City and Regional Planning (CPLN)

CPLN 300 The Making of Modern Paris

Paris, Ville-Lumiere, has long been renowned for its urbanity, architecture, and city design. This course will trace the people, ideas, and projects that contributed to this reputation, through an exploration of the city's built environment as expressed in literature and urban planning projects of the 19th and 20th centuries. The class will analyze literary readings, including texts by Hugo, Baudelarie, Zola, and Breton, in conjunction with historical and visual materials covering works from Viollet-le-Duc to Napoleon III and Haussmann to Mitterand and Sarkozy. This seminar has four goals: (1) To engage students in an interdisciplinary conversation about the development of a modern global city as experienced by a range of observers: writers, photographers, designers and inhabitants. (2) To introduce students to some of the major literature written as Paris moved from a pre-industrial to a post-industrial state, while attending critically to the ideological and rhetorical strategies at work in representations of a modernity and urban space. (3) To expand students' knowledge of how to "read" a city over time. (4) To guide students in the preparation of an in-depth research project. This interdisciplinary course, which brings together the humanities and the design professions, has been designated a Penn Global Seminar. With the support of the Provost's Office, the class will include a week-long seminar in Paris during Spring Break. The required on-site seminar will have several objectives including visiting the sites recorded in the literature and tracing the city's physical development over time, as reflected in the extant built environment. The overall goal is to understand how this place has enduringly responded to the needs of various generations and how artistic and literary representations have interacted with planning decisions to create a shifting Paris - imagined and real. We will query the role of public and private decision-makers in making the adaptations that have allowed Paris to remain a global city in the 21st century.

Taught by: Goulet/Birch

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: FREN 300

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 500 Introduction to City Planning: Past, Present and Future

Orientation to the profession, tracing the evolution of city and regional planning from its late nineteenth-century roots to its twentieth century expression. Field trips included.

Taught by: Ammon or Drake Rodriguez

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: URBS 440

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 501 Quantitative Planning Analysis Methods

Introduction of methods in analyzing demographic conditions, land use and housing trends, employment and business changes, community and neighborhood development. Focus on using spreadsheet models and data analysis for local and neighborhood planning.

Taught by: Faculty

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 502 Public Finance and Public Policy

This course deals with how governments tax and spend. Students become familiar with the theoretical, empirical, and practical tools and methods used to create and analyze government budgets, as well as the flow of public resources. The course examines public revenues and expenditures within the context of fiscal federalism, in addition to budgeting and resource management and the social, economic, and political forces that shape the fiscal environment within which governments (particularly state and local governments) operate. Significant attention is paid to tax policy analysis and the fiscal crises confronting many large cities and states. Additional special topics covered include health care & social security, public education finance, public finance and the environment, bond markets & municipal finance, and public pensions.

Taught by: Gershberg

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: GAFL 651

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 503 Modeling Geographical Objects

This course offers a broad and practical introduction to the acquisition, storage, retrieval, maintenance, use, and presentation of digital cartographic data with vector-oriented (i.e. drawing-based) geographic information systems (GIS) for a variety of environmental science, planning, and management applications. Previous experience in GIS is not required.

Taught by: Tomlin or O'Neill

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: MUSA 503

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 504 Site Planning

This course introduces students to the practice of site planning. Skills and methods examined in the course include observation of the physical and community environment; physical and environmental site inventorying and analysis; analysis of alternative site programming and uses; site design processes and strategy;and the creation of site plans and development standards. Methods of community participation and collaboration with other disciplines will be explored. The spring version of this course differs from the fall version in its orientation toward urban designers and/or those with prior design backgrounds and skills.

Taught by: Page

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 505 Planning by Numbers

This class emphasizes the theory, practice, and use of statistics as applied to planning and policy problems and data. Starting with a review of basic descriptive statistics and measures of association, this course will introduce students to the regression techniques, including multiple regression analysis and logistical and probabilistic models for categorical data; data mining techniques, measures of spatial autocorrelation, and time-series modeling; and causal inference techniques, including structural equation modeling(SEM). A basic familiarity with descriptive and inferential statistics at the upper-division undergraduate level is expected at the beginning of the class. This course uses the popular, free, and open source statistical software R. Meets methods breadth requirement.

Taught by: Ryerson

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 506 Negotiation and Conflict Resolution

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to the theory and practice of negotiation, conflict resolution and community engagement. We will start by looking at basic approaches to interpersonal negotiation and then move to considering contemporary approaches to understanding and addressing public disputes using negotiation, facilitation and public involvement. Design professionals - architects, construction managers, planners and others - face a variety of kinds of problems and challenges in their work. Some problems and challenges, whether simple or complex, are amenable to technical solutions based solely on the expertise of planners, managers, architects and others. There are, however, other problems and challenges that require adaptive work, primarily because technical expertise alone is insufficient to address the problems or challenges being faced. In this course, we'll focus on perspectives and methods for working through those later sorts of problems and challenges. Meets methods breadth requirement.

Taught by: Sokoloff

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 508 Urban Research Methods

This new course will introduce students to the practice of conducting original social, policy, and planning research in an urban context, and through a series of applied exercises, cover the following topics: research conceptualization and design, logic models, survey and ethnographic research, urban policy analysis and evaluation.

Taught by: Drake Rodriguez, Akira

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 509 Law of Planning and Urban Development

The central focus will be on selected aspects of the field of the law of planning and development, a field that embraces a range of legal doctrines that are particularly relevant to cities and suburbs. We will study the principles that govern the regulation of land use and management of urban growth (through land use controls and other techniques for regulating new development)and, to a limited extent, environmental planning laws.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 520 Introduction to Community and Economic Development

Introduction to the theories and practices of urban economic and community development with a focus on improving opportunity and quality of life in low-income communities. Provides foundation for advanced courses in real estate and economic development finance, housing policy, downtown and neighborhood revitalization, workforce development and metropolitan regional development.

Taught by: Servon, Lisa

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 528 Research Seminar 21st Century Urbanism

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: URBS 428

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 530 Introduction to Land Use Planning

Exploration of the methods and tools for managing land use and shaping the built environment. Presents how to create a successful Comprehensive Plan, Zoning Ordinance, Subdivision Regulations, Capital Improvements Progam, and design guidelines. Also, presents functional area, regional, and state-level plans.

Taught by: Daniels

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 531 Introduction to Environmental Planning & Policy

Overview of federal programs for protecting air quality, water quality, and endangered species along with managing climate change, solid waste, toxics, energy, transportation, and remediating brownfields in an overall sustainability framework. State-level, local government, and NGO efforts to protect the environment are also explored as are green infrastructure and green cities.

Taught by: Daniels

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 535 Topics in Energy Policy

This seminar will explore a collection of ideas influencing energy policy development in the U.S. and around the world. Our platform for this exploration will be seven recent books to be discussed during the semester. These books each contribute important insights to seven ideas that influence energy policy: Narrative, Transition, Measurement, Systems, Subsidiarity, Disruption, Attachment. Books for 2018 will be chosen over the summer; the 2017 books are listed here as examples: Policy Paradox (2011) by Stone, Climate Shock (2015) by Wagner and Weitzman, Power Density (2015) by Smil, Connectography (2016) by Khanna, Climate of Hope (2017) by Bloomberg and Pope, Utility of the Future (2016) by MIT Energy Initiative, Retreat from a Rising Sea (2016) by Pilkey, Pilkey-Jarvis, Pilkey.

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: ENMG 503

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 540 Introduction to Property Development

This course is designed to acquaint students with the fundamental skills and techniques of real estate property development. It is designed as a first course for anyone interested in how to be a developer, and as a foundation for further courses in urban development and real estate.

Taught by: Reina, Vincent

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 550 Introduction to Transportation Planning

Survey of the technological and design aspects of urban transportation systems and land use patterns. Covers facilities operations, congestion, environmental concerns and policy debates revolving around mobility issues at the federal, state, and metropolitan levels.

Taught by: Guerra

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 551 Transport Justice

This course will explore the concept of transport justice and how this idea can inform changes to public transit infrastructure. The first half of the course will set theoretical foundations through close reading and discussion of spatial and social justice theories, emphasizing questions of transportation and mobility. The second half of the course will feature a project-based application of these theories. Students will develop analyses to inform a proposed extension to the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority's (SEPTA) bus Route 52, which serves a corridor between the Kingsessing and Overbrook sections of West Philadelphia. Students will be encouraged to explore multiple analytic approaches including: interviews and qualitative data collection; GIS and spatial analysis; quantitative analysis and predictive modeling, and more. The course will culminate in written and oral presentations given to partners from SEPTA and other planning agencies in Philadelphia.

Taught by: Joshua Davidson

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 560 Introduction to Graphics for Urban Design

This course introduces students to visual literacy and the use of a variety of software packages. Through a series of assignments and in class discussions participants develop a visual vocabulary and skills to function in and between AutoCAD, Adobe Creative Suite, and 3D modeling software.

Taught by: Fogelson

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 571 Sensing the City

This course will teach you to design and build sensing installations that engage with real-time urban environmental stimuli. Using the Arduino microcontroller as a prototyping platform, you will write code and wire circuits, learn to select and implement available sensors, and generate raw environmental data. You will populate databases and interpret data streams, and then create responsive urban interventions. Following the model of hackerspaces around the globe, we will collaboratively pose problems and find solutions, teaching and learning from one another. No background in coding or electronics is required, but a desire to learn is absolutely necessary. Also, this course is hands-on. You are a maker! Be prepared to build, design, and create.

Taught by: Lassiter

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 572 Modern Architectural Theory

A survey of architectural theory from the mid-eighteenth century to the present. The discussion of original writings will be emphasized.

Taught by: Brownlee

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 571

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 577 Introduction to International Development Finance for Cities

With the world's population growth exploding - 2050 will see the addition of some 2 billion inhabitants, primarily in cities in low and middle income countries - decision-makers are pressed to meet basic infrastructure needs (transportation, water and sanitation, public space, electricity, social service facilities and others) while responding to such large global issues as climate change. This course will review the history, theory, and current practice of international development finance with special attention to urban places. It will examine the challenges of the planning and financing projects, explore innovation and best practices in the field and suggest needed regulatory and governance reforms. Student research undertaken in the course will contribute to the "Cities Investment and Financing Initiative," an important project being incubated at the University of Pennsylvania through the Perry Word House and Penn Institute for Urban Research with support from the World Economic Forum (WEF), the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, United Cities and Governments (UCLG) and C-40. Guest speakers will be invited.

Taught by: Eugenie Birch

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 581 Issues in Global Sustainable Development: Adapting in Rapidly Urbanizing Places

The world is beset by interconnected economic, social, and enviornmental challenges of a magnitude difficult to grasp, much less address. Population growth and urbanization are at the heart of these challenges, with 2.5 billion additional people expected to be living in urban places by 2050. Poverty (3 billion people live on less than $2.50 a day), enviornmental deprivation (75% of the earth;s land is degraded) and low productivity (global productivity has increased only .5% in the past decaded are key issues. To have a sense of the magnitude of today's urbanization, realize that accomodating the increased population will require the construction of a city of a million every week for the next forty years - mainly in Asia and Africa. The speed wtih which city growth is occurring is overwhelming places' abilities to provide formal employment and core services both necessary to achieve sustainable urban development. Dealing with mounting concerns will be a central task that city and regional planners will confront in the next decades. Between 2015 and 2016, the 193 members of the United Nations approved five global agreements to deal with development issues that are of great importance to city and regional planners. These agreements, Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (2015), Addis Ababa Action Agenda (2015), Transforming Our World, Agenda 2030 (2015), Paris Agreement (2015), and New Urban Agenda (2016), represent a worldwide consenus to frame current and future development policies over the next decades. Each will require significant efforts in aligning nationl and subnational programs and their financing. In fact, estimates for the achievement of the UN's Sustainable Development Goals (a proxy for core service provision) calls for some $4.5 trillion/year in investment for the next 15 years. In this class, students will explore the agreements, their underlying theoretical concepts, their evolution, and their implementation. They will focus on the explicit and implicit urban implications and the challenges faced by subnational governments in coming to grips with integrating aspirational goals with political and economic realities of their specific contexts.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 582 Place, Taste and Neighborhood Change: Frameworks for Integrating Aesthetics, Equity and Creativity

Places provide a sense of identity and orientation to the world for its users in ways that go beyond the traditional practice areas that urbanists are trained to understand (i.e. housing, economic development, transportation). The popularization of artistic, cultural, and "creative interventions" in redevelopment has added to that complexity in hybrid ways require new tools, languages, and frameworks to meaningfully participate in the development process. By taking a humanistic and scienctific views of the longstanding arts-based community development field now known as "creative placemaking", the class will help learners formulate critical, evaluative answers pressing, emergent questions for urban practitioners. In particular, learners will explore the various state-sponsored meanings of creative placemaking, artistic excellence, and artistic merit. During the course we will interrogate, compare, and articulate the power dynamics embedded in those definitions with new, alternate, and stakeholder-centric definitions. The course aims to invite conversation, reflection, and sharing of best practices alongside community-based leaders with the promise that learners will be able to apply equity-based frameworks to these debates. Learners will emerge from this guided journey with a sharpened ability to identify, generate, and extend authentic, inclusive arts-based neighborhood change.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 590 Spatial Analysis for Urban and Environmental Planning

This course builds on prior knowledge of GIS and basic statistics to help students to develop GIS and spatial analysis applications for use in urban and environmental planning and management. Each weekly session will focus on a particular analytical approach (e.g., buffering, geo-processing, map algebra, network analysis) as applied to a particular urban or environmental planning tasks (e.g., identification of development opportunities, prioritizing conservation lands, urban growth modeling, housing price modeling). The format of the class includes weekly lectures/in-class demos; and weekly homework assignments. The course will make extensive use of ArcGIS and associate Extensions, especially Spatial Analyst, Network Analyst, and Business Analyst. One-year student versions of ArcGIS and ArcGIS extensions will be available free of charge at the City Planning Office. ArcGIS runs best on Windows machines; those with Macs will need to install a Windows emulator.

Taught by: Steif

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: MUSA 507

Prerequisite: MUSA 501 OR CPLN 503

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 591 INTRODUCTION TO SMART CITIES

This course reviews the infrastructure, databases, deployment, and development of emerging digital technologies in cities. We review existing initiatives, discuss challenges and opportunities, and critically evaluate what technology has and has not been able to offer cities. We contrast utopian visions of teaching with the possible realities. Finally, we ask; what makes a city smart?

Taught by: Lassiter

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 592 Public Policy Analytics

Data scientists convert data into actionable intelligence. While most private sector data scientists optimize for profit, their public sector counterparts must address multiple complex bottom lines including economics, equity, politics, bureaucracy and social cohesion. This course teaches students how to wrangle government data; how to mine it for descriptive and predictive intelligence and how to communicate results to non-technical decision-makers. Broadly, coursework is focused on spatial analysis and geospatial machine learning and taught 70/30 in R and ArcGIS. Use cases include home price prediction, forecasting in criminal justice, land use modeling, transportation modeling and real estate site suitability. Prerequisites include vector and raster GIS and introductory statistics.

Taught by: Ken Steif

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: MUSA 508

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 600 Planning Workshop

Application of planning skills (including community inventorying and reconnaissance, goal articulation; alternatives creation and analysis, and plan development and implementation) to community plan creation. Students work in groups of seven to eight students each. Juried presentation required.

Taught by: Landis

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Studio

2.0 Course Units

CPLN 620 Techniques of Urban Economic Development

This course is about how planners act to catalyze and support economic well-being in cities and regions. Students in the course examine the effectiveness of alternative strategies and approaches to economic development and practice a variety of specific economic development policy and finance techniques. The semester is divided into three modules. In part one, students build knowledge about how theories of growth, specialization, agglomeration and innovation inform (and fail to inform) economic development strategies. In part two, they develop a working understanding of economic development finance, completing exercises on tax increment finance, tax-credit financed development and "double bottom line" lending and equity investment. In part three, they review best practices in the formulation and negotiation of location incentives and subsidies, examine "growth with equity" policies, and explore the technical and political details of economic impact analysis.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 621 Metropolitan Food System

This course introduces students to the planning and development of metropolitan food systems. Major topics include regional planning and policy; sustainable agriculture; food access and distribution; and markets. The class includes a mix of lectures, discussion, and field trips; and students will work on real-world projects in Philadelphia. Ultimately, the course aims to develop students' broad knowledge of food systems planning in the global North and South, with an emphasis on community and economic development strategies for sustainable food systems and food security.

Taught by: Vitiello

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 624 Race, Poverty and Place

In recent years, long-disinvested cities have become the site of renewed investment, population growth, and economic development in a phenomenon often described as gentrification. Nonetheless, socioeconomic inequality between races, ethnicities, genders, and places within the larger metropolitan area continue to persist, suggesting that a rising tide does not raise all boats. Planners must grapple with these issues of inequality and inequity, particularly the implementation of plans and policies that may in theory provide benefits to all, but in practice continue to accumulate benefits for a select few. This course examines the construction of race, the making of a place, and the persistence of poverty in racialized places in the city. This course will engage in a critical discussion of the aforementioned themes, such that the normative notions of race, capitalism, urbanism, gender, power, and space are upended to privilege more marginalized perspectives of these processes.

Taught by: Drake-Rodriguez

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 625 Politics of Housing and Community Development

This course offers an exploration of how legislative action, government policy making, and citizen advocacy influence plans for the investment of public capital in distressed urban neighborhoods. Course topics this semester will include an evaluation of the results of City of Philadelphia development policies under the administration of former Mayor Michael A. Nutter, as well as consideration of plans being undertaken by the administration of Mayor James F. Kenney, who took office in January. The course will also include an assessment of a large-scale property acquisition and development strategy being implemented by the Philadelphia Housing Authority in North Philadelphia and a review of recent and current reinvestment proposals for Camden's waterfront and downtown-area neighborhoods.

Taught by: Kromer

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: GAFL 569, URBS 451

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 627 Social Impact in Practice

The course will be an opportunity for students across PennDesign (and other schools) to meaningfully engage with community partners and practitioners working in Philadelphia and the surrounding region, and to grapple with the complex issues necessary for understanding community perspective, thereby influencing the approach when planning and designing as professionals. The course intends to reverse common perceptions and practices of community engagement ("beyond the theater of engagement:) and discuss how to productively and sensitively work with communities of all types, on projects of all scales, to work towards common goals and high aspirations. The organization of the course, will be a combination of readings and discussions, guest lecturers, and tours in the immediate community. The primary assignments will be reflection pieces, case studies, a collaborative group project, and a implementation project proposal. The group project(s) would partner students with a current, ongoing, or new community project that is funded and actionable. Students will work together, with the partner, and with community members to complete a project (could be built, a printed deliverable, evaluation, or other). The final assignment would ask students to brainstorm and present a potential "Phase II" implementation project, thinking through the mechanics of funding partnerships, academic research, etc, that could carry forward the work.

Taught by: Donofrio, Julie / Gould, David

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 628 Migration and Development

Human migration is one of the most important phenomena driving urban, social community and economic development. This course focuses on the ways that migrants and community, government, and private institutions work to influence development around the world. We explore a range of large- and small-scale economic development, social and community development. After a brief introduction to histories and theories of migration and development, our major themes include: Local revitalization, labor and housing markets, workforce and enterprise development; Diaspora-led transational development, including remittances, hometown and country associations, and transnational advocacy and community orgnaizing; The work of instituions, governments, and private sector firms in sending and receiving nations that influence migration and development. Readings are drawn from a variety of social sciences, plannning and development studies, including from academic and practice. Guests from local and transnational development organizations will visit the class. Assignments include short papers on the readings and a research paper or project designed by each student in consultation with the instructor. Ultimately, the course aims to help students develop: 1) a broad knowledge of migration and development in geographic and institutional settings around the world; 2) an in-depth understanding of community and economic development practices in migrant sending and receiving communities; and 3) familiarity with social science approaches to evaluating the dynamics and impacts of migration and development.

Taught by: Vitiello, Domenic

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 630 Innovations in Growth Management

The US population is expected to grow by more than 85 million from now to 2050.This course evaluates the tools and techniques for managing growth in America, especially to control sprawl in metropolitan regions. The course analyzes the form and functions of the central cities, suburbs, edge cities, ex-urbs, and megaregions. Federal,state, and local programs that influence metro change are evaluated. Regional planning approaches are analyzed in case studies.

Taught by: Daniels, Thomas

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: CPLN 530 OR CPLN 531

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 631 Planning for Land Conservation

Land preservation is one of the most powerful, yet least understood planning tools for managing growth and protecting the environment. This course provides an introduction to the tools and methods for preserving private lands by government agencies and private non-profit organizations (e.g., land trusts). Topics include purchase and donation of development rights (also known as conservation easements), transfer of development rights, land acquisition, limited development, and the preservation of urban greenways, trails, and parks. Preservation examples analyzed: open space and scenic areas, farmland, forestland, battlefields, and natural areas.

Taught by: Daniels

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 632 Modeling Geographic Space

This course explores the nature and use of raster-oriented (i.e. image-based) Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for the analysis and synthesis of spatial patterns and processes. Previous experience in GIS is not required.

Taught by: Tomlin

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: LARP 741

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 635 Water Policy

Aging infrastructure, urbanization, climate change, and limited public funds are contributing to urban water management crises in cities around the globe. This course examines the systems and policies that comprise urban water. We begin with the infrastructures that underlie drinking water, wastewater, and stormwater services. Then, we review innovative management technologies and strategies, focusing on case studies of infrastructure shifts in Philadelphia and Melbourne. Finally, we undertake a global investigation of water management challenges and opportunities.

Taught by: Lassiter

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 641 Progressive Development

Using a lecture/guest lecture/case study approach, this course will teach students how to plan,develop, and finance a variety of progressive real estate development forms including affordable housing; infill, mixed-use and brownfield development transit-oriented development; green and LEED-certified office and housing development; historic preservation projects; public-private partnerships; and suburban retrofit and master- planned-community development. In each case, we will consider site acquisition, entitlement, market and marketing conditions, financing options, ownership and deal structures, ongoing operation and asset management issues; and connections to the community. Sessions will include lectures as well as case study presentations by guest developers and students.

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: CPLN 540 OR REAL 821

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 642 Downtown Development

The course will provide an overview of the changing role of downtowns and commercial centers, how and why they have evolved, diversified and been redeveloped and who are the various public and private actors that are helping them reposition themselves in a new regional and global context. There will be a strong focus on implementation, on how things get done, on the role of business improvement districts, not-for-profit development corporations and local government in the United States, Canada and a few international cities.

Taught by: Levy

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 643 Design and Development

This newly reconstituted course will introduce designers and planners to practical methods of design and development for major real estate product types. Topics will include product archetypes, site selection and obtaining entitlements, basic site planning, programming, and conceptual and basic design principles. Project types will include, among others; infill and suburban office parks, all retail forms, campus and institutional projects. Two-person teams of developers and architects will present and discuss actual development projects.

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: ARCH 762

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 644 Housing Policy

The government intervenes in housing markets in different ways and for different reasons. This course is designed to explore why the federal and local government in the U.S. intervene in housing markets and what forms these interventions take. Specifically, students will learn about: the mechanisms that drive both the supply and demand for housing; how U.S. housing policy has changed over time; factors that affect the production, distribution, and location of housing; the social and economic impact of housing on households and neighborhoods; the equity implications of housing policies. This course will place particular emphasis on low-income rental housing. By the end of this class students will have a firm understanding of U.S. housing policy and be able to engage in a meaningful debate about future challenges and opportunities in the U.S. housing market and the implications of different policy interventions. Ultimately, this course will provide students the conceptual tools necessary to evaluate, formulate, and implement housing policy.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 650 Transportation Planning Methods

This course introduces students to the development and uses of the 4-step urban transportation model (trip generation-trip distribution-mode choice-traffic assignment) for community and metropolitan mobility planning. Using the VISUM transportation desktop planning package, students will learn how to build and test their own models, apply them to real projects, and critique the results. Prerequisite: CPLN 505 or other planning statistics course.

Taught by: Ryerson

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: ESE 548

Prerequisite: CPLN 505

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 652 Topics in Infrastructure

Course examines current trends and topics pertaining to the nation's infrastructure.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 653 Global Challenges in International Development

An investigation of how international organizations, national, subnational government and non-governmental groups are responding to recent global agreements addressing major economic, social and environmental issues, this course will focus on the Sendai Framework, Addis Ababa Action Agenda, 2030 Framework for Sustainable Development, Paris Agreement and New Urban Agenda. It will cover selected topics related to poverty reduction, health, food security, disaster risk reduction, climate change, and urbanization. Course objectives: 1. to provide a sophisticated understanding of the fundamental assumptions, definitions, current state, and proposed paths toward a global sustainable development to students of city and regional planning; 2. to outline the role of city and regional planners as members of multi-disciplinary teams in participating in these agreements at the global, national, regional and local levels; 3. to highlight innovations in the models, tools and approaches to the field. Requirements: team project, midterm examination and final paper.

Taught by: Eugenie Birch

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 654 The Practice of Trans.Plng:Crafting Policies & Bldg. Infrastructure

As the first woman and planner to serve as Secretary of the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT), Leslie Richards has over 20 years of leadership experience working on the planning and delivery of transportation projects, including overseeing one of the largest and most innovative transportation agencies in the U.S. She is recognized for her ability to find common ground among bi-partisan boards, as well as her commitment to engage local communities before the implementation of transportation projects to incorporate quality of life issues in all decisions. Her experience gives her a unique perspective on understanding operational, financial and stakeholder issues of transportation planning. In this seminar-style course, Leslie Richards will explore the planning, development and delivery of multimodal projects and policies at the state and regional level, including national influences and an awareness of the many actors and processes involved. Topics to be discussed include: funding and implementation processes through the levels of government (municipal, county, region, state, national); challenges and opportunities working with different sectors, politics, and contexts; current issues and emerging technologies (e.g. Pennsylvania's policies and advocacy related to Automated Vehicles); and best practices for individuals pursuing careers in planning or public administration. Presentations and lectures will be supplemented by guest presentations from transportation leaders, policymakers, and planning consultants offering local, regional, and state perspectives. Students will have the opportunity to learn directly from leaders in the field and develop the skills and knowledge to work effectively with federal, state, and local entities.

Taught by: Richards, Leslie

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 655 Multimodal Transport

The purpose of this course is to explore contemporary multimodal transportation systems, policy, planning, and practice through a series of comparative international case studies. Topics include innovative parking management in San Francisco, congestion charging in London, Metro investments in Mexico City, informal transportation in Indonesia, Bus Rapid Transit in Bogota, and bicycle infrastructure investments in Copenhagen. The course will also include one or more site visits to innovative multimodal transportation projects in the Philadelphia or New York City regions. By analyzing contemporary planning challenges and best practices, students will develop a better understanding of how the transportation system works and how to design and employ specific multimodal interventions and policies effectively.

Taught by: Guerra

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 656 Life Cycle Assessment in Residential Land Use and Transportation

This course explores the benefits and limitations of life cycle assessment (LCA) as a methodological approach for thoroughly assessing energy use associated with residential land use and transportation. This interdisciplinary class brings together designers and planners to conduct a comprehensive examination of GHG emissions of design proposals. Energy assessment in residential land use is particularly complex because, in addition to construction of buldings and the daily energy use, city planning factors, such as the spatial location of buildings, shapes the extent to which people consume fossil fuels to commute to job-rich areas. Therefore, energy assessment of residential land use should be based on comprehensive understanding of design quality, use of buildings, and transportation.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 660 Fundamentals of Urban Design

This course is a requirement for students enrolled in Certificate in Urban Design and for Master of City Planning students enrolled in the Urban Design concentration. How should urban designers give shape to the city? What urban design methods could they apply? This course helps students acquire the principles that can inform urban design practice. It has three major pedagogical objectives. First, it helps students understand the contemporary city through a series urban design tools. Second, it covers both historical and modern urban design principles. Finally, it includes all the scales in which urban designers operate, ranging from the fundamentals of social interaction in public space, to the sustainability of the region." This course is open to other interested PennDesign students if there is space and with permission of the instructor.

Taught by: Lin, Zhongjie

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: LARP 660

Activity: Studio

2.0 Course Units

CPLN 662 Design and the City

"The rumor of a great city goes out beyond its borders to all the latitudes of the known earth." Metropolis and her Children, the Federal Writers; Project Guide, 1938. Great cities are both real and legendary. They have economies and cultures, identity and brand, pattern and chaos, inclusion and exclusion. They are made by men (and women) who either reap the benefits of their labors or are excluded from them. They are dynamic, or they are dead. Constant change is essential to the city. This seminar will explore the ways in which design - including architecture, urban design, and landscape design - is a constructive force in the creation of cities. What are the various scales of the operation of design? What are its elements? With whom do urban designers collaborate? How does design make "place"? How is the city experienced? How does it cultivate identity, inclusion and equity? Each class will be a wide-ranging discussion about a series of open questions regarding the city and design. Each student will be expected to bring examples, quotes, readings, and news clips to support his/her answers. In alternating weeks, we will introduce a design problem to be addressed by teams of two or three students.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 670 Geospatial Software Design

The purpose of this course is to equip students with a selected set of advanced tools and techniques for the development and customization of geospatial data-processing capabilities. It is open to any student with experience equivalent to that of an entry-level class on GIS.

Taught by: Tomlin

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: LARP 743

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 671 Spatial Statistics and Data Analysis

This hands-on course will provide an introduction to statistical methods and will serve as a prequel to ESE502. Topics covered will include exploratory univariate analysis, correlation and Chi-square analysis, t-tests and ANOVA. Non-parametric alternatives to the standard tests will be discussed. OLS regression, including assumptions and diagnostics, will be covered in detail. Heavy emphasis will be placed on the application of each method covered. The course will conclude with an introduction to spatial statistical methods and a brief overview of linear algebra and matrix notation for OLS and spatial regression. Students will learn to use JMP-IN, ArcGIS and GeoDa for data analysis.

Taught by: Eugene Brusilovskiy

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: MUSA 500

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 672 Geospatial Data Science in Python

This course will provide students with the knowledge and tools to turn data into meaningful insights, with a focus on real-world case studies in the urban planning and public policy realm. Focusing on the latest Python software tools, the course will outline the "pipeline" approach to data science. It will teach students the tools to gather, visualize, and analyze datasets, providing the skills to effectively explore large datasets and transform results into understandable and compelling narratives. The course is organized into five main sections: Exploratory Data Science:; Introduction to Geospatial Data Science; Data Ingestion & Big Data; Geospatial Machine Learning; Data Visualization & Storytelling.

Taught by: Nick Hand

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: MUSA 550

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 673 Contemporary Urbanism

This course will expose students to a wide array of case studies in planning, urban design, and landscape architecture including notions of sustainable development, the interplay between open space and built form, the rehabilitation of existing areas as historic districts, commercial corridors, and the improvement of squatter settlements. Also, it will focus on city expansions and new towns, housing, mix-use developments, and areas of new centrality. The program will also address territorial planning, the improvement of open space systems, and site specific interventions of parks, plazas, streetscape and gardens. Cases will provide the proper ground for analysis and interpretation of issues related to the design and implementation of "good" landscape and urban form. Class discussions will be complemented with short design exercises. We will also enjoy the presence of outstanding visiting lecturers who will share with us cutting-edge information, derived from their professional practice and research. Registration is limited to MLA students in the LARP 602 studio and to students in the Urban Design Certificate program .

Taught by: Weller/Gouverneur

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: LARP 781

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 675 Land Use and Environmental Modeling

Planners at every scale and of every type are increasingly using spatial data and models to analyze existing patterns, identify and parameterize key trends and urban processes, visualize alternative futures, and evaluate development impacts. This course will introduce students to various GIS-based land use andenvironmental planning models, including, among others: TR55 for analyzing parcel-level stormwater runoff; BASINS for analyzing watershed-level stream volumes, runoff, and water quality; HAZUS for analyzing the potential damage impacts of floods, earthquakes, and hurricanes; UPlan and CUF/CURBA for developing detailed urban growth projections; CommunityViz for analyzing, simulating, and visualizing the impacts of proposed development projects; and other packages as available. A basic familiarity with ArcGIS is required.

Taught by: Landis

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: Some knowledge of GIS and statistics.

Activity: Laboratory

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 676 The Immigrant City

Immigration is among the most important phenomena shaping neighborhoods, cities, and regions. Understanding migration is fundamental to understanding urbanization, community development, and urban society today. This course examines the development of immigrant communities in United States cities and suburbs. Class readings, discussions, and visits to a variety of Philadelphia immigrant neighborhoods explore themes including labor markets, commerce, housing, civil society, racial and ethnic relations, integration, and the public sphere. We study the diverse dynamics and impacts of immigration through foundational readings and close observation of various newcomer and receiving communities. The first part of the course surveys migration and community formation among a broad range of ethnic groups in different sorts of city and suburban neighborhoods, mainly through history, sociology, and geography. The second part focuses on public policy and community and economic development practices related to migration at the local, regional, national, and trans-national scales.

Taught by: Vitiello

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 680 Advanced Topics in GIS

This course offers students an opportunity to work closely with faculty, staff, local practitioners, and each other in conducting independent projects that involve the development and/or application of Geographic Information System (GIS) technology. The course is open to all students who can demonstrate sufficient experience, expertise, or initiative to purse a successful term project.

Taught by: Tomlin

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: LARP 745

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 685 Environmental Readings

In this seminar, we will explore this green thread and analyze its influence on how we shape our environments through design and planning. The course has three parts. Throughout, the influence of literature on design and planning theory will be explored. The first part will focus on three most important theorists in environmental planning and landscape architecture: Frederick Law Olmstead Sr., Charles Eliot and Ian McHarg. The second part of the course will critically explore current theories in environmental planning and landscape architecture. The topics include: frameworks for cultural landscape studies, the future of the vernacular, ecological design and planning, sustainable and regenerative design, the languages of landscapes, and evolving views of landscape aesthetics and ethics. In the third part of the course, students will build on the readings to develop their own theory for ecological planning or, alternatively, landscape architecture. While literacy and critical inquiry are addressed throughout the course, critical thinking is especially important for this final section.

Taught by: Dean Steiner

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: ARCH 685, LARP 685

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 687 Topics in Historic Preservation

This seminar concentrates on a selected topic in the social and cultural history of the built environment. Past themes have included photography and the American city and the relationship between cities and sound. For full spring 2019 course description, please visit: https://www.design.upenn.edu/historic-preservation/courses

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: HSPV 638

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 691 Data Wrangling and Visualization

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the "pipeline" approach to data science. This involves the process of gathering data; sorting the data; analyzing the data and visualizing the data such that non-technical managers can make use of it for decision making. The first part of the course teaches students how to gather data by way of scraping, APIs, Google Big Query, Twitter and other unstructured sources. The second part of this course, teaches students how to store and retrieve these data in a database. The third part of the class teaches some more esoteric machine driven analytics. The fourth and final component of the class is data visualization both in state and dynamic (web-based) form. The students will be expected to replicate this pipelines on a data set of their own choosing for their final project. Prerequisite: Working knowledge of R and ArcGIS.

Taught by: Hand, Nicholas

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: MUSA 620

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 692 Java Script Programming for Planners and Designers

This course will introduce City Planning, MUSA and design graduate students to Javascript. Students will learn the logic and syntax of the Java programming language for use in a simple web application (weeks 1 to 7); as well as how to program database and map-oriented web and desktop applications using Javascript (weeks 8 to 14). The "hands-on" uses of Javascript in urban planning applications will be emphasized. Students will hone their programming and applications development skills through a series of bi-weekly assignments.

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: MUSA 611

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 701 Planning Studio

Intensive study of a selected planning topic. Teams of students work with clients to develop alternative scenarios and produce plan and implementation strategies. Multiple presentations required.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Studio

2.0 Course Units

CPLN 702 Planning Studio

Intensive study of a selected planning topic. Teams of students work with clients to develop alternative scenarios and produce plan and implementation strategies. Multiple presentations required.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Studio

2.0 Course Units

CPLN 703 Planning Studio

Intensive study of a selected planning topic. Teams of students work with clients to develop alternative scenarios and produce plan and implementation strategies. Multiple presentations required.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Studio

2.0 Course Units

CPLN 704 Planning Studio

Intensive study of a selected planning topic. Teams of students work with clients to develop alternative scenarios and produce plan and implementation strategies. Multiple presentations required.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Studio

2.0 Course Units

CPLN 705 Planning Studio

Intensive study of a selected planning topic. Teams of students work with clients to develop alternative scenarios and produce plan and implementation strategies. Multiple presentations required.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Studio

2.0 Course Units

CPLN 706 Planning Studio

Intensive study of a selected planning topic. Teams of students work with clients to develop alternative scenarios and produce plan and implementation strategies. Multiple presentations required.

Activity: Studio

2.0 Course Units

CPLN 707 Planning Studio

Intensive study of a selected planning topic. Teams of students work with clients to develop alternative scenarios and produce plan and implementation strategies. Multiple presentations required.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Studio

2.0 Course Units

CPLN 708 Planning Studio

Intensive study of a selected planning topic. Teams of students work with clients to develop alternative scenarios and produce plan and implementation strategies. Multiple presentations required.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Studio

2.0 Course Units

CPLN 709 Studio V

These advanced elective studios provide opportunities for focused exploration of particular themes in contemporary landscape architecture. Important emerging and accomplished designers, often from divergent points-of-view, interests and backgrounds, are invited to run these studios. Collaborative options (between Landscape and the Departments of Architecture or City Planning) are sometimes offered across the School. In addition to our own faculty who offer some of these studios (Fabiani Giannetto, Gouverneur, Marcinkoski, Mathur, M'Closkey, Neises, Olin, Pevzner, Sanders, Tomlin), visitors have included Paolo Burgi (Switzerland), Peter Latz (Munich), Bernard Lassus (Paris), Margie Ruddick (Philadelphia), Chris Reed (Boston), Peter Beard (London), Nicholas Quennell (New York), Ken Smith (New York), Raymond Gastil (New York), Alessandro Tagliolini (Italy), Ignacio Bunster (Philadelphia), Perry Kulper (Los Angeles),James Wines (New York), Lee Weintraub (New York), Charles Waldheim (Chicago), Stanislaus Fung (Australia), Dennis Wedlick (New York), Sandro Marpillero (New York), Peter Connolly (Australia), and former associate professor Anita Berrizbeitia. More recent visitors have been Claire Fellman (New York), Catherine Mosbach (Paris), Nanako Umemoto/Neil Cook (New York), Valerio Morabito (Italy), Carol and Colin Franklin (Philadelphia), Keith Kaseman (Philadelphia), Silvia Benedito (New York), Claudia Taborda (Lisbon), Mark Thomann (New York), Jerry Van Eyck (New York), and Martin Rein-Cano (Berlin).

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: ARCH 701, LARP 701

Activity: Studio

2.0 Course Units

CPLN 720 Community and Economic Development Practicum

This practicum involves a weekly mixture of lecture and seminar course-time with applied problem solving for real-world clients. It will be a second-year course focused on organizational development, business planning, and other strategic planning techniques that complement the physical planning focus on PennPlanning Workshop and Studio. Required of students in the CED concentration.

Taught by: Servon

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 730 Sustainable Cities

Sustainability as a concept has been around for almost thirty years, but only recently has become a major factor in planning practice. This seminar course will explore the following sustainability topics and practices:(i) Goals and organization of urban sustainability initiatives;(ii)Transportation, water and air quality, solid waste reduction;(iii)Climate change and energy efficiency initiatives; and (iv) Green building policies. We will thoroughly examine case studies drawn from sustainability planning initiatives from major American cities, with selected international comparisons.

Taught by: Lassiter, Allison

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 750 Advance Transportation Seminar

Air transportation is a fascinating multi-disciplinary area of transportation bringing together business, planning, engineering, and policy. In this course, we explore the air transportation system from multiple perspectives through a series of lessons and case studies. Topics will include airport and intercity multimodal environmental planning, network design and reliability, air traffic management and recovery from irregular operations, airline operations, economics, and fuel, air transportation sustainability, and land use issues related to air transportation systems. This course will introduce concepts in economics and behavioral modeling, operations research, statistics, environmental planning, and human factors that are used in aviation and are applicable to other transportations systems. The course will emphasize learning through lessons, guest lecturers, case studies of airport development and an individual group and research project.

Taught by: Ryerson

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: ESE 550

Prerequisite: CPLN 550

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 760 Public Realm Studio

This intensive foundation studio focuses on the physical planning and design skills necessary in shaping the public realm. Students will undertake a series of targeted exercises that introduce them to project conceptualization, context analysis, programming, site planning, technical issues, and detailed design of public space in cities. Focusing on issues pertinent to local municipalities, students will work collaboratively and individually over the semester on design elements that cover a range of scales. Intellectual objectives within the studio include: the links between theory and practice, the development of principles to guide design, understanding associations between design and stakeholder-user interests, and exploring larger issues of sustainability and participation in design practice. Emphasis on the pragmatics of problem solving and implementation will be balanced with essential skills in visioning, critical thinking and design leadership.

Taught by: Lin, Zhongjie

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Studio

2.0 Course Units

CPLN 773 Urban Regeneration in the Americas: The Conservation and Dev. of Urban Areas

This advanced topic seminar will focus on the challenges confronted by the conservation and urban planning professions in turning the urban heritage into a social and economic development resource for cities in developing countries. The preservation of the urban heritage is moving to a new paradigm of intervention responding to: a growing interest in communities for preserving their intangible and tangible urban heritage; rising development pressures on historic neighborhoods; the generalization of adaptive rehabilitation as a conservation strategy; and recent international agreements calling for expanding the role of the urban heritage in the social and economic development of the communities. This is a problem that is in the cutting edge of the research and practice of heritage conservation and urban planning and has conservation, planning and design implications making it ideally suited to a multi-discipline seminar approach. The course is modeled on successful 1-CU spring seminars conducted in recent years--the Gordion Site Planning Studio (2011), Parks for the People (2012), and the Regeneration of Historic Areas in the Americas (2012, 2014, 2016, 2018)--that attracted students from across the School and fit easily with core studios and thesis projects. Students from multiple departments are encouraged to participate in the course; enrollment will be kept to about 12. The course will combine seminar and field study methodologies in ways that they support each other. The knowledge acquired through the seminar work will be put to use in a field study exercise whose objective is to allow the students to work on topics of their interest and pursue research or urban development and heritage conservation interventions for expanding the contribution of the historic center of Cartagena in Colombia to the social and economic development of the city.

Taught by: Hector Eduardo Rojas

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: HSPV 703

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 790 MUSA/Smart Cities Practicum

The purpose of this course is for students to work with city and non-profit clients on data science that convert government data into actionable public policy intelligence. Groups of 2-3 students will work with the client to understand the business process, wrangle data, develop spatial and aspatial analytics and serve these outputs to non-technical decision makers through the medium of data visualization. Students will be mentored by MUSA Faculty and advised by someone from the partnering agency. Prerequisites: students must have a working knowledge of R and experience building both spatial and statistical models including machine-learning models. Prerequisites include MUSA-507/CPLN-590 and either CPLN-505 or MUSA-500. Students must have taken or be enrolled concurrently in MUSA-601 or MUSA-800. Students without these specific prerequisites are asked to contact the instructor. Please contact the instructor for full admission details, no later than November 15, 2018. Interested students are asked to contact the instructor to learn about specific projects and how to apply for the course.

Taught by: Ken Steif

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: MUSA 801

Prerequisite: (MUSA 507 OR CPLN 590) AND (CPLN 505 OR MUSA 500)

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 791 CPLN Summer Institute: Spreadsheet Review

Excel for Planners: use of Excel to develop simple planning indicators (e.g., location quotients), simple planning models (e.g., fiscal impact models), and database operations. Course enrollment is by permit only. Please contact Roslynne Carter (CPLN Dept.) at at roslynne@design.upenn.edu.

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Lecture

0.0 Course Units

CPLN 792 CPLN Summer Institute: Statistics

Basic Statistics for Planners: review of descriptive and basic inferential statistics, including z-scores, confidence intervals, t-tests, and chi-squared. Course enrollment is by permit only. Please contact Roslynne Carter (CPLN Dept.) at at roslynne@design.upenn.edu.

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Lecture

0.0 Course Units

CPLN 793 CPLN Summer Institute: Urban Design

Introduction to Presentation and Report Graphics for Planners: including one day each on Photoshop, Illustrator, Sketchup, and InDesign Course enrollment is by permit only. Please contact Roslynne Carter (CPLN Dept.) at at roslynne@design.upenn.edu.

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Lecture

0.0 Course Units

CPLN 794 CPLN Summer Institute: Microeconomics Review

Micro-econ Review: review of principles of supply and demand, elasticities, equilibrium prices and quantities. Course enrollment is by permit only. Please contact Roslynne Carter (CPLN Dept.) at at roslynne@design.upenn.edu.

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Lecture

0.0 Course Units

CPLN 795 CPLN SUMMER: INTRODUCTION TO GIS

The summer GIS Bootcamp prepares students for the intermediate GIS classes thatbegin in the fall semester. It begins with a discussion of GIS in planning and the social sciences and then moves on to topics related to spatial data, geocoding, projection, vector and raster-based geoprocessing, 3D visualization and more. Each class includes a brief lecture and a walk through involving actual planning related data. Course enrollment is by permit only. Please contact Roslynne Carter (CPLN Dept.) at at roslynne@design.upenn.edu.

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Lecture

0.0 Course Units

CPLN 797 CPLN Summer Institute: Writing Lab

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Lecture

0.0 Course Units

CPLN 798 CPLN Summer Institute: Success Stratgies

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Lecture

0.0 Course Units

CPLN 799 CPLN Summer Institute: Introduction to the R Statistical System

This one-week short course will introduce students to the basics of the R statistical programming language, including importing and setting up data, using the R interface to conduct descriptive data analysis, and basic model-building procedures.

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Lecture

0.0 Course Units

CPLN 800 Doctoral Seminar

Open to PhD students, this scholar-oriented seminar explores how academic researchers from different disciplines define researchable questions, craft research designs, and contribute to knowledge through an examination of important and/or recently published books and monographs with an urban focus. Required of all first- and second- year CPLN doctoral students and those doctoral students enrolled in the Urban Studies Graduate Certificate Program, enrollment is limited to 15 students. Other doctoral students may enroll on a space available basis. Course requirements include completion of a major research paper on a topic selected in consultation with the instructor.

Taught by: Birch

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 995 Dissertation

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Dissertation

1.0 Course Unit

CPLN 999 Independent Study and Research

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: Ph.D. candidates. Independent study and research under faculty supervision.