Dutch (DTCH)

DTCH 000 Study Abroad

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

DTCH 101 Elementary Dutch I

A first semester language course covering the core Dutch grammar and vocabulary with the goal of providing the corner stone for developing overall linguistic proficiency in Dutch.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Naborn

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: DTCH 501

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

DTCH 102 Elementary Dutch II

Continuation of DTCH 101.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Naborn

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: DTCH 502

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

DTCH 103 Intermediate Dutch I

A third semester Dutch language course. The emphasis lies on vocabulary expansion through the use of audio-taped materials and readings. Grammar is expanded beyond the basics and focuses on compound sentences, features of text coherence and idiomatic language usage.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Naborn

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: DTCH 503

Prerequisite: DTCH 102

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

DTCH 104 Intermediate Dutch II

A fourth semester Dutch language course.

For BA Students: Last Language Course

Taught by: Naborn

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: DTCH 504

Prerequisite: DTCH 103

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

DTCH 153 Is Europe Facing a Spiritual Crisis?

Is Europe Facing a Spiritual Crisis? On Contemporary Debates about Secularization, Religion and Rationality. Point of departure for this course is the difference between Europe and the US as to the role of religion in the unfolding of their respective "cultural identities" (cf. Charles Taylor, A Secular Age, 522-530). As a rule, both the US and Western Europe are now defined as secularized cultures, even if their histories and specific identities are strongly rooted in the Christian heritage. Given this contemporary situation, four research questions will be dealt with in this course. 1) What is meant by secularization? In answer to that question, two secularization theories are distinguished: the classic versus the alternative secularization thesis; 2) What is the historical impact of the nominalist turning-point at the end of the Middle Ages in this process towards secularization? 3) How did the relation between rationality and religion develop during modern times in Europe? 4) What is the contemporary outcome of this evolution in so-called postmodern / post-secular Europe and US? We currently find ourselves in this so-called postmodern or post-secular period, marked by a sensitivity to the boundaries of (modern) rationality and to the fragility of our (modern) views on man, world and God. In this respect, we will focus on different parts of Europe (Western and Eastern Europe alike) and will refer to analogies and differences between Western Europe and US. This historical-thematic exposition is illustrated by means of important fragments from Western literature (and marginally from documents in other arts) and philosophy. We use these fragments in order to make more concrete the internal philosophical evolutions in relation to corresponding changes in diverse social domains (religion, politics, economy, society, literature, art...).

Taught by: Vanheeswijck

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: COML 153, GRMN 153

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

DTCH 230 Topics in Dutch Studies

Topics vary annually. Taught in English.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: GRMN 230

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

DTCH 261 Netherlandish Art

Dutch and Flemish painting in the 15th and 16th centuries with special emphasis on the contributions of Robert Campin, Jan van Eyck and Roger van der Weyden, Bosch, and Bruegel.

Taught by: Silver

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 262, ARTH 662

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

DTCH 262 Topics in North Baroque

Taught by: Silver

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 362

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

DTCH 501 Elementary Dutch I

A first semester Dutch language course covering the core Dutch grammar and vocabulary with the goal of providing the corner stone for developing overall linguistic proficiency in Dutch.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Naborn

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: DTCH 101

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

DTCH 502 Elementary Dutch II

Continuation of DTCH 501.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Naborn

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: DTCH 102

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

DTCH 503 Intermediate Dutch I

A third semester Dutch language course. The emphasis lies on vocabulary expansion through the use of audio-taped materials and readings. Grammar is expanded beyond the basics and focuses on compound sentences, features of text coherence and idiomatic language usage.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Naborn

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: DTCH 103

Prerequisites: DTCH 502 or equivalent.

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

DTCH 504 Intermediate Dutch II

For BA Students: Last Language Course

Taught by: Naborn

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: DTCH 104

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

DTCH 530 Topics in Dutch Studies

Topics vary annually. Topic for Spring 2016 is: "20th Century Paintings and Literature in the Low Countries"

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 532, GRMN 555

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

DTCH 574 Politics and Societies in the Early Modern World

In this seminar, we will discuss how early modern globalization affected societies and the ways their members and rulers made politics. Following a historiographical introduction, it is divided in three sections. In the first, we will concentrate on empires and kings in order to detect common features of dynastic power across the globe and to explore how such characteristics influenced each other. Second, we will shift our attention to citizens and the ways they made politics in their city-states. For a long time, research on citizenship has been confined to the post-revolutionary nation states. However, recent research suggests that urban citizenship has far deeper roots in medieval and early modern cities. Up to now most research has focused on urban centers in Western Europe and more precisely on the so-called urban belt stretching from Central and North-Italy, over Switzerland and Southern Germany to the Rhineland and the Low Countries. Comparisons with urban centers in Asia and the colonial Americas will be needed to test that view. In the third section, we will study the people who provided information to societies and decision makers. Often, they held multiple identities or they acted as religious or ethnic outsiders. Therefore, we call them, with a term borrowed from anthropology 'brokers'. Taken together, the analysis of these aspects will deepen our understanding of politics and societies in the globalizing early modern world. Thus, the seminar will contribute to a more comprehensive, less Europe-centered view on that period.

Taught by: Cools

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: GRMN 574, HIST 575

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

DTCH 661 Topics in N. Ren Art

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 761

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

DTCH 665 Topics in North Baroque

Taught by: Silver, Larry

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 765

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit