Greece and Rome, and discuss both differences and similarities between ancient drama and modern art forms. The course will also pursue some broader goals: to improve students skills as readers and scholarly critics of literature, both ancient and modern; to observe the implications of form for meaning, in considering, especially, the differences between dramatic and non-dramatic kinds of cultural production: to help students understand the relationship of ancient Greek and Roman culture to the modern world; and to encourage thought about some big issues, in life as well as in literature: death, heroism, society, action and meaning.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 111 Introduction to Mediterranean Archaeology

The cultures of Greece and Rome, what we call classical antiquity, span over a thousand years of multicultural achievement in the Mediterranean. This course tells the story of what it was like to live in the complex societies of ancient Greece and Rome. This story is told principally using the art, architecture, pottery and coins produced by these societies. We will examine both the bold and sexy, and the small and humble, from the Parthenon to wooden huts, from the Aphrodite of Knidos to the bones of a fisherman named Peter.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Bowes

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CLST 123 Great Discoveries in Archaeology

Archaeology is a young and exciting scientific discipline created around 150 years ago as a way to discover and interpret the material remains of our human past. Many archaeological sites are world-famous: Pompeii, Troy, the pyramids of Egypt, the Parthenon of Athens, the temple complex at Angkor, to name a few. In this course, we will examine many important archaeological sites, mainly in the Old World of the Mediterranean, Near East, and Asia, but also in the New World of North and South America. Using a thematic and comparative approach, we will delve deeper to explore the societies that produced these wonders, and examine cultural similarities and differences across the ancient world. This course is a non-technical introduction for students interested in archaeology, history, art history, anthropology, or related subjects. There are no prerequisites. A typical sequence of meetings will begin with lecture on a particular theme, such as Writing Systems or Sacred Spaces and Places, followed by the presentation of relevant monuments, sites, or regions from different parts of the world, with discussion and assessment of the cross-cultural similarities and differences. In this way, both the great diversity of culture in our world, as well as our underlying similarities, can be revealed. How different are we from our ancestors who lived hundreds or thousands of years ago? Museum visits and exercises will allow students to engage with the material creations of these civilizations.

Taught by: Tartaron

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CLST 127 The Material Past in a Digital World

The material remains of the human past -objects and spaces- provide tangible evidence of past people's lives. Today's information technologies improve our ability to document, study, and present these materials. But what does it mean to deal with material evidence in a virtual context? In this class, students will learn basic digital methods for studying the past while working with objects, including those in the collections of the Penn Museum. This class will teach relational database design and 3D object modeling. As we learn about acquiring and managing data, we will gain valuable experience in the evaluation and use of digital tools. The digital humanities are a platform both for learning the basic digital literacy students need to succeed in today's world and for discussing the human consequences of these new technologies and data. We will discuss information technology's impact on the study and presentation of the past, including topics such as public participation in archaeological projects, educational technologies in museum galleries, and the issues raised by digitizing and disseminating historic texts and objects. Finally, we will touch on technology's role in the preservation of the past in today's turbulent world. No prior technical experience is required, but we hope students will share an enthusiasm for the past.

Taught by: Peter Cobb

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CLST 129 The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire?

The Roman Empire, teetering under the weight of its bureaucracy, oppressed by the demands of its soldiers, weakened by wave after wave of barbarian invasions, and, with the rise of Christianity, confronted by its own immorality, finally fell when the last Roman emperor, Romulus Augustulus, was sent into exile in 476 CE. That, at least, is one version of the story. In truth, there are many stories that can be told of the period between the apogee of the Roman empire in the 2nd c. AD and the rise of Christianity and Islam and origins of the so-called Barbarian Kingdoms in the 7th and 8th centuries AD. This course will explore this period of 600 years, using methodologies from history, archaeology, social science and the sciences to understand the complex problem of empire and its evolutions. No previous knowledge of ancient or medieval history required.

Taught by: Bowes, Grey

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CLST 136 The Ancient Economy

This class presents an introduction to economies before economics, a study of economic activity in the Greco-Roman world. Ancient Greece and Rome have been called some of the first "global" economies - they engaged in long-distance trade, introduced the first coinage systems, and built and manufactured at large scales. At the same time, they remained agrarian societies, with majority peasant populations, high levels of inequality and social systems that often placed social capital ahead of profit. Using textual sources, archaeology and techniques from the natural and social sciences, this class will not only look at basic elements of economic activity in the ancient world - demographics, trade, monetization, industry - but also ask critical questions about how - or if -modern economic methods can be applied to the distant past. No previous knowledge of the ancient world or economics is necessary.

Taught by: Bowes

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CLST 140 Scandalous Arts in Ancient and Modern Communities

What do the ancient Greek comedian Aristophanes, the Roman satirist Juvenal, have in common with Snoop Dogg and Eminem? Many things, in fact, but perhaps the most fundamental is that they are all united by a stance that constantly threatens to offend prevailing social norms, whether through obscenity, violence or misogyny. This course will examine our conceptions of art (including literary, visual and musical media) that are deemed by certain communities to transgress the boundaries of taste and convention. It juxtaposes modern notions of artistic transgression, and the criteria used to evaluate such material, with the production of and discourse about transgressive art in classical antiquity. Students will consider, among other things, why communities feel compelled to repudiate some forms of art, while others into classics."

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: Rosen

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Previously listed as CLST 240.

CLST 143 Great Books of Greece and Rome

The literature of ancient Greece and Rome has been foundational for the national literatures of Europe and the Americas, and in the modern period it remains one of the most influential and widely read world literatures. This course introduces many of the most representative works that define the Greek and Roman canon from Homer to Augustine, along with the most characteristic issues that they examine. In the process, students will become familiar not only with the works themselves, but with the idea of a literary canon consisting of "great books," and will consider differing perspectives both on that idea and those of what constitutes a "foundational" or a "classical" literature, of literary influence, and of a community or culture defined in part by such a literature.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

CLST 146 Ancient Mediterranean Empires

What constituted an empire in antiquity and how was imperialism legitimized? Which measures were used to maintain and organize imperial power? How did foreign rule affect the daily life of people all over the Mediterranean? In this course we will discuss and compare ancient empires from Achaemenid Persia to Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic kingdoms of his successors to the emergence of Rome as one of the most successful and influential empires in world history. Topics that will be discussed include ancient ideas and concepts of imperial rule, patterns of political, economic and cultural power and their interrelations as well as imperial crises and local resistance. All texts will be discussed in translation. There are no prerequisites.

Taught by: Wilker

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CLST 148 Food and Fire: Archaeology in the Laboratory

This course will let students explore the essential heritage of human technology through archaeology. People have been transforming their environment from the first use of fire for cooking. Since then, humans have adapted to the world they created using the resources around them. We use artifacts to understand how the archaeological record can be used to trace breakthroughs such as breaking stone and bone, baking bread, weaving cloth and firing pottery and metals. The seminar will meet in the Penn Museum's new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials. Students will become familiar with the Museum's collections and the scientific methods used to study different materials. Class sessions will include discussions, guest presentations, museum field trips, and hands-on experience in the laboratory.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: Katherine Moore

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CLST 185 Ancient Political Thought

The way in which the Greeks understood and expressed their political institutions, activities and challenges has deeply impressed our own conception of politics. This course will trace the history of this ancient heritage from its inception to today, first through a close analysis of key texts from Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, and Polybius, and then by considering several important moments in the reception of the Greek political tradition, from the Renaissance and American Revolution to the crisis of modernity and the Neo-Conservative Movement. We evaluate the relationship between distant and recent past as well as the influence of both on our own day.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Course not offered every year

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

CLST 191 World Literature: Classics of the World I

This course will introduce students to a wide array of literary works from across the world. It operates on the assumption that cultures have never been isolated from each other and that literature has always been in motion across national boundaries; it has been translated, adapted, and circulated. We will explore the genres, forms, and thematic preoccupations of major works that strive to imagine a wider world, while also studying the critical debates around the concept of world literature, from its origins with Goethe's essay on Weltliteratur to contemporary arguments about cosmopolitanism and globalization.

Taught by: Premoli/Irele

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 199 Independent Study

Coursework and/or research undertaken independently by the student, supervised by a faculty member.

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

CLST 202 Cleopatra

Cleopatra VII (70/69 30 BCE) is one of the most famous women in world history She has been remembered, admired, and reproached as a power-hungry Hellenistic queen, as the last pharaoh of Egypt, as a self-confident female ruler, and as the vicious seductress of Julius Caesar and Mark Antony. Her supposedly extravagant lifestyle, her political schemes, but also her integrity in choosing suicide over submission have inspired poets, artists, and historians from her own time to our modern world. In this seminar, we will take a closer look at some of the common perceptions and stereotypes that have shaped the image of Cleopatra for more than 2000 years. The main focus, however, will be on the historical queen, her biography, and the political and cultural contexts of her life. We will use ancient literary texts, papyri, inscriptions, coins, and archaeological evidence to analyze Cleopatras rise to power, how she presented herself to her subjects and how she was perceived by others, as well as her role in the tumultuous events that led to the end of the Hellenistic period and the rise of imperial Rome under the rule of Augustus.

Taught by: Wilker

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 211 Ancient Moral Philosophy

A survey of the ethical theories debated by philosophers in Classical Greece and Rome. Plato, Aristotle, Stoics, Epicureans and Pyrrhonist Sceptics offer competing answers to the fundamental question raised by Socrates: How are we to live? That is, what is the best life for a human being? These philosophers generally agree that virtue is an important part of the best human life, but disagree about whether it is the greatest good (Epicurus, for example claims that pleasure is the highest good), or whether there are any other goods (for example, health, wealth, family). Much attention is paid in their theories to accounts of the virtues of character, and to the place of wisdom in the best sort of human life.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Meyer

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 217 Periclean Athens

Athens in the 5th Century BCE is often viewed as a high point of human civilization. We will assess this claim by looking at the period's cultural achievements (in such areas as drama, architecture, and oratory) within their social and political contexts. Topics for discussion include: the structure and workings of the Athenian democracy; the interplay between pro-democratic and anti-democratic positions in Athenian political life; the connections between democracy and imperialism; conceptions of citizenship and relations between citizens and non-citizens (women, slaves, and resident foreigners); the role of the law courts in both dispute resolution and elite competition; sexual politics; and the civic significance of religious ritual.

Taught by: MURNAGHAN

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 220 Greek Art and Artifact

This course surveys Greek art and artifacts from Sicily to the Black Sea from the 10th BCE up to the 2nd centuries BCE reaching the Age of Alexander and the Hellenistic Kingdoms. Our objects range from public sculpture and painting on and around grand buildings and gardens, to domestic luxury arts like jewelry, cups and vases, mosaic floors, and the humbler objects of worship and every-day life. Greek addressed heroic epic, religous and political themes, engaged viewers' emotions, and served mundane as well as monumental aims. Current themes include Greek ways of looking at art and space, and ideas of invention and progress; the roll of monuments, makers and patrons in Greek society; and connections with the other cultures that inspired and made use of Greek artists and styles. To understand ancient viewers' encounters, you will meet the spaces of sanctuary and tomb, house and city, garden and private collection; your readings will sample ancient peoples' art writing. Diverse approaches introduce art historical aims and methods, and their relationships to archaeology, anthropology and other disciplines -- also to modern kinds of museums, not least our own University Museum of Archaeology. No prerequisites. This course fulfills the 'global requirement'. Of interest to students of classical, middle-eastern, visual and religious studies, anthropology, history, communications and the GSD programs.

Taught by: Kuttner

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CLST 221 Hellenistic and Roman Art and Artifact

An intensive introduction to the art and architecture of Rome and her empire from Republican and later Hellenistic to Constantinian times. Variable emphasis on topics ranging from major genres, styles, and programs of commemorative and decorative art, historical narrative, and political iconography to building types and functions and the specific Etrusco-Roman notion of space, land division, and city planning.

Taught by: Kuttner

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CLST 223 Ages of Homer: An Archaeological Introduction to the Greek Bronze and Iron Ages

This illustrated lecture course surveys the prehistory and early history of the Greek world through texts and material remains, with the aim of bringing to life the society, economy, and politics of this ancient era. Among the topics are the rise and fall of the great Bronze Age civilizations of the Aegean area, the Minoans of Crete and the Mycenaeans of the Greek mainland; the cataclysmic volcanic eruption on the island of Thera and its long-term consequences; the possibly historical Trojan War; the Homeric world of the Dark Age that followed the collapse of the Mycenaean palaces; and the Greek renaissance of the eighth century B.C.-including the adoption of the alphabet, the great colonizing movement, and the Panhellenic sanctuaries-that laid the foundation for the Classical world to come. Ages of Homer is part of a sequence of introductory courses on the archaeology of the Greco-Roman world , which also includes Introduction to Greek Archaeology (CLS 275) and Introduction to Roman Archaeology (CLST 274). There are no prerequisites, and these courses need not be taken in a particular order

Taught by: Tartaron

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CLST 227 Age of Caesar

A course on Roman culture and society in a period of tumultuous political change, the lifetime of Julius Caesar (100-44BCE). Focuses on the interplay between shifting political and military realities and developments in social organization and literary production at Rome and in the wider Mediterranean world. The reception of Caesar in later ages will also be considered. Readings (all in translation) will include Catullus, Cicero, Lucretius, Plutarach, Sallust, Suetonius, and, of course, Caesar himself.

Taught by: Damon

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 228 Excavating Ancient Cities: Troy and Gordion

The instructor has spent the last 30 years excavating the Turkish sites of Troy and Gordion, the latter of which has been explored under Penns sponsorship. The former was famous in antiquity as the site of the Trojan War; the latter served as the capital of the Phrygian Kingdom, ruled by Midas. Both of these are multi-period sites, with nine settlements built above each other during more than four millennia, and determining the chronology and appearance of each settlement has consistently been controversial. In this course we will examine the history of both sites, focusing on the problems of archaeological interpretation. Students will be placed in the position of the archaeologist and charged with re-interpreting the existing archaeological evidence.

Taught by: Brian Rose

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CLST 251 Greek and Roman Universe

This course covers the history of Greek and Roman exploration and mapping of the earth and the cosmos from the Bronze Age to Late Antiquity, together with advances in timekeeping and the measurement of time. Readings include poetic, historical, and scientific texts.

Taught by: Farrell

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 267 The Ancient Novel

The ancient Greek and Roman novels include some of the most enjoyable and interesting literary works from antiquity. Ignored by ancient critics, they were until fairly recently dismissed by classical scholars as mere popular entertainment. But these narratives had an enormous influence on the later development of the novel, and their sophistication and playfulness, they often seem peculiarly modern--or even postmodern. They are also an important source for any understanding of ancient culture or society. In this course, we will discuss the social, religious and philosophical contexts for the ancient novel, and we will think about the relationship of the novel to other ancient genres, such as history and epic. Texts to be read will include Lucian's parodic science fiction story about a journey to the moon; Longus' touching pastoral romance about young love and sexual awakening; Heliodorus' gripping and exotic thriller about pirates and long-lost children; Apuleius' Golden Ass, which contains the story of Cupid and Psyche; and Petronius' Satyricon, a hilarious evocation of an orgiasic Roman banquet.

Taught by: Wilson

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 268 Living World in Archaeological Science

By focusing on the scientific analysis of archaeological remains, this course will explore life and death in the past. It takes place in the new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and is team taught in three modules: human skeletal analysis, analysis of animal remains, and analysis of plant remains. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how organic materials provide key information about past environments, human behavior, and cultural change through discussions of topics such as health and disease, inequality, and food.

Taught by: Kassabaum, Monge, Moore

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CLST 271 Greek & Roman Medicine

The history of Western medicine is remarkably recent; until the nineteenth century prevailing theories of the body and mind, and many therapeutic methods to combat disease, were largely informed by an elaborate system developed centuries earlier in ancient Greece, at a period when the lines between philosophy, medicine, and what we might consider magic, were much less clearly defined than they are today. This course will examine the ways in which the Greeks, and then the Romans, conceptualized the body, disease, and healing, and will compare these to medical culture of our time. We will consider sources from Hippocrates, Plato, and Aristotle to Galen and Soranus, and will juxtapose these writings with modern discourse about similar topics. We will also pay some attention to ancient pharmacology and religious healing, and will visit the Penn Museum to see their collection of ancient medical instruments. All readings will be in English and no previous background in Classical Studies is required. This course will be especially appealing (and useful) to Pre-med and Nursing students, and to students interested in the History of Science, Ancient Philosophy, and Classics.

Taught by: Rosen

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Fulfills History Tradition Distribution Requirement

CLST 300 Lies My Ancient History Teacher Taught Me

The neat, comforting narratives that we construct of the histories of ancient Greece and Rome cover up a collection of controversies and debates that continue to rage in contemporary scholarship. Can we use the Homeric epics as sources of early Greek history? Who was responsible for the Peloponnesian War? How can we best explain Rome's acquisition of empire? How new was the political revolution of Augustus? What were the main reasons for the rise of Christianity? In this course, we explore these and other controversies, focusing on both modern scholarship and the ancient sources. All texts will be discussed in translation. No prior knowledge of Ancient History is required, although it would be useful to have taken ANCH 026 and/or ANCH 027.

Taught by: Cam Grey

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 310 Ancient and Modern Constitution Making

Constitutionmaking reemerged as an urgent issue with the transformation of colonial empires after World War II, the collapse of the Soviet empire in 1991, and nationalist movements in the Balkans, the British Isles, and the European Union. It has remained important as competition for control of Central Asia, the Middle East, and Northern Africa has reintensified. The written constitution has been hailed by some as making the vehicle for changing long established cultures, but its success has been uneven when it comes to reducing political conflict and to reforming if not improving customs, character, habits, and actions. What might explain this uneven success? Is an explanation to be found by going back to what appears to be the roots of constitutionmaking? This course builds on contemporary scholarship to reconstruct what we may call the constitutionmaking tradition as it develops in the main ancient texts, which are read in English translation. The course traces this tradition through the classically trained thinkers of the Seventeenth Century, the American colonial compacts and covenants, the so-called state constitutions, and the debates in the U.S. Constitutional Convention up to recent efforts in, for example, Zimbabwe (2013) or Egypt (2014).

Taught by: Mulhern

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 311 Disasters in the Ancient World

Natural disasters occupy a powerful place in our imagination. Stories of floods, plagues, earthquakes and storms excite and horrify us, and communities mobilize their resources quickly in response to these events. In the ancient Mediterranean world, natural disasters could take on potent meaning, indicating the anger or disfavor of the gods, acting as warnings against certain courses of action, or confirmations of individuals' fears or suspicions about the world in which they lived. In this course, we explore the evidence for some disasters in the ancient Mediterranean world, the ways in which contemporaries reacted to those disasters and interpreted their causes. This project is, of necessity, multidisciplinary, involving textual, archaeological, geological, and comparative materials and drawing on methodologies from history, political and archaeological science, and the emerging field of disaster studies. In the process, we will gain an appreciation of the socialstructures of communities in the period, the thought-world in which they operated, and the challenges and opportunities thatattend a project of this sort. No prior knowledge of Ancient History is required, although it would be useful to have taken an introductory survey course. Texts will be discussed in translation.

Taught by: Grey

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 325 Topics in Roman Art and Architecture

Topics varies

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 328 Topography and Monuments of Ancient Rome

An intensive exploration of Rome's urban topography during the Republican and Imperial periods (6th c. B.C. through 4th c. A.D.) Using archaeological and textual sources, including the Etruscan and Roman collections of the Penn Museum, the goal will be to reconstruct the built environment and decoration of Rome over the course of a millennium. Of interest to students of classics, archaeology, art history, and architecture. Some familiarity with Rome will be a plus, but is not required.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 329 Topics in Classicism and Literature

This advanced seminar will examine the classical backgrounds to English poetry, in particular the Biblical and Greco-Roman antecedents to Renaissance lyric verse and verse drama (such as, preeminently, Shakespeare). Different versions of this course will have different emphases on Biblical or Hellenist backgrounds.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 332 The Rise and Decline of Macedonia

In this course, we will study the rise and development of Macedonia from a tiny kingdom on the northern fringes of the Greek world to one of the major powers of the region and beyond. Regarded by the Greeks as an at least semi-barbarian culture on the periphery, Macedonia became the dominant power in the Greek world during the fourth century BC and its king Alexander the Great set out to conquer the world. After his death, Macedonia was one of the Hellenistic kingdoms competing for power and influence in the Mediterranean until it finally came under Roman control. Topics that will be discussed include questions of ethnicity and identity, Macedonian kingship, culture and society (including the role of women) and the role of Macedonian traditions in the Hellenistic era in general. Special emphasis will therefore be laid on critical reading and interpretation of ancient literary texts, documentary evidence and archaeological material. that will be discussed include questions of ethnicity and identity, Macedonian kingship, culture and society (including the role of women) and the role of Macedonian traditions in the Hellenistic era in general.

Taught by: Wilker

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 336 Archaeology of Anatolia

This class is devoted to the archaeology and history of Anatolia (ancient Turkey) from the beginning of the Bronze Age (3000 BC) to the end of the Byzantine period (1453 AD). Emphasis will be placed on the great empires in Anatolia (Hittite, Phrygian, Lydian, Urartian, Persian, Roman, and Byzantine), and on the great cities (Troy, Sardis, Ephesus, Constantinople). The course is intended to complement the major exhibit on Gordion, the Phrygians, and Anatolian archaeology that will open at the Penn Museum in February of 2016 and run for 10 months.

Taught by: Brian Rose

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CLST 337 Iliad

Homer's Iliad presents a dark and difficult vision of the world, but one that nonetheless inspires. Casual cruelty, divine caprice, and savage violence test heroes and lesser folk and provoke a reckoning with the stark realities of both human vulnerability and capability. It inspires kind of terror, but still also somehow provides a kind of comfort, albeit one whose character seems almost beyond comprehension. By a close and careful reading of Homer's text, along with some reflections and readings drawn from more contemporary wars, including the current ones, we will try to examine these issues with one eye on the past and one on the present. Our goal will be to achieve some further understanding of war and human experience. This course will be offered online.

Taught by: Struck

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 338 Power & Peril: the Paradox of Monarchy Among Ancient Greeks, Romans & Jews

We imagine Ancient Greece and Rome as the cradles of democracy and republicanism, the early Judea as pious theocracy, but the evidence tells us that monarchy was the most common and prevalent form of government in antiquity (and the premodern world in general). Despite their ubiquity, the King was a polarizing figurein reality and in conception. On the one hand, some idealized the monarchy as the ideal leader, and monarchy provided the language with which to describe and even imagine the very godsbut on the other, monarchs were widely reviled in both theory and practice, from the Greek tyrant to biblical Saul. The Emperor Augustus loudly denied his own affinity to the office of king, even as he ruled alone and was revered as a god. In other words, kings stood both for the ideal ruler and the worst form of government. This class confronts the paradox of the King.

Taught by: Wilker, Dohrmann

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 339 Descent to the Underworld in Ancient Near-Eastern and Western Literature

From antiquity to the present the hero's journey to the underworld, or the land of the dead, has offered poets and philosophers a metaphor to express our search for life's meaning. In antiquity that meaning was to be found by an extraordinary individual in a heroic quest beyond the grave. In this course we will consider various interpretations what of this katabasis means within the context of our everyday struggle to find meaning.

Taught by: Foley

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 341 Topics in Greco-Roman Art

Topic Varies

Taught by: Kuttner

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 343 The Iliad and its Afterlife

As the earliest work in the western tradition, the Iliad has been a constant point of reference for later considerations of heroism, friendship, the search for meaning in the face of mortality, and the effects of war on individuals and societies. We will begin with a close reading of the Iliad in translation, with attention both to the story of its hero Achilles as he experiences disillusionment, frustration, anger, triumph, revenge, and reconciliation and to the poems broader portrait of a society at war, which incorporates the diverse perspectives of invaders and defenders, men and women, old and young, gods and mortals, along with tantalizing glimpses of peacetime life. We will then consider how later writers and artists have drawn on the Iliad to present a range of perspectives of their own -- whether patriotic, mock heroic, romantic, or pacifist -- with particular attention to 20th and 21st century responses by such figures as W.H. Auden, Simone Weil, Cy Twombly, David Malouf, Alice Oswald, and Adrienne Rich. There are no specific prerequisites, but the course can serve as a complement to CLST 302, The Odyssey and its Afterlife or CLST 331 Reading the Iliad in a Time of War.

Taught by: Murnaghan

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 344 Curiosity: Ancient and Modern Thinking about Thinking

This course will examine two approaches to the still unanswered question of what happens when we humans come up with new knowledge. How should we describe the impulse, or set of impulses, that leads us to seek it? What is happening when we achieve it? And how do we describe the new state in which we find ourselves after we have it? We will study the work of contemporary physicists and cognitive scientists on these questions along side the approaches developed by the two most powerful thinkers from antiquity on the topic, Plato and Aristotle.

Taught by: Struck

Also Offered As: EAS 244

Prerequisites: Curiosity, bravery, and a predilection for the interdisciplinary

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 345 Ancient Epic Poetry

Admission to the course is by application only. This course will be a collaboration between Penn and Yale-NUS in Singapore. It involves travel to study in Singapore during Penns Spring Break 2019. Mira Seo, Professor of Humanities (Literature) at Yale-NUS and Peter Struck, Professor of Classics at University of Pennsylvania, will teach a shared syllabus between two seminars, one at Yale NUS, and one at Penn. The syllabus will focus on five complete epics, Gilgamesh, the Iliad, Odyssey, Ramayana, and Aeneid, with appropriate secondary literature on each text. Class will meet on each campus independently during standard course times. In addition, we will schedule six plenary sessions via teleconference, held as additional sessions in the morning (Singapore) and evening (Philadelphia) to allow for simultaneity. In the plenary sessions, we will engage in a mix of interactive activities, including lectures, discussions, and group work. The course will pivot around two weeks at the midpoint of the semester, the last week of February (23 February-3 March, 2019) and the first week of March (3-10 March, 2019). The first is Yale-NUS's Spring break, and that class will travel to Philadelphia and join Penn students in face-to-face class sessions, plus engage in additional ambassadorial kinds of events, in which they will explore the richness of Penn and Philadelphia, including the Penn Museum. The first week of March is Penns Spring break, and as Yale students return to Singapore, Penn students will fly over to meet them for a week that mirrors the Philadelphia experience, with attendance in classes, and cultural events, including the Asian Civiliations Museum. Course grades will consist in a combination of sole-authored papers and work pursued by groups drawn from both campuses and turned in as collaborative projects. These will be seeded before the face-to-face weeks, and pursued via shared blog and small group videoconferencing links. There will be money available to subvene travel expenses for students. Up to date passports are required for the course.

Taught by: Peter Struck

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CLST 360 Troy Stories: Classical Epic and Medieval Romance

In this course on ancient and medieval epic we will track the literary compulsion to return to the Trojan War. The matter of Troy provided ancient and medieval writers with a rich resource for reflections on war and violence, on the power and vulnerability of states, on personal and communal suffering, and on how history is written. We will begin with the Homeric Iliad along with other ancient Greek uses of the Trojan myth; we will read Virgils refashioning of the Trojan story as the new beginnings of a triumphant Roman history; and then we will consider how medieval writers, including Geoffrey of Monmouth, Boccaccio, Chaucer, the Gawain-Poet, and Robert Henryson, shaped and contended with the myth of Troy. In the hands of late medieval writers, Troy becomes a literary site for the transformation of epic into the genre of romance. The course requirements will be: one ten-minute oral presentation on a research topic of your choice related to the reading, together with a short write-up of your research; one very short critical paper; and one longer research paper (which can develop the subject of your oral presentation).

Taught by: Copeland

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 362 Intro to Digital Archaeology

Digital methods allow archaeologists to approach research questions about the human past with increasing accuracies on larger datasets and at multiple scales. This class introduces students to the three main steps of digital archaeology: data management, analysis, and sharing. Data management involves the design, creation, and curation of digital objects that capture the archaeological process and evidence. Students will gain deep familiarity in working with the main types of digital archaeological data: structured data (relational databases), 3D models/spatial data, and raster images. The class will provide abundant hands-on experience with the latest equipment and software for working with many different kinds of data. We will learn about data analysis techniques through a close examination of a variety of case studies in the literature that demonstrate how other archaeologists have applied digital methods to their archaeological questions. Finally, we will discuss the importance of sharing data through open access data publication and we will apply our skills with structured data to existing online archaeological datasets. The goal of this class is to prepare students to make methodological decisions during future research endeavors, both in the field and in the archaeological lab.

Taught by: Peter Cobb

Prerequisite: Prior archaeological classwork and/or experience preferred

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CLST 370 Classics & American Government

Before the universities established public-service programs in the twentieth century, many Americans prepared themselves for public life by studying Greek and Latin authors in school and college. In this course, using English translations, students survey an eighteenth-century classical curriculum and trace its influence in the political activity of Madison and others who guided the development of American governmental institutions.

Taught by: John Mulhern

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 396 History of Literary Criticism

This is a course on the history of literary theory, a survey of major debates about literature, poetics, and ideas about what literary texts should do, from ancient Greece to examples of modern European thought. The first half of the course will focus on early periods: Greek and Roman antiquity, especially Plato and Aristotle; the medieval period (including St. Augustine, Dante, and Boccaccio), and the early modern period ( such as Philip Sidney and Giambattista Vico). We'll move into modern and 20th century by looking at the literary (or "art") theories of some major philosophers, artists, and poetsKant, Hegel, Shelley, Marx, the painter William Morris, Freud, and the critic Walter Benjamin. We'll end with a look at Foucault's work. The point of this course is to consider closely the Western European tradition which generated questions that are still with us, such as: what is the "aesthetic"; what is "imitation" or mimesis; how are we to know an author's intention; and under what circumstances should literary texts ever be censored. During the semester there will be four short writing assignments in the form of analytical essays (3 pages each), and students can use these small assignments to build into a long writing assignment on a single text or group of texts at the end of the term. Most of our readings will come from a published anthology of literary criticism and theory; a few readings will be on Canvas.

Taught by: Copeland

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Benjamin Franklin Seminar

CLST 399 Independent Study

This course is taken by students doing independent work with a faculty advisor, such as students approved to work on a senior research paper in pursuit of honors in the major.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

CLST 402 Post-Baccalaureate Studies in Greek

Intensive Greek reading course for students in the Post-Baccalaureate Program in Classical Studies. Readings are chosen to expose students to a variety of prose and poetry texts during their program experience. The Fall course includes some grammar review and analysis as well as translation. Permission of instructor required for non-Post-Baccalaureate students.

Two terms. student may enter either term.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CLST 403 Post-Baccalaureate Studies in Latin

Intensive Latin reading course for students in the Post-Baccalaureate Program in Classical Studies. Readings are chosen to expose students to a variety of prose and poetry texts during their program experience. The Fall course includes some grammar review and analysis as well as translation. Permission of instructor required for non-Post-Baccalaureate students.

Two terms. student may enter either term.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CLST 425 Late Antique Arts

What is 'Late Antiquity'? In 312 when Roman emperor Constantine inaugurated a Christian empire, 'Roman' culture was centuries old. The period ca. 200-650 saw profound transformations that launched Medieval, Byzantine and Islamic traditions. In the epoch of economic and political upheaval destruction was frequent but partial: Rome long survived, Constantine's 'new Rome,' Constantinople flourished, and around the Empire both proto-global visual culture and local forms prospered. Roman cultural models authorized both innovation and passion for tradition, in forms and styles: we critique art-historial models for Late Antiquity 'decline', analyze habits of material reuse and curation, and look at new Christian and Jewish roles for Roman things as well as polytheist visual survival. Foreign allies and enemies, and new peoples invading an already polyethnic Empire, interacted with Greco-Roman Late Antiquity: we visit arts of Sasanian and Islamic empires east and south, and 'barbarian' domains in Africa, Europe, Britain. Media discussed, for sacred, courtly, domestic, funerary, political and civic spaces and structures include not just 'monumental' painting, mosaic, sculpture, but also objects of silver, ceramic, ivory, figural textile, glass; painted books, jewelry; mass-media artifacts like coins and pilgrimage tokens. We also study Late Antique texts on art, objects, space and viewership.

Taught by: Kuttner

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CLST 427 Roman Sculpture

Survey of the Republican origins and Imperial development of Roman sculpture-free-standing, relief, and architectural--from ca. 150 BC to 350 AD. We concentrate on sculpture in the capital city and on court and state arts, emphasizing commemorative public sculpture and Roman habits of decorative display; genres examined include relief, portraits, sarcophagi, luxury and minor arts (gems, metalwork, coinage). We evaluate the choice and evolution of styles with reference to the functions of sculptural representation in Roman culture and society.

Taught by: Kuttner, Rose

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CLST 500 Materials and Methods, proseminar in CLASSICAL STUDIES AND ANCIENT HISTORY

This is the required proseminar for first year graduate students in classical and ancient history. It will introduce you to some key methodological, practical and theoretical tools for beginning a scholarly career in these fields.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 503 Historical Grammar of Greek

Investigation of the grammar of Classical Greek from the viewpoint of historical linguistics. The course will offer historical explanations for numerous structural peculiarities of the Greek language and anomalies of Greek grammar, touch on the relationship of Greek with other languages, and incidentally introduce the student to some basic concepts of language analysis likely to be useful in teaching Greek and learning other languages.

Taught by: Ringe

Course not offered every year

Prerequisite: A fluent reading knowledge of ancient Greek

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 517 MLA Proseminar: Reading the Iliad in an Age of War

Homer's Iliad presents a dark and difficult vision of the world, but one that nonetheless inspires. Casual cruelty, divine caprice, and savage violence test heroes and lesser folk and provoke a reckoning with the stark realities of both human vulnerability and capability. It inspires kind of terror, but still also somehow provides a kind of comfort, albeit one whose character seems almost beyond comprehension. By a close and careful reading of Homer's text, along with some reflections and readings drawn from more contemporary wars, including the current ones, we will try to examine these issues with one eye on the past and one on the present. Our goal will be to achieve some further understanding of war and human experience. This course will be offered online.

Taught by: Struck/Reinhardt

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 521 Topics in Greek and Roman Art

Topic Varies. Please check website for more details. Fall 2018: "Roman Provincial Art" is a very active scholarly category: we test how it might be productive, sampling visual culture outside the empire's Italian heartland from the Late Republic into Late Antiquity. Rome's arts were always in dialogue with those of neighboring cultures; imperialist expansion into the Mediterranean world and beyond meant that cultural relations across many boundaries--social, ethic, territorial--potentially became cultural politics. Of related interest are relationships between visual and material culture within the Roman world's formal boundaries, in proto-global and imperial contexts, and those of peoples along and beyond those frontiers. (In Late Antiquity some of them took up rule within the old imperial boundaries, and came to cultural terms with their new lands.) "Style" is a fraught issue: what does attributed crudeness in regional practice add up to, and what were the aims of apparently trans-Mediterranean forms of display? Do "arts" engage identity formation, enforced or discrepant viewing?

Taught by: Kuttner

Course not offered every year

Prerequisites: No prerequisite. Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 526 Material & Methods in Mediterranean Archaeology

This course is intended to familiarize new graduate students with the collections of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology and the wide range of scholarly interests and approaches used by faculty at Penn and neighboring institutions, as well as to provide an introduction to archaeological methods and theory in a Mediterranean context. Each week, invited lecturers will address the class on different aspects of archaeological methodology in their own research, emphasizing specific themes that will be highlighted in readings and subsequent discussion. The course is divided into five sections: Introduction to the Mediterranean Section; Collections; Method and Theory in Mediterranean Archaeology; Museum Work; and Ethics. The course is designed for new AAMW graduate students, though other graduate students or advanced undergraduate students may participate with the permission of the instructor.

Taught by: Tartaron

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 532 Ancient Greek Colonies

This seminar examines the archaeology of Greek colonization from the Late Bronze Age to ca. 500 B.C. These colonies were highly diverse in their motivations, physical settings, and political and social structures, as well as in their relationships with mother cities and the new worlds they inhabited. Emphasis is placed on the colonial experience as a cross-cultural and negotiated process; several streams of the changing theoretical and conceptual approaches to Greek colonization are explored. In addition to archaeological and epigraphic evidence, literary and historical traditions are examined. Colonies from the southern Balkan peninsula, Black Sea, Ionia, northern Africa, and Magna Graecia will be the focus of reading and reports. Seminar meetings will consist of oral reports and discussion of these reports and other topics. Depending on the number of participants, each person will be responsible for two or three reports of approximately 30-45 minutes length. Accompanying the oral report will be a PowerPoint document (in most cases), a synopsis/summary of one to two pages, and a bibliography. These will all be posted on the course Canvas site. No later than one week before an oral presentation, the presenter will identify one or two key readings for all to read, in consultation with the instructor. These will be posted, in PDF format, on the Canvas site. One or more visits to the Penn Museum may be built into the course.

Taught by: Tom Tartaron

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 533 Topog & Mon of Anc Rome

An intensive exploration of Rome's urban topography during the Republican and Imperial periods (6th c. B.C. through 4th c. A.D.) Using archaeological and textual sources, including the Etruscan and Roman collections of the Penn Museum, the goal will be to reconstruct the built environment and decoration of Rome over the course of a millennium. Of interest to students of classics, archaeology, art history, and architecture. Some familiarity with Rome will be a plus, but is not required.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 541 Plato and Aristotle in the Renaissance

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 562 Intro to Digital Archaeology

Digital methods allow archaeologists to approach research questions about the human past with increasing accuracies on larger datasets and at multiple scales. This class introduces students to the three main steps of digital archaeology: data management, analysis, and sharing. Data management involves the design, creation, and curation of digital objects that capture the archaeological process and evidence. Students will gain deep familiarity in working with the main types of digital archaeological data: structured data (relational databases), 3d models/spatial data, and raster images. The class will provide abundant hands-on experience with the latest equipment and software for working with many different kinds of data. We will learn about data analysis techniques through a close examination of a variety of case studies in the literature that demonstrate how other archaeologists have applied digital methods to their archaeological questions. Finally, we will discuss the importance of sharing data through open access data publication and we will apply our skills with structured data to existing online archaeological datasets. The goal of this class is to prepare students to make methodological decisions during future research endeavors, both in the field and in the archaeological lab.

Taught by: Peter Cobb

Prerequisite: Prior archaeological classwork and/or experience preferred

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CLST 568 Living World in Archaeological Science

By focusing on the scientific analysis of archaeological remains, this course will explore life and death in the past. It takes place in the new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and is team taught in three modules: human skeletal analysis, analysis of animal remains, and analysis of plant remains. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how organic materials provide key information about past environments, human behavior, and cultural change through discussions of topics such as health and disease, inequality, and food.

Taught by: Kassabaum, Monge, Moore

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CLST 598 Language Pedagogy Workshop

The Workshop is intended to serve as a forum for first-time teachers of Latin or Greek. This will include discussing course-plans and pedagogical theories and strategies, collaborating on course materials, and addressing any concerns in the language courses presently being taught.

Taught by: James Ker

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 600 Graduate Seminar

Topics will vary

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 611 Greek Epigraphy: Ancient Economies

Scholars have long debated the nature of the ancient economy, the terms in which it can best be approached, and the decision-making processes that underpinned economic behavior in antiquity. In particular, controversy has surrounded the extent to which the economies of Greco-Roman antiquity can be modeled using contemporary tools of analysis. In recent scholarship, many of the tenets laid down by Moses Finley in his "Ancient Economy" have been re-evaluated, with the result that the field is currently in a state of intellectual ferment. It is the purpose of this course to explore the terms in which contemporary debates over ancient economic systems are formulated, with reference to a variety of societies and periods, from the palace economies of the Mycenaean period to the system of taxation introduced in the early fourth century by the emperor Diocletian and his colleagues in the Tetrarchy.

Taught by: Bowes

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 616 Ancient Economies

Scholars have long debated the nature of the ancient economy, the terms in which it can best be approached, and the decision-making processes that underpinned economic behavior in antiquity. In particular, controversy has surrounded the extent to which the economies of Greco-Roman antiquity can be modeled using contemporary tools of analysis. In recent scholarship, many of the tenets laid down by Moses Finley in his The Ancient Economy have been re-evaluated, with the result that the field is currently in a state of intellectual ferment. It is the purpose of this course to explore the terms in which contemporary debates over ancient economic systems are formulated, with reference to a variety of societies and periods, from the palace economies of the Mycenaean period to the system of taxation introduced in the early fourth century by the emperor Diocletian and his colleagues in the Tetrarchy.

Taught by: Bowes and Grey

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 618 Medieval Poetics

This is a comparative course on medieval stylistic practices, formal innovations, and especially theories of form. Our common ground will be the theories that were generated in learned and pedagogical traditions of medieval Latinity (with their roots in ancient thought about poetic form). We will also collaborate on the particulars of the European vernacular cultures that stamped their interests on the interplay of language, genre, and form. Questions common to all the literary traditions may be the social, ethical, and epistemological roles of poetry. Other common questions include the distinctively medieval terms of interpretive theory and practice; technologies of interpretation; theories of fiction (fabula); the histories of the language arts; transformations of the terminology of figurative language; grammatical orthopraxis and permitted deviation; and material texts. As we turn from interpretive to generative categories, we will consider how arts of poetry find their linguistic and stylistic focus in the vocabularies of individual vernacular traditions.

Taught by: Rita Copeland

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 622 Gloss & Commentary

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 698 Prospectus Workshop

Designed to prepare graduates in any aspect of study in the ancient world to prepare for the dissertation prospectus. Course will be centered around individual presentations and group critique of prospectus' in process, as well the fundamentals of large-project research design and presentation.

Taught by: Bowes

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Graduates only

CLST 700 Geoarchaeology

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CLST 705 Ethnoarchaeology Greece

Ethnoarchaeology involves distinctive theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of living societies for the explicit purpose of shedding light on archaeological questions. In this seminar, we will review the intellectual history of ethnoarchaeology in North America and Europe, and explore case studies from Greece, the wider Mediterranean, and beyond. Among the topics will be analogy, cross-cultural comparison, experimental archaeology, oral history research, and archaeologically oriented ethnographic fieldwork. Students will create a proposal for ethnoarchaeological fieldwork in their area of interest in NSF or Wenner-Gren format, to be critiqued by the instructor and their peers.

Taught by: Tartaron

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 706 Archaeology of the Hellenistic Period in Italy, Greece, and Asia Minor

A survey of the archaeology of the Hellenistic period (331-31 BCE) across the Mediterranean, with a focus on Rome, Magna Graecia, Greece, and western Asia Minor. The course will stress the interactions among cities and kingdoms during the Roman Republic and Greek Hellenistic periods, especially the second century B.C. Students will work with relevant objects in the Penn Museums Mediterranean Section.

Taught by: Brian Rose

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 707 TOPICS IN AEGEAN ARCHAEOLOGY

Topics vary. This course explores current topics in Aegean archaeology. It is designed to inform and prompt debate and discussion on substantive, methodological, and theoretical matters of current interest, within a geographical and/or chronological framework. Spring 2017 topic TBA.

Taught by: Tom Tartaron

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Undergraduates require permission of instructor

CLST 711 The Archaeology of Greece and Asia Minor in the Archaic and Classical Periods

An examination of new discoveries and conflicting interpretations in the archaeology of Greece and Asia Minor between the seventh and fourth centuries B.C.E. Both sides of the Aegean will receive equal attention, and emphasis will be placed on sanctuaries, settlements, and cemeteries.

Taught by: C. Brian Rose

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Graduates Students Only

CLST 715 Archaeology of Troy

An introduction to the archaeology of Troy, in northwestern Turkey. The course will focus on the results of excavations at the site in 1988, although the earlier excavations of Schliemann, Dorpfeld, and Blegen will also be considered. The course will cover a broad chronological span--from the early Bronze age through the late Roman period, and will include Greek, Roman, and Medieval attitudes toward Troy and the Trojan legend.

Taught by: Rose

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 720 Topics in Aegean Art

Fall 2018: The choices made by groups of people with regard to the treatment of their dead can be reflective of a society s beliefs and social structure. In this course, we will examine the burial traditions of the people of the Prehistoric Aegean from the Neolithic through the end of the Bronze Age, circa 7,000-1,100 BCE. We will focus on burial architecture, grave goods, burial rituals, mortuary variability, and the symbolic meaning of death and burial in Prehistoric Greece. Particular attention will be paid to recent discoveries on Crete, the Mainland, and the Cycladic islands. Students will write two papers, and these papers will be presented to the class. The first paper will be circa 15 pages long with footnotes, bibliography, and images (presented via powerpoint) and the second will be a 20-25 page paper with footnotes, bibliography, and images presented via powerpoint.

Taught by: Shank

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

CLST 990 Masters Thesis

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Masters Thesis

1 Course Unit

CLST 995 Dissertation

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Dissertation

1 Course Unit

CLST 999 Independent Study and Research

For doctoral candidates.

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Permission of Graduate Chair and instructor required.

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit