English (ENGL)

ENGL 003 Introduction to Queer Theory

This course provides an introduction to the field of queer studies. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: GSWS 003

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 005 In Dark Times: The Dystopian Imagination in Literature and Film

This CWiC course will offer a guided introduction to the one of the most resilient genres of the human imagination: dystopian and apocalyptic fiction. Like a group of survivors huddled around a campfire, we will turn to literature and cinema to debate some of the big questions about the future of science, technology, religion, and capitalism. This course is designed as a Critical Speaking Seminar, and the majority of class assignments will be devoted to oral presentations: including a Parliamentary-style debate and a video essay. We will begin by reading some of the early, influential works in the dystopian genre by authors like Mary Shelley, H.G. Wells, and Aldous Huxley. Next, we will explore the paranoid, schizophrenic world of Cold-War-era dystopias by J.G Ballard, Philip K. Dick and Octavia Butler. We will conclude by reading contemporary climate fiction by the likes of Margaret Atwood and Kim Stanley Robinson. Alongside the literary material, we will also track the changing nature of dystopian cinema-- from classics like Metropolis (1927) and La Jetee (1962) to the latest Zombie film. By the end of course, students will have a firm grasp of the history of the genre and will be able to draw on this knowledge to effectively debate issues related to privacy, big business, animal rights, climate change, migration etc.

Taught by: Dadawala

Also Offered As: CIMS 005

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 009 Introduction to Digital Humanities

This course provides an introduction to foundational skills common in digital humanities (DH). It covers a range of new technologies and methods and will empower scholars in literary studies and across humanities disciplines to take advantage of established and emerging digital research tools. Students will learn basic coding techniques that will enable them to work with a range data including literary texts and utilize techniques such as text mining, network analysis, and other computational approaches.

Taught by: Trettien

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: CIMS 009, COML 009, HIST 009

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 010 Introduction to Creative Writing

A course designed to introduce students to many of the elements of creative writing, including fiction, poetry, journalism, creative nonfiction, and memoir. Students can expect to read from a variety of assigned texts, respond to regular writing prompts, and workshop their own creative work in a collaborative setting. This course does not satisfy the writing requirement. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 014 Dark Comedy in Theatre and Film

This course will examine the troublesome genre of dark comedy by looking at the ways in which theatre and film use comic and tragic structures and traditions to explore concepts and stories seemingly at odds with those traditions. Although not always organized chronologically in time, we will examine the formal and structural characteristics of tragicomedy by tracing its development, from some of its earliest roots in Roman comedy, to its manifestation in contemporary films and plays. Aside from close readings of plays and analysis of films, we will read selected critical essays and theory to enhance our understanding of how dark comedies subvert categories and sections of plays aloud in class. Issues to be considered include comparing the way the genre translates across theatre and film (adaptation) and examining the unique placement of the genre at the heart of contemporary American culture. Students will have the opportunity to experiment with creating tragicomic effect through performance in their presentations. The class is a seminar, with required participation in discussions. Other assignments include an 8-10 page paper and a presentation. We will read plays by authors as diverse as Plautus, Anton Chekhov, and Lynn Nottage, and filmmakers including Charlie Chaplin, Sofia Coppola, and Bong Joon-ho.

Taught by: Ferguson

Also Offered As: CIMS 274, THAR 273

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 015 Topics in Literature

An introduction to Writing about Literature, with emphasis on a particular theme, genre, or period. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: CIMS 015, CLST 019, GSWS 017, LALS 016

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 016 Topics in Literature

Freshman Seminars under the title "Topics in Literature" will afford entering students who are considering literary study as their major the opportunity to explore a particular and limited subject with a professor whose current work lies in that area. Topics may range from the lyric poems of Shakespeare's period to the ethnic fiction of contemporary America. Small class-size will insure all students the opportunity to participate in lively discussions. Students may expect frequent and extensive writing assignments, but these seminars are not writing courses; rather, they are intensive introductions to the serious study of literature. One of them may be counted toward the English major and may be applied to a period, genre, or thematic requirement within the major. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 017, COML 016

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 017 Freshman Seminar

The primary goal of the freshman seminar program is to provide every freshman the opportunity for a direct personal encounter with a faculty member in a small sitting devoted to a significant intellectual endeavor. Specific topics be posted at the beginning of each academic year. Please see the College Freshman seminar website for information on current course offerings https://www.college.upenn.edu/node/403

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ARTH 100, CIMS 016, URBS 106

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 018 Old English

This course introduces students to the powerful and influential corpus of Old English literature. We will read a wide variety of texts: short poems such as The Wonderer, The Seafarer, The Wife's Lament and the passionate religious poem The Dream of The Rood; chronicles such as The Battle Of Maldon Against The Vikings, The Old Testament, Exodus and Bede's Conversion Of The English; and selections from the greatest of all English epics, Beowulf. Readings will be in Old English, and the first few weeks of the course will be devoted to mastering Old English prosody, vocabulary, and grammar (as well as a crash course on the early history of the English language). During the last few weeks we may read modern criticism of Old English poetry, or we will consider the modern poetic reception of Old English literature and explore theories and problems of translation, reading translations of Old English poems by Yeats, Auden, Tolkien, and Heaney. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 020 Literature Before 1660

This course will introduce students to key works of English literature written before 1660. It will explore the major literary genres of this period, as well as the social and cultural contexts in which they were produced. The course will examine how literature texts articulate changes in language and form, as well as in concepts of family, nation, and community during the medieval and early modern periods. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 021 Medieval Literature and Culture

This course introduces students to four hundred years of English literary culture, from approximately 1100 to 1500. This period was marked by major transformations, not only with respect to government, law, religious practice, intellectual life, England's relation to the Continent (during the 100 Years War), the organization of society (especially after the Black Death), the circulation of literary texts, and the status of authors. Topics may include medieval women writers, manuscript production, literatures of revolt, courtly culture, Crusades, cross-Channel influences, and religious controversy. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 022 Romance

This course will focus on what is arguably the most extravagant, adventuresome, and fantastical of the literary genres: the Romance. We will read a number of medieval and renaissance romance narratives, in verse and prose, beginning with the Arthurian romances (Malory's Morte D'Arthur, Sir Gawain And The Green Knight) and continuing with as many (and as much) of the great renaissance romances as time will allow: Sir Philip Sidney's Arcadia, Edmund Spenser's The Faerie Queen, and Lady Mary Wroth's Urania. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 024 Introduction to American and British Film and Media

This is a course on the history of Hollywood. It seeks to unravel Hollywood's complex workings and explain how the business and politics of the film industry translate into the art of film. We will trace the American film industry from Edison to the internet, asking questions such as: What is the relationship between Hollywood and independent film? How has the global spread of Hollywood since the 1920s changed the film industry? How has Hollywood responded to crises in American politics (e.g., world wars, the cold war, terrorism)? And how have new technologies such as synchronized sound and color cinematography, television and the VCR, and new digital technologies changed film and the film industry? We will look closely at representative studios (Paramount, Disney, and others), representative filmmakers (Mary Pickford, Frank Capra, and George Lucas, amoung many others), and we will examine the impact of industrial changes on the screen. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CIMS 024

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 025 The Age of Chaucer

In this class we come to speak as people spoke in England some six centuries ago: in medieval or 'Middle' English. We do this by reading the poetry of Geoffrey Chaucer, a great poet who has influenced everyone from William Shakespeare to Sylvia Plath. Since Middle English takes some getting use to, class assignments are not heavy: usually about 800 lines per class. A typical class might begin by looking at a few of the easier passages in the Canterbury Tales, proceed to reading the greatest poem of love in the English language (Chaucer's Troilus And Criseyde), before moving on to other contemporary writers in medieval culture. We will likely compare representations of medieval Christianty, Judaism, and Islam, as well as aspects of film adaptation by Italian filmmaker Pasolini (and perhaps by Chaucer scholar Terry Jones). We will consider what it might have been like to live secure in an age of faith; yet to live insecure, as a dizzying new profusion of trades and occupations sprang up in unprecedented "divisions of labor." We will imagine being a medieval woman, and may visit and handle medieval manuscripts. Above all, we will enjoy the poetry. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 026 Early Drama

Early drama in English had its roots as much in Christianity as in Classical antiquity. What grew into the theater of Shakespeare began as networks of strolling players and church atuhorities in market towns sponsoring cycles of "miracle" and "mystery" plays. This course will introduce students to major dramatic works of the medieval and early modern periods, including plays written for the public stage, closet dramas, masques, mayoral pageants and other kinds of performances. The course will also pay attention to the development of different dramatic genres during these periods, as well as the social and cultural contexts in which they were produced. Students thus will explore the history of drama in English through the renaissance to the closing of the theaters in 1641 and their eventual reopening in 1660. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 029 Classical Antiquity and English Literature

This course will examine the relationship between English literature and that of ancient Greece and Rome. At times we will discuss how classical theories of genre and aesthetics were appropriate and reinvented in medieval, renaissance, and seventeenth-century texts. What does it mean to call Hamlet and Oedipus The King tragedies, or The Frogs and The Way Of The World comedies? Should we consider the development of English drama and poetry as an extension of an imposing classcial traditon or as a sustained and resistant response to it? See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CLST 102

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 031 Introduction to Renaissance Literature and Culture

This course will survey the cultural history of sixteenth and seventeenth century England. Interdisciplinary in nature and drawing on the latest methodologies and insights of English studies, we will explore how aesthetics, politics, social traditions, impacted literature at this vital and turbulent time of English history. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Loomba

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 031

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 033 The Bible As Literature

Successive generations have found the Bible to be a text which requires - even demands - extensive interpretation. This course explores the Bible as literature, considering such matters as the artistic arrangement and stylistic qualities of individual episodes as well as the larger thematic patterns of both the Old and New Testaments and the Apocrypha. A good part of the course is spent looking at the place of the Bible in cultural and literary history and the influence of such biblical figures as Adam and Eve, David, and Susanna on writers of poetry, drama, and fiction in the English and American literary traditions. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 034 Cultures of The Book

The impact of various technologies (from writing to various forms of manuscript to print to electronics) on the way the written word gives shape to a culture. The emphasis is on western cultures from Plato to the present, but participation by students with interest or expertise in non-western cultures will be of great value to the group as a whole. The course offers an ideal perspective from which students can consider meta-issues surrounding their own special interests in a wide variety of fields, as well as learn to think about the way in which traditional fields of study are linked by common inherited cultural practices and constructions. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 038 The Age of Milton

The seventeenth century was a time of revolution and upheaval, of excesses both puritanical and cavalier. It saw the execution of one kind and the restoration of another, and survived the English Civil War and the Great Fire and Great Plague of London. This course explores the literature of this century through the works of John Milton's major works (selected sonnets, Comus, Areopagitica, Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes), and his contemporaries. We will concentrate on a number of issues that governed writing in the period, particularly the tension between individual interiority and historial, social and political activity. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 040 British Poetry 1660 - 1914

This course provides students with a survey of British poetry and poetics from the Restoration to the Modern period, and usually will include writers ranging from Aphra Behn and Alexander Pople to Thomas Hardy. The course may be offered in various forms, some covering less, and some more historical back ground. Most will provide a sampling of eighteenth-century, Romantic, and Victorian poets. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 041 18th-Century British Literature

An introduction to British literary and cultural history in the eighteenth century. Typically, this course will contain materials from the later seventeenth to the early nineteenth centuries--from the Restoration and Glorious Revolution through the Englightenment, the American and French Revolutions, and the Napoloeonic Wars--though it need not cover the entire period. We will read plays, poetry and prose in order to understand the aesthetic, intellectual, social and political issues of literary production and achievement in this period. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 045 18th-Century Novel

This survey of the novel addresses key questions about the novel's "rise" in the eighteenth century on both sides of the Atlantic, as well as attending to the cultural conditions that attended this new literary from. How did the concurrent "rise" of the middle classes and the emergence of an increasingly female reading public affect the form and preoccupations of early novels? What role did institutions like literary reviews, libraries, and the church play in the novel's early reception? While reading will vary from course to course, students should expect to read such authors as Austen, Behn, Brockden Brown, Burney, Defoe, Fielding, Richardson, Rowlandson, Rowson, Scott, and Smollett. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 046 Drama from 1660 - 1840

This course surveys drama from the Restoration through the Romantic period, and in so doing explores arguably the most tumultuous period of British and American Theater history. These years saw the reopening of the theaters in London in 1660 after their having been closed through two decades of Civil War and Puritan rule. They witnessed the introduction of actresses to the stage, the development of scenery and the modern drop-apron stage, the establishment of theatrical monopolies in 1660 and stringent censorship in 1737, and the gradual introduction, acceptance, and eventual celebration of the stage in America. Perhaps most importantly, they oversaw some of the best comedies and farces in the English language, the introduction of pantomime and the two-show evening, sustained experimentation with music and spectacle on stage, and the transformation of tragedy into a star vehicle for actors and actresses like David Garrick, Sarah Siddons, John Philip Kemble, and Edmund Kean. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 050 The Romantic Period

This course offers an introduction to the literature of the Romantic period (ca. 1770-1830). Some versions of this course will incorporate European romantic writers, while others will focus exclusively on Anglo-American romanticism, and survey authors such as Austen, Blake, Brockden Brown, Byron, Coleridge, Emerson, Irving, Keats, Radcliffe, Scott, Shelley, and Wordsworth. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: GSWS 050

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 051 19th-Century British Literature

In 1815 in the wake of the battle of Waterloo, Great Britain controlled a staggering quarter of the world's landmass and half of its gross national product. This course will begin with the Napoleonic Wars and this Regency aftermath to survey a century of British literature -- from Romanticism through the revolutions of 1848 and the Victorian and Edwardian periods to the beginning of the first World War. Most versions of this course will read both novels and poetry, often focusing on the relation between the two and their function within nineteenth century culture. Others may incorporate drama and non-fiction prose. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 053 19th-Century American Literature

A consideration of outstanding literary treatments of American culture from the early Federalist period to the beginnings of the First World War. We will traverse literary genres, reading autobiographies and travel accounts as well as fiction and poetry. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 054 Sounding Poetry: Music and Literature

Never before has poetry been so inescapable. Hip hop, the soundtrack of our times, has made rhyme, meter, and word-play part of our daily lives. How did this happen? This course begins not on the page, but in the bardic traditions of Homer's Iliad, which encoded many of the values of its time in oral formulas. Poetry was, however, no mere encyclopedia, but also a source of risk, as we will read in Plato's warning against its hypnotic powers, and in the excesses of the Bacchae. We continue through 19th and 20th century attempts to recover these classic traditions (Wordsworth, Longfellow, Pound). Yet Europe was not the only center of poetic production. How does the Homeric tradition relate to living traditions of West African singing poets (griots) and Southern African praise songs? And what traces of these traditions can we hear in the blues? We will listen to early blues recordings and discuss the politics of collecting folklore, and the genius of African American modernists (Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, Georgia Douglas Johnson) who bought vernacular speech onto the page. We will read and listen to a number of 20th century poets inspired when page meets stage in jazz poetry, dub poetry, spoken word, and hip hop. Assignments will include 2 papers, 2 small-group performances, memorization exercises, and a creative adaptation of one poem. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of current offerings.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Taught by: TBD

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 054, COML 054

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 055 19th-Century Novel

During the nineteenth century the novel became the dominant literary form of its day, supplanting poetry and drama on both sides of the Atlantic. In this introduction to the novelists of the period, we will read the writers who secured the novel's cultural respectability and economic prominence. Likely authors will include Austen, the Brontes, Collins, Dickens, Eliot, Hardy, Hawthorne, Melville, Poe, Thackeray, Scott, and Stowe. The course will explore the themes, techniques, and styles of the nineteeth-century novel. It will focus not only on the large structural and thematic patterns and problems within each novel but also on the act of reading as a historically specific cultural ritual in itself. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 056 Modern Drama

This course will explore the major dramatic and theatrical movements that constitute the "modern," from the successive rises of melodrama and "realism" in the nineteenth century, to those theatrical aesthetics that positioned themselves beyond or against realism at the turn of the twentieth century, to the present day. We'll explore political theatre, the invention of the avant garde, the rise of the auteur-director, performance art, feminist and queer theatres, and the integration of non-western theatre into shared theatre practice in the colonial and post-colonial world. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: THAR 125

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 057 Literature of the Americas to 1900

This course examines U.S. literature and culture in the context of the global history of the Americas. Historical moments informing the course will range from the origins of the Caribbean slave-and-sugar trade at the beginning of the nineteenth century, to the Monroe Doctrine of 1823 and the U.S. Mexico and Spanish-American wars. Readings will include works by authors such as Frances Calderon de la Barca, Frederick Douglass, Helen Hunt Jackson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Jose Marti, Herman Melville, John Rollin Ridge, Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton, and Felix Varela. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 058 Irish Literature

This course will provide an introduction to modern Irish literature, focusing on the tension between Ireland's violent history and its heroic mythology. This tension leaves its mark not only on the ravaged landscape, but also on the English language, which displays its "foreignness" most strongly in the hands of Irish writers. Readings will span the genres of poetry, drama, fiction, and history, and will include works by Sommerville and Ross, Yeats, George Moore, Joyce, Synge, O'Casey, Beckett, Edna O'Brien, and Brian Friel. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 059 Modernisms and Modernities

This class explores the international emergence of modernism, typically from the middle of the 19th century to the middle of the 20th century. We will examine the links between modernity, the avant-garde, and various national modernisms that emerged alongside them. Resolutely transatlantic and open to French, Spanish, Italian, German, or Russian influences, this course assumes the very concept of Modernism to necessitate an international perspective focusing on the new in literature and the arts -- including film, the theatre, music, and the visual arts. The philosophies of modernism will also be surveyed and concise introductions provided to important thinkers like Marx, Nietzsche, Sorel, Bergson, Freud, and Benjamin. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 059, FREN 258

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 060 Rise of the Novel

This course explores the history of the British novel and the diverse strategie of style, structure, characterization, and narrative techniques it has deployed since the late seventeenth century. While works from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries will form the core of the reading, some versions of this course will include twentieth-century works. All will provide students with the opportunity to test the advantages and limitations of a variety of critical approaches to the novel as a genre. Readings may include works by Behn, Swift, Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Lennox, Smollett, Burney, Scott, Austen, the Brontes, Dickens, Eliot, Hardy, Conrad, Joyce, Lawrence, Woolf, Rhys, Greene, Naipaul, Carter, Rushdie, and Coetzee. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 061 20th-Century British Literature

This course introduces major works in twentieth-century British literature. We will read across a range of fiction, poetry, plays, and essays, and will consider aesthetic movements such as modernism as well as historical contexts including the two World Wars, the decline of empire, and racial and sexual conflict. Authors treated might include: Conrad, Yeats, Joyce, Eliot, Lawrence, Forster, Shaw, Woolf, Auden, Orwell, Beckett, Achebe, Rhys, Synge, Naipaul, Rushdie, Heaney, and Walcott. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 061

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 062 20th-Century Poetry

From abstraction to beat, from socialism to negritude, from expressionism to ecopoetry, from surrealism to visual poetry, from collage to digital poetry, the poetry of the twentieth century has been characterized by both the varieties of its forms and the range of its practitioners. This course will offer a broad overview of many of the major trends and a few minor eddies in the immensely rich, wonderfully varied, ideologically and aesthetically charged field. The course will cover many of the radical poetry movements and individual innovations, along with the more conventional and idiosyncratic work, and will provide examples of political, social, ethnic, and national poetries, both in the Americas and Europe, and beyond to the rest of the world. While most of the poetry covered will be in English, works in translation, and indeed the art of translation, will be an essential component the course. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 062

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 063 Art Now

One of the most striking features of today's art world is the conspicuous place occupied in it by the photographic image. Large-scale color photographs and time-based installations in projections are everywhere. Looking back, we can see that much of the art making of the past 60 years has also been defined by this medium, regardless of the form it takes. Photographic images have inspired countless paintings, appeared in combines and installations, morphed into sculptures, drawings and performances, and served both as the object and the vehicle of institutional critique. They are also an increasinglyimportant exhibition site: where most of us go to see earthworks, happenings and body-art. This course is a three-part exploration of our photographic present.

Taught by: Silverman

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: ARTH 294, ARTH 694, GSWS 294, VLST 236

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 064 Modern America

This course is concerned with American literature and cultural life from the turn of the century until about 1950. The course emphasizes the period between the two World Wars and emphasizes as well the intellectual and cultural milieu in which the writers found themselves. Works by the following writers are usually included: James, Eliot, Frost, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, West, Stevens, DuBois, Williams, Wharton, Stein, West, Moore, and Hemingway. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 065 20th-Century British Novel

This course traces the development of the novel across the twentieth-century. The course will consider the formal innovations of the modern novel (challenges to realism, stream of consciousness, fragmentation, etc.) in relation to major historical shifts in the period. Authors treated might include: Conrad, Lawrence, Joyce, Forster, Woolf, Cather, Faulkner, Hemingway, Achebe, Greene, Rhys, Baldwin, Naipaul, Pynchon, Rushdie, and Morrison. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 065

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 066 African American Drama: From the 1920's to the present

This course will introduce students to Pulitzer-prize winning plays such as Lynn Nottage's Sweat, groundbreaking plays such as Ntozake Shange's For Colored Girls, as well as less known plays that show the wide range of form and themes in 20th and 21st century African American drama. We will focus on performance as a mode of interpreting a script and performance as a way of understanding the intersections of race, class, and gender. In-class viewings of selected scenes in recorded productions of the plays will energize our analysis of the scripts. Short creative, performance-oriented writing assignments will produce the questions explored in the two critical essays. In addition to Sweat and For Colored Girls, our line-up may include Zora Neale Hurston's Color Struck, Anna Deavere Smith's Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992, Suzan-Lori Parks' 100 Plays for the First Hundred Days, August Wilson's Radio Golf, Lydia Diamond's Harriet Jacobs, Amiri Baraka's The Slave, and Claudia Rankine's The White Card.

Taught by: Crawford

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 066, THAR 066

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 067 American Theatre and Performance

This course examines the development of the modern American theatre from the turn of the century to the present day. Progressing decade by decade the course investigates the work of playwrights such as Eugene O'Neil, Arthur Miller, Tennessee Williams, Edward Albee, David Mamet, August Wilson and Tony Kushner, theatre companies such as the Provincetown Players and the Group Theatre, directors, actors, and designers. Some focus will also be given to major theatrical movements such as the Federal Theatre Project, Off-Broadway, regional theatre, experimental theatre of the Sixties, and feminist theatre.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CIMS 273, THAR 272

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 069 Poetry and Poetics

What is poetry and what place does it have among literary forms? What is its relation to culture, history, and our sense of speakers and audiences? This course will focus on various problems in poetic practice and theory, ranging from ancient theories of poetry of Plato and Aristotle to contemporary problems in poetics. In some semesters a particular school of poets may be the focus; in others a historical issue of literary transmission, or a problem of poetic genres, such as lyric, narrative, and dramatic poetry, may be emphasized. The course will provide a basic knowledge of scansion in English with some sense of the historical development of metrics. This course is a good foundation for those who want to continue to study poetry in literary history and for creative writers concentrating on poetry. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 070 Latina/o Literature and Culture

This course offers a broad introduction to the study of Latina/o/x culture. We will examine literature, theater, visual art, and popular cultural forms, including murals, poster art, graffiti, guerrilla urban interventions, novels, poetry, short stories, and film. In each instance, we will study this work within its historical context and with close attention to the ways it illuminates class formation, racialization, and ideologies of gender and sexuality as they shape Latino/a/xs' experience in the U.S. Topics addressed in the course will include immigration and border policy, revolutionary nationalism and its critique, anti-imperialist thought, Latinx feminisms, queer latinidades, ideology, identity formation, and social movements. While we will address key texts, historical events, and intellectual currents from the late 19th century and early 20th century, the course will focus primarily on literature and art from the 1960s to the present. All texts will be in English.

Taught by: Sternad Ponce de Leon

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 070, COML 070, GSWS 060, LALS 060

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 072 Asian American Literature

An overview of Asian American literature from its beginnings at the turn of the twentieth century to the present. This course covers a wide range of Asian American novels, plays, and poems, situating them in the contexts of American history and minority communities and considering the variety of formal strategies these different texts take. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ASAM 002

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 074 Contemporary American Literature

The readings for this course expose the student to a wide range of American fiction and poetry since World War II, giving considerable attention to recent work. Works may include All The King's Men by Robert Penn Warren, Herzog by Saul Bellow, On The Road by Jack Kerouac, V by Thomas Pynchon, Of Love and Dust by Ernest J.Gaines, A Flag For Sunrise by Robert Stone, The Killing Ground by Mary Lee Settle, and selected poem by Ginsberg, Plath, and Walcott. Readings vary from term to term. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 085, CIMS 074

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 078 Television and New Media

As a complex cultural product, television lends itself to a variety of critical approaches that build-on, parallel, or depart from film studies. This introductory course in television studies begins with an overview of the medium's history and explores how technical and industrial changes correspond to developing conventions of genre, programming, and aesthetics. Along the way, we analyze key concepts and theoretical debates that shaped the field. In particular, we will focus on approaches to textual analysis in combination with industry research, and critical engagements with the political, social and cultural dimensions of television as popular culture. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ARTH 107, CIMS 103, COML 099

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 080 Literatures of Jazz

That modernism is steeped as much in the rituals of race as of innovation is most evident in the emergence of the music we have come to know as jazz, which results from collaborations and confrontations taking place both across and within the color line. In this course we will look at jazz and the literary representations it engendered in order to understand modern American culture. We will explore a dizzying variety of forms, including autobiography and album liner notes, biography, poetry, fiction, and cinema. We'll examine how race, gender, and class influenced the development of jazz music, and then will use jazz music to develop critical approaches to literary form. Students are not required to have a critical understanding of music. Class will involve visits from musicians and critics, as well as field trips to some of Philadelphias most vibrant jazz venues. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: TBD

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 081 African-American Literature

An introduction to African-American literature, typically ranging across a wide spectrum of moments, methodologies, and ideological postures, from Reconstruction and the Harlem Renaissance to the Civil Rights Movement. Most versions of this course will begin in the 19th century; some versions of the course will concentrate only on the modern period. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 081, GSWS 081

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 083 Sicily on Page and Screen

What images come to mind when we hear the words Sicily and Sicilians? Often our thoughts range from scenic vacation spots, delicious seafood and cannoli, and sweet grandmothers dressed in black, to mafia violence, vendettas, and the deep-rooted code of silence, omerta. But, how did these ideas get to us? Is there truth in them? Is there more to this island and its people? Through careful analysis of literary and cinematic representations of this Italian region, and those that do and have inhabited it, we will trace and analyze how Sicilians have represented themselves, how mainland Italians have interpreted Sicilian culture, how outsiders have understood these symbols, how our own perceptions shaped what we thought we knew about this place and, finally, how our own observations will have evolved throughout our studies. We will watch films such as Tornatore's Cinema paradiso and Coppola's The Godfather II, and read texts such as Lampedusa's The Leopard and Maraini's Bagheria. This course aims to increase students' understanding and knowledge of the Sicilian socio-cultural system. It will help students develop their ability to understand and interpret Sicilian culture through close analysis of its history, values, attitudes, and experiences, thereby allowing them to better recognize and examine the values and practices that define their own, as well as others', cultural frameworks.

Taught by: Broccia

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CIMS 204, COML 208, ITAL 205

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 085 War and Representation

This class will explore complications of representing war in the 20th and 21st centuries. War poses problems of perception, knowledge, and language. The notional "fog of war" describes a disturbing discrepancy between agents and actions of war; the extreme nature of the violence of warfare tests the limits of cognition, emotion, and memory; war's traditional dependence on declaration is often warped by language games--"police action," "military intervention," "nation-building," or palpably unnamed and unacknowledged state violence. Faced with the radical uncertainty that forms of war bring, modern and contemporary authors have experimented in historically, geographically, experientially and artistically particular ways, forcing us to reconsider even seemingly basic definitions of what a war story can be. Where does a war narrative happen? On the battlefield, in the internment camp, in the suburbs, in the ocean, in the ruins of cities, in the bloodstream? Who narrates war? Soldiers, refugees, gossips, economists, witnesses, bureaucrats, survivors, children, journalists, descendants and inheritors of trauma, historians, those who were never there? How does literature respond to the rise of terrorist or ideology war, the philosophical and material consequences of biological and cyber wars, the role of the nuclear state? How does the problem of war and representation disturb the difference between fiction and non-fiction? How do utilitarian practices of representation--propaganda, nationalist messaging, memorialization, xenophobic depiction--affect the approaches we use to study art? Finally, is it possible to read a narrative barely touched or merely contextualized by war and attend to the question of war's shaping influence? The class will concentrate on literary objects--short stories, and graphic novels--as well as film and television. Students of every level and major are welcome in and encouraged to join this class, regardless of literary experience.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: Irele

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: COML 150, REES 193

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 086 Artist in Residence

This course offers students the opportunity to study with a major figure in contemporary literature, culture, and the arts. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 087 Theatre, History and Culture I, Classical Athens to Elizabethan London

This course will explore the forms of public performance, most specifically theatre, as they emerge from and give dramatic shape to the dynamic life of communal, civic and social bodies, from their antropological origins in ritual and religious ceremonies, to the rise of great urban centers, to the closing of the theaters in London in 1642. This course will focus on development of theatre practice in both Western and non-Western cultures intersects with the history of cities, the rise of market economies, and the emerging forces of national identity. In addition to examining the history of performance practices, theatre architecture, scenic conventions and acting methods, this course will investigate, where appropriate, social and political history, the arts, civic ceremonies and the dramaturgic structures of urban living. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: THAR 101

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 088 American Poetry

Some versions of this course survey American poetry from the colonial period to the present, while others begin with Whitman and Dickinson and move directly into the 20th century and beyond. Typically students read and discuss the poetry of Williams, Stein, Niedecker, H.D., Pound, Stevens, Fearing, Rakoksi, McKay, Cullen, Wilbur, Plath, Rich, Ginsberg, Kerouac, Waldman, Creeley, Ashberry, O'Hara, Corman, Bernstein, Howe, Perelman, Silliman, and Retallack. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 089 American Fiction

Some versions of this course survey the American novel from its beginnings to the present, focusing on the development of the form, while others concentrate on the development of American fiction in one or two periods. Readings may include novels by writers such as Brown, Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Wharton, Morrison, Twain, James, Adams, Chopin, Howells, Norris, Whitman, Dreiser, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Dos Passos, Ellison, and Nabokov. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 090 Gender, Sexuality, and Literature

This course will focus on questions of gender difference and of sexual desire in a range of literary works, paying special attention to works by women and treatments of same-sex desire. More fundamentally, the course will introduce students to questions about the relation between identity and representation. We will attend in particular to intersections between gender, sexuality, race, class, and nation, and will choose from a rich vein of authors: Mary Wollstonecraft, Jane Austen, Mary Shelley, Lord Byron, the Brontes, Christina Rossetti, George Eliot, Oscar Wilde, Henry James, Gertrude Stein, Zora Neale Hurston, E. M. Forster, Virginia Woolf, Nella Larsen, Radclyffe Hall, Willa Cather, Elizabeth Bishop, Jean Rhys, James Baldwin, Sylvia Plath, Bessie Head, Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, Cherrie Moraga, Toni Morrison, Michael Cunningham, Dorothy Allison, Jeanette Winterson, and Leslie Feinberg. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Cavitch

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 090, GSWS 090

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 091 World Film History to 1945

This course is an introduction to the history of cinema from the 1890s to the present. In demonstrating how history energizes and complicates the movies, we will examine numerous film cultures and historical periods, including Hollywood silent cinema, Italian neo-realism, the French New Wave, recent films from Iran, and a variety of other film movements from different historical epochs and cultures. Screenings will feature movies such as Sergei Eisenstein's THE BATTLESHIP POTEMKIN (1925), Jean Renoir's THE GRAND ILLUSION (1937), Nicholas Ray's REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE (1955), Jean-Luc Godard's CONTEMPT (1963), Spike Lee's DO THE RIGHT THING (1989), Sally Potter's ORLANDO (1992), and Pedro Almodovar's TALK TO HER (2003). Our aim is to establish a broad historical and global foundation for the understanding of film as a complex exchange between art, technology, politics, and economics. Screenings will be mandatory. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ARTH 108, CIMS 101, COML 123

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 092 World Film History 1945-Present

This course is an introduction to the analysis of film as both a textual practice and a cultural practice. We will examine a variety of films--from Fritz Lang's M (1931) to Julia Dash's DAUGHTERS OF THE DUST (1991)--in order to demonstrate the tools and skills of "close reading." We will concentrate on those specifically filmic features of the movies, such as mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing and sound strategies, as well as those larger organizational forms, such as narrative and non-narrative structures and movie genres. Because our responses to the movies always extend beyond the film frame, we will additionally look closely at the complex business of film distribution, promotion, and exhibition to show how the less visible machinery of the movie business also shapes our understanding and enjoyment of particular films. Along the way, we will discuss some of the most influential and productive critical schools of thought informing film analysis today, including realism, auteurism, feminism, postmodernism, and others. Screenings are mandatory. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ARTH 109, CIMS 102, COML 124

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 093 Introduction to Postcolonial Literature

English is a global language with a distinctly imperial history, and this course serves as an essential introduction to literary works produced in or about the former European colonies. The focus will be poetry, film, fiction and non fiction and at least two geographic areas spanning the Americas, South Asia, the Caribbean and Africa as they reflect the impact of colonial rule on the cultural representations of identity, nationalism, race, class and gender. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CIMS 093, COML 093

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 094 Introduction to Literary Theory

This course introduces students to major issues in the history of literary theory, and provides an excellent foundation for the English major or minor. Treating the work of Plato and Aristotle as well as contemporary criticism, we will consider the fundamental issues that arise from representation, making meaning, appropriation and adaptation, categorization and genre, historicity and genealogy, and historicity and temporality. We will consider major movements in the history of theory including the "New" Criticism of the 1920's and 30's, structuralism and post-structuralism, Marxism and psychoanalysis, feminism, cultural studies, critical race theory, and queer theory. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 094, GRMN 279

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 096 Theories of Gender and Sexuality

What makes men and women different? What is the nature of desire? This course introduces students to a long history of speculation about the meaning and nature of gender and sexuality -- a history fundamental to literary representation and the business of making meaning. We will consider theories from Aristophanes speech in Platos Symposium to recent feminist and queer theory. Authors treated might include: Plato, Shakespeare, J. S. Mill, Mary Wollstonecraft, Sigmund Freud, Virginia Woolf, Simone de Beauvoir, Adrienne Rich, Audre Lorde, Michel Foucault, Gayle Rubin, Catherine MacKinnon, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Judith Butler, bell hooks, Leo Bersani, Gloria Anzaldua, David Halperin, Cherrie Moraga, Donna Haraway, Gayatri Spivak, Diana Fuss, Rosemary Hennesy, Chandra Tadpole Mohanty, and Susan Stryker. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: Sanchez

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 096, GSWS 096

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 097 Theatre, History and Culture II

This course examines theatre and performance in the context of the border urban, artistic and political cultures housing them from the Renaissance to the mid-19th century. Encompassing multiple cultures and traditions, it will draw on a variety of readings and viewings designed to locate the play, playwright, trend or concept under discussion within a specific socio-historical context. The evolution of written and performed drama, theatre architecture, and scenography will be examined in tandem with the evolution of various nationalisms, population shifts, and other commerical and material forces on theatrical entertainment. Readings consequently will be drawn not only from plays and other contemporary documents, but also from selected works on the history, theory, design technology, art, politics or society of the period under discussion. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: THAR 102

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 100 Introduction to Literary Study

Literature does not exist for your protection. So dangerous is it, that Socrates argued poets ought to be banned from his ideal Republic. And Socrates himself--one of the most subversive of all poetic thinkers--was condemned to death for corrupting the young with his speeches. All great literature is unsettling and alarming. Along with its beauty and delicacy and rhetorical power and ethical force, it can be terrifyingly sublime and even downright ugly: full of contempt and horror and grandiosity and malice. From Socrates' day to our own, countless writers have been jailed, exiled, and murdered, their works censored, banned, burned, for daring to say what others wish would remain unsaid--about religion and the State; sexuality, gender, and the body; art, science, and commerce; freedom and order; love and hate--and for saying it in ways that are aesthetically innovative, surprising, seductive, ravishingly unanticipated. See COML website for current semester's description at https://complit.sas.upenn.edu/course-list/2019A This course will introduce you to fundamentals of literary style, form, and history, and to approaches to reading and interpretation. It will also mean paying close attention to your own writing, in a series of brief essays and blog contributions in which you'll learn better how to meet the demands of college-level writing while striving always to be a dangerous writer yourself. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of current offerings.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: COML 100

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 101 Study of an Author

This course introduces students to literary study through the works of a single author--often Shakespeare, but other versions will feature writers like Jane Austen, Geoffrey Chaucer, Herman Melville, and August Wilson. Readings an individual author across his or her entire career offers students the rare opportunity to examine works from several critical perspectives in a single course. What is the author's relation to his or her time? How do our author's works help us to understand literary history more generally? And how might be understand our author's legacy through performance, tributes, adaptations, or sequels? Exposing students to a range of approaches and assignments, this course is an ideal introduction to literary study for those students wishing to take an English course but not necessarily intending to major. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 101, GSWS 101

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 102 Study of a Literary Theme

This is an introduction to literary study through the works of a compelling literary theme. The theme's function within specific historical contexts, within literary history generally, and within contemporary culture, are likely to be emphasized. Some versions of this course will also serve as an introduction to other members of the English faculty, who will visit the class as guest lecturers. This course is designed for the General Requirement, and is ideal for the students wishing to take an English course but not necessarily intending to major. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: CIMS 112, COML 245, GSWS 102

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 103 Narrative Across Cultures

The purpose of this course is to present a variety of narrative genres and to discuss and illustrate the modes whereby they can be analyzed. We will be looking at shorter types of narrative: short stories, novellas, and fables, and also some extracts from longer works such as autobiographies. While some works will come from the Anglo-American tradition, a larger number will be selected from European and non-Western cultural traditions and from earlier time-periods. The course will thus offer ample opportunity for the exploration of the translation of cultural values in a comparative perspective.

Taught by: Loomba

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: COML 125, NELC 180, SAST 124, THAR 105

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 104 Study of a Literary Period

This is an introduction to literary study through a survey of works from a specific historical period. Some versions will begin with traditional stories or poems, including a sampling of works in translation. Others will focus exclusively on modern and contemporary American short fiction or poetry. This course is designed or the General Requirement, and is ideal for students wishing to take an English course but not necessarily intending to major. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: CIMS 104, COML 104

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 105 Topics in Literature and Society

While the topic of this course varies from semester, its subject is always the relation between literature and socio-economic realitites: political, economic, social, and of identity. Past versions of English 105 have included "The World of Work," "Disability Narratives," and "Conflict in Print." Each devotes a number of weeks to the economic and social theories underlying its given subject in order to provide students with adequate background. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 107 Literature and Medicine

This course offers a comprehensive study of significant changes and continuities in the history of medicine from 1650-1850, alongside works of literature that exemplify the shifting notions of the doctor and sickness in the Western medical tradition. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 111 Experimental Writing

A creative writing workshop committed to experimentation. The workshop will be structured around writing experiments, collaborations, intensive readings, and new and innovative approaches to composition and form. See English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 112 Workshop for Fiction Writers

This course emphasizes the study and practice of basic techniques of short fiction, with assignments divided between readings and discussion of student-written material. May be repeated for credit with a different instructor. See English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 113 Poetry Writing Workshop

This is a workshop for students who are interested in exploring a variety of approaches to poetry. Students will encounter a diverse series of readings, in-class writing activities, weekly writing assignments, and creative methods for heightening your abilities as a reader and writer. May be repeated for credit with different instructor. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 114

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 114 Playwriting Workshop

The expressive possibilities and limitations of the stage medium through close reading of plays of various styles and period, study of the various resources of various types of theater, and original exercise in dramatic writing. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: THAR 114

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 115 Workshop for Advanced Fiction Writers

An advanced workshop in the writing of fiction, with reading assignments and discussion of student works in progress. Topics may include the short story or the art of the novel. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: ENGL 112

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 116 Screenwriting Workshop

This course will look at the screenplay as both a literary text and a blue print for production. Several classic screenplay texts will be critically analyzed (REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE, DOCTOR STRANGELOVE, PSYCHO, etc.) Students will then embark on writing their own scripts. We will intensively focus on: character enhancement, creating "believable" cinematic dialogue, plot development and story structure, conflict, pacing, dramatic foreshadowing, the element of surprise, text and subtext and visual story-telling. Class attendance is mandatory. Students will submit their works-in-progress to the workshop for discussion. See English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: CIMS 116

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 117 The Arts and Popular Culture

A creative writing workshop that concentrates on various aspects of writing about artistic endeavor, including criticism, reviews, profiles, interviews and essays. For the purposes of this class, the arts will be interpreted broadly, and students are able -- and, in fact, encouraged -- to write about both the fine arts and popular culture, including music, theater, film, fashion, photography and television. Students will write on a weekly basis, and many assignments will be tailored to each student's individual interests and are likely to include reporting and research. Writing subjects can range from a local band to a museum, from a theater group to a comedian. Course offerings may inclue Writing about Music, Writing about Popular Culture, or other topics and themes. Prerequisite: Students who have previously taken ENGL 117 should also be able to take this course in the spring term file. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 118 Advanced Poetry Writing Workshop

This workshop is especially valuable for creative writing concentrators in poetry within the English Major, for those who are working on longer works, or for those who wish to work on a series of poems connected by style and subject matter. Prerequisite: This workshop is designed for those students who have taken the introductory workshop ENGL 113 or its equivalent and desire advance study. May be repeated for credit with a different instructor. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 120 Working with Translations

In this class we will study and translate some of the major figures in 20th century poetry, including Rainer Maria Rilke, Claire Malroux, Pablo Neruda, Cesare Pavese, Anna Akhmatova, and Bei Dao. While the curriculum will be tailored to the interests and linguistic backgrounds of the students who enroll, all those curious about world poetry and the formidable, irresistible act of translation are welcome. Students should have at least an intermediate knowledge of a language other than English. We will study mulitple translations of seminal poems, render our own versions in response, and have the additional opportunity to work directly from the original. Students may also work in pairs, or groups. A portion of the course will be set up as a creative writing workshop in which to examine the overall effect of each others' translations so that first drafts can become sucessful revisions. While class discussions will explore the contexts and particularity of (among others) Urdu, Italian, French, and Polish poetry, they might ultimately reveal how notions of national literature have radically shifted in recent years to more polyglottic and globally textured forms. Through guest speakers, essays on translation theory, and our own ongoing experiments, this course will celebrate the ways in which great poetry underscores the fact that language itself is a translation. In addition to the creative work, assignments will include an oral presentation, informal response papers, and a short final essay. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 121

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 121 Writing for Children

This is a course for students who have always thought it would be challenging, fun, curious,or rewarding to write a children's book. The class will be conducted as a seminar, using a wide variety of published children's books in all genres--picture books, chapter books, young fiction, older fiction as examples of successful books for young readers. See English Department website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 121

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 122 Grotesque Forms

An introduction to letterpress printing and bookmaking and writing for the artist book, focusing on the history of the artist book, competence in letterpress technique, print composition and design skills, and alternative book binding. Course readings will focus on the work of Joanna Drucker and Jerome Rothenberg, and the examination of multi-media works. Field trips to local artist book collections will supplement course reading, projects, and the final project. The entire class will be taught, and practiced, through the lens of "the grotesque" in art and literature. As a final project, each student will make their own limited-edition artist book that considers the course theme of "the grotesque" through writing, image, printing and binding. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 124 Writing and Politics

This is a course for students who are looking for ways to use their writing to participate in the 2020 election. Student writers will use many forms--short essay, blogs, social media posts, mini video- or play scripts, podcasts--and consider lots of topics as they publish work, in real time, with #VoteThatJawn. This multi-media platform popped up in 2018 to support youth registration and voting in Philadelphia's 2018 mid-term elections. Registration of 18-year-olds that year doubled: from 3,300 to nearly 7,000. This year university, high school, and media partners across the city aim to hit 10K. Imagine that. Imagine a Creative Writing class that answers our desire to live responsibly in the world and to have a say in the systems that govern and structure us. Plus learning to write with greater clarity, precision, and whatever special-sauce Jawn your voice brings. The course is designed as an editorial group sharing excellent, non-partisan, fun, cool, sometimes deadly earnest content for and about fresh voters. In addition, you will gain experience in activities that writers in all disciplines need to know: producing an arts-based event, a social media campaign, working with multi-media content, and collaborating with other artists. English 124 will sometimes work directly with diverse populations of youth from other colleges and high schools throughout the city. Because you will engage with a common reading program about the ground-breaking Voting Rights Act of 1965, the class is cross-listed with Africana Studies 124. In addition, the work of #VoteThatJawn performs a civic service; therefore it is listed as an an Academically Based Community Service (ABCS) course with the university. Don't sit out this momentous electoral season because you have so much work. Use your work to bring other youth to the polls.

Taught by: Cary

Also Offered As: AFRC 124

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 129 Across Forms: Art and Writing

What if a poem spoke from inside a photograph? What if a sculpture unfurled a political manifesto? What if a story wasn't just like a dance, but was a dance or a key component of a video, drawing, performance, or painting? In this course, artists and writers will develop new works that integrate the forms, materials, and concerns of both art and writing. Many artists employ writing in their practices, but many not look at the texts they create as writing. And many writers have practices that go beyond the page and deserve attention as art. This course will employ critique and workshop, pedagogic methodologies from art and writing respectively, to support and interrogate cross-pollination between writing and art practices. Additionally, the course will examine a field of artists and writers who are working with intersections between art and writing to create dynamic new ways of seeing, reading, and experiencing. Prerequisite: Permission to enroll is required; please submit a short description of your interest in the class to zolfr@writing.upenn.edu. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: FNAR 315, FNAR 615

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 130 Advanced Screenwriting

This is a workshop-style course for students who have completed a screenwriting class, or have a draft of a screenplay they wish to improve. Classes will consist of discussing student's work, as well as discussing relevant themes of the movie business and examining classic films and why they work as well as they do. See English Department website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: CIMS 130

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 131 Inner Outer Space Travel Writing: A Creative Writing Workshop

Inner Outer Space Travel Writing is a creative writing workshop focused on writing work within the science fiction/speculative fiction/alternative futurities, science/land/travel writing, and creative-critical nonfiction traditions. Students will work within a variety of genres, with an emphasis on the essay, the short story, screen/tele-play, play, blog and performance. Students will read recommended texts from within their particular interests, and the course will culminate in both a public performance and dissemination/publication via another media platform (zine, website, podcast, etc). All levels of experience, from none/first-time writer to published writers, are encouraged to register for the course.

Taught by: Bracho

Also Offered As: GSWS 510, LALS 510

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 133 Self-Scripting: Writing through Body and Space

In Self-Scripting, students will write through a variety of exercises and activities that put text into play with the body and space. Over the course of the semester, students will actively engage space and composition as they develop and explore scriptwriting for performance. We will explore exercises in an active laboratory setting. This course aims to expand on techniques for writing plays, poetry, and experimental biography.

Taught by: O'Karra

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: THAR 115

Activity: Studio

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 134 Passion Projects: Radical Experiments in Writing Plays, Screenplays, and Pilots

This creative writing workshop will focus on writing for screen, stage and internet and is open to undergraduate and graduate students at every level of writing experience. The course will be writing intensive and also include the reading and analysis of feminist, trans, queer, working class and racially liberatory plays, films, television and performance as models of inspiration. Meditation, drawing, theater games, improv exercises, screenings and outings to see work on and off campus will round out this holistic and experimental approach to making work that illuminates and entertains audiences from across the US and global audience spectrum.

Taught by: Bracho

Also Offered As: GSWS 512, LALS 512

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 135 Creative Non-Fiction Writing

A workshop course in the writing of creative nonfiction. Topics may include memoir, family history, travel writing, documentary, and other genres in which literary structures are brought to bear on the writing of nonfiction prose. May be repeated for credit with a different instructor. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 134, GSWS 135, URBS 135

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 138 Writing Center Theory & Practice

WRIT 138 401: This course is intended for capable writers who possess the maturity and temperament to work successfully as peer tutors at Penn. WRIT 138 402: ABCS course. Along with a study of theories, strategies, and methods for teaching and tutoring writing in diverse communities, this course will also interrogate our own social locations and the ways we engage with the realities of teaching and learning. To enable this, this course will provide opportunities for community engagement and reflection beyond the walls of our classroom by working with nearby high school students to prepare them for college-level writing. Please note that 8 of our weekly classes will be held at Robeson High School (4125 Ludlow School, Philadelphia, PA 19102). In addition to fieldwork, students will read and discuss key texts on community-engaged writing instruction, keep a weekly reflection and reading response journal, and engage in a scaffolded semester-long research project on community-engaged writing theory and practice.

Taught by: Varies

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: WRIT 138

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 142 Duchamp is My Lawyer

This course examines the impact of copyright law on artists and creative industries. Looking at publishing, music, film, and software, we will ask how the law drives the adoption of new media, and we will consider how regulation influences artistic decisions. A mix of the theoretical with the practical, we will be using UbuWeb (the largest and oldest site dedicated to the free distribution of the avant-garde) as our main case study. The course will cover both the history of copyright law and current debates, legislation, and cases. We will also follow major copyright stories in the news. Readings cover such diverse topics as the player piano, Disney films, YouTube, video game consuls, hip hop, the Grateful Dead, file sharing, The Catcher in the Rye, and many more. We will also examine the critical role of "shadow libraries," (free culture hubs) in regards how the cultural artifact is produced and distributed in the digital age, alongside today's gatekeepers of algorithmic culture, such as Netflix, Amazon, and Spotify.

Taught by: Decherney

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: CIMS 142

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 144 Speculative Fiction

A creative writing course devoted to speculative fiction. Topics may include science fiction, fantasy, horror, or other related genres. Students will study the literary origins of these genres and create their own original work. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 145 Advanced Non-Fiction Writing

An advanced writing course devoted to creative nonfiction. Topics may include writing for literary magazines; writing for journals of opinion; memoir; family history; travel writing; documentary; or other topics and genres in which literary structures inform the writing of nonfiction prose. Offerings may address writing as a public act, questions of ethics and policy, methods of research and fact-checking, marketing, and how to understand and enter the world of publishing. May be repeated for credit with a different instructor. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: GSWS 145

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 155 Writing in the Documentary Tradition

This course will function as a workshop, with a select group of students. It's a course that will honor the spirit and tradition of "documentary" writing. The word "documentary" has meant many things over time. Here, it means a kind of nose-close observation and reportage. It means a level of being with one's subject matter in a way that other creative writing courses do not allow because of their format and structure. In English 155, a student writer at Penn will dare to "hang" with a topic--a girl's high-school basketball team; a medical intern in a HUP emergency room; a janitor doing the graveyard shift in a classroom building; a food-truck operator crowding the noontime avenues; a client-patient in the Ronald McDonald House near campus; a parish priest making a solitary and dreary and yet redemptive rounds of the sick and the dying in the hospital--for the entire term. At the term's end, each writer in the course will have produced one extended prose work: a documentary piece of high creative caliber. This is our goal and inspiration. The piece will be 35 to 40 pages long, at minimum. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 156 Photographs and Stories

A creative writing course built entirely around the use of photographs, and the crafting of compelling nonfiction narratives from them. The essential concept will be to employ photographs as storytelling vehicles. So we will be using curling, drugstore printed Kodak shots from our own family albums. We will be using searing and famous images from history books. We will be taking things from yesterday's newspaper. We will even be using pictures that were just made by the workshop participants outside the campus gates. In all of this, there will be one overriding aim to achieve memorable, full-bodied stories. To locate the strange, evocative, storytelling universes that are sealed inside the four rectangular walls of photograph. They are always there, if you know how to look. It's about the quality of your noticing, the intensity of your seeing. See the English Department's websitee at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 157 Introduction to Journalistic Writing

This workshop is designed as an introduction to journalistic writing. Topics may include Writing about Food, Journalism and the Environment, Digital Newswriting, and other themes. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 158 Advanced Journalistic Writing

A workshop in creative writing devoted to original student work in journalism. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: STSC 118

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 159 Political Writing in the Digital Age

A primer on writing about U.S. politics, in an era of major technological upheaval and serious voter polarization. Today's 24/7, wi-fi'd, blogging environment-along with the rise of new conservative media-are changing the ways that writers cover politics and deliver the information. May be repeated for credit with a different instructor. See English Department website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 160 Long-form Journalism

This course in long-form journalism is required of all journalistic writing minors. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 161 The Art of the Profile

One of the toughest challenges for any journalist is to master the art of the profile-writing. In this course, students will read and critique some of the classic profile articles of the past 40 years and, most importantly, write profile articles of their own. Writing about people is often very rewarding, but rarely easy. In this course, students will debate the questions that have plagued and energized journalists for generations: How do you persuade someone that theirs is a worthy topic for a profile? How do you ask sensitive questions? If the person is a celebrity, how do you avoid being manipulated into writing a "puff piece"? Do you tape the interviews or just take notes? How do you structure a profile in order to keep the reader's attention? Is it even possible to capture the essence of a person on the written page? Are you a friend to the profile subject--or a manipulator? A journalist at The New Yorker once said that a writer's relationship with the profile subject is "a kind of love affair." On the other hand, a famous author once said that a profile writer is typically "gaining their trust and betraying without remorse." Which is closer to the truth? Students, in addition to writing their own profiles, will kick around these questions while reading some of the best contemporary profile writers, including Susan Orlean, Gay Talese, David Remnick, Mark Bowden, and Judy Bachrach. The instructor will also offer several of his own. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 162 Covering Political Elections

In this course, students with a passion for both writing and politics will have the unique opportunity to track the news as it unfolds week by week, to critique it in class, and, most importantly, to write about it in a variety of formats, ranging from "straight" news to informed opinion. Students can expect spirited class debate about the elusive nature of "objectivity," the often thin line between truth and rumor, the challenges of fact-checking a candidate's "spin," the challenges of writing responsibility in an era when even facts seem to be polarized, the challenges of analyzing election results and writing effectively, the growing pressure on journalists to reveal their political beliefs, and much more. Some of the writing will happen in class; students will view excerpts from election debates and broadcasts, and will file their reports "on deadline." And students will also have a chance, in class, to critique some of the nation's best political writers--reporters, feature writers, columnists, and bloggers. Topics for this course may include reporting on Congressional midterms and reporting on the Presidential election. See English Department website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 165 Writing through Culture and Art

This is a year-long creative writing class, given as a collaboration between the Center for Programs in Contemporary Writing and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Students will be encouraged to develop correspondent methods of responding to the PMA's exhibitions. The class will involve regular trips to attend concerts, museums and lectures. The students will have access to the most cutting-edge artists today via class visits and studio visits. English 165 will culminate in a publication of student work. May be repeated for credit with a different instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Ideally, applicants will have already taken 117 with the instructor, but that is not firm prerequisite and other students should absolutely feel free to apply. See English Department website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 169 Advanced Writing Projects in Long-Form Nonfiction

An advanced course in long-form nonfiction journalistic writing for a select group of experienced and self-starting student writers. (Ideally, each accepted member will have already taken one or two nonfiction seminars within the creative writing program.) The goal will be to tailor a reporting and writing project to your interest, one you may have long wished to take up but never had the opportunity. It could be a project in the arts. It could be a profile of a person or place. It might be documentary in nature, which is to say an extremely close-up observation of your subject. (An example: think of a hospital chaplain at Penn, going on his dreary, redemptive, daily rounds, to visit the sick and anoint the dying. What if you were there, for most of the term, as unobtrusively as possible, at his black-clad elbow?) The group will meet at to-be-determined intervals. In between, the enrollees will be pairing off and in effect serving as each other's editor and coach and fellow (sister) struggler. When we do assemble as a group, we will be reading to each other as well as discussing the works of some long-form heroes--Didion, Talese, Richard Ben Cramer, one or two others you may not have heard of. In essence, this is a kind of master course, limited in enrollment, and devoted to your piece of writing, to be handed in on the final day. It will be in the range of 25 to 30 pages, something above 8,000 words. The course presumes a lot of individual initiative and self-reliance. If you're interested, please email phendric@english.upenn.edu and suggest your qualifications. Permission to enroll is required.

Taught by: Hendrickson

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 199 Independent Study in Writing

Supervised study in writing.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 200 Junior Research Seminar

This course offers junior English majors the opportunity to design and undertake a semester-long research and writing project in an advanced seminar setting. Discussions will address debates within the field/period/topic of the course, research methods, and advanced writing and critical thinking issues. This course is required for most English Majors. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 201 Virtual Reality Lab

In this collaboration between Penn and the Philadelphia Museum of Art (PMA), students will work with with curators to create virtual reality projects connected to the museum's collections. This course mixes virtual reality theory, history, and practice. We will read a wide range of scholarship, manifestoes, and memoirs that examine virtual reality and other immersive technologies, stretching from the 18th century to today. We will explore virtual reality projects, including narrative and documentary films, commercial applications, and games. We will work with many different virtual reality systems. And we will learn the basics of creating virtual reality, making fully immersive 3-D, 360-degree films with geospatial soundscapes. Finally, we will take what we have learned out of the classroom, working with the Philadelphia Museum of Art curators to create virtual realty experiences based around the museum's objects and exhibits. Students will gain an understanding of the unique approaches needed to appeal to museum visitors in a public setting, so we can make viable experiences for them. No previous knowledge of VR or experience is necessary. Interested students should email Prof. Peter Decherney to obtain a permit for the course.

Taught by: Decherney

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CIMS 200

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 205 Spiegel-Wilks Seminar

Topic varies from semester to semester. For the Fall 2020 semester, the topic will be: Elijah Pierce's America: Barnes Foundation Curatorial Seminar This Spiegel-Wilks Curatorial Seminar is offered in collaboration with the Barnes Foundation. Students will be provided with an immersion in curatorial and museum studies and will have the opportunity to interact with curators, scholars, and staff at Penn and the museum, including Executive Director and President Thom Collins, who will co-teach the course. The course syllabus will engage the permanent collection at the museum, where the course will meet weekly. As part of the course, students will also conduct research and contribute to the temporary exhibition opening at the Barnes Foundation that semester, which will feature the work of Elijah Pierce (1892-1984), a self-taught woodcarver whose handcrafted works reacted to life in 20th-century America. One of the first generations of African Americans born into freedom, his remarkable narratives depict religious parables, autobiographical scenes, episodes from American politics, and figures from popular culture.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 305, SAST 305

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 209 Topics in Digital Humanities

This course focuses intensively on a particular issue in digital humanities (DH) and computational approaches to literary texts. See the English Departments website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 210 Critical-Creative Approaches to Literature

These courses enable students to think and write creatively as a means to the critical understanding of literary texts. The topic of the course will vary from semester to semester, but the course will always seek to advance students understanding of literature, its formal elements, and its relationship to culture and history through the use of creative projects instead of or alongside more traditional critical writing. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 211 Paris Modern: Spiral City

Paris has been shaped by a mixture of organic development, which is still today perceptible in the "snail" pattern of its arrondissements whose numbers, from 1 to 20, coil around a central island several times so as to exemplify a "spiral city," and of the violent cuts, interruptions and sudden transformations that again and again forced it to catch up with modern times, the most visible of which was Baron Haussmann's destruction of medieval sections of the city to make room for huge boulevards. Thus Parisian modernism has always consisted in a negotiation between the old and the new, and a specific meaning of modernity allegorized for Louis Aragon, the Surrealists and Walter Benjamin consisted in old-fashioned arcades built in the middle of the 19th century and obsolete by the time they turned into icons of Paris. The aim of the class will be to provide conceptual and pragmatic (visual, experiential) links between a number of texts, theories and films deploying various concepts of the modern in Paris, with a guided tour of the main places discussed. The course that Professors Jean Michel Rabate (English) and Ken Lum (Fine Arts) will lead studies Paris as a work of science-fiction where its many futures are embedded in its many pasts, where discontinuity is a continuous process and where the curving line of the snail's shell is a line of ceaseless curling resulting in a perennial oscillation where an outside converts into an inside and an inside then converts to an outside. The course will travel to Paris over spring break to get an in-depth look at the topics discussed in class.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: FNAR 318, FNAR 518

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 212 Walt Whitman and the People's Press

Walt Whitman and the People's Press: A Course to Design and Program a Mobile Printing Space as a Public Art Project. Inspired by Whitman at 200, a region-wide celebration of Walt Whitman, this hands-on and collaborative course will engage students with artists, writers, community leaders and the public to design and program a mobile poetry printing facility that recognizes the complicated legacy of Walt Whitman in the 21st Century. To do this students and instructors will consider Whitman's poetry as well as in his historical period and his place in Philadelphia and Camden. At the same time students will learn to use a press, design materials and create their own multimedia responses to Whitman. Students in this course should expect to read a great deal of poetry but also to be ready to work with their classmates to create responses to Whitman and to see and experience Philadelphia and Camden in new ways.

Taught by: Turner and Comberg

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: FNAR 212

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 218 Topics In Old English

This seminar explores an aspect of Anglo-Saxon culture intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 219 Topics in the History of Language

This course investigates in-depth a topic in the history of the English language or of linguistic theory more broadly. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: COML 095, HIST 056, REES 095

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 220 Study Abroad

See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 221 Topics In Medieval Literature

This seminar explores an aspect of medieval literature intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. Topics in the past have included the medieval performance, medieval women, and medieval law and literature. Prerequisite: Spaces will be reserved for English majors See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 222 Topics In Romance

This seminar explores an aspect of epic or romance intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 225 Topics In Chaucer

This course explores an aspect of Chaucer's writings intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 226 Topics In Drama to 1660

This course explores an aspect of drama before 1660 intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Loomba

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: GSWS 226

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 229 Topics In Classicism and Literature

This advanced seminar will examine the classical backgrounds to English poetry, in particular the Biblical and Greco-Roman antecedents to Renaissance lyric verse and verse drama (such as, preeminently, Shakespeare). Different versions of this course will have different emphases on Biblical or Hellenist backgrounds. Prerequisite: Spaces will be reserved for english majors. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CLST 360, COML 304, GSWS 228

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 231 Topics In Renaissance Literature

This course explores an aspect of renaissance literature intensively; specific topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CIMS 300, COML 300, ITAL 300

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 234 Introduction to Written Culture, 14th - 18th Centuries

This course explores an aspect of the History of the Book intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 411, HIST 411

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 236 Topics In Renaissance Drama

Through specialized readings, writing assignments, and in-class acting exercises, the class will develop methods of interpreting Shakespeare's plays through theatrical practice. Topics include Shakespeare's use of soliloquy, two and three person scenes, the dramatic presentation of narrative source material, modes of defining and presenting the "worlds" of the plays, and the use of theatrical practice to establish authoritative text. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: THAR 236

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 238 Topics In 17th-Century Literature

This course explores an aspect of 17th-century literature intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 241 Topics In 18th-Century Literature

This course explores an aspect of 18th-century literature intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 242 Life Stories in America, 1730-1830

This seminar explores the social and cultural history of America by focusing on the lives of specific individuals, ranging from Jesuit priests in early Quebec to Philadelphia politicians to Saramaka slaves to Maine midwives. One of the people in Philadelphia who we will discuss is Benjamin Franklin, Penn's founding father. As we examine biography and autobiography as two of history's most powerful narrative frames, we will concentrate on the spaces and places in the social landscape that shaped individual understandings of work, sense of self, gender, beliefs, and political power.

Taught by: St. George

Also Offered As: HIST 242

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 243 Topics In Early American Literature

This course explores an aspect of early American literature intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: Spaces will be reserved for English Majors

ENGL 245 Topics In The 18th-Century Novel

This course explores an aspect of 18th-century novel intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 246 Spirituality and Global Warming

This course listed as secondary in ENGL and primary in RELS 246. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ENVS 246, RELS 246

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 248 Topics In Trans-Atlantic Literature

This course examines in-depth a topic in trans-Atlantic literature, literature that emerges from and deals with the links and tensions between Europe and the Americas. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 250 Topics In Romanticism

This course explores an aspect of Romantic literature intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 251 Topics In 19th-Century Literature

This course explores an aspect of 19th-century literature intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 253 Topics In 19th-Century American Literature

This course explores an aspect of 19th-century American literature intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. Prerequisite: Spaces will be reserved for English majors See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 254 Topics in Music and Literature

The particular of the seminar will change depending on the instructor, and so it is particularly recommended that students consult the actual course description for that semester. These are housed on the Department of English's website at: www.english.upenn.edu

Taught by: White

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 255 Topics In The 19th-Century Novel

This course explores an aspect of the 19th-century novel intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 256 Topics In Modern Drama

This course explores an aspect of Modern drama intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: THAR 274

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 257 Topics of Americas Before 1900

The Essay Film is an important tradition within the various genres that constitute the field of Film and Video Art. Through the element of time it differentiates itself from its literary and photographic antecedents. It borrows selectively from both narrative fiction and documentary - highly subjective and occasionally poetic but without perhaps the burden of truth. The Essay Film is an attmept to dimensionalize our experience of the world and our place in it. It represents an argument, a meditation, a critical engagement with a place, a time or a subject. This is a combination seminar/studio course. Through readings, screenings and discussion students will gain an historical perspective on the genre. The core assignment is for each student to complete a short film (20 minutes max.) in the tradition of the Essay Film. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Also Offered As: FNAR 177, FNAR 677

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 258 Topics in Irish Literature

This course explores an aspect of modern Irish literature intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 259 Topics In Modernism

This course explores an aspect of literary modernism intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. Past offerings have included seminars on the avant-garde, on the politics of modernism, and on its role in shaping poetry, music, and the visual arts. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings. Prerequisite: Some knowledge of 20th-century poetry. Spaces will be reserved for English majors

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 385, COML 140, FREN 259, GRMN 249

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 260 Topics In The Novel

This course explores an aspect of the novel intensively, asking how novels work and what they do to us and for us. Specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 261 Topics In 20th-Century Literature

The course explores an aspect of 20th-century literature intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CIMS 261, JWST 262

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 262 Topics In 20th-Century Poetry

The course explores an aspect of 20th-century poetry intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 274

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 263 Topics In 20th-Century American Literature

The course explores an aspect of 20th-century American literature intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 262

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 264 Topics In Modern American Literature

This course explores an aspect of Modern American literature intensively; specific course topics will vary, and have included "American Expatriotism," "The 1930's," and "Intimacy and Distance: William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, Eudora Welty, and Richard Wright." Prerequisite: Spaces will be reserved for English majors See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 265 Topics In The 20th-Century Novel

This course explores an aspect of the 20th-century novel intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 266 Topics In Law and Literature

This course explores an aspect of law and literature intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CIMS 266

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 268 Apocalypse and the Anthropocene

In this class we will explore the narrative mode of the apocalypse in the context of the geologic designation of the Anthropocene. We will analyze a diversity of cultural forms to think about questions, reconceptions, and social issues relevant to that ephocal concept. Specifically, we will study the ways American apocalyptic novels, films, blogs, and video games attempt to understand the human and non-human relationships in the Anthropocene. We will look to the ways apocalypse narratives can represent and contest the exploitative, extractive, and unequal power relations that the "era of the human" includes, paying special attention to American notions of nature and stewardship as they relate to geologic time and the legacies of genocide, slavery, and capitalism. Our class will investigate the ways works of art attempt to render these complex and perhaps overwhelming concepts comprehensible so that we may envision and enact just futures.

Taught by: Anson

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 269 Topics In Poetry and Poetics

This course explores an aspect of poetry and poetics intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. Prerequisite: Spaces will be reserved for English majors See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 281

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 270 Topics In Latina/o Literature

This course explores an aspect of Latina/o literature intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: LALS 291

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 271 Topics In the Literature of Africa and the African Diaspora

This course explores an aspect of the literature of Africa and the African Diaspora intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 272 Topics In Asian American Literature

This seminar is an advanced-level topics-based version of ENGL 072, Introduction to Asian American Literature. The intended audience is junior and senior English majors and advanced students in Asian studies, Asian American studies, contemporary U.S. and world history, ethnic studies, urban studies, etc. Typical versions of this seminar will include representations and images of Asians in contemporary U.S. novels and films; Asian American literature by women; Asian American film narrative and film aesthetics; studies in Asian American literature and visual art; Asian American literature and immigration; Asian American literature in the context of the literature of exile and journey; Asian American literature 1929-1945; Asian American literature, 1945 to the present; Anglophone/South Asian literature in England, 1970 to the present; Southeast Asia, Vietnam, and American literature, 1970-1990; etc. Students will typically present research projects and write several long essays. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ASAM 202, CIMS 272

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 273 The Chinese Body and Spatial Consumption in Chinatown

This course looks at representations of the Chinese (and Asian body) since the Limehouse district in East London and the advent of Chinese contract laborers to the Americas in the 19th century. The localization of the Chinese throughout the Americas within Chinatown precincts were also subject to representational imaginings that were negotiated through the lens of civic planning, literature and later in cinema. Chinatowns are ultimately a product of racism. They were created as a political and social support system for newly arrived Chinese immigrants. While Chinese laborers arrived into the United States in 1840 and in significant numbers into Canada about 1860, Chinese contract workers were encouraged to immigrate to the Americas as an inexpensive source of labor, especially after the end of the American Civil War. Industrial leaders in America, Canada and elsewhere in the Americas (Mexico, Cuba, Peru, etc) saw the arrival of Chinese workers as a victory for commercial interests. However, the celebration was short-lived, as anti-Chinese sentiment quickly transformed into anti-Chinese hysteria. Rather than attacking the vested interests that exploit foreign labor as embodied by the Chinese worker, racist unions with the cooperation of civic leaders and the police deemed it safer to burn Chinatowns than capitalist property. Deeply under-studied to this day is the number of mass murders of Chinese workers in the 19th century by anti-Chinese thugs. This seminar will focus in on how the body of the Chinese (and Asian) was imagined and reimagined multiple times from the middle of the 19th century to today.

Taught by: Lum/Yang

Also Offered As: ASAM 313, FNAR 313, FNAR 613

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 274 Topics In Contemporary American Literature

This course explores an aspect of contemporary American literature intensively;specific course topics will vary from year to year but have included "The Literary History of The Cold War, 1947-1957" and the "Kelly House Fellows Seminar." See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings. Prerequisite: Spaces will be reserved for English majors

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 275 Sustainability & Utopianism

This seminar explores how the humanities can contribute to discussions of sustainability. We begin by investigating the contested term itself, paying close attention to critics and activists who deplore the very idea that we should try to sustain our, in their eyes, dystopian present, one marked by environmental catastrophe as well as by an assault on the educational ideals long embodied in the humanities. We then turn to classic humanist texts on utopia, beginning with More's fictive island of 1517. The "origins of environmentalism" lie in such depictions of island edens (Richard Grove), and our course proceeds to analyze classic utopian tests from American, English, and German literatures. Readings extend to utopian visions from Europe and America of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, as well as literary and visual texts that deal with contemporary nuclear and flood catastrophes. Authors include: Bill McKibben, Jill Kerr Conway, Christopher Newfield, Thomas More, Francis Bacon, Karl Marx, Henry David Thoreau, Robert Owens, William Morris, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Ayn Rand, Christa Wolf, and others. Taught in English.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: Wiggin

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 209, ENVS 239, GRMN 239

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 276 Advanced Topics in Theatre History

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the basic materials and methods of theatre history and historiograhpy, as applied to a particular topic, organized around a specific period, national group, or aesthetic issue. This course is concerned with methodological questions: how the history of theatre can be documented; how primary documents, secondary accounts, and historical and critical analyses can be synthesized; how the various components of the theatrical event--acting, scenography, playhouse architecture, audience composition, the financial and structural organization of the theatre industry, etc.--relate to one another; and how the theatre is socially and culturally constructed as an art form in relation to the politics and culture of a society in a particular time and place. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CIMS 225, THAR 275, URBS 274

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 278 Topics in Digital and New Media

This course explores a particular topic in the study of digital and new media in an intensive and in-depth manner. See the English Department's website at: www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 292, CIMS 278, COML 066, REES 066

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 279 Jewish Films and Literature

From the 1922 silent film "Hungry Hearts" through the first "talkie," "The JazzSinger," produced in 1927, and beyond "Schindler's List," Jewish characters have confronted the problems of their Jewishness on the silver screen for a general American audience. Alongside this Hollywood tradition of Jewish film, Yiddish film blossomed from independent producers between 1911 and 1939, and interpreted literary masterpieces, from Shakespeare's "King Lear" to Sholom Aleichem's "Teyve the Dairyman," primarily for an immigrant, urban Jewish audience. In this course, we will study a number of films and their literary sources (in fiction and drama), focusing on English language and Yiddish films within the framework of three dilemmas of interpretation: a) the different ways we "read" literature and film, b) the various ways that the media of fiction, drama, and film "translate" Jewish culture, and c) how these translations of Jewish culture affect and are affected by their implied audience. All readings and lectures in English.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Taught by: Hellerstein

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CIMS 279, COML 265, GRMN 261, JWST 263

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 280 Arts and Research Studio: Queer Archives, Aesthetics, and Performance

This course focuses on questions of how to represent the queer past, which it approaches from several angles: through training in archival methods and in scholarly debates about historiographical ethics (or, in the words of David Halperin, "how to do the history of homosexuality"); through engagement with the work of artists who make archives central to their practice; and through lab-based training that aims to represent encounters with queer history through embodied performance. Expectations: This course meeting weekly for 3 hours. But as you will see listed below (these activities and dates are not confirmed for this draft syllabus) the course includes and require that you attend a series of off-campus trips both in Philadelphia and to NYC that occur outside of the class schedule. Below is a list of archives we will visit, performances we will attend, and artists' studios we will visit for in-depth conversation with artist about their practice. The course will address both practical and theoretical issues raised by research in LGBT archives. We will take advantage of local resources in Philadelphia, including the John J. Wilcox Archives at the William Way Center (http://www.waygay.org/archives/). But we will also visit the Lesbian Herstory Archives (http://www.lesbianherstoryarchives.org/) and The Downtown Collection at the Fales Library at NYU (https://guides.nyu.edu/downtown-collection) and the Franklin Furnace Performance Archives (http://www.franklinfurnace.org), all in New York City. We will also bring artists to campus to work directly with students, and will meet with artists in New York. We will take advantage of the staging of Killjoy Kastle in Philadelphia in Fall 2019. This site-specific art installation, the work of Toronto artists Allyson Mitchell and Dierdre Logue, is a haunted house that addresses the difficult history of lesbian feminism, as well as its potential for contemporary LGBT politics. Since the Haunted House will include materials related to the history of feminist and LGBT activism in Philadelphia, students in the course can actively contribute to the research for this project.

Taught by: Love

Course offered fall; odd-numbered years

Also Offered As: THAR 281

Activity: Studio

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 281 Topics In African-American Literature

In this advanced seminar, students will be introduced to a variety of approaches to African American literatures, and to a wide spectrum of methodologies and ideological postures (for example, The Black Arts Movement). The course will present an assortment of emphases, some of them focused on geography (for example, the Harlem Renaissance), others focused on genre (autobiography, poetry or drama), the politics of gender and class, or a particular grouping of authors. Previous versions of this course have included "African American Autobiography," "Backgrounds of African American Literature," "The Black Narrative" (beginning with eighteenth century slave narratives and working toward contemporary literature), as well as seminars on urban spaces, jazz, migration, oral narratives, black Christianity, and African-American music. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 281

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 282 (T)rap Music

This course examines the coming to pass of trap music from several perspectives: 1) that of its technological foundations and innovations (the Roland 808, Auto-tune, FL Studio (FruityLoops), etc.); 2) that of its masters/mastery (its transformation of stardom through the figures of the producer (Metro Boomin) and the rock star (Future)); 3) that of its interpretability and effects (what does the music say and do to us). We will thus engage with this music as a practice of art and form of techno-sociality that manifests uncanny and maximal attunement with the now.

Taught by: White

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 279

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 284 Topics In Race and Ethnicity

This course explores an aspect of race and ethnicity intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 286

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 285 American Musical Theatre

The American musical is an unapologetically popular art form, but many of the works that come from this tradition have advanced and contributed to the canon of theatre as a whole. In this course we will focus on both music and texts to explore ways in which the musical builds on existing theatrical traditions, as well as alters and reshapes them. Finally, it is precisely because the musical is a popular theatrical form that we can discuss changing public tastes, and the financial pressures inherent in mounting a production. Beginning with early roots in operetta, we will survey the works of prominent writers in the American musical theatre, including Kern, Berlin, Gershwin, Porter, Rodgers, Hart, Hammerstein, Bernstein, Sondheim and others. Class lecture/discussions will be illustrated with recorded examples.

Taught by: Fox

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CIMS 271, THAR 271

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 286 Topics In American Literature

This course explores an aspect of American literature intensively; specific course topics will vary, and have included "American Authors and the Imagined Past" and "American Gothic." See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: GSWS 286

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 287 Theatre and Politics

This course will examine the relationship between theatre and politics in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. How do theatre artists navigate their artistic and political aims? How do we distinguish between art and propaganda? Throughout the semester we will ask how the unique components of theatre--its poetic structure, engagement with spectators, aesthetics of representation, relationship to reality, and rehearsal process--contribute to its political capacity. Students will read a variety of plays drawn from late twentieth century and contemporary global theatre practice alongside political and aesthetic theory to interrogate the relationship between artistic production, power, and resistance. We will conclude with a consideration of the ways politics is itself a performance, considering how power is supported by theatrical means and how performance functions in resistance movements.

Taught by: Thompson

Also Offered As: COML 285, THAR 282

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 288 Topics In American Poetry

Sometimes limiting itself to the works of one or two authors, sometimes focusing on a particular theme such as "American Poetry and Democratic Culture," this course devotes itself to the study of twentieth-century American poetry. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 290 Topics In Gender, Sexuality, and Literature

The advanced women's studies course in the department, focusing on a particular aspect of literature by and about women. Topics might include: "Victorian Literary Women"; "Women, Politics, and Literature"; "Feminist Literary Theory"; and similar foci. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 290, COML 290, GSWS 290

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 291 Topics In Film History

This course explores an aspect of Film History intensively; specific course topics vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 391, CIMS 201, COML 201

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 292 Topics In Film Studies

This course explores an aspect of Film Studies intensively; specific course topics vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 289, CIMS 202, COML 292

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 293 Topics In Postcolonial Literature

This course explores an aspect of Postcolonial literature intensively; specific course topics vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 378

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 294 Topics In Literary Theory

This course explores an aspect of literary theory intensively; specific course topics vary from year to year. Prerequisite: Spaces will be reserved for English majors. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 291, GSWS 296

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: Formerly ENGL 204, Spaces will be reserved for English majors

ENGL 295 Topics In Cultural Studies

This course explores an aspect of cultural studies intensively; specific course topics vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 293, CIMS 295, COML 295

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 299 Independent Study in Language and Literature

Supervised reading and research.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 303 Women in Theatre and Performance

What is feminist theatre? How do artists use live performance to provoke not only thought and feeling, but also social, personal, and political change? This course will examine a wide array of plays and performances by and about women; these pieces are, in turn, serious, hilarious, outrageous, poignant--and always provocative. Our focus will be on English-language works from the late 20th century to the present (#metoo) moment. We will read these performance texts and/or view them on stage/screen; we will also read essays that provide contextual background on feminist theatre theory and history. Throughout the semester, we will engage diverse perspectives on women and race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, and gender identity; the issues we encounter will also include marriage and motherhood, career and community, feminism and friendship, and patriarchy and power. The class will take full advantage of any related events occurring on campus or in the city, and will feature visits with guest speakers. Students will have the opportunity to pursue research on their own areas of interest (some recent examples are "women in comedy," trans performance, drag kings, feminist directing, etc.).

Taught by: Malague

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: GSWS 279, THAR 279

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 304 Japanese Cinema

This course is a survey of Japanese cinema from the silent period to the present. Students will learn about different Japanese film genres and histories, including (but not limited to) the benshi tradition, jidaigeki (period films), yakuza films, Pink Film, experimental/arthouse, J-horror, and anime. Although the course will introduce several key Japanese auteurs (Mizoguchi, Ozu, Kurosawa, Oshima, Suzuki, etc), it will emphasize lesser known directors and movements in the history of Japanese film, especially in the experimental, arthouse, and documentary productions of the 1960s and 1970s. Finally, in addition to providing background knowledge in the history of Japanese cinema, one of the central goals of the course will be to interrogate the concept of "national" cinema, and to place Japanese film history within a international context.

Taught by: Alekseyeva

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: CIMS 304, EALC 268

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 305 Cinema and Media

This course explores in detail a topic in theories of film, television, and digital media. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 295, ARTH 695, CIMS 305, COML 299, GSWS 295

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 311 The Honors Program

An essay of substantial length on a literary or linguistic topic, written under the supervision of a faculty adviser. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 318 Topics In Old English

This seminar explores an aspect of Anglo-Saxon culture intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 321 National Literatures

A course that traces how particular literary texts, very often medieval, are adopted to become foundational for national literatures. Key moments of emphasis will be the early nineteenth century, the 1930s, and (to some extent) the unfolding present. Research subtending this offering has been conducted over the last years, both in my editing of Europe: A Literary History, 1348-1418 (2 vols and 82 chapters, Oxford UP, 2016) and in preparation for "Medieval Studies in Troubled Times: the 1930s," to be offered as Presidential plenary at the Medieval Academy of America convention at Penn on 9 March 2019. I have also travelled and lectured extensively for Penn Alumni Travel over the last decade, crossing national boundaries and also pondering how complex literary issues might be framed for a broad (but exceptionally intelligent) audience. Issues arising in traversing Mediterranean space are explored in an article published (in Italian) in Studi migranti. Some texts immediately suggest themselves for analysis. The Song of Roland, for example, has long been fought over between France and Germany; each new war inspires new editions on both sides. The French colonial education system, highly centralized, long made the Chanson de Roland a key text, with the theme of Islamic attack on the European mainland especially timely, it was thought, during the Algerian war of independence. Germany also sees the Niebelungenlied as a key text, aligning it with the Rhine as an impeccably Germanic: but the Danube, especially as envisioned by Stefan Zweig, offers an alternative, hybridized, highly hyphenated cultural vision in running its Germanic-Judaic-Slavic-Roman course to the Black Sea. The course will not be devoted exclusively to western Europe. Delicate issues arise as nations determine what their national epic needs to be. Russia, for example, needs the text known as The Song of Igor to be genuine, since it is the only Russian epic to predate the Mongol invasion. The text was discovered in 1797 and then promptly lost in Moscow's great fire of 1812; suggestions that it might have been a fake have to be handled with care in Putin's Russia. Similarly, discussing putative Mughal (Islamic) elements in so-called "Hindu epics" can also be a delicate matter. Some "uses of the medieval" have been exercised for reactionary and revisionist causes in the USA, but such use is much more extravagant east of Prague. And what, exactly, is the national epic of the USA? Preference given to Ben Franklin students.

Taught by: Wallace

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: COML 321

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 323 Topics In Medieval Poetry

In this course we will read the Inferno, the Purgatorio and the Paradiso, focusing on a series of interrelated problems raised by the poem: authority, fiction, history, politics and language. Particular attention will be given to how the Commedia presents itself as Dante's autobiography, and to how the autobiographical narrative serves as a unifying thread for this supremely rich literary text. Supplementary readings will include Virgil's Aeneid and selections from Ovid's Metamorphoses. All readings and written work will be in English. Italian or Italian Studies credit will require reading Italian texts in their original language and writing about their themes in Italian. This course may be taken for graduate credit, but additional work and meetings with the instructor will be required. When crosslisted with ENGL 323, this is a Benjamin Franklin Seminar.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 333, ITAL 333

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 326 Topics In Drama to 1660

This course explores an aspect of drama before 1660 intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 329 Topics In Classicism and Literature

This advanced seminar will examine the classical backgrounds to English poetry, in particular the Biblical and Greco-Roman antecedents to Renaissance lyric verse and verse drama (such as, preeminently, Shakespeare). Different versions of this course will have different emphases on Biblical or Hellenist backgrounds. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CLST 329

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 338 Topics In 17th-Century Literature

This course explores an aspect of 17th-Century literature intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 341 Topics In 18th-Century Literature

This course explores an aspect of 18th-Century British literature intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 345 Topics In The 18th Century Novel

This course explores an aspect of 18th-Century novel intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 353 Topics In 19th-Century American Literature

This course explores an aspect of 19th-Century American literature intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: GSWS 353

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 355 Topics In The 19th-Century Novel

This course explores an aspect of the 19th-Century novel intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 356 Topics In Modern Drama

This course explores an aspect of Modern drama intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 359 Topics In Modernism

This course explores an aspect of literary modernism intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. Past offerings have included seminars on the avant-garde, on the politics of modernism, and on its role in shaping poetry, music, and the visual arts. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 360 Topics In The Novel

The content of the course will vary from semester to semester. All works read in English. Please check the department's website for a description. https://www.sas.upenn.edu/french/pc. Prerequisite: Two 200-level Frencg courses taken at Penn or equivalent. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 272, FREN 250, HIST 251

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 361 Topics In 20th-Century Literature

The course explores an aspect of 20th-Century literature intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 271

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 363 Topics In 20th-Century American Literature

The course explores an aspect of 20th-Century American literature intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 364 Topics In Modern American Literature

This course explores an aspect of Modern American literature intensively; specific course topics will vary, and have included "American Expatriotism," "The 1930's," and "Intimacy and Distance: William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, Eudora Welty, and Richard Wright." See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 369 Topics In Poetry and Poetics

This course explores an aspect of poetry and poetics intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: GSWS 369

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 378 Global Media

This course explores a broad media landscape through new critical and conceptual approaches. It is designated as a Benjamin Franklin Seminar. This course maps the footprints of television at a global scale. Adopting comparative approaches, we will be studying TV's formation of national and global discourses, and thereby recognizing not only television's impact on processes of globalization, but also the ability of television to matter globally. Working through concepts of "broadcasting," "flow," "circulation," and "circumvention," the course examines the movement of (and blocks encountered by) television programs and signals across national borders and cultures. The course particularly focuses on how global television cultures have been transformed due to shifts from broadcasting technologies to (Internet) streaming services? Navigating from United States and Cuba to India and Egypt, the readings in the course illuminate how particular televisual genres, institutions, and reception practices emerged in various countries during specific historical periods. We shall be addressing a range of questions: what kind of global phenomenon is television? Can we study television in countries where we do not know the existing local languages? In what different ways (through what platforms, interfaces, and screens) do people in different continents access televisual content? What explains the growing transnational exports of Turkish and Korean TV dramas? What is the need to historically trace the infrastructural systems like satellites (and optical fiber cables) that made (and continue to make) transmission of television programming possible across the world? How do fans circumvent geo-blocking to watch live sporting events? Assignments include submitting weekly discussion questions and a final paper. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Mukherjee

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ARTH 379, CIMS 378

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 380 Performance in the African Diaspora

The purpose of this course is to engage students in the rigorous process of mining experiences for material that can be transformed into a public performance piece. In-class writing, group discussions, and field work in the Philadelphia area. AUGUST WILSON AND BEYOND. The people need to know the story. See how they fit into it. See what part they play. - August Wilson, King Hedley II. In this seminar, students will read groundbreaking playwright August Wilson's 20th Century Cycle: ten plays that form an iconic picture of African American traumas, triumphs, and traditions through the decades, told through the lens of Pittsburgh's Hill District neighborhood. Other readings include supporting material on Wilson's work and African American theatre, the works of contemporary playwrights whom Wilson has influenced (such as Suzan-Lori Parks and Tarell Alvin McCraney), and context on Penn's relationship with West Philadelphia. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of current offerings.

Taught by: Beaver, Berger

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 325

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 388 Topics In American Poetry

Sometimes limiting itself to the works of one or two authors, sometimes focusing on a particular theme such as "American Poetry and Democratic Culture," this course devotes itself to the study of twentieth-century American poetry. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 390 Topics In Gender, Sexuality, and Literature

The advanced women's studies course in the department, focusing on a particular aspect of literature by and about women. Topics might include: "Victorian Literary Women"; "Women, Politics, and Literature"; "Feminist Literary Theory";and similar foci. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: GSWS 390

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 392 Topics In Film Studies

This course explores an aspect of Film Studies intensively; specific course topics vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 389, CIMS 392, COML 391

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 393 Topics In Postcolonial Literature

This course explores an aspect of Postcolonial literature intensively; specific course topics vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 392, SAST 323

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 396 History of Literary Criticism

This is a course on the history of literary theory, a survey of major debates about literature, poetics, and ideas about what literary texts should do, from ancient Greece to examples of modern European thought. The first half of the course will focus on early periods: Greek and Roman antiquity, especially Plato and Aristotle; the medieval period (including St. Augustine, Dante, and Boccaccio), and the early modern period (such as Philip Sidney and Giambattista Vico). In the second half of the course we will turn to modern concerns by looking at the literary (or "art") theories of some major philosophers and theorists: Kant, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, and Walter Benjamin. We end the course in the mid-twentieth century. The purpose driving this course is to consider closely how this tradition generated questions that are still with us, such as: what is the act of interpretation; what is the "aesthetic"; what is "imitation" or mimesis; and how are we to know an author's intention. During the semester there will be four short writing assignments in the form of analytical essays (3 pages each). Students may use these small essays to build into a long piece of writing on a single text or group of texts at the end of the term. Most of our readings will come from a published anthology of literary criticism and theory; a few readings will be on Canvas.

Taught by: Copeland

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CLST 396, COML 396

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 399 Independent Study in Language and Literature

Supervised reading and research.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

2.0 Course Units

ENGL 500 Black Speculative Futures

Why do black cultural producers turn to the speculative? What, in turn, is speculative about blackness? These questions frame this seminar s exploration of how black artists, theorists, and activists imagine different futures, often in the service of critiquing power asymmetries and creating radical transformation in the present. We will explore how the speculative works differently across black literature, visual culture and performance. Additionally, inspired by the multi-disciplinary work that we encounter in the course, we will experiment with crafting our own embodied speculative art in order to better understand its function as both art practice and politics. The course will be divided between discussions centered on close reading of primary and secondary material and creative writing/movement exploration (no previous movement experience necessary). Occasional guest lectures with visiting artists will provide additional fodder for our critical and creative work.

Taught by: Knight

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 377, AFRC 677, ANTH 377, ANTH 677, FNAR 377

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 501 Introduction to Old English Language and Literature

This is an accelerated study of the basic language of Anglo-Saxon England, together with a critical reading of a variety of texts, both prose and poetry. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: GRMN 510

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 505 Electronic Literary Studies Proseminar

This course is designed to introduce advanced undergraduate and graduate students to the range of new opportunities for literary research afforded by recent technological innovation. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ARTH 506, CIMS 505, COML 504

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 512 Fiction Writing Workshop

In this fiction writing workshop, we will be making a conscious effort to transcend our personal reading and writing preferences in order to be apprenticed by divergent literature--aesthetic achievements centered around objective reality, subjective life, and ecstatic confession and play! Most of the works that tend to affect us deeply are the ones that might have wearied us, or even greatly disturbed us. But in time, upon further reflection, we find them rather informative--or even illuminating! We will do a lot of new weekly writing, which will result in a draft and a final version of an original story. You and another classmate will be "hosting" at least one class in open discussion of a weekly reading, and critiquing each other's drafts--focusing on craft, rather than content. You will challenge your self-censorship in a safe and supportive environment, and will read weekly what you write to develop your observational and listening skills in determining the effects of the spoken word.

Taught by: Richardson

Also Offered As: GSWS 512

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 513 Writing through Music

"Not all that's heard is music...Remember the little / lovely notes" - Lorine Niedecker. This writing workshop will focus on the provocative interchanges between music and creative writing. We will consider music of all kinds, all genres (jazz, classical, hip-hop, ambient, folk, electronic, experimental, etc.), as a springboard for the imagination, as a counterpoint to forms of language, and as a tool for cultivating creative writing practices; we will also explore a range of poets and prose writers whose engagement with music reveals new ways of understanding the relationship between sound and the written word. Students will craft their own original pieces in this community-based classroom, where we will read and comment on each other's work as well as on outside readings and recordings; students will also be encouraged to explore the live music scenes where they live, and to create their own music if so inclined. Through regular weekly writing assignments in a range of genres, including poetry, essay, and fiction, we will push the boundaries of our ideas and discover and expand our own listening and reading practices. Course requirements include thoughtful and committed class participation, regular writing assignments, and a final portfolio as well as statement of creative practice.

Taught by: Johnson

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 514 Writing Experiments

A workshop course devoted to cultivating experimental approaches in your writing. Practitioners of prose, poetry, and mixed-genre writing--as well as students who are new to any of these genres--are all welcome. We will test the boundaries of form and language as we hone our skills, experiment with new tools, read a number of writings by authors who break the rules, and explore what taking risks can teach us about our craft.

Taught by: Davids

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 518 King Arthur: Medieval to Modern

From the Middle Ages to the present, stories about King Arthur, the brave deeds of the nights of the Round Table, and Merlin's mysterious prophecies have mesmerized readers and audiences. In this course, we will study nearly 1000 years of literature about King Arthur, beginning with Geoffrey of Monmouth's twelfth-century History of the Kings of Britain and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and ending with Mark Twain, Alfred Lord Tennyson, and the fantasy fiction classic, T. H. White's Once and Future King. We will also be reading authors who repurposed Arthurian literature to think about gender relations (for example, Elizabeth Phelps' critique of domesticity), colonialism and nationalism (Wales and India), and religious cultures (for example, the medieval Hebrew version of King Arthur). Throughout the course, we will think about what Arthurian legends mean to the way we write history and the ways in which we view our collective pasts (and futures). Assignments will include response papers, an oral presentation, and a final paper.

Taught by: Steiner

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 524 Topics Medieval Studies

This course covers topics in Medieval literature. Its emphasis varies with instructor. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 525 Chaucer

An advanced introduction to Chaucer's poetry and Chaucer criticism. Reading and discussion of the dream visions, Troilus and Criseyde, and selections from Canterbury Tales, from the viewpoint of Chaucer's development as a narrative artist. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 522, GSWS 524, ITAL 525

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 537 Renaissance Epic

An introduction to the practice and theory of epic in the early modern period. Specific texts vary with instructor. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 549, FREN 550, GSWS 550

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 538 Major Renaissance Writers

This is a monographic course, which may be on Spenser, Milton, or other major figures of the period. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Sanchez

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 558

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 540 Topics in 18th Century British Literature

This course covers topics in 18th Century British literature. Its emphasis varies with instructor. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 541 Archiving Jazz: Visuality And Materiality In The Phila Jazz Community 1945-2019

This seminar will be organized around three distinct pathways. First, it will serve as an introduction to Jazz Studies and thus be attentive to the ways that jazz music has sparked an interdisciplinary conversation that is wide-ranging and ongoing. Second, we will be partnering with the African American Museum of Philadelphia to consider jazz within the realm of visual art. In light of efforts to map the "black interior," how have visual artists (e.g. painters, sculptors, filmmakers, and photographers) sought to represent jazz? Third, we will endeavor to develop partnerships with the Philadelphia (and beyond) jazz community, especially as it pertains to creating and sustaining an archive that serves as way to understand jazz as an instrument of placemaking and also as a vehicle for jazz musicians to take ownership of their narratives. The seminar will meet at the African American Museum of Philadelphia and be team taught with members of the Museum staff. The course will culminate with a virtual exhibit of visual works and archival materials centering on Philadelphia's jazz community and (if funding is available) a free concert to be held at AAMP. Undergraduates are welcome to register for the course with permission of the instructor.

Taught by: Beavers

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 542, ARTH 519, MUSC 542, URBS 542

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 545 Eighteenth-Century Novel

A survey of the major novelists of the period, often beginning with Defoe and a few of the writers of amatory fiction in the early decades of the century and then moving on to representative examples of the celebrated novels by Richardson, Fielding, and others of the mid-century and after. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 548 English Literature and Culture, 1650-1725

English 548, with its companion, English 549, studies the literature of this period in the context of the artistic and cultural milieu of the later seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Texts usually include works by Dryden, Rochester, Swift, Pope, and Defoe. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 550 Topics in Romanticism

This class explores the cultural context in which the so-called Romantic Movement prospered, paying special attention to the relationship between the most notorious popular genres of the period (gothic fiction and drama) and the poetic production of both canonical and emerging poets. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 553 British Women Writers

A study of British women writers, often focusing on the women authors who came into prominence between 1775 and 1825. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 554, GSWS 553

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 556 Topics in 19th-Century British Literature

This course covers topics in ninteenth-century British Literature, its specific emphasis varying with the instructor. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 560 The Novel

This course will provide an intensive introduction to the study of the novel, approaching the genre from a range of theoretical, critical, and historical perspectives. It may examine conflicting versions of the novel's history (including debates about its relationship to the making of the individual, the nation-state, empire, capital, racial and class formations, secularism, the history of sexuality, democracy, print and other media, etc.), or it may focus on theories of the novel, narratology, or a particular problem in novel criticism. It may attend to a specific form or subgenre of fiction, or it may comprise a survey of genres and texts. See the English Department's website at: www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 563

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 563 Topics in 20th-Century British Literature

Topic for Spring 2016: Making and Marking Time. What is time? In the late 19th century, the questions of how to define time, how to slow down time, and, above all, how to accelerate movement have become focus of the work by many European philosophers who have tried to come to terms with what is now termed as the Industrial Revolution, and the idea of "progress." And can time be understood as something continuous, or is it fragmented, proceeding in fits and burst? Such contemplations on time have deeply influenced writers. Marcel Proust was a reader of Henri Bergson and translated his theories of time into a concept of memory. Thomas Mann has tried to navigate timelessness in a novel set on a "Magic Mountain." Virginia Woolf and James Joyce have pictured an entire universe in a single day (Mrs. Dalloway, Ulysses) while early 20th century Italian Futurists made the contemplation of time part of their manifestos. With them, and with expressionist writers in Germany or writers from the DADA movement there elsewhere in Europe, a reckoning with time would also influence their choice of genre and form, writerly practice, and technique. Parallel to these literary experimentation, pictures were set into motion in scholarly studies by Eadweard Muybridge and finally in the new medium film; Impressionist painters insisted on picturing fleeting moments, and composers experimented with temporal sequences. We may be able to understand a reconsideration of time as driving force for the modern movement, or simply "modernity." In this seminar, we will study a selection of literary texts of the late 19th century and the modernist movement, consider the philosophical background and changes in historiography, and integrate a consideration of the visual arts and music.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 584, COML 537, GRMN 541

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 564 British Modernism

An introduction to British Literary Modernism. Specific emphasis will depend on instructor. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 564

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 569 Topics in 20th-Century American Literature

This course covers topics in 20th-century literature, its emphasis varying with instructor. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 569

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 570 African-American Literature

This course treats some important aspect of Afican-American literature and culture. Some recent versions of the course have focused on the emergence of African-American women writers, on the relation between African-American literature and cultural studies, and on the Harlem Renaissance. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 570, GSWS 570

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 572 Topics in African Literature

This course is based on a selection of representative texts written in English, as well as a few texts in English translation. It involves, a study of themes relating to social change and the persistence of cultural traditions, followed by an attempt at sketching the emergence of literary tradition by identifying some of the formal conventions of established writers in their use of old forms and experiments with new. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 572, CIMS 572, COML 575

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 573 Topics in Criticism and Theory

Topic for Fall 2017: "Object Theory". This seminar will investigate the rise of and ongoing scholarly concern with "objects" and "things," which has emerged from fields such as anthropology and art history as a category of renewed interest for literary scholars, too. We will investigate key contributions to theories of the object by thinkers such as: Mauss, Barthes, Heidegger, Latour, Benjamin, Bill Brown, Jane Bennett, among others. Literary readings will accompany these theoretical texts.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 573, CIMS 515, COML 570, GRMN 573, REES 683

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 574 Introduction to Bibliography

This course offers an introduction to the principles of descriptive and analytic bibliography and textual editing. The history of authorship, manuscript production, printing, publishing, and reading will be addressed as they inform an understanding of how a particular text came to be the way it is. Diverse theories of editing will be studied and put into practice with short passages. The course is generally suitable for students working in any historical period, but particular emphases specified in the current offerings on the English website. www.english.upenn.edu

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 580, HIST 574

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 581 Learning from James Baldwin (1924-1987)

James Baldwin, one of the greatest writers of the twentieth century, spoke to the issues of his times as well as to our own. This class will examine the intellectual legacy that Baldwin left to present-day writers such as Toni Morrison, Charles Johnson, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Thulani Davis, Caryl Phillips and others. We will spend time reading and discussing Baldwin's novels, short stories, plays and essays. In doing so, we will be considering the complex assumptions and negotiations that we make in our day-to-day lives around our identities and experiences built upon gender, sexual preference, the social-constructs called "race," and more. James Baldwin's life and work will be the touchstone that grounds our discussions. We will read Go Tell It on the Mountain, Another Country, The Fire Next Time, and Giovanni's Room and see films I Am Not Your Negro, The Price of the Ticket and The Murder of Emmett Till. Students will research subjects of their own choosing about Baldwin's life and art. For example, they may focus on the shaping influences of Pentecostalism; segregation; racism; homophobia; exile in Paris; the Civil Rights Movement; Black Power, Baldwin's faith, or his return to America.

Taught by: Watterson

Also Offered As: AFRC 581, GSWS 580

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 582 American Literature to 1810

In this course we shall examine the ways various voices--Puritan, Indian, Black, Female, Enlightened, Democratic--intersect with each other and with the landscape of America to produce the early literature(s) of America. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 584 Environmental Imaginaries

Drawing on theories of worldmaking and ethnographic works on culture and environment, this seminar will examine the production of Cartesian-based environmental imaginaries and their alternatives across a range of genres and practices. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 782, COML 615, GRMN 614, URBS 614

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 589 Twentieth-Century American Poetry

See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 577

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 590 Recent issues in Critical Theory

This course is a critical exploration of recent literary and cultural theory, usually focusing on one particular movement or school, such as phenomenology, psychoanalysis, the Frankfurt School, or deconstruction. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CIMS 580, COML 590, GSWS 589, LALS 590

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 591 Topics in Russian and Soviet Cultural History

This course treats some aspect of literary and cultural politics in the 20th-Century with an emphasis on comparative literature and culture. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 653, REES 653

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 592 20th-Century Literature and Theory

This course treats some aspect of literary and cultural politics in the 20th-Century with emphasis varying by instructor. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CIMS 592, COML 592

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 593 Topics in Literature and Society

See the English Department's website at: www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 593, CIMS 590, COML 599

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 594 Theories of Nationalism

You cannot build a wall to stop the free flow of literary and creative ideas. But in constructing narratives of national identity, states have long adopted particular texts as "foundational." Very often these texts have been epics or romances designated "medieval," that is, associated with the period in which specific vernaculars or "mother tongues" first emerged. France and Germany, for example, have long fought over who "owns" the Strasbourg oaths, or the Chanson de Roland; new editions of this epic poem, written in French but telling of Frankish (Germanic) warriors, have been produced (on both sides) every time these two countries go to war. In this course we will thus study both a range of "medieval" texts and the ways in which they have been claimed, edited, and disseminated to serve particular nationalist agendas. Particular attention will be paid to the early nineteenth century, and to the 1930s. Delicate issues arise as nations determine what their national epic needs to be. Russia, for example, needs the text known as The Song of Igor to be genuine, since it is the only Russian epic to predate the Mongol invasion. The text was discovered in 1797 and then promptly lost in Moscow's great fire of 1812; suggestions that it might have been a fake have to be handled with care in Putin's Russia. Similarly, discussing putative Mughal (Islamic) elements in so-called "Hindu epics" can also be a delicate matter. Some "uses of the medieval" have been exercised for reactionary and revisionist causes in the USA, but such use is much more extravagant east of Prague. And what, exactly, is the national epic of the USA? What, for that matter, of England? Beowulf has long been celebrated as an English Ur-text, but is set in Denmark, is full of Danes (and has been claimed for Ulster by Seamus Heaney). Malory's Morte Darthur was chosen to provide scenes for the queen's new robing room (following the fire that largely destroyed the Palace of Westminster in 1834), but Queen Victoria found the designs unacceptable: too much popery and adultery. Foundations of literary history still in force today are rooted in nineteenth-century historiography: thus we have The Cambridge History of Italian Literature and The Cambridge History of German Literature, each covering a millennium, even though political entities by the name of Italy and Germany did not exist until the later nineteenth century. What alternative ways of narrating literary history might be found? Itinerary models, which do not observe national boundaries, might be explored, and also the cultural history of watercourses, such as the Rhine, Danube, or Nile. The exact choice of texts to be studied will depend in part on the interests of those who choose to enroll. Faculty with particular regional expertise will be invited to visit specific classes.

Taught by: Wallace

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 591, ITAL 594

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 595 Post-Colonial Literature

This course covers topics in Post-Colonial literature with emphasis determined by the instructor. The primary focus will be on novels that have been adapted to film. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 594, CIMS 595

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 596 Topics in Contemporary Art

Topics varies. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 596, CIMS 596, FNAR 605, GSWS 596

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 597 Modern Drama

This course will survey several basic approaches to analyzing dramatic literature and the theatre. The dramatic event will be broken into each of its Aristotelian components for separate attention and analysis: Action (plot), Character, Language, Thought, Music and Spectacle. Several approaches to analysing the dramatic text will be studied: phenomenological, social-psychological, semiotic, and others. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 600 Proseminar

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 605 Modern Literary Theory and Criticism

This course will provide an overview of major European thinkers in critical theory of the 20th and 21st centuries. We will pay particular attention to critical currents that originated in Eastern European avant-garde and early socialist contexts and their legacies and successors. Topics covered will include: Russian Formalism and its successors in Structuralism and Deconstruction (Shklovsky, Levi-Strauss, Jakobson, Derrida); Bakhtin and his circle, dialogism and its later western reception; debates over aesthetics and politics of the 1930s (Lukacs, Brecht, Adorno, Benjamin, Radek, Clement Greenberg); the October group; Marxism, new Left criticism, and later lefts (Althusser, Williams, Eagleton, Jameson, Zizek).

Taught by: Platt

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: COML 605, FREN 605, GRMN 605, REES 605

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 616 Approaches to Literary Texts

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CLST 636, COML 616, EALC 715, REES 616, ROML 616

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 705 Interdisciplinary Approches to Literature

This course will explore one or more interdisciplinary approaches to literature. Literary relationships to science, art, or music may provide the focus. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 705

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 707 Orality and Literacy

Major lines of study of the subject of literacy are traceable in at least three disciplines: history of Western literature (especially classical and medieval studies), anthropology, and ethnography of education, including education development in the Third World and psychological and developmental education theory and practice. The linkages between oral and literary communicative modes in different cultures are studied, from a folklorist's viewpoint. The overall task of the course is not to isolate topics of narrowly defined folkloric interest in the broad field of literacy, but to integrate and critique the diverse approaches to literacy as a communicative mode or modes, from the point of view of folklore as a discipline. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CLST 530, COML 530

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 715 Middle English Literature

This seminar will study a number of selected Middle English texts in depth. Attention will be paid to the textual transmission, sources, language, genre, and structure of the works. Larger issues, such as the influence of literary conventions (for example, "courtly love"), medieval rhetoric, or medieval allegory will be explored as the chosen texts may require.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CLST 610, COML 714

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 721 Medieval Poetics

This course may include some of the following fields: studies of medieval stylistic practices, formal innovations, and theories of form; medieval ideas of genre and form; medieval thought about the social, moral, and epistemological roles of poetry; interpretive theory and practice; technologies of interpretation; theories of fiction (fabula) and allegory; sacred and secular hermeneutics; theories of language and the histories of the language arts; vernaular(s) and Latinity; material texts. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current's offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CLST 628, COML 618

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 730 Topics in 16th-Century History and Culture

This is an advanced course treating topics in 16th Century history and culture particular emphasis varying with instructor. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 730

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 731 Renaissance Poetry

An advanced seminar in English poetry of the early modern period. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 734 Renaissance Drama

This is an advanced course in Renaissance drama which will include plays by non-Shakespearean dramatists such as Marlowe, Jonson, and Middleton. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 734

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 736 Renaissance Studies

This is an advanced topics course treating some important issue in contemporary Renaissance studies. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 736

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 739 Milton

An examination of Milton's major poetry and prose with some emphasis on the social and political context of his work. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 745 Restoration and 18th-Century Fiction

This is an advanced course in the fiction of the Restoration and the 18th-Century, the period of "The rise of the novel". See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 748 Studies in the Eighteenth Century

This course varies in its emphases, but in recent years has explored the theory of narrative both from the point of view of eighteenth-century novelists and thinkers as well as from the perspective of contemporary theory. Specific attention is paid to issues of class, gender, and ideology. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 753 Victorian British Literature

An advanced seminar treating some topics in Victorian British Literature, usually focusing on non-fiction or on poetry. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 753

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 761 British Modernism

This course treats one or more of the strains of British modernism in fiction, poetry, or the arts. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 768 Genres of Writing

Please check the department's website for the course description: https://www.english.upenn.edu. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 769 Feminist Theory

Specific topic varies. The seminar will bring together the study of early modern English literature and culture with histories and theories of gender, sexuality and race. Contact with 'the East' (Turkey, the Moluccas, North Africa and India) and the West (the Americas and the Caribbean) reshaped attitudes to identity and desire. How does this history allow us to understand, and often interrogate, modern theories of desire and difference? Conversely, how do postcolonial and other contemporary perspectives allow us to re-read this past? See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 769, GSWS 769, NELC 783, SAST 769

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 770 Afro-American Literature

An advanced seminar in African-American literature and culture. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 770

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 771 Textual Production

This course is based on library work and is intended as a practical introduction to graduate research. It addresses questions of the history of the book, of print culture, and of such catagories as "work," "character," and "author," as well as of gender and sexuality, through a detailed study of the (re)production of Shakespearean texts from the seventeenth to the twentieth century. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 773 Modernism

An interdisciplinary and international examination of modernism, usually treating European as well as British and American modernists. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 774 Postmodernism

An advanced seminar on postmodernist culture. Recently offered as a study of relationship between poetry and theory in contemporary culture, with readings in poststructuralist, feminist, marxist, and postcolonial theory and in poets of the Black Mountain and Language groups. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 622

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 775 African Literature

An advanced seminar in anglophone African literature, possibly including a few works in translation. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 775, COML 700

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 777 African Film and Media Pedagogy

This graduate seminar offers an intensive, critical, and collaborative study of contemporary African film and media production. The past three decades have seen an unprecedented shift in the African media landscape. Not only has the wide availability of satellite media across the continent made international film and television programing part of African popular culture, but moreover the growing film industries within the continent, most notably Nollywood, have altered how Africans are carving an image of themselves on the big and small screens. In partnership with local, regional, and international film and media centers, we will study a range of films--features, shorts, documentaries, and television shows--paying close attention to the means and sites of production as well as the formal qualities that distinguish these works. Many of the films we will analyze stand out both for their exceptional aesthetic quality as well as their remarkable ability to confront pressing political and social themes. But we will also think about trash: what counts as trashy media, and for whom? Who watches it, where, and why? Other questions we will ask include: What particular indigenous modes of storytelling do African films employ? What categories begin to emerge under the umbrella category of "African film and media," and where do diasporan film and media practitioners and critics fit in this landscape? How are these films tackling some of the urgent questions of our times, including migration and globalization; ethnic, political, and economic polarization; gender and sexuality; and massive urbanization and industrialization sweeping Africa and other parts of the Global South? What role do festivals in various countries play in shaping media production and distribution? How important is the concept of authorship in this context? And how do these films challenge the dominant western trope of Africa as a spectacle, instead offering novel ways of picturing everyday African experiences that we rarely glimpse in western media? To explore these questions, we will visit multiple sites of film production, distribution, exhibition, and education, including Scribe Video Center in Philadelphia, Sankofa Films in Washington, D.C., and the College of Performing and Visual Art at Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia. Location and knowledge production are inextricably connected, and by considering African media production from these multiple sites, and collaborating with multiple stakeholders, this course offers a directly engaged pedagogy of the complex artistic, cultural, social, and political dynamics of African audiovisual creation. The travel component of this course entails a day trip to Washington, D.C. during the semester (tentative date: April 2, 2020) and a week-long trip to Addis Ababa at the end of the spring term (students applying for this course should be prepared to travel to Addis Ababa May 30, 2020-June 7, 2020). All expenses for travel, accommodation, and food will be covered, but students will need to hold a passport. Ultimately, this course aims to use film and media production to intervene in a larger discourse on how Africa is figured in the global humanities, not as an absent or passive actor but one actively engaged in producing art and humanistic knowledge that has much to teach us and the world. Admission to the course will be by permission only and students are required to submit a short statement of interest (max. 250 words) to dagw@english.upenn.edu and redkaren@sas.upenn.edu. Students must be prepared to travel to Addis Ababa and Washington D.C. as described in the syllabus, and must hold a passport.

Taught by: Redrobe/Woubshet

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 791, ARTH 791, CIMS 791, COML 791

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 778 20th-Century Aesthetics

This course explores notions that have conditioned 20th century attitudes toward beauty among them ornament, form, fetish, the artifact "women", the moves to 20th century fiction, art manifestos, theory, and such phenomena as beauty contests and art adjudications. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 797

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 783 Major American Author

A seminar treating any one of the major American Writers. Past versions have focused on Melville, Whitman, Twain, James, Pound, Eliot, and others. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 790 Recent Issues in Critical Theory

See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 790, GSWS 790

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 791 Collective Violence, Trauma, and Representation

This seminar is organized as a laboratory space for graduate students and faculty working in a number of adjacent fields and problems. Seminar discussions will be led not only by the primary instructors, but also by a number of guests drawn from the Penn faculty. For the first weeks of the course, we will focus on seminal works in the interlinked areas of history and memory studies, cultural representations of collective violence, trauma studies, and other related topics. Beginning with the Xth week of the course, we will turn to case studies in a variety of geographic, cultural and historical contexts. Additionally, some later sessions of the course will be devoted to a presentation and discussion of a work in progress of a Penn graduate student, faculty member or a guest lecturer.

Taught by: Platt

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 683, LALS 683, REES 666

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 794 Postcolonial Literature

An advanced seminar treating a specific topic or issue in Postcolonial Literature. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 794

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 795 Topics in Poetics

Topics in poetics will vary in its emphasis depending on the instructor. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 799 Topics in American Literature

An advanced topics course in American literature, with the curriculum fixed by the instructor. Recently offered with a focus on American Literature of Social Action and Social Vision. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 799

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 800 Teaching of Literature and Composition

A course combining literary study with training in teaching. These courses will normally be taken by students in their first semester of teaching.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 850 Field List

Students work with an adviser to focus the area of their dissertation research. They take an examination on the field in the Spring and develop a dissertation proposal.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 851 Dissertation Proposal

A continuation of ENGL 850.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 998 Independent Study

Open to students who apply to the graduate chair with a written study proposal approved by the advisor. The minimum requirement is a long paper. Limited to 1 CU.

Course offered summer, fall and spring terms

Activity: Independent Study

1.0 Course Unit

ENGL 999 Independent Reading

Open only to candidates who have completed two semesters of graduate work.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1.0 Course Unit