East European (EEUR)

EEUR 009 INTRO TO RUSSIA AND EURASIA: HISTORIES, CULTURES, SOCIETIES

This course is designed as a broad introduction to the study of Russia and Eurasia that will offer students a multi-disciplinary overview of the cultures, histories and societies of this large and diverse region of the world. It is organized in units that illustrate the approaches of various disciplines to the study of the region, including history, literary studies, cinema studies, art history, and social scientific inquiry. At the conclusion of the course, students will be acquainted with these various disciplinary frameworks and the differences between them, with the modes of analysis and writing that pertain to them, and with fundamental knowledge of the region. They will be prepared for further study of the region in a variety of programs of study, including the Russian and East European Studies major, for which the course serves as a foundation.

Taught by: Platt/Staff

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EEUR 010 Central and Eastern Europe: Cultures, Histories, Societies

The reappearance of the concept of Central and Eastern Europe is one of the most fascinating results of the collapse of the Soviet empire. The course will provide an introduction into the study of this region - its cultures, histories, and societies - from the foundation of the Holy Roman Empire to the enlargement of the European Union. Students are encouraged to delve deeper into particular countries, disciplines, and sub-regions, such as Central Europe, Eastern Europe, and the Balkans, through an individual research paper and class presentations.

Taught by: Steiner/Orenstein/Verkholantsev

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: This course is one of two required core courses for the Russian and East European Studies (REES) Major.

EEUR 026 Behind the Iron Curtain

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EEUR 121 Elementary Hungarian I

The elementary Hungarian I course focuses on providing reading, writing, listening and reading-comprehension skills on basic level Hungarian. Interactive class activities and authentic Hungarian material will enable students to develop language skills so they could talk about themselves and their families, discuss every day and weekend routines, express likes and dislikes, converse about school and family activities, and get acquainted with Hungarian holidays and cultural traditions.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Mizsei

Two terms. student may enter either term.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center.

EEUR 122 Elementary Hungarian II

Continuation of EEUR121. The second semester of elementary Hungarian course continues on providing functional language competency in basic grammar, vocabulary, comprehension, reading, writing and speaking in Hungarian. Students will continue to learn communicating in everyday life situations as well as in organizing a trip to Hungary, staying in a hotel, ordering meals, buying goods, and participating in cultural activities by using authentic Hungarian online resources and interactive class activities.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Mizsei

Two terms. student may enter either term.

Prerequisite: EEUR 121 or a placement test

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center.

EEUR 123 Intermediate Hungarian I

The Intermediate Hungarian I course builds on and continues the course material in Elementary Hungarian I-II. Course activities, authentic audio and video material along with Hungarian online resources will enable students to further develop their reading, writing, listening comprehension and conversational skills. Students will practice their skills by discussing and writing about their interests, student lives, travel and cultural experiences, life on campus as well as learning about Hungarian seasonal traditions, cultural events, and Hungarian student life.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Mizsei

Two terms. student may enter either term.

Prerequisite: EEUR 121-122 or a placement test

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through the Penn Language Center

EEUR 124 Intermediate Hungarian II

The intermediate Hungarian II course continues EEUR123. Class documents and activities enable students to develop functional intermediate Hungarian competency by exploring Hungary and its culture, reading authentic online news sources, practicing listening and comprehension skills via video and audio material, researching cultural events and traditions, and exploring Hungarians' everyday lives. At the end of the semester, students will be able to participate and pass their Oral Competency Exit Interview on intermediate level and discuss topics, such as student life, family, friends, academic and student life activities/interests, travel, shopping, and cultural events.

For BA Students: Last Language Course

Taught by: Mizsei

Two terms. student may enter either term.

Prerequisite: EEUR 121-123 or a placement test

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center.

EEUR 135 Cold War: A Global History

The Cold War was more than simply a military confrontation between the United States and the Soviet Union; it was the frame within which the entire world developed (for better or worse) for nearly five decades. This course will examine the cold War as a global phenomenon, covering not only the military and diplomatic history of the period, but also examining the social and cultural impact of the superpower confrontation. We will cover the origins of the conflict, the interplay between periods of tension and detente, the relative significance of disagreements within the opposing blocs, and the relationship between the "center" of the conflict in the North Atlantic/European area and the global "periphery".

Taught by: NATHANS

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

EEUR 152 Russia and Eastern Europe in International Affairs

Russia and the European Union (EU) are engaged in a battle for influence in Eastern Europe. EU foreign policy towards its Eastern neighbors is based on economic integration and the carrot of membership. With the application of this powerful incentive, Central and Southeastern European countries such as Poland, Hungary, the Czech Republic, and Croatia have progressed rapidly towards integration with the EU (and NATO). Yet, given Russias opposition to the further enlargement, membership is off the table for the large semi-Western powers such as Russia itself and Turkey and the smaller countries inhabiting an emerging buffer zone between Russia and the EU, such as Georgia, Ukraine, Azerbaijan, Moldova, and Belarus. These in-between countries find themselves subject to intense competition for influence between Eastern and Western powers. In this context, EU countries must balance their energy dependence on Russia and need for new markets and geopolitical stability with concern for human rights, democratic governance, and self-determination. What are the trade-offs implicit in the foreign policies of Russia, EU member states, and Eastern Europe? What are the best policy approaches? What are the main opportunities and obstacles?

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Orenstein

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EEUR 153 Communism

The rise and fall of Communism dominated the history of the short twentieth century from the Russian revolution of 1917 to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. As a system of government, Communism is more or less dead, but its utopian ideals of liberation from exploitation and want live on. Communism remains the one political-economic system that presented, for a time, an alternative to global capitalism. In this course, students will gain an introduction to socialist and Communist political thought and explore Communist political and economic regimes their successes and failures, critics and dissidents, efforts at reform, and causes of collapse. We will learn about the remnants of Communism in China, North Korea, and Cuba and efforts of contemporary theorists to imagine a future for Communism.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Orenstein

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EEUR 159 POPULATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH IN EASTERN EUROPE

Since the collapse of communism in 1989 in Eastern Europe (and 1991 in the Soviet Union), many of the countries in the region have experienced public health crises and demographic catastrophe. Below replacement fertility rates and massive out migration have decimated the populations of these countries even as populations age and place unsustainable strains on pension systems and medical services. The demographic collapse has also been accompanied by falling male life expectancy and the rise of alcoholism, depression, domestic violence, and suicide. The economic exigencies of the transition from communism to capitalism dismantled welfare states at the exact moment when health services were most needed, leaving charities and nongovernmental organization to try to fill in the gaps. Through a combination of readings from the fields of epidemiology, demography, and medical anthropology, this course examines the public health implications of poverty and social dislocation in post-communist states. All readings and assignments are in English.

Taught by: GHODSEE

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EEUR 160 Sex and Socialism

This seminar examines classic and current scholarship and literature on gender and sexuality in contemporary Eastern Europe, and examines the dialogue and interchange of ideas between East and West. Although the scholarly and creative works will primarily investigate the changing status of women during the last three decades, the course will also look at changing constructions of masculinity and LGBT movements and communities in the former communist bloc. Topics will include: the woman question before 1989; gender and emerging nationalisms; visual representations in television and film; social movements; work; romance and intimacy; spirituality; and investigations into the constructed concepts of "freedom" and "human rights."

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EEUR 161 Communism & Woman Qstion

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EEUR 164 Russian and East European Film from the October Revolution to World War II

This course presents the Russian contribution to world cinema before WWII - nationalization of the film industry in post revolutionary Russia, the creation of institutions of higher education in filmmaking, film theory, experimentation with the cinematic language, and the social and political reflex of cinema. Major themes and issues involve: the invention of montage, Kuleshov effect, the means of visual propaganda and the cinematic component to the communist cultural revolutions, party ideology and practices of social-engineering, cinematic response to the emergence of the totalitarian state. Great filmmaker and theorist in discussion include Vertov, Kuleshov, Eisenstein, Pudovkin, Medvedkin and others.

Taught by: Todorov

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EEUR 165 Russian and East European Film after World War II

This course examines the Russian and East European contribution to world cinema after WWII - Stalinist aesthetics and desalinization, WWII in film, the installation of totalitarianism in Eastern Europe and the Cold War in film, the fall of the Berlin Wall, the collapse of the Soviet Union and the post-soviet condition, cinematic representations of Yugoslavia's violent breakup; the new Romanian waive. Major filmmakers in discussion include Kalatozov, Tarkovsky, Wajda, Polanski, Forman, Mentzel, Sabo, Kusturitsa, Konchalovsky, Mikhalkov and others.

Taught by: Todorov

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EEUR 171 The Socialist City

This course will explore the ideology and politics of the socialist city in the Soviet Union, East Europe, and the Second World. We will focus on how design professionals, politicians, and residents realized utopian socialist values in the face of national design traditions, local politics, and limited resources. Beginning with the Soviet case, the course will consider how planners and architects addressed modernization, multi-family housing, and neighborhood units in new city plans. We will consider capitals, like Moscow, as well as less well-known regional centers that had strong local identities, such as Tashkent, Belgrade, and Prague. We will examine the state's use of public spaces for commemorations and preservationists' reinterpretation of existing historic sites. In addition, we will consider how everyday residents experienced the socialist city, such as multi-family housing, shopping centers, and subway systems. We will address how citizens circumvented official state channels to obtain state housing and illegally build homes for themselves, sometimes in a folk style. The course will center on Soviet and East European cities, but also address socialist cities in Cuba and Africa whose design was influenced by transnational exchanges. Most broadly, this course explores the question, what was the socialist city? How did its planners, architects, and politicians understand it, and what did they intend to construct? And, what resulted? In the past fifteen years, North American scholars have begun to take seriously the study of the socialist city, and this course draws on the emerging scholarship on this exciting, cross-disciplinary topic. How do scholars understand the socialist city today? We will examine the shared legacies that socialist cities across East Europe shared with their Western European counterparts, as well as the particularities of design that have sparked North American scholars' debates on what distinguished the socialist city from ones that emerged in a capitalist context. In our discussions, we will seek to understand how socialist design professionals understood their work and the emerging cities at the time, as well as how North American scholars view the socialist city today. Disciplinarily, the focus of the call will fall at the intersection of architectural history and politics.

Taught by: Aplenc

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EEUR 250 Europe: From an Idea to the Union

Employing the methods from the humanities and social sciences this interdisciplinary seminar will explore the variety of factors that contributed to dividing and uniting Europe. The continent will be considered as a geographical and cultural space and the construction of its identity will be examined through several historical periodsfrom the Middle Ages to Modernism--comprising the rich layer of pan-European civilization across the ethnic or national borders. Finally, the structure of the European Union will be scrutinized including its institutions, decision-making mechanism, monetary union, collective security, the Grexit, and Europes changing relationship with Russia. Participants will be encouraged to select a particular topic in European studies and research it through assigned readings, film, literature, and other media

Taught by: Steiner

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EEUR 265 Yiddish in Eastern Europe

This course presents the major trends in Yiddish literature and culture in Eastern Europe from the mid-19th century through World War II. Divided into four sections - "The Shtetl," "Religious vs. Secular Jews," "Language and Culture," and "Confronting Destruction" - this course will examine how Jews expressed the central aspects of their experience in Eastern Europe through history, literature (fiction, poetry, drama, memoir), film, and song.

Taught by: Hellerstein

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EEUR 430 Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict in Film

This course studies the cinematic representation of civil wars, ethnic conflicts, nationalistic doctrines, and genocidal policies. The focus is on the violent developments that took place in Russia and on the Balkans after the collapse of the Soviet Bloc and were conditioned by the new geopolitical dynamics that the fall of communism had already created. We study media broadcasts, documentaries, feature films representing the Eastern, as well as the Western perspective. The films include masterpieces such as "Time of the Gypsies", "Underground", "Prisoner of the Mountains", "Before the Rain", "Behind Enemy Lines", and others.

Taught by: Todorov

Course not offered every year

Activity: Online Course

1 Course Unit