Gender, Sexuality & Women's Studies (GSWS)

GSWS 002 Gender and Society

This course will introduce students to the ways in which sex, gender, and sexuality mark our bodies, influence our perceptions of self and others, organize families and work like, delimit opportunities for individuals and groups of people, as well as impact the terms of local and transnational economic exchange. We will explore the ways in which sex, gender, and sexuality work with other markers of difference and social status such as race, age, nationality, and ability to further demarcate possibilities, freedoms, choices, and opportunities available to people.

For BA Students: Society Sector

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Requirement for Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies major

GSWS 003 Introduction to Sexuality Studies and Queer Theory

This course will introduce students to the historical and intellectual forces that led to the emergence of queer theory as a distinct field, as well as to recent and ongoing debates about gender, sexuality, embodiment, race, privacy, global power, and social norms. We will begin by tracing queer theory's conceptual heritage and prehistory in psychoanalysis, deconstruction and poststructuralism, the history of sexuality, gay and lesbian studies, woman-of-color feminism, the feminist sex wars, and the AIDS crisis. We will then study the key terms and concepts of the foundational queer work of the 1990s and early 2000s. Finally, we will turn to the new questions and issues that queer theory has addressed in roughly the past decade. Students will write several short papers.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 004 The Family

Historical and cultural development of the family, analysis of sexual codes; discussion of role difference between men and women; factors involved in mate selection and marital adjustment; analysis of family disorganization with both individual and societal implications.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Harknett

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 007 Population and Society

The course serves as an introduction to the study of population and demography, including issues pertaining to fertility, mortality, migration, and family formation and structure. Within these broad areas we consider the social, economic, and political implications of current trends, including: population explosion, baby bust, the impact of international migration on receiving societies, population aging, racial classification, growing diversity in household composition and family structure, population and environmental degradation, and the link between population and development/poverty.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Flippen, Harknett, Kohler, Zuberi

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 008 Critical Speaking Seminar

American political discourse, especially since September 11th, has often depicted Islam as an oppressive force from which both Muslims and non-Muslims, particularly women and gender/sexual minorities, must be saved. In this CWiC critical speaking seminar, we will investigate how oral and written narratives-such as political rhetoric, apologetics and historical sources - claim to establish unassailable "facts" about Islam, Muslims and the Middle East. We will also investigate how the notion of empire-both in its traditionally understood form in Islamic and European history, as well as in its iterations as US Military and soft power-privileges certain voices over others, and how we can reclaim the voices of the marginalized in both contemporary discourse as well as historical oral traditions.

Taught by: Rafii

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 010 Freshman Seminars

Freshmen seminars are small, substantive courses taught by members of the faculty and open only to freshmen. These seminars offer an excellent opportunity to explore areas not represented in high school curricula and to establish relationships with faculty members around areas of mutual interest. See www.college.upenn.edu/admissions/freshmen.php

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 017 Topics in Literature

An introduction to Writing about Literature, with emphasis on a particular theme, genre, or period. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of current offerings.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 028 Introduction to Feminist Philosophy

This course is an introduction to feminist thought, both in theory and in practice. We will consider how feminist thought emerged and evolved, as well as how feminist theories respond to various intellectual, social and political challenges. Questions we will address include: What exactly is feminism? How does one's gender identity impact one's lived experiences? How should we revise, reformulate, or rethink traditional answers to politial and ethical issues in light of feminist theories? How can feminist analyses contribute to the development of better science, and our conceptions of knowledge?

Taught by: M. Meyer

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through the College of Liberal and Professional Studies

GSWS 040 Womanism and Identity Politics in the Realm of Hip-Hop

This course centers on the intersections of womanism, woman of color identity development, and agency within hip-hop culture. We will touch on several topics that uncover the condition of minoritized women in hip-hop media, including creating/owning space, lyrical assault, defining womanhood, sexuality, and fetishes. In exploring music, literature, advertisements, film, and television, we will discuss the ways women of color construct understandings of self, while navigating and reimagining reality within hip-hop contexts.

Taught by: Patterson

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 048 Voicing Politics/Politicizing Voices

What does it mean to have a voice? To raise your voice? To have your voice heard? What do our voices say about us and what do they fail to communicate? How we speak and how our voices are perceived impact our interactions in daily life, our participation in the political sphere, and our capacity to effect change through activism. This CWiC course explores the parameters by which voice is defined in the context of music and sound studies, social justice, philosophy, and media and communication studies. We will consider how voice embodies our political constitution through an examination of the vocal practices of artists such as Tanya Tagaq, Anohni, Juliana Huxtable, Laurie Anderson, Sikh Knowledge, and Lucas Silveira; the phenomena of voice-activated devices such as Apple s Siri and Amazon s Echo; and the collective voices of movements such as Black Lives Matter and the Standing Rock water protectors. Through individual and group presentations, discussions, and creative projects, this critical speaking seminar encourages students to develop their oral communication skills while examining what informs their individual and collective voices. No previous musical training required. Enrollment limited to 16.

Taught by: Murphy

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 050 The Romantic Period

This course offers an introduction to the literature of the Romantic period (ca. 1770-1830). Some versions of this course will incorporate European romantic writers, while others will focus exclusively on Anglo-American romanticism, and survey authors such as Austen, Blake, Brockden Brown, Byron, Coleridge, Emerson, Irving, Keats, Radcliffe, Scott, Shelley, and Wordsworth. The primary for this course is ENGL-050. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 060 Latina/o Literature and Culture

A survey of cultural productions by Latinas/os (i.e. people of Latin American descent who have been raised in the U.S.) that usually will focus on the twentieth century, but might at times examine earlier periods instead. The course will take a culturally and historically informed approach to a wide range of novels, poems, plays, and films, and will sometimes include visual art and music. Writers and artists might include Am?rico Paredes, Piri Thomas, Cherrie Moraga, Sandra Cisneros, Julia Alvarez, Junot Diaz, Cristina Garcia, El Teatro Campesino, John Leguizamo, Carmen Lomas Garza, the Hernandez Brothers, and Los Tigres del Norte. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 081 African-American Literature

An introduction to African-American literature, typically ranging across a wide spectrum of moments, methodologies, and ideological postures, from Reconstruction and the Harlem Reanaissance to the Civil Rights Movement. Most versions of this course will begin in the 19th century; some versions of the course will concentrate only on the modern period. ENGL-081 is the primary for this course. See the English Department's website adescription of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 090 Gender, Sexuality, and Literature

This course will focus on questions of gender difference and of sexual desire in a range of literary works, paying special attention to works by women and treatments of same-sex desire. More fundamentally, the course will introduce students to questions about the relation between identity and representation. We will attend in particular to intersections between gender, sexuality, race, class, and nation, and will choose from a rich vein of authors: Mary Wollstonecraft, Jane Austen, Mary Shelley, Lord Byron, the Brontes, Christina Rossetti, George Eliot, Oscar Wilde, Henry James, Gertrude Stein, Zora Neale Hurston, E. M. Forster, Virginia Woolf, Nella Larsen, Radclyffe Hall, Willa Cather, Elizabeth Bishop, Jean Rhys, James Baldwin, Sylvia Plath, Bessie Head, Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, Cherrie Moraga, Toni Morrison, Michael Cunningham, Dorothy Allison, Jeanette Winterson, and Leslie Feinberg. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 096 Theories of Gender and Sexuality

What makes men and women different? What is the nature of desire? This course introduces students to a long history of speculation about the meaning and nature of gender and sexuality -- a history fundamental to literary representation and the business of making meaning. We will consider theories from Aristophanes speech in Platos Symposium to recent feminist and queer theory. Authors treated might include: Plato, Shakespeare, J. S. Mill, Mary Wollstonecraft, Sigmund Freud, Virginia Woolf, Simone de Beauvoir, Adrienne Rich, Audre Lorde, Michel Foucault, Gayle Rubin, Catherine MacKinnon, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Judith Butler, bell hooks, Leo Bersani, Gloria Anzaldua, David Halperin, Cherr?e Moraga, Donna Haraway, Gayatri Spivak, Diana Fuss, Rosemary Hennesy, Chandra Tadpole Mohanty, and Susan Stryker. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: Love

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 101 Study of an Author

This is an introduction to literary study through the works of a single author--often Shakespeare, but some versions of this course will feature other writers. (For offerings in a given semester, please see the on-line course descriptions on the English Department website.) We will read several works and approach them--both in discussion and in writing--from a range of critical perspectives. The author's relation to his or her time, to literary history generally, and to the problems of performance, are likely to be emphasized. This course is designed for the General Requirement; it is also intended to serve as a first or second course for prospective English majors. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 102 Study of a Literary Theme

The primary for this course is the English Department. When the course content includes gender, sexuality and women's studies it will be cross-listed with GSWS. See additional information and description on the English Department's website: https://www.english.upenn.edu

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 105 Topics in Lit. & Society

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 109 Gender, Sexuality, & Religion

What does it mean to be a Muslim, Hindu, Jewish, Christian, or spiritual woman or man? How important are the gender differences in deciding social roles, ritual activities, and spiritual vocations? How does gender intersect with nationality, language, and politics? This course tackles all of these questions, showing how gender- it's definition and the way it is taught and performed- is central to understanding religion. In this course we will learn about women's and men's rituals, social roles, and mythologies in specific religious traditions. We will also look at the central significance of gender to the field of religious studies generally, with particular attention to non- binary genders. The first part of the course will be focused on building a foundation of knowledge about a range of religious traditions and the role of women in those traditions. This course emphasizes religious traditions outside the West. Although it is beyond the scope of this class to offer comprehensive discussions of any one religious tradition, the aim is to provide entry points into the study of religious traditions through the lens of gender. This course will emphasize both historical perspectives and contemporary contexts. We will read religion through a variety of feminist and queer theory lenses- exploring the key characteristics of diverse feminist analyses of religion, as well as limits of specific feminist approaches.

Taught by: Robb

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 114 Discrimination: Sexual and Racial Conflict

This course is concerned with the structure, the causes and correlates, and the government policies to alleviate discrimination by race and gender in thee United States.The central focus of the course is on employment differences by race and gender and the extent to which they arise from labor market d discrimination versus other causes, although racial discrimination in housing is also considered. After a comprehensive overview of the structures of labo and housing markets and of nondiscriminatory reasons (that is, the cumulative effects of past discrimination and/or experiences) for the existence of group differentials in employment, wages and residential locations, various theorie ofthe sources of current discrimination are reviewed and evaluated. Actual government policies and alternatives policies are evaluated in light of both the empirical evidence on group differences and the alternative theories of discrimination.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Madden

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 115 Before Transgender: Hermaphrodites in 19th Century Literature

This course provides a literary and cultural prehistory to contemporary discourses on transgender identity by focusing on the figure of the hermaphrodite in 19th Russia and the West. Far from a marginal subject, the hermaphrodite and intersex characters played central roles in the novels of Balzac, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, and many others whose work we will read in this course. Interdisciplinary in nature, this course draws on 19th century discourses in medicine, psychology, opera, religious philosophy, and political theory to understand why characters who exist outside of the male/female gender binary feature so prominently in 19th century literature and cultural texts across a wide range of traditions (Anglophone, French, and Russian, and others).

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 118 Iranian Cinema: Gender, Politics and Religion

This seminar explores Iranian culture, society, history and politics through the medium of film. We will examine a variety of cinematic works that represent the social, political, economic and cultural circumstances of contemporary Iran, as well as the diaspora. Along the way, we will discuss issues pertaining to gender, religion, nationalism, ethnicity, and the role of cinema in Iranian society and beyond. Discussions topics will also include the place of the Iranian diaspora in cinema, as well as the transnational production, distribution, and consumption of Iranian cinema. Films will include those by internationally acclaimed filmmakers, such as Rakhshan Bani-Etemad, Asghar Farhadi, Bahman Ghobadi, Abbas Kiarostami, Mohsen Makhmalbaf, Dariush Mehrjui, Tahmineh Milani, Jafar Panahi, Marjane Satrapi and others. All films will be subtitled in English. No prior knowledge is required.

Taught by: Entezari

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 122 The Sociology of Gender

Gender is an organizing principle of society, shaping social structures, cultural understandings, processes of interaction, and identities in ways that have profound consequences. It affects every aspect of people's lives, from their intimate relationships to their participation in work, family, government, and other social institutions and their place in the stratification system, Yet gender is such a taken for granted basis for differences among people that it can be hard to see the underlying social structures and cultural forces that reinforce or weaken the social boundaries that define gender. Differences in behavior, power,and experience are often seen as the result of biological imperatives or of individual choice. A sociological view of gender, in contrast, emphasizes how gender is socially constructed and how structural constraints limit choice. This course examines how differences based on gender are created and sustained, with particular attention to how other important bases of personal identity and social inequality--race and class-interact with patterns of gender relations. We will also seek to understand how social change happens and how gender inequality might be reduced.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Leidner

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 125 The Adultery Novel

The object of this course is to analyze narratives of adultery from Shakespeare to the present and to develop a vocabulary for thinking critically about the literary conventions and social values that inform them. Many of the themes (of desire, transgression, suspicion, discovery) at the heart of these stories also lie at the core of many modern narratives. Is there anything special, we will ask, about the case of adultery--once called "a crime which contains within itself all others"? What might these stories teach us about the way we read in general? By supplementing classic literary accounts by Shakespeare, Pushkin, Flaubert, Chekhov, and Proust with films and with critical analyses, we will analyze the possibilities and limitations of the different genres and forms under discussion, including novels, films, short stories, and theatre. What can these forms show us (or not show us)about desire, gender, family and social obligation? Through supplementary readings and class discussions, we will apply a range of critical approaches to place these narratives of adultery in a social and literary context, including formal analyses of narrative and style, feminist criticism, Marxist and sociological analyses of the family, and psychoanalytic understandings of desire and family.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: All readings and lectures in English.

GSWS 128 The Diary

Diary writing is an intimate mode of expression in which individuals seek to find meaning in their personal lives and relations, responding to the external realities in which they live. Their coping is subjected to their historical,educational and social contexts, and to the generic conventions of diary writing. This course examines the diary as a genre, exploring its functions, meanings, forms and conventions, comparing it with fictive and non-fictive autobiographical writings such as the diary novel, autobiography and the memoir, as well as comparative gender diary-writing.

Taught by: Ben-Amos

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 135 Creative Non-Fiction Writing

A workshop course in the writing of expository prose. Assignments include informal as well as formal essays, covering such topics as autobiography, family history, review, interview, analysis of advertising and popular culture, travel, work, and satire. ENGL-135 is the primary for this course, and will be cross-listed with GSWS when the course content includes gender, sexuality and women's studies. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: May be repeated for credit with a different instructor.

GSWS 145 Advanced Non-Fiction Writing

Writing with a view to publication in the freelance sections of newspapers such as THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER and THE NEW YORK TIMES, in magazines such as THE ATLANTIC and THE NEW YORKER, and in the literary quarterlies and the journals of opinion. Among the areas likely to be considered are writing as a public act, issues of taste and of privacy, questions of ethics and of policy, methods of research and of checking, excerpting, marketing, and the realistic understanding of assignments and of the publishing world. Student papers will be the basis of weekly editorial sessions, with concentration on the language: how to render material literate, how to recognize and dispose of padding and self-indulgence, how to tighten structure and amplify substance. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: This course is not open to freshmen. Students wishing to take this course must submit a writing sample a part of the selection process. May be repeated for credit with a different instructor.

GSWS 149 Law and Social Policy on Sexuality and Reproduction

This course will examine how statutory law, court decisions and other forms of social policy encourage or discourage various forms of sexuality, reproduction and parenting. Such issues as contraception, abortion, gay and lesbian rights, reproductive technology, family violence, and welfare and family policies will be covered.

Taught by: Tracy

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 152 Love and Loss in Japanese Literary Traditions: In Translation

How do people make sense of the multiple experiences that the simple words "love" and "loss" imply? How do they express their thoughts and feelings to one another? In this course, we will explore some means Japanese culture has found to grapple with these events and sensations. We will also see how these culturally sanctioned frameworks have shaped the ways Japanese view love and loss. Our materials will sample the literary tradition of Japan from earliest times to the early modern and even modern periods. Close readings of a diverse group of texts, including poetry, narrative, theater, and the related arts of calligraphy, painting, and music will structure our inquiry. The class will take an expedition to nearby Woodlands Cemetery to experience poetry in nature. By the end of the course, you should be able to appreciate texts that differ slightly in their value systems, linguistic expressions, and aesthetic sensibilities from those that you may already know. Among the available project work that you may select, if you have basic Japanese, is learning to read a literary manga. All shared class material is in English translation.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Taught by: Chance

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 157 Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary Eastern Europe

The region of Central and Eastern Europe is a fascinating place to examine questions of gender and sexuality in a non-US context. Stretching from Montenegro on the Adriatic Sea to Estonia on the Baltic, these diverse countries are now mostly members of the European Union and NATO and share common 20th century experiments with various forms of state socialism. Through a combination of scholarly articles and literary fiction, this course will examine the changing status of women during and after the fall of communism, shifting constructions of masculinity, and the emergence of LGBT movements and communities in the post-socialist space. Specific topics will include: the woman question before 1989; gender and emerging nationalisms; neoliberal precarity, visual representations in television and film; social movements and radical politics; work; spirituality; and philosophical investigations into the culturally constructed concepts of "freedom" and "human rights" in post-authoritarian states. All readings and assignments are in English.

Taught by: GHODSEE

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 160 Sex and Socialism

This seminar examines classic and current scholarship and literature on gender and sexuality in contemporary Eastern Europe, and examines the dialogue and interchange of ideas between East and West. Although the scholarly and creative works will primarily investigate the changing status of women during the last three decades, the course will also look at changing constructions of masculinity and LGBT movements and communities in the former communist bloc. Topics will include: the woman question before 1989; gender and emerging nationalisms; visual representations in television and film; social movements; work; romance and intimacy; spirituality; and investigations into the constructed concepts of freedom and human rights.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 162 Women in Jewish Literature

This course introduces students of literature, women's studies, and Jewish studies to the long tradition of women as readers, writers, and subjects in Jewish literature. All texts will be in translation from Yiddish and Hebrew, or in English. Through a variety of genres--devotional literature, memoir, fiction, and poetry -- we will study women's roles and selves, the relation of women and men, and the interaction between Jewish texts and women's lives. The legacy of women in Yiddish devotional literature will serve as background for our reading of modern Jewish fiction & poetry from the past century. The course is devided into five segments. The first presents a case study of the Matriarchs Rachel and Leah, as they are portrayed in the Hebrew Bible, in rabbinic commentary, in pre-modern prayers, and in modern poems. We then examine a modern novel that recasts the story of Dinah, Leah's daughter. Next we turn to the seventeenth century Glikl of Hamel, the first Jewish woman memoirist. The third segment focuses on devotional literature for and by women. In the fourth segment, we read modern women poets in Yiddish, Hebrew, and English. The course concludes with a fifth segment on fiction and a memoir written by women in Yiddish, Hebrew, and English.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Taught by: Hellerstein

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 199 Independent Study

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

GSWS 205 Identity

The content of the course may include the following, and related, themes: what makes a human the same human over time? What constitutes our identities? Are gender, race, sexual orientation, and the like essential features of our identities, and if so, how do they become so? How do ethics, politics and identity interact? After learning this philosophical content, Penn students will develop lesson plans for introducing this content to Philadelphia public high school sudents. Mid way through the semester, Penn students will start to prepare the high school students to present their own original work on the philosophy of identity at a conference to be held at Penn in May 2017. Penn students will be assessed on their own written and other work for the course, and in no way on the written or oral work of the high school students. Enrollment by permit only. Please contact Professor Detlefsen detlefse@sas.upenn.edu to schedule an interview for admission to the course.

Taught by: Detlefsen

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 212 Women in Imperial Rome

Livia, the first empress of Rome, is a critical figure for our understanding of Roman women at the transitional moment between Republic and Empire. As the most publicly celebrated woman of Augustus' household, Livia is an opportune figure through which to examine a variety of Augustan and early imperial texts and monuments. This course will survey Livia's different literary and material representationsand attempt to come to terms with the various perspectives on the first empress presented by these texts and contexts. Livia provides a key figure through whom students will be exposed to various issues surrounding the portrayal of Roman women in the early empire. Through lecture and discussion, we will relate Livia to her contemporary world, and then examine the role of imperial women through the rest of the Julio-Claudian era and beyond. We will discover Livia's influence in creating the role of the empress, and analyze the differences between her representation as an ideal and that of later imperial women. Students will write brief response papers to primary texts and present on select secondary readings that add to our understanding of the portrayal of Livia and imperial women more generally.

Taught by: Gillespie

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 216 Gender and Health

Women's health is a constant refrain of modern life, prompting impassioned debates that speak to the fundamental nature of our society. Women's bodies are the tableaux across which politicians, physicians, healthcare professional, activists, and women themselves dispute issues as wide-ranging as individual versus collective rights, the legitimacy of scientific and medical knowledge, the role of the government in healthcare, inequalities of care, and the value of experiential knowledge, among many others. Understanding the history of these questions is crucial for informed engagement with contemporary issues.

Taught by: Linker

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 217 CU In India - Topics Course

C.U. in India is a hybrid, domestic/overseas course series which provides students with the opportunity to have an applied learning and cultural experience in India. The 2-CU course requires: 1) 15 classroom hours at Penn in the Fall term 2) A 12-Day trip to India with the instructor during the winter break to visit key sites and conduct original research (sites vary) 3) 15 classroom hours at Penn in the Spring term and 4) A research paper, due at the end of the spring term. Course enrollment is restricted to students admitted to the program. For more information, and the program application, go to http://sites.sas.upenn.edu/cuinindia

Two terms. student must enter first term.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 222 African Women's Lives: Past and Present

Restoring women to African history is a worthy goal, but easier said than done.The course examines scholarship over the past forty years that brings to light previously overlooked contributions African women have made to political struggle, religious change, culture preservation, and economic development from pre-colonial times to present. The course addresses basic questions about changing women's roles and human rights controversies associated with African women within the wider cultural and historical contexts in which their lives are lived. It also raises fundamental questions about sources, methodology, and representation, including the value of African women's oral and written narrative and cinema production as avenues to insider perspectives on African women's lives.

Taught by: Blakely

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 224 Family Feuds:Beyonce, Jay-Z and Solange and the Meaning of American Music

Taking Beyonce's "Lemonade," Solange's "A Seat At The Table," and Jay-z's "4:44" as a point of departure, this class will focus on the role of popular music as "politics" within contemporary American culture. While these albums are clearly neither the first nor the only musical expressions to delve into the matters of black lives, feminism, and sexuality today, they do mark a very significant political and personal evolution for these individual artists and their audiences as they relate to the defining issues of our time. By looking at how each artist engages their influences (Nina Simone is staple for all three) and discussing how these albums challenge musical forms and incorporate different visual mediums, this course will reflect on the conversations these artists are having with each other and examine their cultural impact in order to understand the limits and possibilities of black musical expressions as sites of social change.

Taught by: Tillet

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 227 Sex and Power

Gender has been a primary way of organizing power relations throughout history.This class asks how transformations in the global economy, technological change, new patterns of household formation, and social movements, have influenced women's access to economic and political positions over the past two centuries. We will examine how women's mobilization contributed to the abolition of slavery, reform of property and franchise laws, and to the formation of the welfare state. Next, we turn to thinking about how women's increasing labor force participation was hindered by institutions like marriage bars and union policy. Third, we look at cross-national patterns of women's political participation and descriptive representation including whether and how the adoption of electoral quotas influences gender equality more generally. Finally we study how institutional norms and gender stereotypes affect political representation. This class will draw on examples from around the world, and will look a experiences of women from all economic, social, and ascriptive backgrounds.

Taught by: Teele

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 228 Topics In Classicism and Literature

The primary for this course is the English Department. When the course content includes gender, sexuality and women's studies it will be cross-listed with GSWS. See additional information and description on the English Department's website: https://www.english.upenn.edu

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 229 This course explores the origins and the politics of reform movements in the United States between 1800 and the Civil War.

This course explores the origins and the politics of reform movements in the United States between 1800 and the Civil War. We will consider the politics of antislavery and abolitionism, temperance, women's rights, education, Indian removal, and poor relief. The course will explore how broader social, economic, political and religious transformations affected the ways in which oridinary Americans as well as elected politicians and professional reformers understood the need for and the methods of reform. We will consider how urbanization, industrialization, electoral democratization, the market revolution, religious revivalism, and the growing sophistcation of print culture revolutionized the way Americans understood the problems of good and evil and their own various roles in effecting societal change.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 232 World History: Africa or the Middle East

Topics vary.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 233 World History: East Asia or Latin America

This is a topics course. See History Department's website: http://www.history.upenn.edu/courses/undergraduate for a complete description of this course for the term.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 234 Gender and Religion in China

This course examines gender in Chinese religious culture from ancient to contemporary times. We will explore topics including the Buddhist accommodation of Chinese family system, Chinese transformation of the bodhisattva Guanyin, female deities in Daoist and popular religious pantheons, writings about religious women, female ghosts and fox spirits in literary imagination and folk tales, and the significance of yin force in Chinese medicine and Daoist alchemy. Through the case of China, we will look at how gender plays critical and constitutive roles in religious traditions, and how religion can be used both to reinforce and to challenge gender norms.

Taught by: Cheng, H

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 235 Psychology of Women

Critical analyses of the psychological theories of female development, and introduction to feminist scholarship on gender development and sexuality.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 236 Gender, Violence, and WWII: Europe, 1933-1950

This seminar explores World War II-era Europe through the lens of evolving gender norms and relations. This turbulent period in European history magnified the so-called "gender troubles" that emerged in the wake of the First World War. From the question of equality between the sexes to the liberalization of sexual mores and divergence from the proscribed roles of men and women, gender had a profound impact on the prewar, wartime, and immediate postwar European landscape. Drawing on primary and secondary sources, we will consider the following questions: How did gender and violence shape the course of World War II and the immediate postwar from Britain to the Soviet Union? How can gender and sexuality help us to understand militarization, violence, and war? How did war and occupation impact relations between and among men and women on the home- and war fronts? We will complicate these questions by probing topics such as women's support for war, masculinity in combat, everyday racial discrimination, eugenics, sexual violence and genocide and the ways in which they infiltradted the every aspect of Europeans' public and private lives. Finally, we will discuss scholarly debates and historiographies on gender during World War II that have emerged since the early 1970s.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 243 The Fantastic and Uncanny in Literature: Ghosts, Spirits & Machines

Do we still believe in spirits and ghosts? Do they have any place in an age of science of technology? Can they perhaps help us to define what a human being is and what it can do? We will venture on a journey through literary texts from the late eighteenth century to the present to explore the uncanny and fantastic in literature and Our discussions will be based on a reading of Sigmund Freud's essay on the uncanny, and extraordinary Romantic narratives by Ludwig Tieck, E.T.A. Hoffmann, Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Prosper Merimee, Villiers de Isle-Adam, and others.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Taught by: Weissberg

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: All readings and lectures in English

GSWS 244 Critical Methods in Sexuality Studies

This seminar examines the links between queer theory and research methods, with an emphasis on approaches that cross the division between the social sciences and the humanities. How do scholars who contribute to critical sexuality studies navigate questions related to knowledge, ethics, and practice? How do critical, transnational, and post-colonial theories inform methods in sexuality studies? Over the course of the term, students will become acquainted with a variety of methods for conducting qualitative research in the interdisciplinary field of critical sexuality studies. Introducing students to the process of doing research, we will consider such topics as: how to frame a research question, how to conduct a literature review, and how to choose appropriate tools to answer research questions. A range of methods including archival research, oral history, qualitative interviews, ethnography, cyber-ethnography, media and cultural studies will be explored. Issues of power, narration, interpretation, representation, and writing will be central to our discussion as we work through the relationships of theory and method.

Taught by: White

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 245 Topics In The 18th-Century Novel

The primary for this course is the English Department. When the course content includes gender, sexuality and women's studies it will be cross-listed with GSWS. See additional information and description on the English Department's website: https://www.english.upenn.edu See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Spaces will be reserved for English Major

GSWS 249 Philosophy of Education

The philosophy of education asks questions about the foundational assumptions of our formal institutions for the reproduction of culture. It ranges therefore, from epistemology and philosophy of mind to ethics and political philosophy. For instance: What is the nature of learning and teaching? How is it possible to come to know something we did not know already--and how can we aid others in doing that? How, if at all, should formal institutions of education be concerned with shaping students' moral and civic character? What is the proper relation between educational institutions and the state? We also ask questions more specific to our own time and context. For example: how, in a multicultural state, should we educate students of varied social identities, like race, gender, and religion? What is the relationship between education and justice.

Taught by: Detlefsen

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 252 Freud: The Invention of Psychoanalysis

No other person of the twentieth century has probably influenced scientific thought, humanistic scholarship, medical therapy, and popular culture as much as Sigmund Freud. This course will study his work, its cultural background, and its impact on us today. In the first part of the course, we will learn about Freud's life and the Viennese culture of his time. We will then move to a discussion of seminal texts, such as excerpts from his Interpretation of Dreams, case studies, as well as essays on psychoanalytic practice, human development, definitions of gender and sex, neuroses, and culture in general. In the final part of the course, we will discuss the impact of Freud's work. Guest lectureres from the medical field, history of science, psychology, and the humnities will offer insights into the reception of Freud's work, and its consequences for various fields of study and therapy.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: Weissberg

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: All readings and lectures in English.

GSWS 254 Japanese Theater

Japan has one of the richest and most varied theatrical traditions in the world. In this course, we will examine Japanese theater in historical and comparative contexts. The readings and discussions will cover all areas of the theatrical experience (script, acting, stage design, costumes, music, audience). Audio-visual material will be used whenever appropriate and possible. The class will be conducted in English, with all English materials.

Taught by: Kano

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 255 Thinking about Capitalism

Throughout the world today, economists are influential policymakers and pub intellectuals, and non-economists understand many aspects of their lives in economic terms. But as recently as 1945 in some regions of the world and a distantly as 1776 in others, the concept of the economy, the field of economics, and economists as a professional community did not exist. This class explores non-economic ways of understanding material life that have preceded, challenged, or undergirded economic thinking; the emergence of th economy and economics as naturalized, globally recognized concepts; the formation of economists as an authoritative professional group; and the ris of economic reasoning in daily life. The class takes a global approach, exploring these developments in societies from eighteenth-century Britain t twentieth-century Egypt in order to understand the local variations, international relationships, and transnational processes at work. It simultaneously takes a social approach to intellectual history, considering how popular and professional ideas developed in relation to one another, an how knowledege related to lived experience.

Taught by: Offner

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 257 Contemporary Fiction & Film in Japan

This course will explore fiction and film in contemporary Japan, from 1945 to the present. Topics will include literary and cinematic representation of Japan s war experience and post-war reconstruction, negotiation with Japanese classics, confrontation with the state, and changing ideas of gender and sexuality. We will explore these and other questions by analyzing texts of various genres, including film and film scripts, novels, short stories, mangazines, and academic essays. Class sessions will combine lectures, discussion, audio-visual materials, and creative as well as analytical writing exercises. The course is taught in English, although Japanese materials will be made available upon request. No prior coursework in Japanese literature, culture, or film is required or expected; additional secondary materials will be available for students taking the course at the 600 level. Writers and film directors examined may include: Kawabata Yasunari, Hayashi Fumiko, Abe Kobo, Mishima Yukio, Oe Kenzaburo, Yoshimoto Banana, Ozu Yasujiro, Naruse Mikio, Kurosawa Akira, Imamura Shohei, Koreeda Hirokazu, and Beat Takeshi.

Taught by: Kano

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Fulfills Cross-Cultural Analysis

GSWS 267 Topics In Poetry and Poetics

This course explores an aspect of poetry and poetics intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Spaces will be reserved for English Majors

GSWS 269 Topics In Modernism

This course explores an aspect of literary modernism intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. Past offerings have included seminars on the avant-garde, on the politics of modernism, and on its role in shaping poetry, music, and the visual arts. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Spaces will be reserved for English Majors

GSWS 270 Folklore and Sexuality

Sexuality is not only a biological act or fact, it also has a creative and aesthetic element. This course examines the folklore elements of sexuality and includes historical readings such as the Bible and the Decameron as well as a contemporary look at topics such as body art and clothing choice. A field-based paper will be required and a final examination will be given on class discussions and readings.

Taught by: Azzolina

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 279 Women in Theatre and Performance

Theatre began as a form that excluded women entirely. The plays of ancient Greece and Elizabethan England were written and performed only by men, beginning a long tradition of theatre that represented women only from male perspectives. Has that tradition been so dominant for so long that women's voices on stage are still a novelty? This course focuses on a wide range of plays and performances by and about women; the work we read (and view) will evidence artistic attempts to represent women's lives, experiences and perspectives on the stage. Among the issues encountered and examined in these works are the roles of love, sexuality, friendship, career, community, marriage, motherhood, family, and feminism in women's lives - as well as the economic and political position(s) of women in society. The course will also offer contextual background on feminist theatre history, theory, and literature, the diverse (and divergent) creative efforts of female artists to use live performance as a means of creating social and political change.

Taught by: Malague

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 280 Feminist Political Thought

This course is designed to provide an overview of the variety of ideas, approaches, and subfields within feminist political thought. Readings and divided into three sections: contemporary theorizing about the meaning of "feminism";women in the history of Western political thought; and feminist theoretical approaches to practical political problems and issues, such as abortion and sexual assault.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Hirschmann

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 285 Kelly Writers House Seminar

This is a topics course for Spring 2015. The description is: Anne Waldman has been an active member of the "Outrider" experimental poetry community for over four decades as a writer, editor, teacher, performer, and cultural/political activist. She is the author of more than forty books, including Fast Speaking Woman, Vow to Poetry, and The Iovis Trilogy: Colors in the Mechanism of Concealment. Dorothy Allisons' works of fiction and memoir delve into issues of gender, sexuality, autobiography, trauma, and the South and include the short story collection Trash and the novels Bastard Out of Carolina and Cavedweller. Jessiva Hagedorn's novels include Toxicology, Dream Jungle, The Gangster of Love, and Dogeaters, set in the turbulent period of the Philippines' late dictator and exploring intersections between American pop culture and local Filipino tradtion; her writing for the theater includes Fe in the Desert, Stairway to Heaven, and the stage adaptation of Dogeaters.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 286 Topics American Lit: Emily Dickinson At Large

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 290 Topics In Gender, Sexuality, and Literature

The primary for this course is the English Department. When the course content includes gender, sexuality and women's studies it will be cross-listed with GSWS. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: This course is not open to freshman.

GSWS 294 Art Now

One of the most striking features of today's art world is the conspicuous place occupied in it by the photographic image. Large-scale color photographs and time-based installations in projections are everywhere. Looking back, we can see that much of the art making of the past 60 years has also been defined by this medium, regardless of the form it takes. Photographic images have inspired countless paintings, appeared in combines and installations, morphed into sculptures, drawings and performances, and served both as the object and the vehicle of institutional critique. They are also an increasingly important exhibition site: where most of us go to see earthworks, happenings and body-art. This course is a three-part exploration of our photographic present.

Taught by: Silverman

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 295 Cinema and Media

This course will provide an introduction to some of the most important film theory debates, and allow us to explore how writers and filmmakers from different countries and historical periods have attempted to make sense of the changing phenomenon known as "cinema," to think cinematically. Topics under consideration may include: spectatorship, authorship, the apparatus, sound, editing, realism, race, gender and sexuality, stardom, the culture industry, the nation and decolonization, what counts as film theory and what counts as cinema, and the challenges of considering film theory in a global context, including the challenge of working across languages. There will be a weekly film screening for this course. No knowledge of film theory is presumed. Course requirements: attendance at lecture and participation in lecture and section discussions; canvas postings; 1 in-class mid-term; 1 final project.

Taught by: Redrobe

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 296 Topics In Literary Theory

This course explores an aspect of literary theory intensively; specific course topics vary from year to year. It is an English course that is cross-listed with GSWS when the topic includes gender, sexuality and women's studies. Please check out the English Department's website for the current semester's description.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 297 Topics In Theories of Gender and Sexuality

The primary for this course is the English Department. When the course content includes gender, sexuality and women's studies it will be cross-listed with GSWS. See additional information and description on the English Department's website: https://www.english.upenn.edu

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 299 Women in Modern S.Asia

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 301 French Identity in the Twentieth Century

Topics vary. Please see the French Department's website for a description of the current offerings: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/french/pc

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 302 Queer Cinema

Queerness has often been understood as a threat to society whether social institutions like marriage or monogamy or familial practices have been characterized by increasing acceptance of gays and lesbians into mainstream society, this process has no doubt reproduced new inequalities and asymmetrities - in terms of race, class and access to institutional spaces. Does "queer" still pose a threat to the mainstream or is it now part of the "normal"? Should one welcome the progressive acceptance of queer lives within the mainstream or should one reject it in the name of an indissoluble difference? In this course we will range across movies and theories that engage with these questions, particularly focusing on negative reactions to processes of assimilation. Topics will include sex and death, queerness and neoliberalism, intersections of race and sexuality. Some of the films we will watch and discuss are Paolini's Pigsty, Fassbiner's In a Year of 13 Moons, Jennie Livingstone's Paris is Burning, Cheryl Dunye's Watermelon Woman, Kimberly Peirce's Boys Don't Cry.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 307 Love, Lust and Violence in the Middle Ages

Medieval Europe was undoubtedly gruff and violent but it also gave birth to courtly culture - raw worries transformed into knights who performed heroic deeds, troubadours wrote epics in their honor and love songs about their ladies, women of the elite carved out a place in public discourse as patrons of the arts, and princely courts were increasingly defined by pageantry from jousting tournaments to royal coronations. This course will trace the development of this courtly culture from the eleventh to the sixteenth century, from its roots in Southern France to its spread to Northern France and then to various kingdoms in Europe. Central themes will include the transformation of the warrior into the knight, the relationship between violence and courtliness, courtly love, cultural production and the patronage of art, and the development of court pageantry and ceremonial. This is a class in cultural history and, as such, will rely on the interpretation of objects of art and material culture, literature as well as historical accounts.

Taught by: Kuskowski

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 313 Topics in East Asian Art

Topic varies.

Taught by: Davis

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 318 Race, Gender, Class and the History of American Health Care

This multidisciplinary course surveys the history of American health care through the multiple perspectives of race, gender, and class, and grounds the discussions in contemporary health issues. It emphasizes the links between the past and present, using not only primary documents but materials from disciplines such as literature, art, sociology, and feminist studies that relate both closely and tangentially to the health professions and health care issues. Discussions will surround gender, class-based, ethnic, and racial ideas about the construction of disease, health and illness; the development of health care institutions; the interplay between religion and science; the experiences of patients and providers; and the response to disasters and epidemics.

Taught by: Fairman

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 321 Global Feminism

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 322 Advanced Topics in Global Gender and Sexuality Studies

This is an advanced topics course, and the course description will vary from semester to semester.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 324 Children's Health in the United States, 1800-2000

This course explores the impact of historical ideas, events, and actors pertaining to the history of children's health care in the United States. Emphasis is placed on tracing the origins and evolution of issues that have salience for twenty-first century children's health care policy and the delivery of care.

Taught by: Connolly

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For Benjamin Franklin Scholars Nursing Honors Students

GSWS 330 Medieval Literature

An introductory course to the literature of the French Middle Ages. French literature began in the 11th and 12th centuries. This course examines the extraordinary period during which the French literary tradition was first established by looking at a number of key generative themes: Identity, Heroism, Love, Gender. All readings and discussions in French.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 335 Topics In The 18th Century Novel

This course explores an aspect of 18th-Century novel intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 336 "Where My Girls At?":African American Women Performers in The 20th Century

African American women performers from blues woman Bessie Smith to Paris revue star Josephine Baker, from jazz darling Billie Holiday to rock legend Tina Turner, and from hip hop giant Lauryn Hill to millennial star Beyonce, have constantly redefined and expanded American popular music. Using the long 20th century as our historical marker, this course will explore how African American women performers, across genres and time, have consciously and sometimes contradictorily navigated the racial and sexual limits of American popular culture in order to assert their own particular narratives of artistic and political freedom.

Taught by: Tillet

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 343 Boys will be Boys: Masculinity in French Literature

Why was a portrait depicting the Renaissance king Francois I as half-man, half-woman made with royal approval, and moreover intended to represent the king as the perfect embodiment of the ideal qualities of a male sovereign? And why, in what is now regarded as the official portrat of Louis XIV, does the king prominently display his silk stockings and high heels with diamond-encrusted buckles? These are just two examples of the questions that lead us to the point of departure for this course: the idea that masculinit is not a fixed essence that has existed since time immemorial, but rather a flexible concept that changes across and even within historical periods. We will examine how masculinity has evolved from the Middle Ages and the chivalric ideal to the present day, how it has been defined, and its implications for gender relations, politics, and religion in different eras. In addition to literary works, we will study how masculinity is represented across a range of media, including visual arts, music, and film. Discussions will be in English, and assignments will be available in translation, but students who wish to receive credit in French will be able to do coursework in French.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 344 Psychology of Personal Growth

Intellectual, emotional and behavioral development in the college years. Illustrative topics: developing intellectual and social competence; developing personal and career goals; managing interpersonal relationships; values and behavior. Recommended for submatriculation in Psychological Services Master's Degree program.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 345 Sinners, Sex and Slaves: Race and Sex in Early America

This course explores the lost worlds of sinners, witches, sexual offenders, rebellious slaves, and Native American prophets from the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries. Using the life stories of unusual individuals from the past, we try to make sense of their contentious relationships with their societies. By following the careers of the trouble-makers, the criminals, and the rebels, we also learn about the foundations of social order and the impulse to reform that rocked American society during the nineteenth century.

Taught by: Brown

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

GSWS 346 Women in American History, 1865 to the Present

Picking up where History 345 leaves off, this course explores how immigration industrialization, racial segregation, and the growing authority of science transformed the fundamental conditions of women's lives in the late nineteent and early twentieth centuries. Building on previous efforts by female reformers to perfect society, women at the turn of the century organized large social movements dedicated to improving the lives of women and children and gaining public access to political power. We will examine the fruits of this activism as well as the consequences of subsequent events for the rise of several important social movements in the latter half of the century -- including civil rights, women's liberation, and gay rights -- in which women played a vital role. The course concludes with an assessment of feminism in the present day, with special emphasis on the responses of younger women to its legacy.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 349 History of Sexuality in the U.S.

This course introduces students to a relatively new field of inquiry, the history of sexuality in the U.S. It explores the past to consider why sexuality has been so central to American identities, culture, and politics. Primary documents and other readings focus on the history of sexual ideology and regulation; popular culture and changing sexual practices; the emergence of distinct sexual identity and communities; the politics of sexuality; and the relationship between sexual and other forms of social difference, such as gender, race, ethnicity, age, and class. Topics include many themes with continuing relevance to contemporary public debate: among them, sexual representation and censorship, sexual violence, adolescent sexuality, the politics of reproduction, gay and lesbian sexualities and sexually transmitted diseases.

Taught by: Peiss

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 353 Topics In 19th-Century American Literature

This course explores an aspect of 19th-Century American literature intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 369 Topics In Poetry and Poetics

This course explores an aspect of poetry and poetics intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 387 Topics in Africana Studies

Topics vary: Black Feminist Approaches to History & Memory - The term black feminism emerged in public discourse amid the social, political, and cultural turbulence of the 1960s. The roots of black feminism, however, are much older, easily reaching back to the work of black women abolitionists and social critics of the nineteenth century. The concept continued to grow and evolve in the work of twentieth century black women writers, journalists, activists, and educators as they sought to document black women's lives. Collectively, their work established black feminism as a political practice dedicated to the equality of all people. More recently, black feminism has been deployed as a tool for theoretical and scholarly analysis that is characterized by an understanding that race, class, gender, and sexuality are inextricably interconnected.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 390 Topics in Gender, Sexuality and Literature

The advanced women's studies course in the English department, focusing on a particular aspect of literature by and about women. Topics might include: "Victorian Literary Women"; "Women, Politics, and Literature"; "Feminist Literary Theory"; and similar foci. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Benjamin Franklin Seminar

GSWS 391 Introduction to Spanish American Literature

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 394 Topics in Contemporary Art

Topic varies. Spring 2017: This course will examine key moments in the history of civil rights through a cinematic lens. Over the course of the semester, we will explore how filmmakers have depicted the lives, aspirations, and strategies of those who have struggled for equal rights; how different struggles have intersected with each other; what aesthetic strategies have been adopted to represent freedom and the denial of it; and how effective cinematic efforts to contribute to increased freedom have been as well as what criteria we use to evaluate success or failure in the first place. Each week, we will watch a film and read a series of texts that will be drawn from a variety of arenas, including histories of civil rights; civil rights pamphlets and speeches; filmmaker interviews; film and media theory; memoirs; and theories of race, gender and sexuality. Course requirements: mutual respect; completion of all readings and screenings; participation in class discussion; weekly online responses; a final project that can be a research paper, film, art project, or community-based initiative.

Taught by: Redrobe

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 396 Studies in Spanish American Culture

Topics vary.

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: Spanish 219

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 397 History of Spanish American Culture

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website descriptions for a description of the current offerings. http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/roml/spanish/undergraduate/courses.html

Course not offered every year

Prerequisite: Spanish 219

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 420 Witchcraft and Gender in the Early Modern World

From the 15th century through the 18th century, social tensions erupted in Europe and the colonies in the witch craze, a period when intense cultural concern over witchcraft was expressed through religious treatises and sermons, popular literature like pamphlets and broadsides, legal accusations, trials, and, in some cases, executions. Although scholars argue vehemently about the total number of people executed during the witch-hunts, their importance in understanding early modern beliefs and responses to social tensions is clear. In this class, we will explore historians' understandings of the causes underlying this cultural phenomenon. With special attention to gender, social position,and religious belief, we will join academic debates about the causes of these persecutions. We will also read some primary sources from the medieval through the early modern periods, including trial transcripts, sermons, and pamphlets. Were women the main target of witchcraft accusations and executions, and if so, was misogyny their most important cause? What role did sexual norms and beliefs have in the way that accusations were framed? Were there different patterns of accusation and executions across time and region, and if so, what social and cultural factors might explain them?

Taught by: Rabberman

Course not offered every year

Activity: Online Course

1 Course Unit

Notes: Master in Liberal Arts course

GSWS 422 History of Sexuality

In this course, rather than simply debating changes in sexual practices over time, we will discuss the ways in which different societies in the past and present constructed sexual norms and understood normality and deviance in sexual terms. We will focus special attention on the following questions: To what extent are sexual identities constructed by different cultures, rather than simply being determined biologically? What influence do social, economic, and political conditions have on social constructions of sexuality? How have different societies used sexual norms to mark "natural" practices from "deviant" ones, and how are these norms connected to societies' power structures? We will explore case studies from Classical Greece through the contemporary United States. Our readings will explore topics such as medieval and modern views of the body, gender, sexuality, and science; prostitutes in medieval and Victorian England; same-sex relationships from classical Greece to medieval Europe to the contemporary United States; expectations for sexuality within and outside marriage; hermaphrodites; and sexual deviants, among others. Students will be expected to participate actively in class discussions, and to complete short response papers and a longer research paper.

Taught by: Rabberman

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Master in Liberal Arts course

GSWS 423 Gendered Constructions of Other Cultures in Western Travel Literature

Descriptions of peoples from foreign lands and faraway places have captured theimaginations of Europeans for centuries. Pilgrims and merchants, explorers and conquistadores, Victorians taking their Grand Tour and 21st century travelers have preserved their observations, both in written form, in ethnographies and diaries, novels and travel narratives, and in visual form, in maps, illuminated manuscripts, engravings, and photographs. Through these media, these travelers have not simply captured their memories, but have also helped to shape Western representations of the people they encountered. In the process, these travelers often have justified Western political, economic, cultural, and social dominance, although instead some travelers have critiqued the West. And in all these depictions, gender and sexuality have played centrol roles in the creation of these identities and relationship.

Taught by: Rabberman

Activity: Online Course

1 Course Unit

GSWS 434 The Politics of Ugly

Venus was the God of Beauty and Love yet she was married to Hephaestus, the mangled, grumpy and for all intents and purposes, ugly god. Why juxtapose such distinct figures? Are they doing the same job? The course discusses the interplay between ugliness and politics with focus on a number of central concepts such as race, social conflict, nationalism, ideology, dictatorship, propaganda and autonomy. Emphasis is put on the double role of the deployment of ugliness, as reinforcement of ideological and political ideas and as a force of social criticism. How does the state justify its own existence by the use of aesthetic narratives? How does the State identify undesirables? This class highlights how groups who feel somatically alike behave, and how their boundaries form and change over time. The focus will be interdisciplinary and multi-national, with case studies from past and present. The class will have a digital media focus as we will delve into issues of representation particularly with respect to race. For example, we will delve into the aesthetic discussion of northern and southern Sudanese as well and Hitler's Germany.

Taught by: Carelock

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 436 Africana Studies Undergraduate Seminar

On the stage of modern world history, Haiti plays the unique role as both exceptionally victorious and tragic character. This course interrogates archival documents, oral histories, historical texts, and prose created wi the nation and her diaspora in order to establish a nuanced image of the projection of Haiti's modern history. Using two classic Haitian texts, Ma Vieux-Chauvet's Love, Anger, Madness (1968) and Michel-Rolph Trouillot's Silencing the Past: Power and the Production of History (1995),this course examines how, why,and to what end Haiti's history and popular narratives a the country have served to construct and dismantle global movements, popul culture, and meanings of race, gender, and citizenship in the Americas. I our historical examination, we will question some of the iconic representations of Haiti through literature that deepen the affective historical profile of Haiti with interrogations of culture, sexuality, political, and media performance. Students will become familiar with the -colonial history of Haiti and the region, meanings of race, and the production of history. The course is a research and historical methods seminar.

Taught by: Johnson

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 447 Human Reproductive Ecology

This course explores the processes that regulate fertility in human populations. We adopt an evolutionary perspective to examine the factors that have shaped human reproductive physiology and contribute to variation in reproductive parameters between populations. The biology of menarche, ovarian cycling, pregnancy, lactation, fetal loss, and menopause will be reviewed and the ecological and social factors that influence these steps in the reproductive process will be considered.

Course offered spring; even-numbered years

Prerequisite: ANTH 003 or consent of instructor

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 485 Topics in Gender Theory

This course seeks to assemble some of the philosophical evidence for feminist claims that traditional political theories are fundamentlaly inadequate because they have not, and presumably cannot, deal with basic facts of gender and the oppression of Women. We will begin by examining the nature of the distinction between sex and gender. This will take us through discussions of: the meaning and significance of categories being socially constructed, the possibility that sexual differences (and inequalities) are in some sense natural and what normative force this has. We will then consider varous attempts to describe the nature of women's oppression. What is it? How does it manifest itself in the lives of women? This will take us through discussions of freedom, constrained choice, ideology, "consciousness raising", androcentrism and the relation between, and methodological importance of, ideal and non-ideal theory. Along the way we will be constructing a version of the feminist framework known as the dominance approach and seeing how it analyzes three presumed sites of oppression: sexuality, reproduction and work/family. Among the authors we will be reading are: Elizabeth Anderson, Marily Frye, Sally Haslanger, Rae Langton, Anthony Laden, Catherine MacKinnon, and Susan Okin. The prerequisite for UNDERGRADUATES taking this course is: two philosophy courses (ONE of which is in moral or political philosophy) OR ONE of the following Gender Studies courses: GSWS/PHIL 028, GSWS/PoliSci 280, GSWS 320. There will be one short paper (6-8 pages) with revision, a longer final paper (15 pages) and weekly one-page reflections on a topic from the previous week's discussion.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 489 Fashioning Gender

Course not offered every year

Activity: Online Course

1 Course Unit

GSWS 492 More Human Than Human

Course not offered every year

Activity: Online Course

1 Course Unit

GSWS 499 Independent Study

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

GSWS 509 Modernist Jewish Poetry

One version of this seminar considers works by Jewish women who wrote in Yiddish, Hebrew, English, and other languages in the late 19th through the 20th century. The texts, poetry and prose, will include both belles lettres and popular writings, such as journalism, as well as private works (letters and diaries) and devotional works. The course will attempt to define "Jewish writing, " in terms of language and gender, and will consider each writer in the context of the aesthetic, religious, and national ideologies that prevailed in this period. Because students will come with proficiency in various languages, all primary texts and critical and theoretical materials will be taught in English translation. However, those students who can, will work on the original texts and share with the class their expertise to foster a comparative perspective. Because we will be discussing translated works, a secondary focus of the course will, in fact, be on literary translation's process and products.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 516 Public Interest Workshop

This is a Public Interest Ethnography workshop (originally created by Peggy Reeves Sanday - Department of Anthropology) that incorporates an interdisciplinary approach to exploring social issues. Open to graduate and advanced undergraduate students, the workshop is a response to Amy Gutmann's call for interdisciplinary cooperation across the University and to the Department of Anthropology's commitment to developing public interest research and practice as a disciplinary theme. Rooted in the rubric of public interest social science, the course focuses on: 1) merging problem solving with theory and analysis in the interest of change motivated by a commitment to social justice, racial harmony, equality, and human rights; and 2) engaging in public debate on human issues to make research results accessible to a broader audience. The workshop brings in guest speakers and will incorporate original ethnographic research to merge theory with action. Students are encouraged to apply the framing model to a public interest research and action topic of their choice. This is an academically-based-community-service (ABCS) course that partners directly with Penn's Netter Center Community Partnerships.

Taught by: Suess

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 517 Sociology of Work

The thinkers whose work formed the foundations of sociological theory considered the nature of the relationship between work and identity key to understanding social solidarity, power, and historical change. In recent years, the division of labor, structures of work, and employment relations have all been undergoing rapid change, necessarily affecting the possibilities for constructing identity through work. This seminar examines how changes in the nature and organization of work have reshaped the relationshop between work and identity.

Taught by: Jacobs, Leidner

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 518 Nursing and the Gendering of Health Care in the United States and Internationally, 1860-2000

This course examines changing ideas about the nature of health and illness; changing forms of health care delivery; changing experiences of women as providers and patients; changing role expectations and realities for nurses; changing midwifery practice; and changing segmentation of the health care labor market by gender, class and race. It takes a gender perspective on all topics considered in the course. A comparative approach is used as national and international literature is considered. This focus is presented as one way of understanding the complex interrelationships among gender, class, and race in health care systems of the United States and countries abroad.

Taught by: Wall

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 520 Art, Sex and the Sixties

Visiting Professor Jonathen Katz will be teaching for GSWS during the fall 2018. The course describtion is as follows: With a distinct emphasis on post World War II performance, film, sculpture and painting, this course explores the conjunction of the period's systematic revamping of our social/sexual schema with the equally revolutionary ascendancy of an artistic postmodernity. And it seeks to explore this dynamic not only within the familiar confines of North America and Europe but towards Latin America and Asia, too, in what was a nearly simultaneous emergence of the erotic as a political force in the 60s. Reading a range of key voices from Brazilian theorist and poet Oswald de Andrade to Frankfurt School philosopher Herbert Marcuse, performance artists Carolee Schneemann, and Yoko Ono, Neo-Freudian theorist Norman O. Brown and lesbian feminist author Monique Wittig, we will examine how and why sex became a privileged form of politics at this historical juncture in a range of different contexts across the globe. Students interested in feminist, gender or queer theory, social revolution, performance studies, post war art and Frankfurt School thought should find the course particularly appealing, but it assumes no background in any of these fields.

Taught by: Katz

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 524 Chaucer: Poetics and Performance

An advanced introduction to Chaucer's poetry and Chaucer criticism. Reading and discussion of the dream visions, Troilus and Criseyde, and selections from Canterbury Tales, from the viewpoint of Chaucer's development as a narrative artist.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 525 The Trouble with Freud: Psychoanalysis, Literature, Culture

For professionals in the field of mental care, Freud's work is often regarded as outmoded, if not problematic psychologists view his work as non-scientific, dependent on theses that cannot be confirmed by experiments. In the realm of literary and cultural theory, however, Freud's work seems to have relevance still, and is cited often. How do we understand the gap between a medical/scientific reading of Freud's work, and a humanist one? Where do we locate Freud's relevance today? The graduate course will concentrate on Freud's descriptions of psychoanalytic theory and practice, as well as his writings on literature and culture.

Taught by: Weissberg

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 527 Race, Gender and Auto/Biography

PRING 2017: Market Women, Madames, Mistresses & Mother Superior studies ender, labor, sexuality, and race in the Caribbean. In our historical xamination of primary source documents alongside literature, and popular edia, we will question some of the iconic representations of Caribbean and atin American women in order to understand the meaning, purpose and usages hese women s bodies as objects of praise, possession, obsession and/or idicule by communities, governments and religions within and outside of th egion. Beginning in the late-18th century and ending with contemporary igration narratives, this course considers the relationship between slave ociety and colonial pasts on gender performance in the modern Caribbean, atin America, and their diasporas. In our interrogation of gender meanings, we will consider the ways Caribbean women and men define themselves and each other, while considering the intersections of color, class, religion and culture on the political and social realities of the Caribbean and the region. The geographic scope of the course will extend to Haiti, the Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Costa Rica and Trinidad & Tobago. The following interrelated questions will anchor our exploration of each text: How have representations of Caribbean and Latin American women informed historical constructions and rhetoric of the region and national identity? What political and social strategies have Caribbean women and men used to define themselves in their countries and throughout the region? How do the history and contemporary conditions of a post-colonial nation impact the gender construction of Caribbean identities? What is the relationship between modern Caribbean gender identities and the regional racial and economic politics?

Taught by: Sanders

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 532 Gender, the Labor Force and Labor Markets

Drawing from sociology, economics and demography, this course examines the causes and effects of gender differences in labor force participation, earnings and occupation in the United States and in the rest of the developed developed and developing world. Differences by race and ethnicity areidered. also considered. Theories of labor supply, marriage, human captial andre discrimination are explored as explanations for the observed trends.se reviews Finally, the course reviews current labor market policies and uses thearriage, theories of labor supply, marriage, human capital and discrimination to men. evaluate their effects on women and men.

Taught by: Madden

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 542 Work and Gender

This seminar examines the relevance of gender to the organization and experience of paid and unpaid work. Combining materialist and social constructuionist approaches, we will consider occupational segregation, the relation of work and family, gender and class solidarity, the construction of gender through work, race and class variation in work experiences, and related topics.

Taught by: Leidner

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 544 Science of Sex & Sexuality

The author of a New York Times article entitled "On Being Male, Female, Neither or Both" concluded her comments with the following statement: "The definition of sex was (and is) still up for grabs." In our post-modern world, we have become accustomed to the malleability of gender identity and sexuality. We are also aware that individuals undergo sex reassignment surgeries but by and large we assume that transgender people are transitioning from one discrete category to another. Queer activists certainly challenge this assumption, preferring to envision sex, gender, and sexuality on a continuum, but these days even scientists don't concur about a definitive definition of sex. Should sex be defined chiefly by anatomy? Chromosomes? The body's ability to produce and respond to hormones? If the boundaries of biological categories can be contested, what are the implications for culturally constructed ideas about gender identity and sexuality.

Prerequisite: This is an advanced seminar for MLA students

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 550 Topics 17th Century

The specific topics of the seminar vary from semester to semester, depending on the instructor and his/her choice. When the topic includes gender, sexuality or women's studies it will be cross-listed with GSWS. Please see the French Department website for a description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/french/pc

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 553 British Women Writers

A study of British women writers, often focusing on the women authors who came into prominence between 1775 and 1825. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Bowers

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 555 Women and Incarceration

This elective course will afford students the opportunity to develop and implement health education workshops for incarcerated women in the Philadelphiajail system. Students will explore the social and historical framework and trends in the incarceration of women, as well as the needs of this population, and will identify specific areas that need to be addressed by particular disciplines or professions. Students will have direct contact with the jail system, its staff, and female inmates.

Taught by: Brown, K.; Guidera; Durain

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 570 African-American Literature

This course treats some important aspect of Afican-American literature and culture. Some recent versions of the course have focused on the emergence of African-American women writers, on the relation between African-American literature and cultural studies, and on the Harlem Renaissance. This course is cross-listed with the English Department. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 572 Language and Gender

This course traces the development of research on language and gender, introducing key theoretical issues and methodological concerns in this area.s Participants will consider how gender ideologies shape and are shaped by language use, with particular attention to how research findings can be applied to educational and other professional settings.

Taught by: Pomerantz

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 574 Masters in Liberal Arts Proseminar

Topic varies.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 579 Provocative Performance

This course will examine a wide array of performance pieces by and about women, designed to provoke social, political, and personal change. Ranging from the serious to the hilarious (and sometimes outrageous), our readings will center on plays and performance art; we will also study live and filmed pieces, attend course-related productions in the city and on campus, and incorporate contextual material on feminist theatre theory and history.

Taught by: Malague

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 581 Advanced Psychology of Women

A critical analysis of psychological theories about women and sex differences, a thorough examination of "psychology of women" research articles, and class-initiated research. Among the issues to be covered are: sex role socialization; class, race and gender connections; women and work; employment discrimination, assertiveness training; women's responses to injustice: domestic violence, rape, discrimination; the family and the "new right"; perceptions of women; sexuality, disability and objectification; reproductive rights, sex roles, androgyny and new role prescriptions; mental health and aging.

Taught by: Stanley

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisite: A course in general psychology

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 583 19 Century American Lit: Kinship, Sexuality, Indigeneity

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 584 Political Philosophy

An examination of basic theoretical problems of political science divided into three parts. First, specific features of social sciences will be examined and three most important general orientations of social sciences (analytical, interpretative and critical) will be compared and analyzed. Second, basic concepts of social and political sciences will be studied: social determination, rationality, social change, politics, power, state, democracy. Third, the problem of value judgments will be considered: Is there a rational, objective method for the resolution of conflicts in value judgments? Is morality compatible with politics?

Taught by: Hirschmann

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 587 Race, Nation, Empire

This graduate seminar examines the dynamic relationships among empires, nations and states; colonial and post-colonial policies; and anti-colonial strategies within a changing global context. Using the rubrics of anthropology, history, cultural studies, and social theory, we will explore the intimacies of subject formation within imperial contexts- past and present- especially in relation to ideas about race and belonging. We will focus on how belonging and participation have been defined in particular locales, as well as how these notions have been socialized through a variety of institutional contexts. Finally, we will consider the relationships between popular culture and state formation, examining these as dialectical struggles for hegemony.

Taught by: Thomas

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 588 The Politics of Women's Health Care

This course will utilize a multidisciplinary approach to address the field of women's health care. The constructs of women's health care will be examined from a clinical, as well as sociological, anthropological and political point of view. Topics will reflect the historical movement of women's health care from an an obstetrical/gynecological view to one that encompasses the entire life span and life needs of women. The emphasis of the course will be to undertake a critical exploration of the diversity of women's health care needs and the past and current approaches to this care. Issues will be addressed from both a national and global perspective, with a particular focus on the relationship between women's equality/inequality status and state of health.

Taught by: Durain, McCool

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 589 Recent issues in Critical Theory

This course is a critical exploration of recent literary and cultural theory, usually focusing on one particular movement or school, such as phenomenology, psychoanalysis, the Frankfurt School, or deconstruction.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 590 Gender and Education (ELD)

This course is designed to provide an overview of the major discussions and debates in the area of gender and education. While the intersections of gender, race, class, ethnicity, and sexuality are emphasized throughout this course, the focus of the research we will read is on gender and education in English-speaking countries. We will examine theoretical frameworks of gender and use these to read popular literature, examine teaching practices and teachers with respect to gender, using case studies to investigate the topics.

Taught by: Schultz; Kuriloff

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 594 Topics in Contemporary Art

Topics vary. The primary for this course is the Art History Department. For a course description please see their website: http://www.sas.upenn.edu/arthistory/courses

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 596 Topics in Contemporary Art

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 599 Independent Study

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

GSWS 608 Gender and Sexuality in Hinduism

Issues related to gender and sexuality occupy a complex, often contradictory place in Hinduism. Sexual desire, sexual activity, and the body are simultaneaously celebrated, manipulated, controlled, and restricted. This fundamental ambiguity is at the core of this course, which concerns itself with religious perpectives on the body, gender and sexual activity in Hinduism. Topics include: dharma, morality, and sexual practice; menstruation; pregnancy and childbirth; Bhakti and Tantra; same-sex relations; masculinities; hijras and the notion of the "third sex"; eroticism in the literary, visual, and performing arts; colonialism; and somatic nationalism.

Taught by: Soneji, D.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 610 Topics in American History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in American history. See history's website for course description for the term: http://www.history.upenn.edu/courses

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 612 Interactional Processes with LGBT Individuals

In the past quarter century, the awareness of the unique issues facing lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals has expanded and become essential knowledge in our work as educators, providers of psychological services, and other service provision fields. This course provides a contextual and applied understanding the interactional processes facing LGBT individuals.

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 630 Gender and Religion in China

This course examines gender in Chinese religious culture from ancient to contemporary times. We will explore topics including the Buddhist accommodation of Chinese family system, Chinese transformation of the bodhisattva Guanyin, female deities in Daoist and popular religious pantheons, writings about religious women, female ghosts and fox spirits in literary imagination and folk tales, and the significance of yin force in Chinese medicine and Daoist alchemy. Through the case of China, we will look at how gender plays critical and constitutive roles in religious traditions, and how religion can be used both to reinforce and to challenge gender norms.

Taught by: Cheng

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 640 Studies in the Renaissance

Topics vary. This course will be cross-listed with GSWS when the topic includes, Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies. Please see French department's website for current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/french/pc

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 670 Topics in Trans Regional History

What do historians gain by approaching the past with an awareness of the body as a material and historically contingent entity? In this course we consider sevveral different ways of imagining historical bodies and the body in history. Our readings will explore how events and new social, racial, economic and political formations influence how contemporaries imagined and described bodies and their capcities. We will also explore whether the body itself might be a dynamic source of historical change. Among the topics we will discuss are: medical theories about bodies, epidemics and their impact; sensory capacities; capacities for physical labor; cultures of violence; reproductive capacit es and politics; coerced imm ig mgration; fashion, beauty, and grace; and the state's interest in mobilizing bodies to serve imperial, economic, and military agendas.

Taught by: Brown

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 678 Gender and Sexuality in Education

This seminar gives an overview of the intersections and interplay among gender, sexuality, and education through theory, practice, current discussions, and analysis of varied contexts in English speaking countries (e.g. the United States, Canada, Great Britain, and Australia). After examining the theoretical foundations of genders and sexualities, we will look at their histories and effects in K-12 schools and colleges and universities as well as explore special topics.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 682 Topics: Literature and Film

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 705 Seminar in Ethnomusicology

This seminar in Ethnomusicology is cross-listed with GSWS when the topic includes gender, sexuality and women's studes.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Open to graduate students from all departments

GSWS 740 Research Seminar in Middle Eastern History

Research seminar on selected topics in Middle Eastern history. See the History's Department website for course description.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 762 Women in South Asia

This course on women in South Asian history has several objectives. To comprehend the genres of narratives in which South Asian women between the sixteenth and twentieth centuries have spoken and have been spoken about. To gain an understanding of evolving institutions and practices shaping women' s lives, such as the family, law and religious traditions. To understand the impact of historical processes -- the formation and and breakdown of empire, colonialism, nationalism and decolonization -- upon South Asian women between the sixteenth and twentieth centuries. We will read primary sources in addition to familiarizing ourselves with the historiography of women in South Asia.

Taught by: Sreenivasan

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 769 Feminist Theory

See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Taught by: Loombia

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 771 Current Japanology

Major trends in scholarship as reflected in important recent publications, especially formative books and periodical literatures. The trajectory within certain disciplines as well as the interaction among them will be critically evaluated in terms of gains and losses. Implications of these theses in the planning of graduate and postgraduate research.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GSWS 790 Recent Issues in Critical Theory

The primary for this course is the English Department. When the course content includes gender, sexuality and women's studies it will be cross-listed with GSWS. See additional information and description on the English Department's website: https://www.english.upenn.edu See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 793 Topics in Cinema and Media

Topics vary. Please refer to the History of Art Department's website for the course description: http://www.sas.upenn.edu/arthistory.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GSWS 830 Conducting Research in Global Women's Health

The course focuses on critical examination of theoretical and methodological issues pertaining to research on women and girls conducted around the world across disciplines. A focused and intensive exploration of place as it pertains to women and girls in formal and informal structures of health care delivery as those needing and/or seeking health care, and as those roviding health care to others. We will examine multiple dimensions and qualities of these endeavors (e.g. activity, power, control, visibility, value, and remuneration) and the intersection of gender and health - locally, globally and across borders. We will focus our examination on the implications of seeking and providing health care for women's and girls' health and well-being. By examining issues in local and global contexts and across geographical boundaries, we will have the opportunity to challenge gendered, class, political, and cultural assumptions related to women's health. Invited guest speakers will highlight examples of research in global women's health representing multiple disciplinary perspectives.

Taught by: Teitelman

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit