Gender, Sexuality & Women's Studies (GSWS)

GSWS 002 Gender and Society

This course will introduce students to the ways in which sex, gender, and sexuality mark our bodies, influence our perceptions of self and others, organize families and institutions, delimit opportunities for individuals and groups of people, as well as impact the terms of local and transnational economic exchange. We will explore the ways in which sex, gender, and sexuality work with other markers of difference and social status such as race, age, nationality, and ability to further demarcate possibilities, freedoms, choices, and opportunities available to people. Prerequisite: Requirement for Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies major and minor

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Beetham

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 003 Introduction to Sexuality Studies and Queer Theory

This course will introduce students to the historical and intellectual forces that led to the emergence of queer theory as a distinct field, as well as to recent and ongoing debates about gender, sexuality, embodiment, race, privacy, global power, and social norms. We will begin by tracing queer theory's conceptual heritage and prehistory in psychoanalysis, deconstruction and poststructuralism, the history of sexuality, gay and lesbian studies, woman-of-color feminism, the feminist sex wars, and the AIDS crisis. We will then study the key terms and concepts of the foundational queer work of the 1990s and early 2000s. Finally, we will turn to the new questions and issues that queer theory has addressed in roughly the past decade. Students will write several short papers.

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: ENGL 003

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 004 The Family

Family life is deeply personal but at the same time is dramatically impacted by social forces outside of the family. In this course we will examine how families are organized along the lines of gender, sexuality, social class, and race and how these affect family life. We will consider how family life is continually changing while at the same time traditional gender roles persist. For example, how "greedy" workplaces, which require long work hours, create work-family conflicts for mothers and fathers. We will also examine diverse family forms including single-parent families, blended families, families headed by same-gender parents, and families headed by gender non-conforming parents. The lectures will also examine how economic inequality shapes family life. Students will have the opportunity to apply key concepts to daily life.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Lareau

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: SOCI 004, SOCI 524

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 007 Population and Society

The course serves as an introduction to the study of population and demography, including issues pertaining to fertility, mortality, migration, and family formation and structure. Within these broad areas we consider the social, economic, and political implications of current trends, including: population explosion, baby bust, the impact of international migration on receiving societies, population aging, racial classification, growing diversity in household composition and family structure, population and environmental degradation, and the link between population and development/poverty.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Flippen, Harknett, Kohler, Zuberi

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: SOCI 007

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 008 Critical Speaking Seminar

American political discourse, especially since September 11th, has often depicted Islam as an oppressive force from which both Muslims and non-Muslims, particularly women and gender/sexual minorities, must be saved. In this CWiC critical speaking seminar, we will investigate how oral and written narratives-such as political rhetoric, apologetics and historical sources - claim to establish unassailable "facts" about Islam, Muslims and the Middle East. We will also investigate how the notion of empire-both in its traditionally understood form in Islamic and European history, as well as in its iterations as US Military and soft power-privileges certain voices over others, and how we can reclaim the voices of the marginalized in both contemporary discourse as well as historical oral traditions.

Taught by: Rafii

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: COML 014, NELC 008

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 017 Topics in Literature

An introduction to Writing about Literature, with emphasis on a particular theme, genre, or period. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of current offerings.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: CIMS 015, CLST 019, ENGL 015, LALS 016

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 028 Introduction to Feminist Philosophy

This course is an introduction to feminist thought, both in theory and in practice. We will consider how feminist thought emerged and evolved, as well as how feminist theories respond to various intellectual, social and political challenges. Questions we will address include: What exactly is feminism? How does one's gender identity impact one's lived experiences? How should we revise, reformulate, or rethink traditional answers to politial and ethical issues in light of feminist theories? How can feminist analyses contribute to the development of better science, and our conceptions of knowledge? Prerequisite: Offered through the College of General Studies.

Taught by: M. Meyer

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: PHIL 028

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 040 Womanism and Identity Politics in the Realm of Hip-Hop

This course centers on the intersections of womanism, woman of color identity development, and agency within hip-hop culture. We will touch on several topics that uncover the condition of minoritized women in hip-hop media, including creating/owning space, lyrical assault, defining womanhood, sexuality, and fetishes. In exploring music, literature, advertisements, film, and television, we will discuss the ways women of color construct understandings of self, while navigating and reimagining reality within hip-hop contexts.

Taught by: Patterson

Also Offered As: URBS 050

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 050 The Romantic Period

This course offers an introduction to the literature of the Romantic period (ca. 1770-1830). Some versions of this course will incorporate European romantic writers, while others will focus exclusively on Anglo-American romanticism, and survey authors such as Austen, Blake, Brockden Brown, Byron, Coleridge, Emerson, Irving, Keats, Radcliffe, Scott, Shelley, and Wordsworth. The primary for this course is ENGL-050. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Also Offered As: ENGL 050

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 060 Latina/o Literature and Culture

This course offers a broad introduction to the study of Latina/o/x culture. We will examine literature, theater, visual art, and popular cultural forms, including murals, poster art, graffiti, guerrilla urban interventions, novels, poetry, short stories, and film. In each instance, we will study this work within its historical context and with close attention to the ways it illuminates class formation, racialization, and ideologies of gender and sexuality as they shape Latino/a/xs' experience in the U.S. Topics addressed in the course will include immigration and border policy, revolutionary nationalism and its critique, anti-imperialist thought, Latinx feminisms, queer latinidades, ideology, identity formation, and social movements. While we will address key texts, historical events, and intellectual currents from the late 19th century and early 20th century, the course will focus primarily on literature and art from the 1960s to the present. All texts will be in English.

Taught by: Sternad Ponce de Leon

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 070, COML 070, ENGL 070, LALS 060

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 081 African-American Literature

An introduction to African-American literature, typically ranging across a wide spectrum of moments, methodologies, and ideological postures, from Reconstruction and the Harlem Renaissance to the Civil Rights Movement. Most versions of this course will begin in the 19th century; some versions of the course will concentrate only on the modern period. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 081, ENGL 081

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 090 Gender, Sexuality, and Literature

This course will focus on questions of gender difference and of sexual desire in a range of literary works, paying special attention to works by women and treatments of same-sex desire. More fundamentally, the course will introduce students to questions about the relation between identity and representation. We will attend in particular to intersections between gender, sexuality, race, class, and nation, and will choose from a rich vein of authors: Mary Wollstonecraft, Jane Austen, Mary Shelley, Lord Byron, the Brontes, Christina Rossetti, George Eliot, Oscar Wilde, Henry James, Gertrude Stein, Zora Neale Hurston, E. M. Forster, Virginia Woolf, Nella Larsen, Radclyffe Hall, Willa Cather, Elizabeth Bishop, Jean Rhys, James Baldwin, Sylvia Plath, Bessie Head, Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, Cherrie Moraga, Toni Morrison, Michael Cunningham, Dorothy Allison, Jeanette Winterson, and Leslie Feinberg. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: COML 090, ENGL 090

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 096 Theories of Gender and Sexuality

What makes men and women different? What is the nature of desire? This course introduces students to a long history of speculation about the meaning and nature of gender and sexuality -- a history fundamental to literary representation and the business of making meaning. We will consider theories from Aristophanes speech in Platos Symposium to recent feminist and queer theory. Authors treated might include: Plato, Shakespeare, J. S. Mill, Mary Wollstonecraft, Sigmund Freud, Virginia Woolf, Simone de Beauvoir, Adrienne Rich, Audre Lorde, Michel Foucault, Gayle Rubin, Catherine MacKinnon, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Judith Butler, bell hooks, Leo Bersani, Gloria Anzaldua, David Halperin, Cherrie Moraga, Donna Haraway, Gayatri Spivak, Diana Fuss, Rosemary Hennesy, Chandra Tadpole Mohanty, and Susan Stryker. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: Sanchez

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 096, ENGL 096

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 101 Study of an Author

This is an introduction to literary study through the works of a single author--often Shakespeare, but some versions of this course will feature other writers. (For offerings in a given semester, please see the on-line course descriptions on the English Department website.) We will read several works and approach them--both in discussion and in writing--from a range of critical perspectives. The author's relation to his or her time, to literary history generally, and to the problems of performance, are likely to be emphasized. This course is designed for the General Requirement; it is also intended to serve as a first or second course for prospective English majors. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 101, ENGL 101

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 102 Study of a Literary Theme

The primary for this course is the English Department. When the course content includes gender, sexuality and women's studies it will be cross-listed with GSWS. See additional information and description on the English Department's website: https://www.english.upenn.edu

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: CIMS 112, COML 245, ENGL 102

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 103 Sex and Human Nature

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of sex in humans. Within an evolutionary framework, the course examines genetic, physiological, ecological, social and behavioral aspects of sex in humans. After providing the basic principles of evolutionary biology, the course delves into the development of sexual anatomy and physiology. Among the subjects to be explored are sex determination, the nature of orgasms, and the sexual development of females and males from birth to adulthood. The role of ecology and social life in shaping human mating patterns is also evaluated using ethnographic and cross-cultural materials from a variety of human cultures. In particular, the course examines why humans marry or pair bond, whether there is a biological basis of love, which biological and psychological factors produce jealousy. Finally, the course explores topics relevant to human sexuality today, such as the "hook-up culture", contraception and abortion, sex work, sexual transmitted diseases, and the ethical and legal dimensions of human sexuality.

For BA Students: Living World Sector

Taught by: Schurr

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANTH 104

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 104 Sex and Gender in Ancient Greece and Rome

What is being a man, being a woman, being masculine, being feminine, being neither, being both? Is sex about pleasure, domination, identity, reproduction, or something else? Are sexual orientation and gender identity innate? How can words, myths and stories inform cultural assumptions about sex and gender? Did people in ancient times have a concept of sexuality? How do gendered English terms (like "girly", "effeminate", or "feisty") compare to gendered ancient Greek and Latin terms, like virtus, which connotes both "virtue" and "masculinity"? Why did the Roman and English speaking worlds have to borrow the word "clitoris" from the ancient Greeks? How did people in antiquity understand consent? Can we ever get access to the perspectives of ancient women? In this introductory undergraduate course, we will learn about sex and gender in ancient Greece and Rome. We will discuss similarities and differences between ancient and modern attitudes, and we will consider how ancient texts, ancient art, ancient ideas and ancient history have informed modern western discussions, assumptions and legislation. Our main readings will be of ancient texts, all in English translation; authors studied will include Ovid, Aristophanes, Plato, Euripides, and Sappho. Class requirements will include participation in discussion as well as quizzes, reading responses, and a final exam.

Taught by: Wilson

Also Offered As: CLST 101, COML 105

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 109 Gender, Sexuality, & Religion

What does it mean to be a gendered individual in a Muslim, Hindu, Jewish, Christian, Buddhist, or Sikh religious tradition? How important are gender differences in deciding social roles, ritual activities, and spiritual vocations? This course tackles these questions, showing how gender - how it is taught, performed, and regulated - is central to understanding religion. In this course we will learn about gendered rituals, social roles, and mythologies in a range of religious traditions. We will also look at the central significance of gender to the field of religious studies generally. The first part of the course will be focused on building a foundation of knowledge about a range of religious traditions and the role of gender in those traditions. This course emphasizes religious traditions outside the West. Although it is beyond the scope of this class to offer comprehensive discussions of any one religious tradition, the aim is to provide entry points into the study of religious traditions through the lens of gender. This course will emphasize both historical perspectives and contemporary contexts. We will also read religion through feminist and queer lenses - we will explore the key characteristics of diverse feminist and queer studies approaches to religion, as well as limits of those approaches.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: Robb

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: FOLK 029, RELS 005

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 111 Gender and Elections in America and Beyond

This course tackles four theoretical and empirical challenges related to gender and political equality: the extension of citizenship rights and voting rights to women; the problem of women's persistent under-representation in politics; the nature of the gender gap in preferences across time and space; and the possibilities for substantive representation. We will focus about half the class on the US (contrasting the experiences of white and black women and men in politics) and the other half on other countries, detailing how different party systems, variation in electoral rules (like proportional representation), and institutional innovations such as gender quotas, enable or constrain gender equality in politics.

Taught by: Teele

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: PSCI 111

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 114 Discrimination: Sexual and Racial Conflict

This course is concerned with the structure, the causes and correlates, and the government policies to alleviate discrimination by race and gender in thee United States.The central focus of the course is on employment differences by race and gender and the extent to which they arise from labor market d discrimination versus other causes, although racial discrimination in housing is also considered. After a comprehensive overview of the structures of labo and housing markets and of nondiscriminatory reasons (that is, the cumulative effects of past discrimination and/or experiences) for the existence of group differentials in employment, wages and residential locations, various theorie ofthe sources of current discrimination are reviewed and evaluated. Actual government policies and alternatives policies are evaluated in light of both the empirical evidence on group differences and the alternative theories of discrimination.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Madden

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 112, SOCI 112

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 118 Iranian Cinema: Gender, Politics and Religion

This seminar explores Iranian culture, society, history and politics through the medium of film. We will examine a variety of cinematic works that represent the social, political, economic and cultural circumstances of contemporary Iran, as well as the diaspora. Along the way, we will discuss issues pertaining to gender, religion, nationalism, ethnicity, and the role of cinema in Iranian society and beyond. Discussions topics will also include the place of the Iranian diaspora in cinema, as well as the transnational production, distribution, and consumption of Iranian cinema. Films will include those by internationally acclaimed filmmakers, such as Rakhshan Bani-Etemad, Asghar Farhadi, Bahman Ghobadi, Abbas Kiarostami, Mohsen Makhmalbaf, Dariush Mehrjui, Tahmineh Milani, Jafar Panahi, Marjane Satrapi and others. All films will be subtitled in English. No prior knowledge is required.

Taught by: Entezari

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CIMS 118, COML 120, NELC 118, NELC 618

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 119 Witchcraft and Possession

This course explores world witchcraft and possession from the persecutions of the early seventeenth century through the rise of Wicca in the twentieth century. The mere mention of these terms, or of such close cousins as demonology, sorcery, exorcism, magic, and the witches Sabbath, raises clear ethnographic and historical challenges. How can the analysis of witchcraft-- including beliefs, patterns of accusation, the general social position of victims, the intensity and timing of witch hunts, and its relation to religious practice, law, language, gender, social marginalization, and property--lead us to a more humane understanding of belief and action? Films such as The Exorcist, The Blair Witch Project, The Crucible, and Three Sovereigns for Sarah will focus discussion.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: St.George

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ANTH 118, HIST 118, RELS 109

Activity: Recitation

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 122 The Sociology of Gender

Gender is an organizing principle of society, shaping social structures, cultural understandings, processes of interaction, and identities in ways that have profound consequences. It affects every aspect of people's lives, from their intimate relationships to their participation in work, family, government, and other social institutions and their place in the stratification system, Yet gender is such a taken for granted basis for differences among people that it can be hard to see the underlying social structures and cultural forces that reinforce or weaken the social boundaries that define gender. Differences in behavior, power,and experience are often seen as the result of biological imperatives or of individual choice. A sociological view of gender, in contrast, emphasizes how gender is socially constructed and how structural constraints limit choice. This course examines how differences based on gender are created and sustained, with particular attention to how other important bases of personal identity and social inequality--race and class-interact with patterns of gender relations. We will also seek to understand how social change happens and how gender inequality might be reduced.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Leidner

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: SOCI 122

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 125 Sex and Representation

This course explores literature that resists normative categories of gender and sexuality. By focusing on figures writing from the margins, we will explore how radical approaches to narrative form and subject-matter invite us to think in new ways about desire and identity. We will read texts that blur the boundaries between fact and fiction, hybridizing the genres of poetry, drama, and autobiography to produce new forms of expression, such as the graphic novel, auto-fiction, and prose poetry. From Viriginia Woolf's gender-bending epic, Orlando, to Tony Kushner's Angels in America, this course traces how non-normative desire is produced and policed by social and literary contexts - and how those contexts can be re-imagined and transformed.

Taught by: Halstead

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: CIMS 125, COML 127

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 135 Creative Non-Fiction Writing

A workshop course in the writing of creative nonfiction. Topics may include memior, faily history, travel writing, docunmentary, and other genres in which literary structures are brought to bear on the writing of nonfiction prose. May be repeated for credit with a different instructor. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 134, ENGL 135, URBS 135

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 145 Advanced Non-Fiction Writing

An advanced writing course devoted to creative nonfiction. Topics may include writing for literary magazines; writing for journals of opinion; memior; family history; travel wriing; documentary; or other topics and genres in which literary structures inform the writing of nonfiction prose. Offerings may address writing as a public act, questions of ethics and policy, methods of research and fact-checking, marketing, and how to understand and enter the worl of publishing. May be repeated for creit with a different instructor. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ENGL 145

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 149 Law and Social Policy on Sexuality and Reproduction

This course will examine how statutory law, court decisions and other forms of social policy encourage or discourage various forms of sexuality, reproduction and parenting. Such issues as contraception, abortion, gay and lesbian rights, reproductive technology, family violence, and welfare and family policies will be covered.

Taught by: Tracy

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 152 Love and Loss in Japanese Literary Traditions: In Translation

How do people make sense of the multiple experiences that the simple words "love" and "loss" imply? How do they express their thoughts and feelings to one another? In this course, we will explore some means Japanese culture has found to grapple with these events and sensations. We will also see how these culturally sanctioned frameworks have shaped the ways Japanese view love and loss. Our materials will sample the literary tradition of Japan from earliest times to the early modern and even modern periods. Close readings of a diverse group of texts, including poetry, narrative, theater, and the related arts of calligraphy, painting, and music will structure our inquiry. The class will take an expedition to nearby Woodlands Cemetery to experience poetry in nature. By the end of the course, you should be able to appreciate texts that differ slightly in their value systems, linguistic expressions, and aesthetic sensibilities from those that you may already know. Among the available project work that you may select, if you have basic Japanese, is learning to read a literary manga. All shared class material is in English translation.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Taught by: Chance

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: EALC 152, EALC 552

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 156 Queer German Cinema

Taught in English. This course offers an introduction into the history of German-language cinema with an emphasis on depictions of lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and queer themes. The course provides a chronological survey of Queer German Cinema from its beginnings in the Weimar Republic to its most recent and current representatives, accompanied throughout by a discussion of the cultural-political history of gay rights in the German-speaking world. Over the course of the semester, students will learn not only cinematic history but how to write about and close-read film. No knowledge of German or previous knowledge required.

Taught by: Fleishman

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CIMS 156, COML 156, GRMN 156

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 160 Sex and Socialism

This seminar examines classic and current scholarship and literature on gender and sexuality in contemporary Eastern Europe, and examines the dialogue and interchange of ideas between East and West. Although the scholarly and creative works will primarily investigate the changing status of women during the last three decades, the course will also look at changing constructions of masculinity and LGBT movements and communities in the former communist bloc. Topics will include: the woman question before 1989; gender and emerging nationalisms; visual representations in television and film; social movements; work; romance and intimacy; spirituality; and investigations into the constructed concepts of "freedom" and "human rights."

Taught by: Ghodsee

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANTH 160, EEUR 160, EEUR 560, RUSS 160

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 162 Women in Jewish Literature

"Jewish woman, who knows your life? In darkness you have come, in darkness do you go." J. L. Gordon (1890). This course will bring into the light the long tradition of women as readers, writers, and subjects in Jewish literature. All texts will be in translation from Yiddish and Hebrew, or in English. Through a variety of genres -- devotional literature, memoir, fiction, and poetry -- we will study women's roles and selves, the relations of women and men, and the interaction between Jewish texts and women's lives. The legacy of women in Yiddish devotional literature will serve as background for our reading of modern Jewish fiction and poetry from the past century. The course is divided into five segments. The first presents a case study of the Matriarchs Rachel and Leah, as they are portrayed in the Hebrew Bible, in rabbinic commentary, in pre-modern prayers, and in modern poems. We then examine a modern novel that recasts the story of Dinah, Leah's daughter. Next we turn to the seventeenth century Glikl of Hamel, the first Jewish woman memoirist. The third segment focuses on devotional literature for and by women. In the fourth segment, we read modern women poets in Yiddish, Hebrew, and English. The course concludes with a fifth segment on fiction written by women in Yiddish, Hebrew, and English. All readings and lectures in English.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Taught by: Hellerstein

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: GRMN 262, JWST 268, NELC 154

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 165 The Asian Caribbean

This course complicates prevailing understandings of the Caribbean and extends the boundaries of Asian America by exploring the histories, experiences, and contributions of Asians in the Caribbean. In particular, we will focus on the migrations of Chinese and Indian individuals to Cuba, Trinidad, and Guyana as well as how their descendants are immigrating to the United States. We will examine the legal and social debates surrounding their labor in the 19th century, how they participated in the decolonization of the region, and how their migration to the United States complicates our understandings of ethnicity and race. Ultimately, through our comparative race approach, we will appreciate that the Caribbean is more than the Black Caribbean, it is also the Asian Caribbean.

Taught by: Pillai

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: ASAM 165, SAST 166

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 199 Independent Study

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 201 Divinities, Diviners and Divinations: Religions of the African Diaspora

This undergraduate course is designed to provide students with a broad introduction to major themes within African Diasporic Religions. This is an interdisciplinary course. We will be drawing upon various theoretical methods, i.e. historical, ethnographical, and autobiographical. Additionally, we will be examining visual media to understand the presence and value of African Diasporic Religions in the 20th/21st century. Special attention will be given to Vodou, Santeria, and Candomble in the Americas. Thematically, we will work through concepts of the diaspora; memory, myth and authenticity; ritual and material practices; borders, migration, gender and sexuality, religious commodities and exchange. As we traverse through these various religious traditions, it is through the readings, lectures, invited speakers, films and class discussions that we will develop a complex understanding of integrative religious worldviews that impacts every aspect of life: family structure, gender relations, education, healing, economics, politics, arts, and so on. It is with the hopes that we can apprehend how these traditions are indeed an American Religion.

Taught by: Nwokocha

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 201

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 202 Spirit possession in Caribbean Religions

This course is designed to provide students with a broad introduction to possession experiences in Caribbean Religions. Through historical, ethnographic, autobiographical, literary and visual texts this course examines complex, gendered practices within the possession process, the vibrant spiritual energy that sustains communal connections during religious ceremonies, and the transnational imaginations that animate Caribbean religious practices in the Americas. Special attention will be given to Santeria, Candomble, Vodou, Myal, Palo Monte, and Revival Zion in the Americas. Possession is a process through which gender and sexuality can be performed, contesting national and regional discourses of sexuality, gender, and race in the Caribbean. Thematically, we will work through concepts of memory, community, adornment, ritual, borders, and the senses. We will investigate religious ritual practices to understand various religious worldviews that shape communities' religious and social lives.

Taught by: Nwokocha

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 202

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 214 Introduction to Persian Poetic Tradition

This course introduces some of the major genres and themes of the millennium-old Persian poetic tradition from ancient to modern Iran. Epic and romance, love and mysticism, wine and drunkenness, wisdom and madness, body and mind, sin and temptation are some of the key themes that will be explored through a close reading of poems in this course.The course suits undergraduate students of all disciplines, as it requires no prior knowledge of or familiarity with the Persian language or the canon of Persian literature. All teaching materials are available in English translation. Students are expected to attend seminars and take part in discussions

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Taught by: Shams

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: COML 215, HIST 226, NELC 216, NELC 516

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 215 Asian American Gender and Sexualities

This course explores the intersection of gender, sexuality, and race in Asian America. Through interdisciplinary and cultural texts, students will consider how Asian American gender and sexualities are constructed in relation to racism while learning theories on and methods to study gender, sex, and race. We will discuss masculinities, femininities, race-conscious feminisms, LGBTQ+ identities, interracial and intraracial relationships, and kinship structures.

Taught by: Rupa Pillai

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: ASAM 215, SAST 215

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 216 Gender and Health

Women's health is a constant refrain of modern life, prompting impassioned debates that speak to the fundamental nature of our society. Women's bodies are the tableaux across which politicians, physicians, healthcare professional, activists, and women themselves dispute issues as wide-ranging as individual versus collective rights, the legitimacy of scientific and medical knowledge, the role of the government in healthcare, inequalities of care, and the value of experiential knowledge, among many others. Understanding the history of these questions is crucial for informed engagement with contemporary issues.

Taught by: Linker

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: HSOC 216

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 217 CU In India - Topics Course

C.U. in India is a hybrid, domestic/overseas course series which provides students with the opportunity to have an applied learning and cultural experience in India. The 2-CU course requires: 1) 15 classroom hours at Penn in the Fall term 2) A 12-Day trip to India with the instructor during the winter break to visit key sites and conduct original research (sites vary) 3) 15 classroom hours at Penn in the Spring term and 4) A research paper, due at the end of the spring term. Course enrollment is restricted to students admitted to the program. For more information, and the program application, go to http://sites.sas.upenn.edu/cuinindia

Two terms. student must enter first term.

Also Offered As: ARTH 317, COML 216, SAST 217, SAST 517

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 218 Media and Culture in Contemporary Iran

This course offers a comprehensive introduction to the culture and media of modern Iran, with a critical perspective on issues such as identity formation, ethnicity, race, and nation-building. It focuses on how these issues relate to various aspects of modern Iranian culture -- such as religion, gender, sexuality, war, and migration -- through the lens of media, cinema, and literature.

Taught by: Esmaeili

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 220 Asian American Women: Nation, Self and Identity

This course examines the literary constructions of Asian American Womens' identity in relation to the U.S. nation state. How have the figures of the tiger mother, the Asian nerd, the rice queen, the trafficked woman, the geisha, the war bride, emerged to represent Asian American women, and how have Asian American feminists responded to these problematic racial stereotypes? How does the scholarship on such racialized representations illuminate historical and contemporary configurations of gender, sexuality, race, class, nation, citizenship, migration, empire, war, neoliberalism and globalization as they relate to the lives of Asian American women? In exploring these questions, this course examines Asian American histories, bodies, identities, diasporic communities, representations, and politics through multi- and interdisciplinary approaches, including social science research, literature, popular representations, film, poetry and art.

Taught by: Roy

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: ASAM 220, SAST 221

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 222 African Women's Lives: Past and Present

Restoring women to African history is a worthy goal, but easier said than done.The course examines scholarship over the past forty years that brings to light previously overlooked contributions African women have made to political struggle, religious change, culture preservation, and economic development from pre-colonial times to present. The course addresses basic questions about changing women's roles and human rights controversies associated with African women within the wider cultural and historical contexts in which their lives are lived. It also raises fundamental questions about sources, methodology, and representation, including the value of African women's oral and written narrative and cinema production as avenues to insider perspectives on African women's lives.

Taught by: Blakely

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 222

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 226 Topics In Drama to 1660

This course explores an aspect of drama before 1660 intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Loomba

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ENGL 226

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 227 Sex and Power

Gender has been a primary way of organizing power relations throughout history.This class asks how transformations in the global economy, technological change, new patterns of household formation, and social movements, have influenced women's access to economic and political positions over the past two centuries. We will examine how women's mobilization contributed to the abolition of slavery, reform of property and franchise laws, and to the formation of the welfare state. Next, we turn to thinking about how women's increasing labor force participation was hindered by institutions like marriage bars and union policy. Third, we look at cross-national patterns of women's political participation and descriptive representation including whether and how the adoption of electoral quotas influences gender equality more generally. Finally we study how institutional norms and gender stereotypes affect political representation. This class will draw on examples from around the world, and will look a experiences of women from all economic, social, and ascriptive backgrounds.

Taught by: Teele

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: PSCI 225

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 228 Topics In Classicism and Literature

This advanced seminar will examine the classical backgrounds to english poetry, in particular the Biblical and greco-roman antecedents to Renaissance lyric verse and verse drama (such as, preeminently, Shakespeare). Different versions of this course will have different emphases on Biblical or Hellenist backgrounds. Prerequisite: Spaces will be reserved for english majors. See the English Department's website at www. english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CLST 360, COML 304, ENGL 229

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 232 World History: Africa or the Middle East

Topics vary.

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 233, HIST 232, NELC 282

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 233 World History: East Asia or Latin America

This is a topics course. See History Department's website: http://www.history.upenn.edu/courses/undergraduate for a complete description of this course for the term.

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 234, ARTH 369, EALC 141, HIST 233, LALS 233

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 234 Gender, Religion, and China

This course examines the interrelationship among "gender," "religion," and "China" as conceptual and historical categories. We ask, for example, how gender plays critical and constitutive roles in Chinese religious traditions, how religion can be used both to reinforce and to challenge gender norms, how religious women impact Chinese society and culture, and what the construction of "China" as a cultural identity and as a nation-state has to do with women, gender, and religion. We will also think about what assumptions we have when speaking of gender, religion, and China, and the infinite possibilities when we strive to think beyond. We will read three kinds of materials: (1) scholarship on gender and religion in historical and contemporary China as well as the Chinese-speaking world, (2) scholarship concerning theories and methodology of gender and religious studies not necessarily focused on China, and (3) historical record of religious women in English translation.

Taught by: Cheng

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: EALC 230, EALC 630, GSWS 630, RELS 237, RELS 630

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 242 Science of Sex & Sexuality

While sexual and gender diversity have been consisten features in most cultures throughout history, how such gender and sexual based discussion have been articulated, understood, condoned, or condemned has varied. If medical historians and queer theorists have paid most obsessive attention to these subjects, bioethicists have intervened to a lesser degree and on only a handful of relevant subjects. Bearing in mind the social and medical legacies related to sexual and gender identities, this course will consider a range of historical and contemporary topics which speak to the intersection of bioethical dilemmas on medicine, sexuality and gender identity, including: the gay adolescent, the intersex person, gay-conversion therapies, the prospect of gay gene studies, sex addiction, queer blood/organ donation policies, and the wake of the global HIV/AIDS pandemic. Specifically, we will focus on literary sources (memoirs, diaries, and films) as well as non-literary accounts (medical texts, bioethical scholarship, and historical records) that explore the emotional and somatic aspects of matters related to sexuality, gender identity, and bioethics.

Taught by: Wahlert

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 243 The Fantastic and Uncanny in Literature: Ghosts, Spirits & Machines

Do we still believe in spirits and ghosts? Do they have any place in an age of science of technology? Can they perhaps help us to define what a human being is and what it can do? We will venture on a journey through literary texts from the late eighteenth century to the present to explore the uncanny and fantastic in literature and life. Our discussions will be based on a reading of Sigmund Freud's essay on the uncanny, and extraordinary Romantic narratives by Ludwig Tieck, E.T.A. Hoffmann, Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Prosper Merimee, Villiers de Isle-Adam, and others. All readings and lectures in English.

Taught by: Weissberg

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 126, GRMN 242

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 244 American Feminist and LGBT Movements, 1960s-1980s

This seminar explores the history of the feminist and LGBT movements from the mid-1960s to mid-1980s in Philadelphia. Although there will be some attention to national organizations, we will focus on social and political activism as it was made in local groups and spaces. We will explore the social and cultural web that fostered activism, for example, in gay and lesbian coffee houses, campus women's centers, bookstores, and radio shows. We will also pay attention to groups and actions that may not have been self-consciously defined as "feminist" or "gay liberationist," but had important effects on social change related to gender and sexuality; these include African American, Latino/a, and working-class organizations. This is a hands-on research seminar, with students exploring local archives and special collections to document and analyze these complex movements. Each student will conduct an oral history, analyze a set of published and printed sources, and write a paper based on archival research.

Taught by: Peiss

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: HIST 243

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 248 High School Ethics Bowl

In this course, teams of undergraduate students, each joined by a graduate student in philosophy, will coach teams of high school students for participation in the National High School Ethics Bowl, an annual competitive yet collaborative event in which teams analyze and discuss complex ethical dilemmas. Cases for the 2019-20 Ethics Bowl will be released in September 2019, and these will serve as a foundational starting point for the undergraduate students' investigations into ethical theory and the study of the ethics bowl itself, to develop the capacities to provide coaching and mentorship to the teams of high school students from schools in West Philadelphia and across the city. Undergraduates will travel to these school as part of the course, and there will be one or two Saturday sessions when all high school convene on Penn's campus for practice scrimmages. This course will introduce the ethics bowl to many new Philadelphia School District schools and students, and it will provide Penn students with the opportunity to develop their teaching and communication skills, build collaborative relationships with community schools, and solidify their knowledge of ethical theory through coaching.

Taught by: Detlefsen

Also Offered As: PHIL 248

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 249 Philosophy of Education

The philosophy of education asks questions about the foundational assumptions of our formal institutions for the reproduction of culture. It ranges therefore, from epistemology and philosophy of mind to ethics and political philosophy. For instance: What is the nature of learning and teaching? How is it possible to come to know something we did not know already--and how can we aid others in doing that? How, if at all, should formal institutions of education be concerned with shaping students' moral and civic character? What is the proper relation between educational institutions and the state? We also ask questions more specific to our own time and context. For example: how, in a multicultural state, should we educate students of varied social identities, like race, gender, and religion? What is the relationship between education and justice.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: Detlefsen

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EDUC 576, PHIL 249

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 252 Freud: The Invention of Psychoanalysis

No other person of the twentieth century has probably influenced scientific thought, humanistic scholarship, medical therapy, and popular culture as much as Sigmund Freud. This course will study his work, its cultural background, and its impact on us today. In the first part of the course, we will learn about Freud's life and the Viennese culture of his time. We will then move to a discussion of seminal texts, such as excerpts from his Interpretation of Dreams, case studies, as well as essays on psychoanalytic practice, human development, definitions of gender and sex, neuroses, and culture in general. In the final part of the course, we will discuss the impact of Freud's work. Guest lectureres from the medical field, history of science, psychology, and the humnities will offer insights into the reception of Freud's work, and its consequences for various fields of study and therapy.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: Weissberg

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 253, GRMN 253, HIST 253

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 255 Thinking about Capitalism

Throughout the world today, economists are influential policymakers and pub intellectuals, and non-economists understand many aspects of their lives in economic terms. But as recently as 1945 in some regions of the world and a distantly as 1776 in others, the concept of the economy, the field of economics, and economists as a professional community did not exist. This class explores non-economic ways of understanding material life that have preceded, challenged, or undergirded economic thinking; the emergence of th economy and economics as naturalized, globally recognized concepts; the formation of economists as an authoritative professional group; and the ris of economic reasoning in daily life. The class takes a global approach, exploring these developments in societies from eighteenth-century Britain t twentieth-century Egypt in order to understand the local variations, international relationships, and transnational processes at work. It simultaneously takes a social approach to intellectual history, considering how popular and professional ideas developed in relation to one another, an how knowledege related to lived experience.

Taught by: Offner

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HIST 255

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 257 Contemporary Fiction & Film in Japan

This course will explore fiction and film in contemporary Japan, from 1945 to the present. Topics will include literary and cinematic representation of Japan s war experience and post-war reconstruction, negotiation with Japanese classics, confrontation with the state, and changing ideas of gender and sexuality. We will explore these and other questions by analyzing texts of various genres, including film and film scripts, novels, short stories, mangazines, and academic essays. Class sessions will combine lectures, discussion, audio-visual materials, and creative as well as analytical writing exercises. The course is taught in English, although Japanese materials will be made available upon request. No prior coursework in Japanese literature, culture, or film is required or expected; additional secondary materials will be available for students taking the course at the 600 level. Writers and film directors examined may include: Kawabata Yasunari, Hayashi Fumiko, Abe Kobo, Mishima Yukio, Oe Kenzaburo, Yoshimoto Banana, Ozu Yasujiro, Naruse Mikio, Kurosawa Akira, Imamura Shohei, Koreeda Hirokazu, and Beat Takeshi.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Taught by: Kano

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CIMS 151, COML 256, EALC 151, EALC 551

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 270 Folklore and Sexuality

Sexuality is usually thought of as being biological or social, divided into categories of natural and unnatural. Often misssed are its creative and communicative aspects. Examining the constructed social elements of sexuality requires attention be paid to folklore in groups, between individuals and on the larger platform of popular technological media. The most interesting locations for exploration are those places where borderlands or margins, occur between genders, orientations and other cultural categories. A field-based paper will be required that must include documentary research.

Taught by: Azzolina

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 275 Faces of Love: Gender, Sexuality and the Erotic in Persian Literature

Beloved, Lover and Love are three concepts that dominate the semantic field of eroticism in Persian literature and mysticism. The interrelation among these concepts makes it almost impossible to treat any one of the concepts separately. Moreover, there exists various faces and shades of love in the works of classical and modern Persian literature that challenges the conventional heteronormative assumptions about the sexual and romantic relationships between the lover and the beloved. A sharp contrast exists between the treatment of homosexuality and 'queerness' in Islamic law, on the one hand and its reflection in Persian literature, particularly poetry (the chief vehicle of Persian literary expression), on the other. This course introduces and explores different faces of love, eroticism and homoeroticism in the Persian literary tradition from the dawn of dawn of the Persian poetry in the ninth century all through to the twenty-first century. It offers a comprehensive study of representations and productions of heteronormativity, sexual orientation and gender roles with particular reference to the notion of love, lover and beloved in Persian literature.

Taught by: Shams

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: COML 275, COML 574, GSWS 575, NELC 290, NELC 574

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 277 Gender, Sex & Urban Life

Is urban space gendered? Do we change how it is gendered as we move through it? Does it change us? This course explores gender and sexuality in the contemporary global city through the study of urban spaces. We will consider feminist, queer, and transgender theories of the city, as we investigate how practices of using and making space are gendered and sexualized. Each week of the course will be organized around a type of space, including subway, school, and birthing center, nightclub, suburb, and park. Assignments will include an auto-ethnography, a short critical essay, and a final assignment that asks you to propose an additional type of space in which to study the intersections of sex, gender, and the urban built environment. In each space, we will conduct an interdisciplinary exploration, drawing from sociology, anthropology, geography, city planning history, feminist and queer theory, as well as from fiction, poetry, music videos, photography, and documentary film.

Taught by: Knittle

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: URBS 277

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 279 Women in Theatre and Performance

What is feminist theatre? How do artists use live performance to provoke not only thought and feeling, but also social, personal, and political change? This course will examine a wide array of plays and performances by and about women; these pieces are, in turn, serious, hilarious, outrageous, poignant--and always provocative. Our focus will be on English-language works from the late 20th century to the present (#metoo) moment. We will read these performance texts and/or view them on stage/screen; we will also read essays that provide contextual background on feminist theatre theory and history. Throughout the semester, we will engage diverse perspectives on women and race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, and gender identity; the issues we encounter will also include marriage and motherhood, career and community, feminism and friendship, and patriarchy and power. The class will take full advantage of any related events occurring on campus or in the city, and will feature visits with guest speakers. Students will have the opportunity to pursue research on their own areas of interest (some recent examples are "women in comedy," trans performance, drag kings, feminist directing, etc.).

Taught by: Malague

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ENGL 303, THAR 279

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 280 Feminist Political Thought

This course is designed to provide an overview of the variety of ideas, approaches, and subfields within feminist political thought. Readings and divided into three sections: contemporary theorizing about the meaning of "feminism";women in the history of Western political thought; and feminist theoretical approaches to practical political problems and issues, such as abortion and sexual assault.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Hirschmann

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: PSCI 280

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 286 Topics American Lit

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ENGL 286

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 290 Topics In Gender, Sexuality, and Literature

The primary for this course is the English Department. When the course content includes gender, sexuality and women's studies it will be cross-listed with GSWS. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 290, COML 290, ENGL 290

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 294 Art Now

One of the most striking features of today's art world is the conspicuous place occupied in it by the photographic image. Large-scale color photographs and time-based installations in projections are everywhere. Looking back, we can see that much of the art making of the past 60 years has also been defined by this medium, regardless of the form it takes. Photographic images have inspired countless paintings, appeared in combines and installations, morphed into sculptures, drawings and performances, and served both as the object and the vehicle of institutional critique. They are also an increasingly important exhibition site: where most of us go to see earthworks, happenings and body-art. This course is a three-part exploration of our photographic present.

Taught by: Silverman

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: ARTH 294, ARTH 694, ENGL 063, VLST 236

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 295 Cinema and Media

This course will provide an introduction to some of the most important film theory debates, and allow us to explore how writers and filmmakers from different countries and historical periods have attempted to make sense of the changing phenomenon known as "cinema," to think cinematically. Topics under consideration may include: spectatorship, authorship, the apparatus, sound, editing, realism, race, gender and sexuality, stardom, the culture industry, the nation and decolonization, what counts as film theory and what counts as cinema, and the challenges of considering film theory in a global context, including the challenge of working across languages. There will be a weekly film screening for this course. No knowledge of film theory is presumed. Course requirements: attendance at lecture and participation in lecture and section discussions; canvas postings; 1 in-class mid-term; 1 final project.

Taught by: Redrobe

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 295, ARTH 695, CIMS 305, COML 299, ENGL 305

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 296 Topics In Literary Theory

This course explores an aspect of literary theory intensively; specific course topics vary from year to year. Prerequisite: Spaces will be reserved for English majors. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 291, ENGL 294

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 297 Topics In Theories of Gender and Sexuality

The primary for this course is the English Department. When the course content includes gender, sexuality and women's studies it will be cross-listed with GSWS. See additional information and description on the English Department's website: https://www.english.upenn.edu

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 297, ENGL 296

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 301 French Identity in the Twentieth Century

Topics vary. Please see the French Department's website for a description of the current offerings: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/french/pc

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: CIMS 301, FREN 301

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 302 Queer Cinema

Queerness has often been understood as a threat to society whether social institutions like marriage or monogamy or familial practices have been characterized by increasing acceptance of gays and lesbians into mainstream society, this process has no doubt reproduced new inequalities and asymmetrities - in terms of race, class and access to institutional spaces. Does "queer" still pose a threat to the mainstream or is it now part of the "normal"? Should one welcome the progressive acceptance of queer lives within the mainstream or should one reject it in the name of an indissoluble difference? In this course we will range across movies and theories that engage with these questions, particularly focusing on negative reactions to processes of assimilation. Topics will include sex and death, queerness and neoliberalism, intersections of race and sexuality. Some of the films we will watch and discuss are Paolini's Pigsty, Fassbiner's In a Year of 13 Moons, Jennie Livingstone's Paris is Burning, Cheryl Dunye's Watermelon Woman, Kimberly Peirce's Boys Don't Cry.

Also Offered As: CIMS 303, COML 303

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 307 Love, Lust and Violence in the Middle Ages

Medieval Europe was undoubtedly gruff and violent but it also gave birth to courtly culture - raw worries transformed into knights who performed heroic deeds, troubadours wrote epics in their honor and love songs about their ladies, women of the elite carved out a place in public discourse as patrons of the arts, and princely courts were increasingly defined by pageantry from jousting tournaments to royal coronations. This course will trace the development of this courtly culture from the eleventh to the sixteenth century, from its roots in Southern France to its spread to Northern France and then to various kingdoms in Europe. Central themes will include the transformation of the warrior into the knight, the relationship between violence and courtliness, courtly love, cultural production and the patronage, and the development of court pageantry and ceremonial. This is a class cultural history and, as such, will rely on the interpretation of objects of art and material culture, literature as well as historical accounts.

Taught by: KUSKOWSKI

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: COML 307, HIST 307

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 310 Politics of Political Writing: From "We, the People" to "Power to the People"

The Politics of Political Writing: From "We, the People" to "Power to the People" is a literary study and research course charting the development of libratory politics, aesthetics and subjectivities in response to colony, capital and empire. Students will read anthology, collected essays, a novel, reportage, oral history, interviews, travel writing and memoir. We will look at works in which the authors articulate political stances that impact the public sphere and their literary craft as well as works in which they examine, often self-critically, the politics of writing as practice, career, advocacy, trickery, solace and pleasure. The works, including ones by June Jordan, Jean Genet, Patricia Galvao, and Claribel Alegria worry the divide between art and politics, and some trouble the notion that writing encapsulates an author's politics and activism. Using the texts as models we will examine in lecture, discussion, and research projects the effect and impact of aesthetic acts on making trouble for state, social and financial structures as such trouble-making urged many of these works into inception, making difficult their production and reception. The Marxist theory of the dialectic and M. Jacqui Alexander's configuration of palimpsestic time in the neo/post/anti-colonial Americas will serve as our theory touchstones. While some of the works are from the recent past and others far older, they touch on, and in many instances, speak to the histories of regions and countries currently in the news and in crisis (Central America, the Caribbean, the Middle East, France, the US and Brazil) contemporary movements (Black Lives Matter, international solidarity, undocuqueers) and problematics (migration, US financial intervention, imperialism).

Taught by: Bracho

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 315 Queer Modernisms

This course tracks the development of Modernism in America, Western Europe, and specific other locations around the globe, with particular emphasis as to how and why dissident sexualities so often found expression in and as aesthetic dissent. Creating new expressive forms and theories that often seem far removed from any traditional definition of sexuality, queer modernist artists often replaced dangerous forms of social dissent with more prudent forms of formal dissidence. In pursuing these questions, we will place art in its broader social context, seeking to answer such significant problems as how and why forms of artistic representation that were once transparent, eminently legible to all strata of society, increasingly became, under the avant garde, designed to speak only to an elect, to a select few in our culture. We will ask what happens when art deliberately narrows its audience, and how that narrowing is related to questions of sexual difference. What is the relationship between queerness and cultural elitism, a connection generally presumed in popular culture, but rarely examined academically? And finally we will ask about the utility of forms of queer political dissent if those forms remain illegible as queer to a wider audience. Throughout, new methods informed by queer, gender, and critical race theory will be utilized.

Taught by: Katz

Also Offered As: ARTH 383

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 322 Advanced Topics in Global Gender and Sexuality Studies

This is an advanced topics course, and the course description will vary from semester to semester.

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: COML 322, SOCI 322

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 324 Children's Health in the United States, 1800-2000

This course explores the impact of historical ideas, events, and actors pertaining to the history of children's health care in the United States. Emphasis is placed on tracing the origins and evolution of issues that have salience for twenty-first century children's health care policy and the delivery of care.

Taught by: Connolly

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: NURS 324

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 331 Women Making History: The Penn Museum and the Centennial 2020

The year 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which declared that the right of citizens to vote "shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex". To mark this centennial - to both celebrate it and critically assess its impact on American society - we will investigate the history of women at the Penn Museum as archaeologists, ethnographers, epigraphers, philanthropists, and more. At the same time, we will examine material in the Penn Museum that women collected, donated, or studied. Our goal will be to produce original research that may contribute to future exhibits and publications as well as to broader public forums. Sponsored by the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, our seminar will focus heavily on western Asia, southeastern Europe, and North Africa - all zones that scholars have variously associated with the Near East or Middle East, and where the Penn Museum has been active since its foundation in 1887. To situate the Penn Museum and its collections within a global and comparative frame, we will also study select women who made major scholarly contributions to other parts of the world such as the Americas and Oceania. Among the figures we will study are Sarah Yorke Stevenson (Egypt), Katharine Woolley (Mesopotamia/Iraq), Harriet Boyd Hawes (Ottoman Crete and Greece), Florence Shotridge (Alaska), Zelia Nuttall (Mexico and Russia), and Tatiana Proskouriakoff (Guatemala). We will venture into many different kinds of history. In regional terms, our scope will be transnational and international: we will cover the United States and the Middle East in the wider world. In thematic and methodological terms, we will approach our subject through biography, oral history, and microhistory; material history and museum studies; cultural and intellectual history; women's and gender studies; and the history of academic disciplines, especially archaeology and anthropology.

Taught by: Sharkey

Course offered spring; even-numbered years

Also Offered As: ANTH 351, ANTH 531, GSWS 533, NELC 331, NELC 531

Prerequisite: Some background in Middle Eastern history; or Anthropology; or Women's History; or Museum Studies

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 334 Feminist Ethnography

This course will investigate the relationships among women, gender, sexuality, and anthropological research. We will begin by exploring the trajectory of research interest in women and gender, drawing first from the early work on gender and sex by anthropologists like Margaret Mead and Ruth Benedict; moving through the 1970s and 1980s arguments about gender, culture, and political economy; arriving at more current concerns with gender, race, sexuality, and empire. For the rest of the semester, we will critically read contemporary ethnographies addressing pressing issues such as nationalism, militarism, neoliberalism and fundamentalism. Throughout, we will investigate what it means not only to "write women's worlds", but also to analyze broader socio-cultural, political, and economic processes through a gendered lens. We will, finally, address the various ways feminist anthropology fundamentally challenged the discipline's epistemological certainties, as well as how it continues to transform our understanding of the foundations of the modern world. Prerequisite: Should have some functional knowledge of Cultural Anthropology.

Taught by: Thomas

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 334, AFRC 634, ANTH 334, ANTH 634, GSWS 634

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 340 Money, Power, Respect: Funding Social Change

This course is about how to apply a race, gender and LGBTQ lens to support contemporary social justice movements in the U.S. and globally, including Black Lives Matter, #MeToo, transgender equality, and disability justice. We will explore intersectionality as a theoretical framework, and how it is practically applied to support social justice organizations and leaders, and fund social change. Over the course of the semester, Professor of Practice Roz Lee, a black lesbian feminist and lifelong racial, gender, LGBTQ and economic justice advocate, and who currently serves as Vice President of Strategy and Programs at the Ms. Foundation for Women, will be joined by movement leaders and philanthropy colleagues to discuss and analyze what's happening on the frontlines of movements for equity, justice and freedom.

Taught by: Lee

Also Offered As: AFRC 340

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 344 Psychology of Personal Growth

Intellectual, emotional and behavioral development in the college years. Illustrative topics: developing intellectual and social competence; developing personal and career goals; managing interpersonal relationships; values and behavior. Recommended for submatriculation in Psychological Services Master's Degree program.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: EDUC 345

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 345 Sinners, Sex and Slaves: Race and Sex in Early America

This course explores the lost worlds of sinners, witches, sexual offenders, rebellious slaves, and Native American prophets from the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries. Using the life stories of unusual individuals from the past, we try to make sense of their contentious relationships with their societies. By following the careers of the trouble-makers, the criminals, and the rebels, we also learn about the foundations of social order and the impulse to reform that rocked American society during the nineteenth century.

Taught by: Brown

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 345, HIST 345

Activity: Recitation

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 346 Bodies, Race and Rights: Sex and Citizenship in Modern American History

What did it mean to be a man or woman in the post-Civil War United States? Was being a man the same as being a citizen? If African-American men were to be fully embraced as both men and citizens in the aftermath of slavery, where did that leave women, white and black? Why did a nation built on immigration become so hostile to certain groups of immigrants during this period? In this course, we consider how the meanings and experiences of womanhood, manhood, citizenship, and equality before the law changed from the period immediately after the Civil War until the present day. We look at political battles over the meaning of citizenship, the use of terror to subdue African Americans politically and economically, and the fears of white Americans that they would lose their political and economic dominance to immigrant groups they deemed irreconcilably different from themselves. We also consider the repercussions of these conflicts for medical, legal, and economic efforts to regulate the bodies of women, children, poor people, immigrants, working class laborers, military men, and African Americans. Throughout the course, we will follow the state's changing use of racial, sexual, and economic categories to assess the bodily and intellectual capacities of different groups of citizens. We will also note some of the popular cultural expressions of manhood, womanhood, and citizenship. The lectures and reading assignments are organized around a series of historical problems, dynamic leaders, and controversies that illuminate these issues.

Taught by: Brown

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AFRC 346, HIST 346

Activity: Recitation

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 347 Gender History and American Film

More than any other medium, the motion pictures fostered new ideals and images of modern womanhood and manhood in the United States. Throughout the twentieth century, gender representations on the screen bore a complex relationship to the social, economic, and political transformations marking the lives and consciousness of American men and women. This course explores the history of American gender through film. It treats the motion pictures as a primary source that, juxtaposed with other kinds of historical evidence, opens a window onto gendered work, leisure, sexuality, family life, and politics. We will view a wide range of Hollywood motion pictures since 1900, as well as films by blacklisted artists, feminists, and independent producers.

Taught by: Peiss

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: CIMS 347, HIST 347

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 349 History of Sexuality in the U.S.

This course introduces students to a relatively new field of inquiry, the history of sexuality in the U.S. It explores the past to consider why sexuality has been so central to American identities, culture, and politics. Primary documents and other readings focus on the history of sexual ideology and regulation; popular culture and changing sexual practices; the emergence of distinct sexual identities and communities; the politics of sexuality; and the relationship between sexual and and other forms of social difference, such as gender, race, ethnicity, age, and class. Topics include many with continuing relevance to contemporary public debate: among them, sexual representation and censorship, sexual violence, adolescent sexuality, the politics of reproduction, gay and lesbian sexualities and sexually transmitted diseases.

Taught by: Peiss

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HIST 349

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 350 Trans Method

What are the subjects of trans studies? What are the disciplinary and theoretical tools necessary to do trans studies? What does "trans" as a category afford us in looking at texts, people, systems, objects? To what extent is trans an identity? What might it mean to think of it as a methodology? This course aims to introduce students to "trans" as an analytic by drawing from queer studies, feminism, critical race theory, disability studies, environmental humanities, literary studies, and postcolonial critique, centering trans ways of thinking on scales from the body to the nation. As a relatively "new" field, trans studies contributes to feminist and queer theory but is uniquely engaged with social and health sciences, trans activist movements, and trans cultural production. In particular, Trans Method aims to extend trans beyond self-identified trans bodies and beyond the United States to consider the affordances of a global, polyscalar trans politics.

Taught by: Knittle, Kim

Prerequisites: GSWS 002, GSWS 003, or GSWS/ENGL 096

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 353 Topics In 19th-Century American Literature

This course explores an aspect of 19th-Century American literature intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ENGL 353

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 369 Topics In Poetry and Poetics

This course explores an aspect of poetry and poetics intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ENGL 369

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 387 Topics in Africana Studies

Topics vary: Black Feminist Approaches to History & Memory - The term black feminism emerged in public discourse amid the social, political, and cultural turbulence of the 1960s. The roots of black feminism, however, are much older, easily reaching back to the work of black women abolitionists and social critics of the nineteenth century. The concept continued to grow and evolve in the work of twentieth century black women writers, journalists, activists, and educators as they sought to document black women's lives. Collectively, their work established black feminism as a political practice dedicated to the equality of all people. More recently, black feminism has been deployed as a tool for theoretical and scholarly analysis that is characterized by an understanding that race, class, gender, and sexuality are inextricably interconnected.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 387, HIST 387, LALS 387

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 390 Topics in Gender, Sexuality and Literature

The advanced women's studies course in the English department, focusing on a particular aspect of literature by and about women. Topics might include: "Victorian Literary Women"; "Women, Politics, and Literature"; "Feminist Literary Theory"; and similar foci. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ENGL 390

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 391 Introduction to Spanish American Literature

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CIMS 390, COML 390, LALS 396, SPAN 390

Prerequisite: SPAN 219 OR SPAN 223

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 392 Queering North African Subjectivities

This seminar will explore the ways in which literary and visual representations of sexual difference and gender roles disrupt the cultural imagination of everyday life in North Africa and its Diasporas. Special attention will be given to representations of Arab women and queer subjectivities as sites of resistance against dominant masculinity. We will analyze the ways in which representations of gender have allowed for a redeployment of power, a reconfiguration of politics of resistance, and the redrawing of longstanding images of Islam in France. Finally, we will question how creations that straddle competing cultural traditions, memories and material conditions can queer citizenship. Course taught in English.

Taught by: Gueydan-Turek

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 392, COML 393, FREN 392

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 394 Topics in Contemporary Art

Topic varies. Spring 2017: This course will examine key moments in the history of civil rights through a cinematic lens. Over the course of the semester, we will explore how filmmakers have depicted the lives, aspirations, and strategies of those who have struggled for equal rights; how different struggles have intersected with each other; what aesthetic strategies have been adopted to represent freedom and the denial of it; and how effective cinematic efforts to contribute to increased freedom have been as well as what criteria we use to evaluate success or failure in the first place. Each week, we will watch a film and read a series of texts that will be drawn from a variety of arenas, including histories of civil rights; civil rights pamphlets and speeches; filmmaker interviews; film and media theory; memoirs; and theories of race, gender and sexuality. Course requirements: mutual respect; completion of all readings and screenings; participation in class discussion; weekly online responses; a final project that can be a research paper, film, art project, or community-based initiative.

Taught by: Redrobe

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 393, ARTH 393, CIMS 393, ENGL 301

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 396 Studies in Spanish American Culture

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CIMS 396, LALS 397, SPAN 396

Prerequisite: SPAN 219 OR SPAN 223

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 397 History of Spanish American Culture

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CIMS 397, LALS 398, SPAN 397

Prerequisite: SPAN 219 OR SPAN 223

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 400 GSWS Honors Thesis Seminar

This course is for senior undergraduate GSWS majors who will be completing an honors thesis. The seminar helps students decide on the most appropriate methodologies to use and topics to include in their thesis. Other topics include thesis organization and drawing conclusions from primary and secondary sources of data.

Taught by: Beetham

Two terms. student must enter first term.

Activity: Senior Thesis

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 435 Writers Advisors Section

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 436 Africana Studies Undergraduate Seminar

On the stage of modern world history, Haiti plays the unique role as both exceptionally victorious and tragic character. This course interrogates archival documents, oral histories, historical texts, and prose created wi the nation and her diaspora in order to establish a nuanced image of the projection of Haiti's modern history. Using two classic Haitian texts, Ma Vieux-Chauvet's Love, Anger, Madness (1968) and Michel-Rolph Trouillot's Silencing the Past: Power and the Production of History (1995),this course examines how, why,and to what end Haiti's history and popular narratives a the country have served to construct and dismantle global movements, popul culture, and meanings of race, gender, and citizenship in the Americas. I our historical examination, we will question some of the iconic representations of Haiti through literature that deepen the affective historical profile of Haiti with interrogations of culture, sexuality, political, and media performance. Students will become familiar with the -colonial history of Haiti and the region, meanings of race, and the production of history. The course is a research and historical methods seminar.

Taught by: Johnson

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 436, HIST 436, LALS 437

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 488 Topics: Culture, Sexuality and Global Health

What does it mean to claim that "Homosexuality is un-African"? This course explores the linked histories of race, nation, gender and sexuality in Africa that such an ideological claim invokes, yet effaces. The polemics that produce statements like this play out through the disciplinary tensions that exist between African and sexuality/queer studies. These tensions have as much to do with the role played by the relation between sexuality and race within cultures of European colonization, as they have with the role of gender and sexuality within postcolonial power relations in Africa. Such antagonisms are sustained through the marginalization of gender and sexuality perspectives within postcolonial scholarship on Africa, as well as the bracketing of African perspectives in queer and feminist studies. This course will deconstruct these impasses by exploring scholarship at the margins of each area of study. Students will be encouraged to ask questions about how issues of race, ethnicity, nation, gender and sexuality are produced as suppressed presences in a range of texts, films and other materials. The course will include readings from postcolonial, gender, sexuality and African studies, anthropology, history, literary studies and Marxism, giving students a grounding in historical and contemporary perspectives at the intersection of African, queer and feminist studies.

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 488, ANTH 488, SOCI 488

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 489 Fashioning Gender

Course not offered every year

Activity: Online Course

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 499 Independent Study

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 509 Modernist Jewish Poetry

One version of this seminar considers works by Jewish women who wrote in Yiddish, Hebrew, English, and other languages in the late 19th through the 20th century. The texts, poetry and prose, will include both belles lettres and popular writings, such as journalism, as well as private works (letters and diaries) and devotional works. The course will attempt to define "Jewish writing, " in terms of language and gender, and will consider each writer in the context of the aesthetic, religious, and national ideologies that prevailed in this period. Because students will come with proficiency in various languages, all primary texts and critical and theoretical materials will be taught in English translation. However, those students who can, will work on the original texts and share with the class their expertise to foster a comparative perspective. Because we will be discussing translated works, a secondary focus of the course will, in fact, be on literary translation's process and products.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 509, GRMN 509, JWST 509, YDSH 509

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 510 Inner Outer Space Travel Writing: A Creative Writing Workshop

Inner Outer Space Travel Writing is a creative writing workshop focused on writing work within the science fiction/speculative fiction/alternative futurities, science/land/travel writing, and creative-critical nonfiction traditions. Students will work within a variety of genres, with an emphasis on the essay, the short story, screen/tele-play, play, blog and performance. Students will read recommended texts from within their particular interests, and the course will culminate in both a public performance and dissemination/publication via another media platform (zine, website, podcast, etc). All levels of experience, from none/first-time writer to published writers, are encouraged to register for the course.

Taught by: Bracho

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ENGL 131, LALS 510

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 512 Passion Projects: Radical Experiments in Writing Plays, Screenplays, and Pilots

This creative writing workshop will focus on writing for screen, stage and internet and is open to undergraduate and graduate students at every level of writing experience. The course will be writing intensive and also include the reading and analysis of feminist, trans, queer, working class and racially liberatory plays, films, television and performance as models of inspiration. Meditation, drawing, theater games, improv exercises, screenings and outings to see work on and off campus will round out this holistic and experimental approach to making work that illuminates and entertains audiences from across the US and global audience spectrum.

Taught by: Bracho

Also Offered As: ENGL 134, LALS 512

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 516 Public Interest Workshop

This is a Public Interest Ethnography workshop (originally created by Peggy Reeves Sanday - Department of Anthropology) that incorporates an interdisciplinary approach to exploring social issues. Open to graduate and advanced undergraduate students, the workshop is a response to Amy Gutmann's call for interdisciplinary cooperation across the University and to the Department of Anthropology's commitment to developing public interest research and practice as a disciplinary theme. Rooted in the rubric of public interest social science, the course focuses on: 1) merging problem solving with theory and analysis in the interest of change motivated by a commitment to social justice, racial harmony, equality, and human rights; and 2) engaging in public debate on human issues to make research results accessible to a broader audience. The workshop brings in guest speakers and will incorporate original ethnographic research to merge theory with action. Students are encouraged to apply the framing model to a public interest research and action topic of their choice. This is an academically-based-community-service (ABCS) course that partners directly with Penn's Netter Center Community Partnerships.

Taught by: Suess

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANTH 516, URBS 516

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 517 Sociology of Work

The thinkers whose work formed the foundations of sociological theory considered the nature of the relationship between work and identity key to understanding social solidarity, power, and historical change. In recent years, the division of labor, structures of work, and employment relations have all been undergoing rapid change, necessarily affecting the possibilities for constructing identity through work. This seminar examines how changes in the nature and organization of work have reshaped the relationshop between work and identity.

Taught by: Jacobs, Leidner

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: SOCI 517

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 518 Nursing and the Gendering of Health Care in the United States and Internationally, 1860-2000

This course examines changing ideas about the nature of health and illness; changing forms of health care delivery; changing experiences of women as providers and patients; changing role expectations and realities for nurses; changing midwifery practice; and changing segmentation of the health care labor market by gender, class and race. It takes a gender perspective on all topics considered in the course. A comparative approach is used as national and international literature is considered. This focus is presented as one way of understanding the complex interrelationships among gender, class, and race in health care systems of the United States and countries abroad.

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: NURS 518

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 520 Art, Sex and the Sixties

With a distinct emphasis on post World War II performance, film, sculpture and painting, this course explores the conjunction of the period's systematic revamping of our social/sexual schema with the equally revolutionary ascendancy of an artistic postmodernity. And it seeks to explore this dynamic not only within the familiar confines of North America and Europe but towards Latin America and Asia, too, in what was a nearly simultaneous emergence of the erotic as a political force in the 60s. Reading a range of key voices from Brazilian theorist and poet Oswald de Andrade to Frankfurt School philosopher Herbert Marcuse, performance artists Carolee Schneemann, and Yoko Ono, Neo-Freudian theorist Norman O. Brown and lesbian feminist author Monique Wittig, we will examine how and why sex became a privileged form of politics at this historical juncture in a range of different contexts across the globe. Students interested in feminist, gender or queer theory, social revolution, performance studies, post war art and Frankfurt School thought should find the course particularly appealing, but it assumes no background in any of these fields.

Taught by: Katz

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ARTH 583

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 524 Chaucer

An advanced introduction to Chaucer's poetry and Chaucer criticism. Reading and discussion of the dream visions, Troilus and Criseyde, and selections from Canterbury Tales, from the viewpoint of Chaucer's development as a narrative artist.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 522, ENGL 525, ITAL 525

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 525 The Trouble with Freud: Psychoanalysis, Literature, Culture

For professionals in the field of mental care, Freud's work is often regarded as outmoded, if not problematic psychologists view his work as non-scientific, dependent on theses that cannot be confirmed by experiments. In the realm of literary and cultural theory, however, Freud's work seems to have relevance still, and is cited often. How do we understand the gap between a medical/scientific reading of Freud's work, and a humanist one? Where do we locate Freud's relevance today? The graduate course will concentrate on Freud's descriptions of psychoanalytic theory and practice, as well as his writings on literature and culture. Prerequisite: Readings and discussions in English.

Taught by: Weissberg

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 523, GRMN 526

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 527 Race, Gender and Auto/Biography

PRING 2017: Market Women, Madames, Mistresses & Mother Superior studies ender, labor, sexuality, and race in the Caribbean. In our historical xamination of primary source documents alongside literature, and popular edia, we will question some of the iconic representations of Caribbean and atin American women in order to understand the meaning, purpose and usages hese women s bodies as objects of praise, possession, obsession and/or idicule by communities, governments and religions within and outside of th egion. Beginning in the late-18th century and ending with contemporary igration narratives, this course considers the relationship between slave ociety and colonial pasts on gender performance in the modern Caribbean, atin America, and their diasporas. In our interrogation of gender meanings, we will consider the ways Caribbean women and men define themselves and each other, while considering the intersections of color, class, religion and culture on the political and social realities of the Caribbean and the region. The geographic scope of the course will extend to Haiti, the Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Costa Rica and Trinidad & Tobago. The following interrelated questions will anchor our exploration of each text: How have representations of Caribbean and Latin American women informed historical constructions and rhetoric of the region and national identity? What political and social strategies have Caribbean women and men used to define themselves in their countries and throughout the region? How do the history and contemporary conditions of a post-colonial nation impact the gender construction of Caribbean identities? What is the relationship between modern Caribbean gender identities and the regional racial and economic politics?

Taught by: Sanders

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 527, LALS 527

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 528 Witchcraft and Gender in the Early Modern World

From the 15th century through the 18th century, social tensions erupted in Europe and the Atlantic colonies in the witch craze, a period when intense cultural concern over witchcraft was expressed through religious treatises and sermons, popular literature such as pamphlets and broadsides, legal accusations, trials, and, in some cases, executions. Although the number of people executed during the witch-hunts is a matter of scholarly debate, their importance in understanding early modern beliefs and responses to social tensions is clear. In this class, we will explore historians' understandings of the causes underlying this cultural phenomenon. With special attention to gender, social position, and religious belief, we will join academic debates about the causes of these persecutions. We will also read some primary sources from the medieval through the early modern periods, including trial transcripts, sermons, and pamphlets. Were women the main target of witchcraft accusations and executions, and if so, was misogyny their most important cause? What role did sexual norms and beliefs have in the way that accusations were framed? Were there different patterns of accusations and executions across time and region, and if so, what social and cultural factors might explain them? In what ways were witchcraft accusations an effort to control marginal people in local communities, particularly in regard to gender, socio-economic position, and age? How might religious developments and conflicts have influenced elite and popular ideas about witchcraft? What challenges do historians face in analyzing primary sources about witchcraft and witchcraft trials? Through in class discussions and threaded discussion forums on primary sources, students will learn about the challenges involved in interpreting sources including treatises, trial transcripts, pamphlets, and images.

Taught by: Rabberman

Course not offered every year

Activity: Online Course

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 529 History of Sexuality

In this online course, we will consider the impact of social, economic, and political conditions on social constructions of sexuality, from the classical world of Greece and Rome, to the early modern West, to the streets of Victorian London and 1920s New York. Topics of interest include: the prostitutes of New Orleans' Storyville district; Jack the Ripper and sensational media accounts of crimes of passion; the taverns and bawdy houses of colonial Philadelphia; cases of sexual misconduct in premodern Europe, Latin America; and colonial America; the history of sexual harassment in the American workplace; the history of hermaphrodites and transgendered people; JFK and representations of 20th-century masculinity. We will pay special attention to the ways that race, class, religion, and gender come together to shape power dynamics through the development, change, and continuity in sexual roles, norms, and relationships.

Taught by: Rabberman

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Online Course

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 531 Gendered Constructions of Other Cultures in Western Travel Literature

Descriptions of peoples from foreign lands and faraway places have captured the imaginations of Europeans for centuries. Pilgrims and merchants, explorers and conquistadores, Victorians taking their Grand Tour and 21st-century travelers have preserved their observations, both in written form, in ethnographies and diaries, novels and travel narratives, and in visual form, in maps, illuminated manuscripts, engravings, and photographs. Through these media, these travelers have not simply captured their memories, but have also helped to shape Western representations of the people they encountered, often justifying Western political, economic, cultural, and social dominance as a result, although some travelers have critiqued the West instead. And in all these depictions, gender and sexuality have played central roles in the creation of these identities and relationships. In this online course, we will explore this topic by studying a variety of primary and secondary sources focusing on medieval Ireland and Wales; English, Spanish, and Portuguese texts representing the New World and indigenous Americans; orientalism through the lens of imperial representations of the Middle East, India, and Africa; and 20th- and 21st-century representations of a globalized world, focusing on political, economic and cultural tensions between the West and other regions of the world. Primary texts will include travel diaries and narratives, ethnographies and novels, as well as visual images. We will also examine how scholars from fields including anthropology, art history, cultural studies, history, and literary studies have analyzed these works, with attention to theories on colonialism and post-colonialism, gendered and queer readings, orientalism and othering, and globalization. Finally, we will also look at how some of the people who were described by the Western writers described Westerners themselves. Assignments will include weekly blogs in response to readings, primary source threaded discussions, live discussions every week in our online classroom, leading class discussion for two weeks, writing two response papers, and completing a final essay in several stages.

Taught by: Rabberman

Course not offered every year

Activity: Online Course

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 532 Gender, the Labor Force, and Markets

Drawing from sociology, economics and demography, this course examines the causes and effects of gender differences in labor force participation, earnings and occupation in the United States and in the rest of the developed developed and developing world. Differences by race and ethnicity areidered. also considered. Theories of labor supply, marriage, human captial andre discrimination are explored as explanations for the observed trends.se reviews Finally, the course reviews current labor market policies and uses thearriage, theories of labor supply, marriage, human capital and discrimination to men. evaluate their effects on women and men.

Taught by: Madden

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: DEMG 541, SOCI 541

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 533 Women Making History: The Penn Museum and the Centennial 2020

The year 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which declared that the right of citizens to vote "shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex". To mark this centennial - to both celebrate it and critically assess its impact on American society - we will investigate the history of women at the Penn Museum as archaeologists, ethnographers, epigraphers, philanthropists, and more. At the same time, we will examine material in the Penn Museum that women collected, donated, or studied. Our goal will be to produce original research that may contribute to future exhibits and publications as well as to broader public forums. Sponsored by the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, our seminar will focus heavily on western Asia, southeastern Europe, and North Africa - all zones that scholars have variously associated with the Near East or Middle East, and where the Penn Museum has been active since its foundation in 1887. To situate the Penn Museum and its collections within a global and comparative frame, we will also study select women who made major scholarly contributions to other parts of the world such as the Americas and Oceania. Among the figures we will study are Sarah Yorke Stevenson (Egypt), Katharine Woolley (Mesopotamia/Iraq), Harriet Boyd Hawes (Ottoman Crete and Greece), Florence Shotridge (Alaska), Zelia Nuttall (Mexico and Russia), and Tatiana Proskouriakoff (Guatemala). We will venture into many different kinds of history. In regional terms, our scope will be transnational and international: we will cover the United States and the Middle East in the wider world. In thematic and methodological terms, we will approach our subject through biography, oral history, and microhistory; material history and museum studies; cultural and intellectual history; women's and gender studies; and the history of academic disciplines, especially archaeology and anthropology.

Taught by: Sharkey

Also Offered As: ANTH 351, ANTH 531, GSWS 331, NELC 331, NELC 531

Prerequisite: Some background in Middle Eastern history; or Anthropology; or Women's History; or Museum Studies

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 542 Work and Gender

This seminar examines the relevance of gender to the organization and experience of paid and unpaid work. Combining materialist and social constructuionist approaches, we will consider occupational segregation, the relation of work and family, gender and class solidarity, the construction of gender through work, race and class variation in work experiences, and related topics.

Taught by: Leidner

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: SOCI 542

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 550 Topics 17th Century

The specific topics of the seminar vary from semester to semester, depending on the instructor and his/her choice. When the topic includes gender, sexuality or women's studies it will be cross-listed with GSWS. Please see the French Department website for a description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/french/pc

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 549, ENGL 537, FREN 550

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 553 British Women Writers

A study of British women writers, often focusing on the women authors who came into prominence between 1775 and 1825. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Bowers

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 554, ENGL 553

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 554 Affect Theory and Power

This seminar will examine contemporary affect theory and its relationship with Michel Foucault's theory of power. We will begin by mapping out Foucault's "analytics of power," from his early work on power knowledge to his late work on embodiment, desire, and the care of the self. We will then turn to affect theory, an approach which centralizes the non-rational, emotive force of power. No previous knowledge of theory is required.

Taught by: Schaefer

Also Offered As: COML 555, RELS 552

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 555 Health Education for Incarcerated Women

This elective course will afford students the opportunity to develop and implement health education workshops for incarcerated women in the Philadelphia jail system. Students will explore the social and historical framework and trends in the incarceration of women, as well as the needs of this population, and will identify specific areas that need to be addressed by particular disciplines or professions. Students will have direct contact with the jail system, its staff, and female inmates.

Taught by: Brown, K.

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: NURS 555

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 565 More Human Than Human

In early 2017, animal rights lawyer Steve Wise argued that two of his clients should be afforded the rights of "personhood." The clients in question were chimpanzees. This case suggests that "speciesism" might soon be met with the same degree of suspicion as sexism and racism. This course will explore how such a shift could come about and what it might signal. We will begin by examining the western foundations of binaries such as human-animal, male-female, and self-other. From here we will explore recent attempts to dismantle these constructs by ecofeminists and post-humanists. We will also look at how such categories have manifested in social movements and cultural artifacts. Finally, we will investigate how our beliefs about who "we" are and what "we" are not can affect everything from the foods we eat to where and how we vacation.

Taught by: Sadashige

Course not offered every year

Activity: Online Course

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 570 African-American Literature

This course treats some important aspect of Afican-American literature and culture. Some recent versions of the course have focused on the emergence of African-American women writers, on the relation between African-American literature and cultural studies, and on the Harlem Renaissance. This course is cross-listed with the English Department. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 570, ENGL 570

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 572 Language and Gender

This course traces the development of research on language and gender, introducing key theoretical issues and methodological concerns in this area. Participants will consider how gender ideologies shape and are shaped by language use, with particular attention to how research findings can be applied to educational and other professional settings.

Taught by: Pomerantz

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EDUC 572

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 574 Masters in Liberal Arts Seminar

This MLA course in the history of art explores an aspect of Art History and Theory, specific course topics vary. Please see the College of Liberal and Professional Studies Course Guide for a description of current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 505, CIMS 502, COML 510

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 575 Faces of Love: Gender, Sexuality, and the Erotic in Persian Literature

Beloved, Lover and Love are three concepts that dominate the semantic field of eroticism in Persian literature and mysticism. The interrelation among these concepts makes it almost impossible to treat any one of the concepts separately. Moreover, there exists various faces and shades of love in the works of classical and modern Persian literature that challenges the conventional heteronormative assumptions about the sexual and romantic relationships between the lover and the beloved. A sharp contrast exists between the treatment of homosexuality and queerness in Islamic law, on the one hand and its reflection in Persian literature, particularly poetry (the chief vehicle of Persian literary expression), on the other. This course introduces and explores different faces of love, eroticism and homoeroticism in the Persian literary tradition from the dawn of dawn of the Persian poetry in the ninth century all through to the twenty-first century. It offers a comprehensive study of representations and productions of heteronormativity, sexual orientation and gender roles with particular reference to the notion of love, lover and beloved in Persian literature.

Taught by: Shams

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: COML 275, COML 574, GSWS 275, NELC 290, NELC 574

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 578 The Sexuality of Postmodern Art

This course is fundamentally concerned with why so many of the defining artists of the postwar generation were queer, indeed such that one could plausibly claim that postmodernism in American art was a queer innovation. Centrally, most of these artists raise the problem, as the above quotes underscore, of authoriality and its discontents. Deploying a combination of social-historical and theoretical texts, we will approach the problem of the disclaiming of authoriality in post war American art, focusing on the works of John Cage, Robert Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns, Cy Twombly, Robert Indiana, Louise Nevelson, Ellsworth Kelly, Agnes Martin, Leon Polk Smith and not least Andy Warhol. Central to this course will be the continuing salience of the "death of the author" discourse, pioneered in literature by Barthes and Foucault, and in art by every one of the artists we will be examining. What, in short, is the relationship between the rise of an anti-biographical, anti-authorial theoretical framework, and the lived histories of so many queer authors? In asking this question, we are of course self-consciously violating the very premise of one key strand of postmodernist critique--and in so doing attempting to historicize a theoretical frame that is strikingly resistant to historical analysis. (Undergraduates interested in the course should contact Professor Katz.)

Taught by: Katz

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 580

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 579 Provocative Performance

This course will examine a wide array of performance pieces by and about women, designed to provoke social, political, and personal change. Ranging from the serious to the hilarious (and sometimes outrageous), our readings will center on plays and performance art; we will also study live and filmed pieces, attend course-related productions in the city and on campus, and incorporate contextual material on feminist theatre theory and history.

Taught by: Malague

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ENGL 456, THAR 579

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 580 Learning from James Baldwin (1924-1987)

James Baldwin, one of the greatest writers of the twentieth century, spoke to the issues of his times as well as to our own. This class will examine the intellectual legacy that Baldwin left to present-day writers such as Toni Morrison, Charles Johnson, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Thulani Davis, Caryl Phillips and others. We will spend time reading and discussing Baldwin's novels, short stories, plays and essays. In doing so, we will be considering the complex assumptions and negotiations that we make in our day-to-day lives around our identities and experiences built upon gender, sexual preference, the social-constructs called "race," and more. James Baldwin's life and work will be the touchstone that grounds our discussions. We will read Go Tell It on the Mountain, Another Country, The Fire Next Time, and Giovanni's Room and see films I Am Not Your Negro, The Price of the Ticket and The Murder of Emmett Till. Students will research subjects of their own choosing about Baldwin's life and art. For example, they may focus on the shaping influences of Pentecostalism; segregation; racism; homophobia; exile in Paris; the Civil Rights Movement; Black Power, Baldwin's faith, or his return to America.

Taught by: Watterson

Also Offered As: AFRC 581, ENGL 581

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 581 Advanced Psychology of Women

The course is intended for those who already have a foundation in the study of the psychology of women and want to expand their understanding of the provision of psychological services to include a contextual, feminist, and relational perspective. Theoretical and applied practices regarding women's mental health, issues of diversity, sexuality and relationships for women will be addressed. Prerequisite: Introduction to Psychology and an undergraduate course in the Psychology of Women or approval by professor.

Also Offered As: EDUC 581

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 582 Gender,Power&Fem Theory

This seminar will examine the theme of power as it engages questions of sex and gender. Subsidiary themes that will be developed over the course of the semester include: the modernism/ postmodernism debate as it particularly relates to feminism; the intersectionality of race, gender, sexuality and class and how feminists can and do talk about "women"; the relevance of feminist theory to policy issues, and which theoretical approaches are the most appropriate or have the most powerful potential. The readings will start with "foundational" texts in feminist theory-- texts that anyone who wants to work in or teach feminist theory needs to have in their repertoire, they set out the background and history of contemporary feminist theory, and they operate from a variety of disciplinary frameworks. We then will move onto some newer scholarship and some more specific political issues and topics, depending on what students in the course are interested in studying. This course is open to undergraduates who have had some prior course work in feminist theory, gender and sexuality studies, and/or political theory, in consultation with the professor.

Taught by: Hirschmann

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: PSCI 582

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 584 Political Philosophy

An examination of basic theoretical problems of political science divided into three parts. First, specific features of social sciences will be examined and three most important general orientations of social sciences (analytical, interpretative and critical) will be compared and analyzed. Second, basic concepts of social and political sciences will be studied: social determination, rationality, social change, politics, power, state, democracy. Third, the problem of value judgments will be considered: Is there a rational, objective method for the resolution of conflicts in value judgments? Is morality compatible with politics?

Taught by: Hirschmann

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: PSCI 584

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 585 Fashioning Gender

In 1901 the average American family spent 14% of their annual income on clothing. By 1929, the average middle-class woman owned a total of nine outfits. Fast forward to the early twenty-first century, where the relative price of clothing has dropped, clothing has become virtually disposable, and individuals post videos of their shopping hauls online. This course will examine how we got here, why fashion matters, and the far-reaching implications of our love affair with clothes. Readings and topics will include foundational theory about fashion; how clothes shape class, gender, and identity; the significance of revolutionary designers such as Vivienne Westwood and Rei Kawakubo; and the evolution of the clothing industry and its place in the global economy.

Taught by: Sadashige

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Online Course

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 587 Race, Nation, Empire

This graduate seminar examines the dynamic relationships among empires, nations and states; colonial and post-colonial policies; and anti-colonial strategies within a changing global context. Using the rubrics of anthropology, history, cultural studies, and social theory, we will explore the intimacies of subject formation within imperial contexts- past and present- especially in relation to ideas about race and belonging. We will focus on how belonging and participation have been defined in particular locales, as well as how these notions have been socialized through a variety of institutional contexts. Finally, we will consider the relationships between popular culture and state formation, examining these as dialectical struggles for hegemony.

Taught by: Thomas

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 587, ANTH 587, LALS 588

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 588 The Politics of Women's Health Care

This course will utilize a multidisciplinary approach to address the field of women's health care. The constructs of women's health care will be examined from a clinical, as well as sociological, anthropological and political point of view. Topics will reflect the historical movement of women's health care from an an obstetrical/gynecological view to one that encompasses the entire life span and life needs of women. The emphasis of the course will be to undertake a critical exploration of the diversity diversity of women's health care needs and the past and current approaches to this care. Issues will be addressed from both a national and global perspective, with a particular focus on the relationship between women's equality/inequality status and state of health. This course satisfies the Society & Social Structures Sector for Nursing Class of 2012 and Beyond.

Taught by: Lessner

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: NURS 588

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 589 Recent issues in Critical Theory

This course is a critical exploration of recent literary and cultural theory, usually focusing on one particular movement or school, such as phenomenology, psychoanalysis, the Frankfurt School, or deconstruction.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CIMS 580, COML 590, ENGL 590, LALS 590

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 594 Topics in Contemporary Art

Topics vary. The primary for this course is the Art History Department. For a course description please see their website: http://www.sas.upenn.edu/arthistory/courses

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 596 Topics in Contemporary Art

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 596, CIMS 596, ENGL 596, FNAR 605

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 598 The Political Economy of Gender

Over the past two hundred years, with the rise industrial production, growing educational attainment, and availability of contraception, women have entered the formal labor market in vast numbers. Yet despite advances, there are still important disparities between the sexes, often exacerbated by class and racial politics. This course unpacks the elements of the transition in the political economy of gender and examines its limits. We set out to understand women's labor in emerging industrial and post-industrial economies; the causes and consequences of women's political inclusion; gendered opportunities in the labor force including the persistence of pay gaps; and the formation of economic and political preferences across the genders. Theoretically, we will engage with Marxian political economy, and new institutionalist approaches to understand how political and economic institutions reproduce or remedy contemporary problems including the gender gap in wages, in political representation, and in women's economic opportunities. Throughout the course we will pay special attention to challenges faced by minority groups and by women in developing countries.

Taught by: Teele

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: PSCI 530

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 599 Independent Study

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 608 Gender and Sexuality in Hinduism

Issues related to gender and sexuality occupy a complex, often contradictory place in Hinduism. Sexual desire, sexual activity, and the body are simultaneaously celebrated, manipulated, controlled, and restricted. This fundamental ambiguity is at the core of this course, which concerns itself with religious perpectives on the body, gender and sexual activity in Hinduism. Topics include: dharma, morality, and sexual practice; menstruation; pregnancy and childbirth; Bhakti and Tantra; same-sex relations; masculinities; hijras and the notion of the "third sex"; eroticism in the literary, visual, and performing arts; colonialism; and somatic nationalism.

Taught by: Soneji, D.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: SAST 247, SAST 607

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 612 LGBT Counseling & Development

In the past quarter century, the awareness of the unique issues facing lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals has expanded and become essential knowledge in our work as educators, providers of psychological services, and other service provision fields. This course provides a contextual and applied understanding the interactional processes facing LGBT individuals.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EDUC 612

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 630 Gender, Religion, and China

This course examines gender in Chinese religious culture from ancient to contemporary times. We will explore topics including the Buddhist accommodation of Chinese family system, Chinese transformation of the bodhisattva Guanyin, female deities in Daoist and popular religious pantheons, writings about religious women, female ghosts and fox spirits in literary imagination and folk tales, and the significance of yin force in Chinese medicine and Daoist alchemy. Through the case of China, we will look at how gender plays critical and constitutive roles in religious traditions, and how religion can be used both to reinforce and to challenge gender norms.

Taught by: Cheng

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: EALC 230, EALC 630, GSWS 234, RELS 237, RELS 630

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 640 Studies in the Renaissance

Topics vary. This course will be cross-listed with GSWS when the topic includes, Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies. Please see French department's website for current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/french/pc

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 643, FREN 640

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 655 Topics in Black Political Thought: Difference And Community

This course is designed to familiarize graduate students with some of the key texts and debates in Africana Studies concerning the relationship between racial slavery, modernity and politics. Beginning with the Haitian Revolution, much of black political thought (thinking and doing politics) has advocated group solidarity and cohesion in the face of often overwhelming conditions of servitude, enslavement and coercion within the political economy of slavery and the moral economy of white supremacy. Ideas and practices of freedom however, articulated by political actors and intellectuals alike, have been as varied as the routes to freedom itself. Thus, ideas and practices of liberty, citizenship and political community within many African and Afro-descendant communities have revealed multiple, often competing forms of political imagination. The multiple and varied forms of political imagination, represented in the writings of thinkers like Eric Williams, Richard Wright, Carole Boyce Davies and others, complicates any understanding of black political thought as having a single origin, genealogy or objective. Students will engage these and other authors in an effort to track black political thought's consonance and dissonance with Western feminisms, Marxism, nationalism and related phenomena and ideologies of the 20th and now 21st century.

Taught by: Hanchard

Also Offered As: AFRC 655, LALS 656, PSCI 612

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 678 Gender and Sexuality in Education

This seminar gives an overview of the intersections and interplay among gender, sexuality, and education through theory, practice, current discussions, and analysis of varied contexts in English speaking countries (e.g. the United States, Canada, Great Britain, and Australia). After examining the theoretical foundations of genders and sexualities, we will look at their histories and effects in K-12 schools and colleges and universities as well as explore special topics.

Taught by: Cross

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: EDUC 678

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 682 Topics: Literature and Film

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CIMS 682, COML 680, ITAL 682

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 769 Feminist Theory

See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Loombia

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 769, ENGL 769, NELC 783, SAST 769

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 771 Current Japanology

Major trends in scholarship as reflected in important recent publications, especially formative books and periodical literatures. The trajectory within certain disciplines as well as the interaction among them will be critically evaluated in terms of gains and losses. Implications of these theses in the planning of graduate and postgraduate research. Prerequisite: Knowledge of reading Japanese.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 771

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 790 Recent Issues in Critical Theory

The primary for this course is the English Department. When the course content includes gender, sexuality and women's studies it will be cross-listed with GSWS. See additional information and description on the English Department's website: https://www.english.upenn.edu See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 790, ENGL 790

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

GSWS 830 Conducting Research in Global Women's Health

An introduction to theoretical and methodological issues as they relate to conducting research in global women's health. Advanced analysis of historical, social, cultural, economic, political, technological and geographical contexts as they influence the health of girls and women across the lifespan and thier relation to health care systems as both clients and providers. This includes contextual issues that constrain the provisiond & receipt of adequate healthcare. Prerequisites: Completion of course in Global Health (this may include a reputable online course eg: Coursera), or equivalent backround (eg. global health field experience). Permission of Instructor. For graduate and professional students from any field with an interest in global women's health; Master students by permission of instructor. A critical examination of theoretical and methodological issues pertaining to research on women and girls condcuted around the world across disciplines. A focused and intenstive exploration of place as it pertains to women and girls formal and informal structors of health care delivery as those needing and/or seeking health care, and as those providing health care to others. Students will examine the multiple dimensions and qualities of these endeavors (e.g. activity, power, control, visibility, value, and remuneration) and the intersection of gender and health - locally, globally and across borders. Students will focus thier examination on the implicaitons of seeking and providing health care for women's and girls' health and well-being. By examining issues in local and global contexts and across geographical boundaries, students will have the opportunity to challenge gendered, class, political, and cultural assumptions related to women's health.

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: NURS 830

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit