Government Administration (GAFL)

GAFL 500 Half-Term Electives

----- GAFL 500 - 025: Empowering Communities through Real Estate Development---- This course introduces students to residential and commercial real estate development and its inherent risks and benefits. By understanding the development process, students will be better able to enact public policy that promotes the advantages broughtby development while slowing the gentrification process. Using the successful Jumpstart Germantown model, students will learn the 7 JumpSteps of real estate development beginning with creating a development strategy and ending with leasing or selling the property. JumpStart is a successful alternative to the boom and bust cycle of real estate development. It encourages slow growth, scattered site development, and a mix of price points - all of which act to slow gentrification and encourage healthy development that sustains and attracts real economic diversity. This course will include presentations by experts in the real estate industry, in-class discussions and projects, and a visit to a local construction site. Students interested in becoming real estate developers or wanting to learn the ins and outs of the development process will benefit from this course. The 7 JumpSteps of real estate development: 1. Create a Development Strategy & Identify Your Team; 2. Source a Property; 3. Do Your Due Diligence; 4. Find Your Financing; 5. Develop Design & Procure Permits; 6. Customize Construction; 7. Lease/Sell Your Property ----GAFL 500 - 026: Economic Development, Equity and Inclusion---- Virtually every US city experienced a great decline in the second half of the twentieth century. As the manufacturing base of the industrial city deteriorated, as factories moved to the suburbs in search of cheaper land, a vicious cycle ensued. Following the jobs and taking advantage of racial preferences in the suburbs, working and middle class residents fled; as the tax base shrunk, cities were forced to raise taxes to support city services, leading to more joband residential flight. The "inner city" became synonymous with blight and decline, with ominous racial undertones, as urban and suburban political priorities and sentiments began to diverge sharply. Yet by the turn of the 21st century, this process had bottomed out and in many so-called "post-industrial" cities, some of these trends were beginning to reverse. In the 1990s and early 2000s in particular, civic and political leaders had to make tough decisions about prioritizing scarce public resources. Should they focus on revitalizing the downtown core to create jobs, create amenities to induce people with higher incomes to choose their city, grow a tourism economy?Or on rebuilding the most distressed and disinvested inner city neighborhoods? Or on shoring up the so-called "middle neighborhoods" that were able to maintain some stability during the great decline? Layered on top of these issues were (and are) critical questions about who does and should benefit from economic development. Should we prefer "trickle down" policies that focus on high-end development andpresume that they will eventually lead to benefit for the less advantaged in the form of service sector or indirect jobs? Or should cities be more proactive and ensure that public and publicly-enabled investments leverage increases in human capital development, in public goods like parks and schools?This course will focus on case studies from several cities to explore the policy options available to leaders, to assess their decisions, and to consider whether it is possible to promote economic development that is robust and sustainable at the same time as it is equitable and inclusive. This is a half-credit course (0.5 CU) that meets in the first half of the semester. The first class session will meet on January 23, and the last class session will meet on March 13.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

0.5 Course Units

Notes: This is a half-credit (0.5 CU), half-term course, meaning that it will meet in the first or second half of the semester. GAFL 500-026 Economic Development, Equity and Inclusion will be offered the first half of the semester, with the first class session meeting on January 23 and the last on March 13. GAFL 500-025 Empowering Communities through Real Estate Development will be offered the second half of the semester, with the first class session meeting on March 27 and the last on May 8.

GAFL 502 Public Communications

Successful leaders must be able to convey their integrity and their ideas, their vision and their values clearly and convincingly in public settings. By analyzing great political speeches and affording students the opportunity to prepare and deliver different types of speeches, this course teaches the fundamentals of persuasive public speaking while encouraging students to develop their own voice. This is a performance course. Students will gain skill and confidence in their speech writing and public speaking skills through practice, peer feedback, and extensive professional coaching. Class lectures and discussions will focus on persuasive strategies and techniques for handling community meetings, Q and A sessions, and interactions with the media.

Taught by: Sarah Besnoff

Course offered summer, fall and spring terms

Activity: Hybrid Course

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: This is a "hybrid" course, with synchronous, online meetings and once-monthly, on-campus meetings in Philadelphia, PA. Also, please note there is an additional $150 online course fee. Fall 2020 on-campus meetings will be held on the following four (4) Saturdays all day from 9:30 AM - 5:30 PM (break for lunch from 1 - 2 PM): September 12, October 10, November 14, and December 12. Class will meet weekly online for one hour a week on Monday evenings from 6:30-7:30 PM. This course has seats reserved for Fels' students and gives priority to grad students. Non-Fels students should Mindy Zacharjasz at mindyzac@sas.upenn.edu to request a permit. Seats are not guaranteed to post-bacc or undergraduate students.

GAFL 506 The Problem of Jobs: The Philadelphia Story

Once the "workshop of the world" with a diverse manufacturing economy, the City of Philadelphia has lost a huge proportion of its historical economic base in the past 60 years. Today, Philadelphia struggles to find its competitive advantage. Yet, it has tremendous assets that can be leveraged. This course will explore the rise and fall of Philadelphia's manufacturing economy, efforts to forestall its decline in the 1960s and 70s, the racial and gender dynamics of its employment ecosystem, and contemporary strategies to create a sustainable local economy. We will focus on the emerging national recognition of place-based economic development strategies, including the revival of downtown residential living, tourism, and hospitality, and the role of institutions, such as universities and hospitals, in the revitalization of urban America. The course will combine readings in economic and social history and urban economics with case study analyses of local policies aimed at stimulating growth.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GAFL 509 Who Gets Elected and Why? The Science of Politics

What does it take to get elected to office? What are the key elements of a successful political campaign? What are the crucial issues guiding campaigns and elections in the U.S. at the beginning of the 21st century? This class will address the process and results of electoral politics at the local, state, and federal levels. Course participants will study the stages and strategies of running for political office and will discuss the various influences on getting elected, including: campaign finance and fundraising, demographics, polling, the media, staffing, economics, and party organization. Each week we will be joined by guest speakers who are nationally recognized professionals, with expertise in different areas of the campaign and election process. Students will also analyze campaign case studies and the career of the instructor himself. Edward G. Rendell is the former Mayor of Philadelphia, former Chair of the Democratic National Committee, and former Governor of Pennsylvania.

Taught by: Rendell

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: PSCI 320, URBS 320

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GAFL 511 Reinventing Nonprofits

Three nonprofit leaders walk into a bar. What's the conversation? cross fields, focus, size, and target audiences, nonprofits often face similar challenges: public policy changes, evolving stakeholder expectations, new modalities to service requiring investment, rising competition, fickle funders and demographic shifts, all in a world where culture eats strategy for breakfast. Against this backdrop, nonprofits need to re-assess their mission, approach, position, organizational structure and revenue model. Why are some organizations able to pivot and reinvent themselves while others languish? Through readings to frame the issues, speakers offering firsthand accounts of successes and disappointments, projects with practitioners wrestling with real-ime issues, and group discussions to tie it all together,this course is intended to provide students with an intellectual construct, ideas, and experience to be better prepared to enter and advance in the field, and be part of the conversation.

Course offered summer, fall and spring terms

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GAFL 514 Public Finance and Public Policy

This course deals with how governments tax and spend. Students become familiar with the theoretical, empirical, and practical tools and methods used to createand analyze government budgets, as well as the flow of public resources. The course examines public revenues and expenditures within the context of fiscal federalism, in addition to budgeting and resource management and the social, economic, and political forces that shape the fiscal environment within which governments (particularly state and local governments) operate. Significant attention is paid to tax policy analysis and the fiscal crises confronting manylarge cities and states. Additional special topics covered include health care & social security, public education finance, public finance and the environment, bond markets & municipal finance, and public pensions.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GAFL 515 Public Finance Leadership in the New Fiscal Reality

Several factors are intersecting upon U.S. local governments including: muted economic growth, demographics, technological change, ineffective monetary & fiscal policy, and political shenanigans. These are having a profound impact on local government financial health. Many local governments are struggling to structurally balance their budgets, even now several years into one of the longest U.S. post-WWII economic recoveries. Expenditure demand, especially because of rising employee pension and OPEB benefits, is rising faster than expected. Revenues are not rising as quickly as they have historically. This New Fiscal Reality is redefining the concept of municipal distress. Further, the options local governments have to respond to distress may be changing. It might be necessary for local governments to move away from typical solutions like distressed municipality programs and other state level aid. If the current financial trajectory continues, some local governments will not be able to deliver the same service-level they have in the past. New solutions are required. This class will 1) define the New Fiscal Reality; 2) review essential public finance concepts and relationships; 3) study past and recent examples of financial distress and prescribed solutions; 4) survey the current local government financial landscape; and 5) identify solutions public finance leaders can institute for the future. Several local government finance, political and policy experts will speak during the semester. A heavy amount of student engagement is expected to be completed in the form of research, group work, writing, and the critiquing of other students/ work.

Taught by: Kozlik

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GAFL 517 Quantitative Tools for Consulting

The purpose of the course is to study the theory and application of certain, key quantitative methods utilized in financial and fiscal decision-making in state and local governments: defining and measuring efficiency and equity; statistical analysis, multivariate analysis, linear and multipole regression; inter-temporal decision-making; and cost-benefit analysis. Primary emphasis will be on understanding the context and quantitative basics of these methods to prepare students for effective careers in state and local governments. Each student should have a basic understanding of market economics, the roles of government in our market economy, accounting/budgeting basics, and the Philadelphia metro area economy and government.

Activity: Hybrid Course

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: This is a "hybrid" course, with synchronous, online meetings and once-monthly, on-campus meetings in Philadelphia, PA. Also, please note there is an additional $150 online course fee. Summer 2019 on-campus meetings will be held all day from 9:30 AM - 1:00 PM and 2:00 PM - 5:30 PM (break for lunch from 1 - 2) on the following 3 Saturdays: May 25 (Memorial Day weekend), June 22, and July 27. Class will also meet online weekly on Monday evenings from 7:45 - 8:45 PM.****************************************** Fall 2019 on-campus meetings will be held on the following four (4) Fridays all day from 9:30 AM - 5:30 PM (break for lunch from 1 - 2 PM): September 6, October 4, November 1, and December 6. Class will also meet online weekly on Monday evenings from 7:45 - 8:45 PM.********* For permits into this course students should email Vincent George at vigeorge@sas.upenn.edu

GAFL 520 Marketing & Fundraising for Non-Profit Organizations

Fundraising and marketing are complementary tools for building revenue streams and fulfilling the program objectives of nearly every nonprofit organization. This course develops students' ability to market a nonprofit to mission recipients and prospective donors and to solicit funds from individuals and organizations. Through lectures, readings, discussions, and assignments, students are actively engaged in learning how to help an organization achieve its mission and objectives. This includes but is not limited to the assessing an organization's marketing and fundraising capabilities; identifying, segmenting,and creating relationships with target markets and donors; building infrastructure to properly seek and steward gifts; using technology to fulfill marketing and fundraising objectives; and focusing on fundraising and marketing methods such as social media, direct response, events, major gifts, planned giving, and others. This course emphasizes applications. Each student will complete a fundraising and/or marketing plan for a specific organization of their choosing, the structure of which will be derived from the term's assignments. This course will meet in-person from 2:00-5:30pm on the following Fridays and Saturdays: September 9-10, October 14-15, November 18-19, December 2-3.This course will meet virtually Wednesdays 9:00-10:00pm.

Taught by: Hugg

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Hybrid Course

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: This is a "hybrid" course, with synchronous, online meetings and once-monthly, on-campus meetings at the Fels Institute of Government in Philadelphia, PA. On-campus meetings vary by term. Please read the description for dates and times. Also, please note there is an additional $150 online course fee.

GAFL 521 Advanced Public Management

A wait list will be kept for this course. To be added to the wait list, please email Josh Power at joshuarp@upenn.edu. This is a "hybrid" course, withsynchronous, online meetings and once-monthly,on-campus meetings. Synchronous online meetings will be held on Mondays 6:30-7:30pm. On-campus meetings for Spring 2018 will be held on the following Friday afternoons (2-5:30pm) and Saturday mornings (9:30am-1pm): January 12-13, February 9-10, March 16-17, April 20-21. This course is designed to provide students with a scientific foundation of management and leadership theory to inform their actions as current and aspiring public leaders. We will draw from diverse disciplines within applied social science, including management science, positive psychology, organizational psychology, system thinking, and change management. Students will learn these theoretical frameworks and management strategies by applying these theoretical frameworks to their specific professional interests.

Taught by: Lim

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Hybrid Course

1.0 Course Unit

GAFL 526 Municipal Bonds

The course provides a comprehensive overview of the $3.7 trillion municipal bond market, with a focus on public finance investment banking; capital project financing for state and local governments including water, sewer, mass transit and road projects, and non-profit financing for educational and healthcare institutions; the legal and regulatory framework governing the municipal bonds market; rating agency analysis; quantitative modeling; and investor perspectives.

Taught by: Steven Genyk

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GAFL 527 Community Development and Qualitative Methods

Urban planning and community development involve attempting to understand (and then propose methods for solving) complex problems arising from our shared experience of living together in communities. These wicked problems (Rittel & Weber, 1973) often arise from multiple co-occurring influences; economic, socio-cultural, political, geographic/geological, psychological, etc. The fluid and multi-dimensional nature of these problems, therefore, calls for a fluid and multi-dimensional approach to understanding them. Nonetheless, for the better part of the last half a century the majority of efforts to approach such dilemmas has relied largely on quantitative research methods. While quantitative approaches to understanding community dynamics certainly have a demonstrated value, an over-reliance on such methods can come at the expense of the more nuanced understanding available through qualitative research approaches. Quantitative methods are useful in exploring questions such as where, when, who and how many. They are less effective, however, in answering questions of why and how. For answers to these sorts of questions we must turn to qualitative research methods. This course will introduce students to qualitative research approaches currently used in urban planning/community development, along with methods NOT currently in use, but that hold the potential to yield insights into community dynamics. In addition, this course will teach students how to apply these research techniques in the service of producing a professional-quality outcome, as opposed to producing a purely academic end result. To this end, attention will be given to the process by which these research methods are applied, or would be applied, in the professional consulting world and the language and concepts that would be used in that process and setting. Each student will leave the course with a firm understanding of terms and concepts such as: project scope; sub-deliverable(s); final deliverable(s); benchmarks; Notice to Proceed (NTP); project kick-off; out of scope services, front-end and best practices research; and other related professional concepts/terms.

Taught by: Terence Milstead

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GAFL 528 Critical Issues in Public Finance

The Course, Critical Issues in Public Finance will consider contemporary issuesaffecting the fiscal state of local governments. Covered will be issues that have distressed municipalities; the policies/initiatives that seek to rectify such including privatization/public private partnerships; reformation of municipal pensions; sustainable education funding alternatives; and tax policies aimed at promoting economic growth. Students will be assigned to a team, which will identify and provide a solution for an issue or issues plaguing a fictional government. Each team will prepare a written report and make a presentation all of which will constitute the final project. Assignments will serve as the building blocks for the final written work product and presentation developed by each team. The class is divided into four modules. The first module will take a historical look at events behind fiscal distress in municipalities and then explore current day drivers that are causing the same today. Modules two, three and four will examine some of the tools that have been used successfully or otherwise to remediate the drivers of fiscal distress. In each module case studies will be used to further analyze the particular fiscal challenge of a municipality. Written assignments will be based on case studies. Spring 2020 on-campus meetings will be held all day from 9:30 AM - 1:00 PM and 2:00 PM - 5:30 PM (break for lunch from 1 - 2) on the following Saturdays: January 18, February 22, March 28, and April 25. Class will also meet online weekly on Monday evenings from 6:30-7:30 PM. This course has seats reserved for Fels' students and gives priority to grad students. Non-Fels students should contact Vincent George at vigeorge@sas.upenn to request a permit. Seats are not guaranteed to post-bacc or undergraduate students.

Taught by: Matthew Stitt, Folasade Olanipekun-Lewis

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Hybrid Course

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: This is a "hybrid" course, with synchronous, online meetings and once-monthly, on-campus meetings in Philadelphia, PA. On-campus meetings vary by term. Please read the description for dates and times. Also, please note there is an additional $150 online course fee. This course has seats reserved for Fels' students and gives priority to grad students. Undergraduate students, contact Vincent George at vigeorge@sas.upenn.edu to request a permit. Seats are not guaranteed to post-bacc or undergraduate students.

GAFL 529 Nonprofit Financial Management

The course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the primary financial management issues and decisions that confront senior management in nonprofits and government. Students will examine financial analysis techniques from both a practical and strategic perspective as they examine operating and capital decisions. The objective of the course is to allow the student to understand how managers integrate the various discrete financial decisions within a broader framework that allows them to analyze, develop and execute a coherent overall financial strategy.

Taught by: Rosenzweig, Janet

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GAFL 530 Evidence Based Policies of Economic and Political Development

This class provides a "hands-on" introduction to the promises and limitations of using Randomized Control Trials (RCTs) to inform policy makers, practitioners, and academics of the conditions under which policies likely would have a positive effect on economic and political outcomes, in the context of international development. This course has three parts: the first is devoted to understanding the "nuts and bolts" of running field experiments / RCTs in developing countries. In part, we will be reading Glennester and Takavarasha's Running Randomized Evaluations: A Practical Guide. In addition, we will discuss core behavioral concepts from both behavioral economics and social psychology (prospect theory). The second part of the course will be devoted to demonstrating how schools have used RCTs to inform core policy debates (e.g. What are some effective ways to reduce corruption? How can we improve the performance of frontline service providers? How can politicians be more responsive to their constituents?) In the third part, students will be presenting their own research proposals, explicitly designed to address either a core policy question in the developing world or--for those interested--in the USA. Here students will have an opportunity to partner with the Social and Behavioral Sciences Team (https://sbst.gov), which is under the National Science and Technology Council.

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: PSCI 413

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GAFL 531 Data Science for Public Policy

In the 21st century, Big Data surround us. Data are being collected about all aspects of our daily lives. To improve transparency and accountability an increasing number of public organizations are sharing their data with the public. But data are not information. You need good information to make sound decisions. To be an effective public leader, you will need to learn how to harness information from available data. This course will introduce you to key elements of data science, including data transformation, analysis, visualization, and presentation. An emphasis is placed on manipulating data to create informative and compelling analyses that provide valuable evidence in public policy debates. We will teach you how to present information using interactive apps that feature software packages. As in all courses at Fels, we will concentrate on more practical skills than theoretical concepts behind the techniques. This course is designed to expand upon core concepts in data management and analysis that you are learning in GAFL 640: Program Evaluation and Data Analysis. This is a graduate level course and while GAFL 640 is not a pre-requisite, students are expected to have a foundation of data management and analysis before beginning this course. Students should have taken a course with R. Fels and other graduate students receive registration preference, though undergraduate students may request registration via email: vigeorge@sas.upenn.edu.

Taught by: sangenito

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GAFL 534 Infrastructure Investment and Economic Growth: Why, How, and When

Infrastructure is widely acknowledged to be critical for economic success, and infrastructure investments are promoted as leading to economic growth, either at the local or national level. Yet, investments in telecommunications, transportation, energy, or other infrastructure do not always yield the hoped public benefit. This course will help answer the question: Under what circumstances does infrastructure investment contribute to economic growth, and how do we know? Because government resources are limited, advocates often must be creative to find sufficient funding to get desirable projects completed. This course will also help answer the question: How do we pay for the infrastructure projects we want to build? The course will illustrate approaches to answering these questions using case studies of past and proposed investments.

Taught by: Angelides

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GAFL 538 Human Rights, Access To Justice, and Public Policy

Law is central to effective and legitimate governance at all levels (local, national, regional, global). Law not only serves as a basis and frames governance and policy-making processes; it also offers tools and opportunities for public policy, as well as accountability mechanisms. Familiarity and understanding of legal frameworks , mechanisms and dynamics is thus essential for public and private actors involved in policy-making. This course combines theoretical insights as well as practical components. During the first portionof each class students will examine a wide spectrum of international legal frameworks and instruments which set standards for good governance on a variety of themes: eg. Children, women, refugees. This comparative perspective lays the context for US policies. During the second major portion of each class, students will explore how statutes, regulations and case law serve as tools for social change. Students will gain familiarity with relevant US legal frameworks at the Federal, State and Municipal level and at all three branches of government: legislative, executive and judicial. The third portion of every class will explore the role of the non government sectorin public policy. Students will learn about core competencies needed to non profits effective such as: Boards, management leadership, and program

Course offered summer, fall and spring terms

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GAFL 542 Downtown Development

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GAFL 546 Social Enterprise Models and Social Impact Locally and Globally

If you believe in finding innovative ways to make a difference and solve social issues locally and globally, you will benefit from the Social Enterprise and Impact Locally and Globally Course (Social Enterprise). Social Enterprise is designed for those who have a practitioner's interest in the development, leadership, and management of the evolving nonprofit sector and their intersection with the socially conscious private sector and government. The course takes the student through the process of developing a mock social enterprise including idea exploration, testing and plan execution and provides the student with essential strategies and tools to conduct in-depth analysis of a social enterprise leading to their application to a regional social enterprise. This course fulfills an elective for the MPA and the Certificate in Nonprofit Administration.

Taught by: Hansen-Turton, Tine; Torres, Nicholas

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GAFL 548 Grant Writing

This is a "hybrid" course, with synchronous, online meetings and once-monthly, on-campus meetings in Philadelphia, PA. Also, please note there is an additional $150 online course fee. Spring 2019 on-campus meetings will be held on the following Fridays and Saturdays from 9:30 AM - 1:00 PM: January 18 & 19;February 15 & 16, March 15 & 16, and April 26 & 27. Class will meet online on Monday evenings from 7:45 PM - 8:45 PM. This course will provide students with the role of the foundation in philanthropy, what it does, how it does it, and what you need to know to be both an effective foundation manager and foundation grant seeker. From the foundation side, the course will include strategic planning, assessment of project results, and the responsibilities of the foundation grant program officer. From the grant seeker side, it will include identifying the appropriate foundations, making the connection to the foundation, grant writing, and relationship management.

Taught by: Colleen Terrell

Activity: Hybrid Course

1.0 Course Unit

GAFL 549 Leading Nonprofits

Leading Nonprofit Organizations is designed for those interested in leading and managing a nonprofit organization. It takes a practitioners perspective on strategic realities of modern practice. Each section will seek to rapidly orient a new manager to the complexities, strategic issues, & politics. The course is taught through a combination of theory and practice using selected readings, lectures, guest presentations, group activities (Mock senior staff discussions) and field assignments (pairing with area nonprofit leader and attendance at one of the organizations board meetings). This course has seats reserved for Fels' students and gives priority to grad students. Non-Fels students should contact Vincent George at vigeorge@sas.upenn to request a permit. Seats are not guaranteed to post-bacc or undergraduate students.

Taught by: Nicholas D Torres, Tine Hansen-Turton

Activity: Hybrid Course

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: Spring 2020 on-campus meetings will be held on the following Fridays from 9:30 AM - 1:00 PM and 2:00 PM - 5:30 PM (break for lunch from 1 - 2): January 17, February 21, March 27, and April 24. Class will meet online on Monday evenings from 7:45 PM - 8:45 PM.

GAFL 550 Organizational Diagnosis

This course will help participants learn the skills involved in conducting a systemic, organizational diagnosis. Applying organizational diagnosis skills can help organizations make more effective, evidence-based decisions; increase an organization's ability to learn and to apply these learnings; increase organizational effectiveness; and, often, save organizations from flawed and detrimental actions. The course places an emphasis on systems thinking, psychodynamic organizational theory, and appreciative inquiry as ways into understanding organizational issues and problems. Frequently, when organizations find themselves in trouble, e.g. problems in the system about such things as lack of leadership, poor communication, diminished productivity, low morale, etc., there is a tendency to frame the problem(s) simplistically and/or locate blame on a few difficult individuals or groups. However, upon closer examination, problematic issues are often found to be symptomatic and/or symbolic of multiple issues within the organization. This course will help participants to understand how problems, which appear, at one level of the system, (e.g. at the personal or interpersonal level) often represent problems at other levels of the system (e.g. at the group and/or institutional level), or signify a range of inter-related issues. Emphasis will be placed on the diagnostic skills needed to examine government agencies, non-profits, and bureaucracies. It will provide participants with the theoretical constructs and application skills necessary for identifying and framing problem areas, collecting data, and organizing feedback to client systems. Real-time examples will inform our discussions as we consider the relationship between diagnosis, organizational reflection, and appropriate action. Summer 2017 On-Campus Meetings: 9:00am-1:00pm Fridays June 23, July 21 and Saturdays May 20, June 24, and July 22.

Activity: Hybrid Course

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: This is a "hybrid" course, with synchronous, online meetings and once-monthly, on-campus meetings at the Fels Institute of Government in Philadelphia, PA. Weekends vary by term. There is a $150 online course fee.

GAFL 551 Government Relations

In a system of representative government, organizations and individuals with interests at stake often seek the support of a government relations professional. This course addresses government relations from the varying perspectives of the current or aspiring professional, the client, and the government official.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GAFL 555 Using the Political Process to Effect Organizational Change

At one time or another, each of us has said something like, "I know what to do to make some really effective--and possibly even profitable--changes in this organization,but the politics make it almost impossible to get anything done." The sense is that, althaough there are changes that should be made to improve organizational performance, politics (internal, external, governmental) simply obstructs our ability to make a difference. Frustrations notwithstanding, depending on how it is employed, politics can be either an impediment or, more importantly, a source of opportunities for improving organizations. Politics is the art and science of coordinating individuals, departments, management, markets--the entire organizational environment-to effect a balance between the organization's objectives and the methods used to achieve them. As with the other factors that are employed to affect organizational performance-the methods used to improve manufacturing, marketing, sales, finance, and so on-politics is a means that organizations can use to initiate and maintain critical personal and institutional relationships One of the seminar readings--Latimer's "Why Do They Call It Business If It's Mostly Politics?" is used to provide illustrations of the ambiguous nature of much of what is regarded as organizational politics. What is critical to understand and appreciate from the outset, however, is that politics is not an external factor that is imposed on organizations. Politics is not only a means for achieving personal or institutional power; it is also a method for developing and maintaining personal and institutional relationships within and among individuals and organizations of all types. This seminar will discuss organizational politics and the ways that it is used to identify, characterize, and effect change--both within and among organizations. After reviewing several perspectives on organizations and the roles that political processes play in decision-making, a series of cases is presented that illustrate the contexts and conditions for effective political communication and coordination. Prerequisite: Course Permits for non-DYNM students: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Taught by: Gale and Brady

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: DYNM 655

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: A; DYNM Concentration: LMC

GAFL 559 Social Enterprise

With an increasing competitive market, the landscape for private, not-for-profits and government organizations nationally and globally is become more complex and diverse. Leaders across government, private, and not-for-profits are being challenged to lead differently given the diversity and complexity of organizations that cross and blend the traditional organizations that cross and blend the traditional organizational legal structures. The course includes providing students with the essential competencies and tools to create, lead, and influence system and policy change utilizing Social Enterprise, Social Finance, and Collective Impact strategies and tools. The knowledge accumulated through this course will be translated to a working level knowledge of a Critical Thinking that hat is important for any leader or manager in government, private, or the non-profit sectors. Critical thinking involves making judgments based on reasoning: leaders consider options; analyze these using specific criteria; and draw conclusions and make judgments. Critical thinking competency encompasses a set of abilities that leaders use to examine their own thinking, and that of others , about information that they receive through observation, experience, and various forms of communication. This course has seats reserved for Fels' students and gives priority to grad students. Non-Fels students should contact Vincent George at vigeorge@sas.upenn to request a permit. Seats are not guaranteed to post-bacc or undergraduate students.

Taught by: Nicholas D Torres

Activity: Hybrid Course

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: This is a "hybrid" course, with synchronous, online meetings and once-monthly, on-campus meetings in Philadelphia, PA. Also, please note there is an additional $150 online course fee. Spring 2020 on-campus meetings will be held on the following Saturdays from 9:30 AM - 1:00 PM and 2:00 PM - 5:30 PM (break for lunch from 1 - 2): January 18, February 22, March 28, April 25. Class will meet online on Monday evenings from 6:30 PM - 7:30 PM

GAFL 561 Media Relations

This course is designed to help you better understand the role and practice of media relations and messaging in corporate, non-profit, and government organizations in this new media era. You will learn how to research media and reporters, devleop messages, build strategic media plans, generate media coverage, serve as spokespeople, handle crisis situations, and use new media strategies. You will hear from public relations professionals on such topics as working with reporters, developing PR campaigns, and creating effective web outreach programs. Class discussions, reading assignments, research and writing projects, group projects, and case studies offer an engaging and interactive learning environment to expand and apply your knowledge of media relations and messaging. Summer 2017 On-Campus Meetings are 9:30am-1:00pm on Fridays--May 19, June 23, and July 21 and Saturdays--May 20, June 24, and July 22

Taught by: Frank Igwe

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Hybrid Course

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: This is a "hybrid" course, with synchronous, online meetings and once-monthly, on-campus meetings in Philadelphia, PA. On-campus meetings vary by term. Please read the description for dates and times. Also, please note there is an additional $150 online course fee.

GAFL 569 The Politics of Housing and Community Development

This course offers an exploration of how legislative action, government policymaking, and citizen advocacy influence plans for the investment of public capital in distressed urban neighborhoods. Course topics this semester will include an evaluation of the results of City of Philadelphia development policies under the administration of former Mayor Michael A. Nutter, as well as onsideration of plans being undertaken by the administration of Mayor James F. Kenney, who took office in January. The course will also include an assessment of a large-scale property acquisition and development strategy being implemented by the Philadelphia Housing Authority in North Philadelphia and a review of recent and current reinvestment proposals for Camden's waterfront and downtown-area neighborhoods.

Taught by: Kromer

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: CPLN 625, URBS 451

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GAFL 571 Children and Law Seminar

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GAFL 581 Law, Religion, and Politics

This course addresses the contemporary interplay between government, religion, and politics with focus on issues during the COVID-19 pandemic and the 2020 presidential election. Due to the rise in statutory religious liberty statutes at the federal and state levels over the last 20 years--which have placed constraints on government beyond the First Amendment--adjustments between the government's interest and religious liberty have become complicated. Public administrators need to anticipate challenges to government action, including the limits imposed by the First Amendment and these relatively new statutory constraints. This course will teach future public policy administrators how to assess the myriad of instances where policy determinations must take into account the likely impact of politically powerful and connected religious leaders and organizations on the public interest. This knowledge has never been more important than it is now with the COVID-19 pandemic and the 2020 presidential election occurring at the same time, both of which entail fascinating questions related to religious liberty and public safety. This is a "hybrid" course, with synchronous, online meetings and once-monthly, on-campus meetings in Philadelphia, PA. Summer 2020 on-campus meetings will be held the following 3 Saturdays (9:30am - 5:30pm, with a break for lunch 1-2pm): May 30, June 27, August 1. Class will also meet online weekly on Monday evenings from 7:45 - 8:45 PM. This course has seats reserved for Fels students and gives priority to grad students. Fall 2020 on-campus meetings will be held on the following four (4) Fridays all day from 9:30 AM - 5:30 PM (break for lunch from 1 - 2 PM): September 11, October 9, November 13, and December 11. Class will meet weekly online for one hour a week on Monday evenings from 7:45 - 8:45 PM. Please contact Mindy Zacharjasz at mindyzac@sas.upenn.edu to request a permit. Seats are not guaranteed to post-bacc or undergraduate students. NOTE: For Summer 2020, this class will meet remotely. The specific meeting times for this class may be updated to accommodate the new format.

Taught by: Marci Hamilton

Activity: Hybrid Course

1.0 Course Unit

GAFL 599 Independent Study

Activity: Independent Study

1.0 Course Unit

GAFL 611 Statistics for Public Policy

This course is GAFL 611, the required course in statistical analysis for students in the Fels school. This is the required course in statistical analysis for public policy/public administration. Increasingly, this is a quantitative field. Even if you think you'll someday just be (say) a city manager, and not likely to use quantitative analysis yourself, you will likely find yourself working with quantitative data. For example, "policy evaluation" has become a buzzword in recent years in public management and examples involving Fels graduates-or their equivalents-abound. Did giving low-income children after-school tutoring improve their academic performance? Does expanding a free-lunch program reduce the number of student outbursts in classrooms? Did Philadelphia's "big belly" trash cans actually reduce the amount of litter on our streets? Answering any of these questions requires statistical analysis. This course aims to lay the groundwork for you to answer these (and many more!) questions. The point here is not to convince you to adopt a quantitative design for your own work, or that quantitative designs are the "best" designs for answering all questions. Rather, the goal is to give you a set of tools that will enable you to read, critique and eventually produce your own quantitative research. The course will introduce you to the logic of social scientific inquiry, and the basic statistical tools used to analyze politics and public policy.

Taught by: Samantha Sangenito

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: This course has seats reserved for Fels' students and gives priority to grad students. Non-Fels students should Mindy Zacharjasz at mindyzac@sas.upenn.edu to request a permit. Seats are not guaranteed to post-bacc or undergraduate students.

GAFL 612 Quantitative Methods for Policy Analysis

This course will help students learn how to make evidence-based decisions in a public sector context. The course will introduce important data analysis skills and help students evaluate the quality of studies undertaken to measure the impact of public policies and programs. This is a "hybrid" course, with synchronous, online meetings and once-monthly, on-campus meetings in Philadelphia, PA. Also, please note there is an additional $150 online course fee.************ Fall 2020 on-campus meetings will be held on the following four (4) Saturdays all day from 9:30 AM - 5:30 PM (break for lunch from 1 - 2 PM): September 7, October 5, November 2, and December 7. Class will meet weekly online for one hour a week on Monday evenings from 7:45-8:45 PM. This course has seats reserved for Fels' students and gives priority to grad students. Non-Fels students should Mindy Zacharjasz at mindyzac@sas.upenn.edu to request a permit. Seats are not guaranteed to post-bacc or undergraduate students.

Taught by: Claire Robertson Kraft

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Hybrid Course

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: This is a "hybrid" course, with synchronous, online meetings and once-monthly, on-campus meetings at the Fels Institute of Government in Philadelphia, PA. Also, please note there is an additional $150 online course fee. Fall 2019 on-campus meetings will be held on the following Fridays and Saturdays, time TBD: September 6-7, October 4-5, November 1-2, December 6-7.

GAFL 621 Public Economics

This course provides students with the knowledge required to understand government operations in relation to the market economy. In theory of supply and demand, students explore the pricing mechanism, price elasticity, and the effects of price controls on markets. Efficiency is examined in connection with competition and again in connection with equity, and market failure is considered as a reason for government intervention. Cost-benefit analysis is examined in the context of selecting among public investment alternatives. The course also assists students in addressing issues connected with local public goods and economic development.

Taught by: Lauren Russell

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: This course has seats reserved for Fels' students and gives priority to grad students. Non-Fels students should Mindy Zacharjasz at mindyzac@sas.upenn.edu to request a permit. Seats are not guaranteed to post-bacc or undergraduate students.

GAFL 622 Economic Principles of Public Policy

This course will introduce students to key economic concepts such as scarcity, efficiency, monopolies and cost-benefit. Students will practice applying these principles to the range of decisions that public sector executives have to make in order to understand the trade-offs inherent in any public policy or program.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Hybrid Course

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: This is a "hybrid" course, with synchronous, online meetings and once-monthly, on-campus meetings in Philadelphia, PA. Also, please note there is an additional $150 online course fee. ************************************ Spring 2020 on-campus meetings will be held on the following Fridays 9:30 AM - 1:00 PM and 2:00 PM - 5:30 PM (break for lunch from 1 - 2): January 17, February 21, March 27, and April 24. Class will meet online on Monday evenings from 7:45 PM - 8:45 PM.

GAFL 623 Leading People

Leading Diverse Organizations focuses on Strategic Human Resource Management (SHRM), the combination of human resource management (HRM) and the strategic direction of the organization, whether public or non-profit. This course will examine the theory and principles of SHRM as they relate to job analysis , recruitment and selection, compensation, benefits, training and career development, performance management, and labor-management relations. Learning to deal with the daily SHRM challenges makes leaders and managers more effective and more valuable to the organization. This course has seats reserved for Fels' students and gives priority to grad students. Post-bacc students, contact Vincent George at vigeorge@sas.upenn.edu for a permit. Undergraduate students, contact Vincent George 2 weeks before the start of the pertinent term to request a seat. Seats are not guaranteed to post-bacc or undergraduate students.

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Hybrid Course

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: This is a "hybrid" course, with synchronous, online meetings and once-monthly,,on-campus meetings in Philadelphia, PA. Also, please note there is an, additional $150 online course fee. Spring 2019 on-campus meetings will be held on the following Fridays and Saturdays from 2:00 PM - 5:30 PM: January 18 19, February 15 16, March 15 16, and April 26 27. Class will meet online on Monday evenings from 6:30 PM - 7:30 PM.

GAFL 631 Policy Making & Public Institutions

This course introduces students to the theories and practice of the policy- making process. There are four primary learning objectives. First, understanding how the structure of political institutions matter for the policies that they produce. Second, recognizing the constraints that policy makers face when making decisions on behalf of the public. Third, identifying the strategies that can be used to overcome these constraints. Fourth, knowing the toolbox that is available to participants in the policy-making process to help get their preferred strategies implemented. While our focus will primarily be on American political institutions, many of the idas and topics discussed in the class apply broadly to other democratic systems of goverment. The class will be a mix of lecture and cases. Cases are on a diverse set of policy topics, with a goal of illustrating braod themes about the policy-making process rather than the specifics of certain policy areas.

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: This course has seats reserved for Fels' students and gives priority to grad students. Non-Fels students should Mindy Zacharjasz at mindyzac@sas.upenn.edu to request a permit. Seats are not guaranteed to post-bacc or undergraduate students.

GAFL 640 Program Evaluations and Data Analysis

One of the trademarks of the 21st century public management is the usage of data and analysis in the decision-making process. A successful public leader will use empirical evidence to guide her decisions. She knows what types of data and analysis she should ask her analysts to collect and conduct, how to consume the results they generate, and how to transform the analytical results into effective communication with stakeholders. This class will help you become that 21st century public leader. At the end of this course, you willunderstand key principals of performance measures and program evaluation. In addition, you will be able to process, manage, and analyze quantitative data using R, a modern programming language optimized for statistical analysis. I picked R for many reasons: it is free, has many open-source visualization techniques and statistical models, and many statistical and quantitative method courses on campus use it as the language of choice. More importantly, knowing how to use R can be a unique and attractive skill for your employer.

Taught by: Lim, Nelson

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: This course is a requirement for MPA full-time students who started in Fall 2015 or later. It is an elective for MPA full-time students who started Fall 2014 or earlier.

GAFL 641 Program Evaluations & Data Analysis

This is a "hybrid" course, with synchronous, online meetings and once-monthly, on-campus meetings in Philadelphia, PA. Also, please note there is an additional $150 online course fee. This course introduces program evaluation in the context of research methods. Students learn about design and the application of data collection skills to all phases of program/service delivery from needs assessment to analysis of findings to implementation of changes based on results. Students learn to appreciate how these skills can be used as practical tools for identifying problems to developing and implementing programs. This applied course provides students with practical experiences to apply guidelinesof evaluation and research methods in actual program evaluation projects in Philadelphia.

Taught by: Claire Robertson-Kraft

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisite: GAFL 612

Activity: Hybrid Course

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: Spring 2020 on-campus meetings will be held on the following Saturdays from 9:30 AM - 1:00 PM and 2:00 PM - 5:30 PM (break for lunch from 1 - 2): January 18, February 22, March 28, April 25. Class will meet online on Monday evenings from 6:30 PM - 7:30 PM.

GAFL 651 Public Finance and Public Policy

This course deals with how governments tax and spend. Students become familiar with the theoretical, empirical, and practical tools and methods used to create and analyze government budgets, as well as the flow of public resources. The course examines public revenues and expenditures within the context of fiscal federalism, in addition to budgeting and resource management and the social, economic, and political forces that shape the fiscal environment within which governments (particularly state and local governments) operate. Significant attention is paid to tax policy analysis and the fiscal crises confronting many large cities and states. Additional special topics covered include health care & social security, public education finance, public finance and the environment, bond markets & municipal finance, and public pensions.

Taught by: Gershberg

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: CPLN 502

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: This course satisfies a core requirement in the Master of Public Administration and the Certificate of Public Finance.

GAFL 652 Financial Management of Public and Nonprofit Organizations

This course provides an introduction to financial management principles for public and nonprofit organizations. The primary objective of this course is to demystify financial information and improve students ability to effectively engage in financial discussions, regardless of their role in the organization. This course will be focused on the vocabulary and tools necessary to interpret, analyze, and properly communicate financial information in order to develop and execute an appropriate financial strategy. This is a "hybrid" course, with synchronous, online meetings and once-monthly, on-campus meetings in Philadelphia, PA. Summer 2020 on-campus meetings will be held the following 3 Saturdays (9:30am - 5:30pm, with a break for lunch 1-2pm): May 30, June 27, August 1. Class will also meet online weekly on Monday evenings from 6:30 - 7:30 PM. This course has seats reserved for Fels students and gives priority to grad students. Please contact Mindy Zacharjasz at mindyzac@sas.upenn.edu to request a permit. Seats are not guaranteed to post-bacc or undergraduate students. NOTE: For Summer 2020, this class will meet remotely. The specific meeting times for this class may be updated to accommodate the new format.

Taught by: Melissa Neuman

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Hybrid Course

1.0 Course Unit

GAFL 710 Negotiations

To influence public policy you need analytical skills to discover optimal solutions to problems, and good negotiation skills to tailor implementable solutions that address the needs and priorities of multiple stakeholders. What resources you want to invest, whom you engage in discussions, and what you expect to receive in return are open to explicit and implicit negotiations. This course will provide a working understanding of key negotiations concepts, including: Strategic elements of negotiations - interests, goals, positions, rights, power, value creation, high stakes, disputes; Preparation for and the details of negotiation processes; Ethical encournters and conundrums; Leveraging your strengths/understanding your negotiating personality. You will learn cooperative and competitive strategies, have a solid grasp of the decision-making science of negotation, and better understand cognitive processes and emotional dynamics that affect the ways people negotiate. This is a "hybrid" course, with synchronous, online meetings and once-monthly, on-campus meetings in Philadelphia, PA. Also, please note there is an additional $150 online course fee.************ Fall 2020 on-campus meetings will be held on the following four (4) Fridays all day from 9:30 AM - 5:30 PM (break for lunch from 1 - 2 PM): September 11, October 9, November 13, and December 11. Class will meet weekly online for one hour a week on Monday evenings from 7:45 - 8:45 PM.

Taught by: Naomi Wyatt

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Hybrid Course

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: This course has seats reserved for Fels' students and gives priority to grad students. Students should contact Vincent George (vigeorge@upenn.edu) for a permit. Undergraduates, contact Vincent 2 weeks before the start of the pertinent term to request a seat. Seats are not guaranteed to post-bacc or undergraduate students.

GAFL 719 Advanced Budgeting

The course will build on the fundamentals taught in the introductory budgeting unit to help build students' competence in budgetary analysis. Using detailed data from a major city as a course-long case study, and incorporating excel skill-building exercises, students will develop hands-on understanding of budgets by working through such factors as economic drivers of fiscal performance, revenue analysis and forecasting, including tax policy considerations; expenditure analysis and projection, with an emphasis on workforce costs; and capital budgeting and financing. Students will also be introduced to key fiscal policies, budget monitoring and performance measurement, and the development of effective budget communications for various audiences.

Taught by: Nadol and Westerman

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GAFL 732 Public Management

This core MPA course is intended to help each student to learn more than he or she already knows about public management both as a profession and as a field of academic study and to enjoy the company of supportive peers, instructors, and special guests as he or she contemplates a post-MPA career in governance. This course satisfies a core requirement in the Master of Public Administration full-time program.

Taught by: DiIulio/Mulhern

Two terms. student may enter either term.

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GAFL 733 Public Management (MPA Executive Section)

This is a required course for the Executive MPA students in the Fels Institute of Government. The purpose of this course is to provide aspiring public managers with the tools necessary to work with and within organizations. Students will be introduced to public management concepts and gain the competencies required to address the unique challenges in the public sector. Public managers must have technical expertise in planning, staffing, and budgeting; however, technical skills alone are not sufficient to become an effective public manager. Effective public managers must learn to lead inclusive organizations that leverage diversity and defuse tensions among heterogeneous constituents and stakeholders. You must understand the socio-political context of your organization and your success will be dependent on your ability to analyze policy options and persuade stakeholders and supervisors, through effective communications, to pursue the policy options you recommend. Students will explore big questions related to managing and leading public sector organizations, such as: (1) What makes for an effective public manager? (2) Who does a public organization serve? (3) What is the internal and external operating environment of public organizations? (4) How do we know if public organizations are effective? This is accomplished through exploration of theory, concepts, and applications. We will use multiple learning methods including lectures, case studies, and group exercises, to provide students with a robust understanding of public management. This is a "hybrid" course, with synchronous, online meetings and once-monthly, on-campus meetings in Philadelphia, PA. Also, please note there is an additional $150 online course fee.************ Fall 2020 on-campus meetings will be held on the following four (4) Fridays all day from 9:30 AM - 5:30 PM (break for lunch from 1 - 2 PM): September 6, October 4, November 1, and December 6. Class will meet weekly online for one hour a week on Monday evenings from 6:30-7:30 PM. This course has seats reserved for Fels' students and gives priority to grad students. Non-Fels students should Mindy Zacharjasz at mindyzac@sas.upenn.edu to request a permit. Seats are not guaranteed to post-bacc or undergraduate students.

Taught by: Michael DiBerardinis

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Hybrid Course

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: This course has seats reserved for Fels' students and gives priority to grad students. Non-Fels students should Mindy Zacharjasz at mindyzac@sas.upenn.edu to request a permit. Seats are not guaranteed to post-bacc or undergraduate students.

GAFL 735 The Performance Imperative

This course will examine the role of performance management within public organizations (government and nonprofit), including why measuring and managing performance is critically valuable to high-functioning organizations' success. With the increasing pressures on nonprofit and government organizations to continue to produce more with less, performance management systems are becoming a staple within organizations looking to drive better outcomes for their constituents. The goal of a highly functioning performance management system within a public organization is to establish a system of continuous monitoring designed to routinely measure specific quantitative and qualitative indicators in real-time- Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) - in order to improve the organization's ability to achieve specific outcomes through continuous improvement and timely, data-based decision-making. This course will use a diversity of course materials, including real-life examples and case studies to: (a) demonstrate how organizations have successfully implemented performance management systems, (b) indicate the importance of using real-time, valid and reliable data, and linking performance results with effective budget resource allocation (e.g., program and outcome-based budgeting) and constituent satisfaction, and (c) explore practices on how to best protect valuable aspects of performance management systems despite changes in leadership. This is a "hybrid" course, with synchronous, online meetings and once-monthly, on-campus meetings in Philadelphia, PA. Summer 2020 on-campus meetings will be held the following 3 Fridays (9:30am - 5:30pm, with a break for lunch 1-2pm): May 29, June 36, July 31. Class will also meet online weekly on Monday evenings from 7:45-8:45 pm. This course has seats reserved for Fels students and gives priority to grad students. Please contact Mindy Zacharjasz at mindyzac@sas.upenn.edu to request a permit. Seats are not guaranteed to post-bacc or undergraduate students. NOTE: For Summer 2020, this class will meet remotely. The specific meeting times for this class may be updated to accommodate the new format.

Taught by: Rachel Meadows, Matthew Stitt

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Hybrid Course

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: This course has seats reserved for Fels' students and gives priority to grad students. Non-Fels students should Mindy Zacharjasz at mindyzac@sas.upenn.edu to request a permit. Seats are not guaranteed to post-bacc or undergraduate students.

GAFL 799 MPA Capstone

Successful completion of a Capstone project is one of the academic requirements for the Master of Public Administration (MPA) at the University of Pennsylvanias Fels Institute of Government. This core course is designed to give students direct guidance as they apply and consolidate knowledge and skills gained across the curriculum through the completion of a rigorous Capstone project. Capstone students are responsible for designing and completing a public policy or public administration-related project and presenting a deliverable (described below) to the Fels community and other stakeholders.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: This is a "hybrid" course, with synchronous, online meetings and once-monthly, on-campus meetings in Philadelphia, PA. Also, please note there is an additional $150 online course fee. Summer 2019 on-campus meetings will be held all day from 9:30 AM - 1:00 PM and 2:00 PM - 5:30 PM (break for lunch from 1 - 2) on the following 3 Saturdays: May 25 (Memorial Day weekend), June 22, and July 27. Class will also meet online weekly on Monday evenings from 7:45 - 8:45 PM.