Energy Management and Policy (ENMG)

ENMG 502 Introduction to Energy Policy

This course provides an advanced introduction to the design and delivery of energy policy at various levels of government in the U.S. and elsewhere. Energy, especially in the context of economic development and environmental sustainability at scales ranging from local to global, presents a career-defining challenge to many disciplines and professions. Because of the breadth of this challenge, this course is not intended to provide a comprehensive survey of the issues, technologies, markets, or institutions involved in energy policy. A full introduction to energy policy requires multiple courses and Penn offers many salient ones across several schools including Law, Wharton, Weitzman, SAS, and SEAS. Instead, this course is intended to teach students how to think rather than what to know about energy policy. As such, this course provides both (a) a foundation for students who want to take additional courses on energy technology, markets, or policy and (b) a synthesis for students who have taken such courses and want to connect ideas and issues across disciplines and professions. Students will complete this course with a solid foundation on energy policy built from a mix of (a) theories that explain the policy process itself and (b) topics that describe the energy system itself. Our seminar discussions will integrate these policy theories and energy topics, and thereby students will also acquire an understanding of timely energy policy debates currently challenging decision makers.

Taught by: Hughes

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: Special Information: Please note that this is a 1 cu graduate level course offered by the Department of City and Regional Planning in the School of Design, not by the undergraduate program in the College of Arts and Sciences. All undergraduates seeking a permit should contact Cornelia Colijn for permission: ccolijn@upenn.edu.

ENMG 503 Topics in Energy Policy

This seminar will explore a collection of ideas influencing energy policy development in the U.S. and around the world. Our platform for this exploration will be seven recent books to be discussed during the semester. These books each contribute important insights to seven ideas that influence energy policy: Narrative, Transition, Measurement, Systems, Subsidiarity, Disruption, Attachment. Books for 2018 will be chosen over the summer; the 2017 books are listed here as examples: Policy Paradox (2011) by Stone, Climate Shock (2015) by Wagner and Weitzman, Power Density (2015) by Smil, Connectography (2016) by Khanna, Climate of Hope (2017) by Bloomberg and Pope, Utility of the Future (2016) by MIT Energy Initiative, Retreat from a Rising Sea (2016) by Pilkey, Pilkey-Jarvis, Pilkey.

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: CPLN 535

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENMG 507 Ideas in Energy Policy

This seminar will explore a collection of ideas influencing energy policy development in the U.S. and around the world. Our platform for this exploration will be seven recent books to be discussed during the semester. These books each contribute important insights to seven ideas that influence energy policy: Narrative, Transition, Measurement, Systems, Subsidiarity, Disruption, Attachment.

Taught by: Mark Alan Hughes

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

ENMG 508 Geopolitics of Energy in Russia and Eurasia

Russia is one of the major players in the international energy market: third largest oil producer after the U.S. and Saudi Arabia and second-largest (after the U.S.) natural gas producers (2019). It is also a top coal and nuclear power producer. But the geopolitical might that the country holds with respect to energy markets stems not as much from how much energy it produces as from how much energy it exports. Today Russia leads global natural gas exports and trails only the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in oil exports. Russia is also reliably one of the top coal-exporting countries. This class will explore the geopolitics of energy focusing on the role of Russia as a leading global energy supplier. In doing so, it hopes to provide a slightly different understanding of global energy that is usually taught from either the U.S. or OPEC angle.

Taught by: Mikulska

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: REES 504

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit