History (HIST)

HIST 0001 Making of the Modern World

How did the world we now live in come to be? Is globalization a recent development or does it have a history of its own? At what point can we say that a world economy emerged and what sort of relations of production and distribution linked it together? When did people start thinking and acting as citizens of nations rather than as subjects of rulers or members of religious or ethnic communities, and what were the consequences? How should we conceptualize the great revolutions (French, American, Russian, Chinese) that would determine the landscapes of modern global politics? This course is designed to help us think about the "making of the modern," not by means of an exhaustive survey but by exploring a range of topics from unusual perspectives: piracy, patriotism, prophecy; global struggles for political and human rights,drivers of war and peace, capitalism, nationalism, socialism, fascism, fundamentalism; communication and culture.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 0010 First-Year: Books that Changed Modern America

Why have some books had a profound impact on their times? How have they articulated an issue, focused debate, captured public attention, and spurred action? In this seminar, we will read a group of books that changed the modern United States. The Jungle, Silent Spring, The Common Sense Book of Baby and Child Care, The Feminine Mystique, The Grapes of Wrath, Conscience of a Conservative: These are among the books that mobilized Americans to demand food safety and a safer environment, adopt new childrearing practices, redefine traditional gender roles, develop greater awareness of poverty, and rethink their politics. We will do close readings of these and other texts, and examine the history of each book as a book: its place within the author’s life and work, its publishing history, critical reception, and readers’ responses. Finally, we will consider the broader historical contexts in which the work was written, to assess its impact on American culture, society, and politics.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 0012 First-Year Seminar: Why College? Historical and Contemporary Perspectives

This course will explore controversies and dilemmas surrounding American colleges, from their birth into the present. What is the purpose of “college”? How have these goals and objectives changed, across time and space? What should college do, and for whom? And how can colleges be reformed to meet their diverse purposes and constituencies? Topics of discussion will include affirmative action, “political correctness,” fraternities and sororities, sexual assault and safety, online education, and the recent trend towards “college for all.” For first-year students only.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 0013 First-Year Seminar: American Pasts in American Places

All around you are traces of America’s past. Some of them, like Independence Hall, are easy to see. Others are more obscure. The long-disappeared Philadelphia house where Cyrus Bustill, a free Black baker of the Revolutionary era, opened his school for Black children is visible only because of a recently erected historic marker. This course introduces you to the skills and techniques necessary to read America’s past in the landscape around you. Even a place like Independence Hall has had many meanings and uses since it was built in 1732 as each generation has projected their understanding of its significance onto its bricks and mortar. We will explore a variety of places – extant and long gone, local and farther afield – to uncover what they can tell us about the American past and its connections to the American present. Meetings will include field trips to places discussed in the course.

1 Course Unit

HIST 0020 First-Year Seminar: Reading the Classics

In this seminar we will study the early roots of Western culture -the Biblical, Greek and Roman traditions- as well as how sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Europeans reproduced, rethought and reshaped these early traditions. Instead of reading and discussing the required texts according to the date when they were written (first the early traditions and then the Renaissance views), we will focus our attention on a few themes that were central concerns to those living in Classic and Renaissance times and that continue to influence modern ways of thinking and acting in Western societies: conceptions of God and place of religion in society; nature of power and authority, and individuals’ rights and duties; good and evil; views on women, their nature and roles in society; ethnography and the perception of other cultures and societies. In addition to reading and discussing several biblical books — Genesis, Exodus, The Book of Revelation — we will work with other seminal classical works — Sophocles' Antigone, Aristotle's Politicsand Ethics, Herodotus' The Histories, Plato's Apology — and works by Michel de Montaigne, Maria de Zayas y Sotomayor, Marie de Gournay, Christopher Marlowe, William Shakespeare, Blaise Pascal, and several others. We will also work with books published in the last decades, analyzing the impact of these works in various periods of history, but also books that analyze the impact of these books and ideas today — Dreyfus and Kelly's All Things Shinning: Reading the Western Classics to Find Meaning in a Secular Age, Anthony Grafton's Bring Out Your Dead: The Past as Revelation, James Miller's Examined Lives, from Socrates to Nietzsche, and Sarah Bakewell's How to Live: Or A Life of Montaigne in One Question and Twenty Attempts at an Answer.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 0021 First-Year Seminar: Inquisitors, Heretics and Witches

When and why did medieval European Christians develop anxieties about the beliefs of others, and what did they do to grapple with this anxiety? This course will explore the development of ideas of right and wrong belief in medieval Europe, and the various concerns and practical reactions that developed in response. We will begin by examining how notions of orthodoxy and its concomitant deviations developed from late Antiquity to the medieval period. We will then turn to the criminalization of the latter and development of the “inquisitors of heretical depravity," individuals assigned by the pope to inquire into heresy, and the various methods they used to identify and punish those they considered to hold wrong belief. Combining the zeal of faith with the power of law, inquisition was Europe's most infamous institution and co-opted judicial procedure in the fight against heresy. Ultimately the course aims to provide a deeper understanding of the development of orthodoxy, dissent, intolerance and persecution.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 0022 First-Year Seminar: A Tale of Two Cities: London and Paris 1750-present

“Paris is the capital of the nineteenth century,” wrote Walter Benjamin. “When a man is tired of London, he is tired of life,” quipped Samuel Johnson. These two great cities have captivated authors and artists, politicians and philosophers, tourists and traders for centuries. They share many things in common, and they both helped set a paradigm for the “modern city” that has shaped urban centers around the world. And yet, many have also remarked on the differences between them. Examining novels, maps, stories, paintings, plays, political writings, and statistical inquiries, we’ll study the characters, companies, and crimes that have made each city tick. What does it mean to be a Londoner or a Parisian? How have both cities changed over the last 250 years? Can the study of these two metropolises tell us something about modern urban life in general?

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 0023 First-Year: Russia in the Age of Anna Karenina

Leo Tolstoy's Anna Karenina is an epic tale of passion, intrigue, tragedy and redemption. It is also a penetrating portrayal of Russian life and society in the period following the Great Reforms of the 1860s. This period, the third quarter of the nineteenth century, was both the time of the flowering of the Russian novel as well as the age of Russia 's imperial glory. In this course we will use Anna Karenina as the starting point for a multifaceted exploration of nineteenth century Russian history and culture. Among the topics we will discuss are family life, social relations, modernization and industrialization, gender and sexuality, revolutionary movements, imperialism, and political power. We will enhance our reading of the novel with a wide range of supplementary materials including memoirs, travel accounts, historical analysis, and art. This course will be organized in a seminar format. No prior knowledge of Russian history or literature is required. All readings are in English.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 0030 First-Year Seminar: Africa in World History

This seminar examines Africa's connections--economic, political, intellectual and cultural--with the wider world from ancient times to the 21st century, drawing on a diverse sample of historical sources. It also explores Africa's place in the imaginations of outsiders, from ancient Greeks to modern-day development "experts." Whether you know a lot or almost nothing about the continent, the course will get you to rethink your stereotypes and to question your assumptions about the importance of Africa in world history. First-year students only.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: AFRC 0030

1 Course Unit

HIST 0031 Gender, Sexuality, and Social Change in the Middle East

This first year seminar introduces basic concepts, debates, and narratives pertaining to the histories of gender and sexuality in the Middle East by covering the period from the late eighteenth century until the present day. In an engagement with global historical contexts, the course aims to engage students with the history of women, gender, and sexuality as they informed and shaped political and social change in the Middle East and vice versa. This course will concentrate on selected themes such as modernity, nationalism, and colonization to encourage students to challenge preconceived assumptions about Middle Eastern women, discuss some of the many roles they have played in social change, and think comparatively and transnationally about gender, history, and social life. In doing so, the class provides a historical context pertaining to the region’s history by presenting a chronologically and thematically organized analysis to scrutinize the decline of the Ottomans, the rise of nationalisms, the implications of Islamist reformism, colonial rules before and after World War I and their impact on shaping women’s lives, gender dynamics and sexual politics, the age of decolonization and rise of state feminisms under colonial and authoritarian regimes, an historical inquiry of same-sex desire and the political activism organized around LGBTQI+ movements, and finally contemporary political movements such as the Iranian Revolution and Arab Uprisings in shaping present discourses and practices informing individual and collective social and political status along with gendered and sexual politics in contemporary Middle Eastern societies.

Also Offered As: GSWS 0031

1 Course Unit

HIST 0040 First-Year Seminar: Coca and Cocaine

This seminar compares a set of practices that center on coca leaf production in indigenous communities, where coca cultivation has been sustained over long centuries, on the one hand, with a set of unsustainable practices linked to the “drug war” in the Americas, on the other. Participants will read scholarly work in history and anthropology, support one another through a research process, and explore what historians and other scholars might contribute to discussions about drug policy. First-year students only.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: LALS 0040

1 Course Unit

HIST 0060 First-Year Seminar: Epidemic Disease in Modern History

In this seminar, we look at how human societies have grappled with epidemic disease across the modern world. From cholera, to bubonic plague, to yellow fever, SARS, ebola, and flu, we’ll explore how outbreaks disrupt and devastate communities but also how they can be linked to state growth, medical reform, and cultural change. By looking at specific societies around the world at moments of acute distress, we’ll be able to ask questions about the role of government, about fault lines of class and race, and about how human beings have grappled with fear and systemic collapse at different moments in time and space. Yet we will also examine global trends and consider what the study of past epidemics can tell us about the world we live in today. Sources we will consider include medical treatises, diaries, novels, films, and cartoons. Hypochondriacs and germophobes are welcome. We’ll study epidemics from a very safe distance and (hopefully) without first-hand experience!

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 0061 First-Year Seminar: Of Horses, Bows and Fermented Milk: the Turkish Empire in 15 Objects

The empires of the Turkic and Turkish peoples have stretched across much of Eurasia since before the Common Era until the twentieth century. We first hear of them in Chinese chroniclers’ tales of a powerful people in the wilderness. Greek historians, Byzantine writers, and Arab polymaths write about the empires of the steppes. Centuries later, the heirs of the heroes of these empires move south and west, establishing empires and tribal confederations beyond the steppe, in Central Asia, Anatolia, and the Middle East. The Turkic empires seem to appear in the periphery of many civilizations, challenging, and, one could say, enriching their borders. But looking at a map, is really more than a half of Eurasia a periphery? If we flip the map, could we say these historians were writing from the margins of the Turkish empires? This course introduces the student to the history of empire by following the various histories of Turkic and Turkish people through 15 objects. It discusses the questions of periphery, borders, and the divide between agrarian, pastoral, and nomadic societies. The student will learn to derive historical questions and hypothesis through the intensive study of material culture, literature, and historical writing tracing the long and diverse history of the bow, the saddle, dumplings, and fermented milk (among others) across Eurasia.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: NELC 0460

1 Course Unit

HIST 0100 Deciphering America

This course examines American history from the first contacts of the indigenous peoples of North America with European settlers to our own times by focusing on a few telling moments in this history. The course treats twelve of these moments. Each unit begins with a specific primary document, historical figure, image, location, year, or cultural artifact to commence the delving into the American past. Some of these icons are familiar, but the ensuing deciphering will render them as more complicated; some are unfamiliar, but they will emerge as absolutely telling. The course meets each week for two 50-minute team-taught lectures and once recitation session. Course requirements include: in-class midterm and final exams; three short paper assignments; and punctual attendance and participation in recitations.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 0108 American Origins

The United States was not inevitable. With that assumption as its starting point, this course surveys North American history from about 1500 to about 1850, with the continent's many peoples and cultures in view. The unpredictable emergence of the U.S. as a nation is a focus, but always in the context of wider developments: global struggles among European empires; conflicts between indigenous peoples and settler-colonists; exploitation of enslaved African labor; evolution of distinctive colonial societies; and, finally, independence movements inspired by a transatlantic revolutionary age.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 0200 The Emergence of Modern Europe

This course traces the formation of European society, politics and culture from its earliest days through the era of the Reformation, ca. 1000-1600 CE. Major themes will include: politics and power; law and the state; economics and trade; religion; learning and the rise of universities; social organization; everyday life. The reading and analysis of primary sources from each era will be important in understanding Europe's key features and development.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 0205 Discover the Middle Ages

This course offers a broad introduction to the history of medieval Europe roughly from the fourth century CE, when Roman civilization faced a series of crises that led to its eventual fall in the West and ushered in the Middle Ages, to the sixteenth century, when European society entered a new early-modern phase. As this is a long period, we will focus on themes that will help us explore some of the most important historical problems related to the period: why was it that a sophisticated and militarily superior Roman empire could fall to "barbarians"? How did political power transform into a feudal model? What did it mean to be a medieval knight? The Middle Ages are known as "an age of faith" but, at the same time, it was an age of questioning that invented the modern university--what roles did faith and knowledge play in the medieval world? It was also a time where many cultures, races and religions came into contact, both at home and in efforts at exploration and conquest. How did medieval culture handle difference, and how did that influence early-modern and even modern approaches? The class will involve a mixture of lecture and discussion, and will include visits to local museum and manuscript collections to provide students first-hand contact with the visual and material culture of medieval Europe.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 0210 Early Modern Europe, 1450-1750

This course examines those European developments which contributed to the world we understand as modern. Special emphasis will be placed on the transformation of Europe through the advent of new technologies, the creation of a global economy, the consolidation of territorial states, the rise of effective, central governments, the dissolution of religious unity, and the dialect between modern and traditional world views.

Not Offered Every Year

1 Course Unit

HIST 0220 England and the British Isles to 1707

The subject of this course is the history of the British Isles from the Roman Conquest in 43AD to the creation of the United Kingdom in 1707. Between these two dates the various societies and cultures in the British Isles were brought into the orbit of the Roman Empire, converted to latin Christianity, and developed distinctive cultures and strong ties with the Continent. From the twelfth century on, the kingdom of England began to exert its power over Wales, Ireland, and Scotland, although English power waxed and waned in these areas between the twelfth and the seventeenth centuries. The Anglo-Norman continental empire of the Plantagenet dynasty also played a large part in shaping the English monarchy, as did the playing out of the Hundred Years War, the internal divisions in fifteenth-century English society, and the rise of the Tudor-Stuart dynasty.

Not Offered Every Year

1 Course Unit

HIST 0240 The Rise and Fall of the Russian Empire, 1552-1917

How and why did Russia become the center of the world's largest empire, a single state encompassing eleven time zones and over a hundred ethnic groups? To answer this question, we will explore the rise of a distinct political culture beginning in medieval Muscovy, its transformation under the impact of a prolonged encounter with European civilization, and the various attempts to re-form Russia from above and below prior to the Revolution of 1917. Main themes include the facade vs. the reality of central authority, the intersection of foreign and domestic issues, the development of a radical intelligentsia, and the tension between empire and nation.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: REES 0310

Mutually Exclusive: HIST 5240

1 Course Unit

HIST 0250 Making and Breaking European Hegemony

This course will trace the dramatic rise and fall of Europe's global hegemony during the period roughly from 1450 to 1950. Among the major themes we will examine are: states and power, borders and resistance, race and genocide, economies and oppression, ideas and revolution, the building and change of hierarchies of gender and power. Truly, a dramatic story. The objectives of the course are: 1) To serve as an introduction to the study of history for majors and non-majors alike, and to teach the critical analysis of historical sources; 2) to teach substantive knowledge of European history; 3) to provide a foundation for further study of the European past. No previous background in European or World history is required.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 0255 Modern Europe, 1789-1919

It's old, it's new. It's unfamiliar, it's recognizable. This course investigates the collapse of the "old regime" and the birth of something like the Europe we recognize. The long nineteenth century witnessed the development of political, economic, and cultural phenomena we often see as characteristic of modern society. Topics considered include political revolution, industrialization, liberalism, imperialism, and new ideologies of gender, race, and class. Our focus will be consistently transnational. Where did Europe begin and end? How did borders and boundaries operate at the edge of nations, but also within societies? We will investigate these questions as we follow European history from the violence and optimism of the French Revolution to the chaos of the First World War.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 0270 Modern Britain, 1700-present: Empire, Industry and Democracy

In this course, we will investigate the extraordinary story of Britain's rise to global predominance and the question of its "decline" in the twentieth century. Our readings and discussions will engage with dominant ideas, social processes, and popular beliefs; we will look at the structure of government and the texture of everyday lives. We will encounter Britons in all corners of the world even as we explore the complexities of metropolitan British history. Big ideas were born there: industrial captialism, political liberalism, and scientific racism. Britain's political system, with its early form of (limited) democracy, gave shape to party politics around the world. We begin in the early eighteenth century--focusing on the agricultural and social changes that accompanied the onset of the Industrial Revolution. We'll examine the rise of the Hanoverian fiscal-military state, and its consolidation and transformation in the course of the Napoleonic Wars. We end in the present day, looking at a Britain which may have lost an Empire, but which retains a strong welfare state, a global cultural presence, and a permanent seat on the UN Security Council. Should we understand its rise and subsequent retraction as a store of an ascent and a decline? We will interrogate that narrative throughout the semester. The course moves roughtly chronologically, but by way of discrete units that provide different perspectives on British politics, economics, and culture.

Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 0290 The Soviet Century, 1917-1991

Out of an obscure, backward empire, the Soviet Union emerged to become the great political laboratory of the twentieth century. This course will trace the roots of the world's first socialist society and its attempts to recast human relations and human nature itself. Topics include the origins of the Revolution of 1917, the role of ideology in state policy and everyday life, the Soviet Union as the center of world communism, the challenge of ethnic diversity, and the reasons for the USSR's sudden implosion at the end of the century.Focusing on politics, society, culture, and their interaction, we will examine the rulers (from Lenin to Gorbachev) as well as the ruled (peasants, workers, and intellectuals; Russians and non-Russians). The course will feature discussions of selected texts, including primary sources in translation.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: REES 0311

1 Course Unit

HIST 0300 Africa Before 1800

Survey of major themes and issues in African history before 1800. Topics include: early civilizations, African kingdoms and empires, population movements, the spread of Islam, and the slave trade. Also, emphasis on how historians use archaeology, linguistics, and oral traditions to reconstruct Africa's early history.

Spring

Also Offered As: AFRC 0300

1 Course Unit

HIST 0310 Warriors, Concubines & Converts: the Ottoman Empire in the Middle East & Europe

For almost six hundred years, the Ottomans ruled most of the Balkans and the Middle East. From their bases in Anatolia, Ottoman armies advanced into the Balkans, Syria, Egypt, and Iraq, constantly challenging the borders of neighboring European and Islamicate empires. By the end of the seventeenth century, Constantinople, Jerusalem, Cairo, Baghdad, Sarajevo, Budapest, and nearly Vienna came under Ottoman rule. As the empire expanded into Europe and the Middle East, the balance of imperial power shifted from warriors to converts, concubines, and intellectuals. This course examines the expansion of the Ottoman sultanate from a local principality into a sprawling empire with a sophisticated bureaucracy; it also investigates the social, cultural, and intellectual developments that accompanied the long arc of the empire's rise and fall. By the end of the course, students will be able to identify and discuss major currents of change in the Ottoman Empire and the Middle East. The student will have a better understanding of the roles of power, ideology, diplomacy, and gender in the construction of empire and a refined appreciation for diverse techniques of historical analysis.

Fall

Also Offered As: NELC 0450

1 Course Unit

HIST 0350 Africa Since 1800

Survey of major themes, events, and personalities in African history from the early nineteenth century through the 1960s. Topics include abolition of the slave trade, European imperialism, impact of colonial rule, African resistance, religious and cultural movements, rise of naturalism and pan-Africanism, issues of ethnicity and "tribalism" in modern Africa.

Fall

Also Offered As: AFRC 0350

1 Course Unit

HIST 0360 History of the Middle East Since 1800

A survey of the modern Middle East with special emphasis on the experiences of ordinary men and women as articulated in biographies, novels, and regional case studies. Issues covered include the collapse of empires and the rise of a new state system following WWI, and the roots and consequences of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, the Iranian revolution and the U.S.-Iraq War. Themes include: the colonial encounter with Europe and the emergence of nationalist movements, the relationship between state and society, economic development and international relations, and religion and cultural identity.

Fall

Also Offered As: NELC 0650

1 Course Unit

HIST 0400 Colonial Latin America

The year 1492 was pivotal in the history of the world. It precipitated huge population movements within the Americas and across the Atlantic - a majority of them involuntary as in the case of indigenous and African people who were kidnapped and enslaved. It led to cataclysmic cultural upheavals, including the formation of new cultures in spaces inhabited by people of African, European and indigenous descent. This course explores the processes of destruction and creation in the region known today as Latin America in the period 1400 - 1800. Class readings are primary sources and provide opportunities to learn methods of source analysis in contexts marked by radically asymmetrical power relationships.

Fall

Also Offered As: AFRC 0400, LALS 0400

1 Course Unit

HIST 0450 Modern Latin American Survey 1808-Present

This course examines central themes of Latin American history, from independence to the present. It engages a hemispheric and global approach to understand the economic and social transformations of the region. We will explore the anti-imperial struggles, revolutions, social movements, and global economic crises that have given rise to new national projects for development, or have frustrated the realization of such goals. Taking a historical perspective, we will ask: What triggers imperial breakdown? How did slaves navigate the boundary between freedom and bondage? Was the Mexican Revolution revolutionary? How did the Great Depression lead to the rise of state-led development? In what ways have citizens mobilized for equality, a decent standard of living, and cultural inclusion? And what future paths will the region take given uneasy export markets and current political uncertainty?

Spring

Also Offered As: LALS 0450

1 Course Unit

HIST 0500 Late Imperial China

This lecture course -- the first of a two-part sequence -- examines the history of late imperial China through the early 19th century. We begin with the Song dynasty transformation: the rise of gentry society and imperial absolutism, the institution of Confucian orthodoxy, the shift of the population and the economic center of gravity to the south, the commercialization of the economy, and change in the relative status of women and men. We then trace China's subsequent political and social history, including the following themes: inner vs. outer court politics; law, government, and society; intellectuals and political dissent; gender, family, and kinship practices; patterns of peasant life and rebellion; traditional foreign relations and first contacts with the West; internal sources of the decline of imperial order.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: EALC 1720

1 Course Unit

HIST 0550 History of Modern China

From an empire to a republic, from communism to socialist-style capitalism, few countries have ever witnessed so much change in a hundred year period as China during the twentieth century. How are we to make sense out of this seeming chaos? This course will offer an overview of the upheavals that China has experienced from the late Qing to the Post-Mao era, interspersed with personal perspectives revealed in primary source readings such as memoirs, novels, and oral accounts. We will start with an analysis of the painful transition from the last empire, the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911), to a modern nation state, followed by exploration of a century-long tale of incessant reform and revolution. The survey will focus on three main themes: 1) the repositioning of China in the new East Asian and world orders; 2) the emergence of a modern Chinese state and nationalistic identity shaped and reshaped by a series of cultural crises; and finally, 3) the development and transformation of Chinese modernity. Major historical developments include: the Opium War and drug trade in the age of imperialism, reform and revolution, the Nationalist regime, Mao's China, the Cultural Revolution, and the ongoing efforts of post-Mao China to move beyond Communism. We will conclude with a critical review of the concept of "Greater China" that takes into account Taiwan, Hong Kong, and the Chinese diaspora in order to attain a more comprehensive understanding of modern China, however defined, at the end of the last century.

Spring

Also Offered As: EALC 0730

1 Course Unit

HIST 0560 Modern Japanese History

This course will survey the major political, economic, social and intellectual trends in the making of modern Japan. Special emphasis will be given to the turbulent relationship between state and society from 1800 to the present.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: EALC 0750

1 Course Unit

HIST 0570 Colonial South Asia, 1700 - 1950

The East India Company established its first trading outpost in India in 1612 and by 1765, was granted the right to collect revenue in eastern India on behalf of the Mughal Emperor. By 1858, Queen Victoria was Empress of India and by 1947, two independent nation states had emerged upon decolonization, India and Pakistan. The course will familiarize students with the outlines of the history of colonial South Asia, while exploring the following themes: How do we know what we know as historians, about the colonial era? What new institutions emerged in India under the British and, more importantly, what older institutions did they replace or modify? What kinds of modernity did South Asians begin to embrace, and what was the role of colonial rule in shaping and constraining these changes? How did different groups of South Asians perceive and respond to colonial rule, and how did this shape the emergence of new political movements in the early twentieth century?

Also Offered As: SAST 0570

1 Course Unit

HIST 0600 The Foundations of the Early Modern Atlantic World 1450-1800

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a solid knowledge of Atlantic history during the early modern period (XV-XVIII centuries). Through readings of primary and secondary texts we will discuss the cultural, religious, intellectual, and economic developments of Europe, Africa, and the Americas, as well as the connections, struggles, and mutual influences between the peoples of these three continents. Throughout the semester we will study several important topics: medieval precedents of early modern expansion; theories of empire; ideologies and systems of conquest and colonialization; the relevance of race and slavery to the understanding of the early modern Atlantic world; how different peoples perceived others and themselves; how European imperialism and colonialization affected the internal development of Africa and America; the role played by religion in the Atlantic world; persistence and continuity of Native cultures and beliefs during an age of expansion; the creation of new identities; the role played by African nations in the creation of the Atlantic world; and the creation of an Atlantic economy.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: LALS 0600

1 Course Unit

HIST 0710 African American Life and Culture in Slavery

This course will examine the lives of enslaved African Americans in the United States, both in the North and the South. We will engage historiographical debates, and tackle questions that have long concerned historians. For example, if slaves were wrenched from families and traded, could they sustain family relationships? If slaves worked from sun-up until sun-down, how could they create music? We will engage with primary and secondary sources to expand our understandings of values, cultural practices, and daily life among enslaved people. Topics will include: literacy, family, labor, food, music and dance, hair and clothing, religion, material culture, resistance, and memories of slavery. Several disciplines including History, Archaeology, Literature, and Music, will help us in our explorations. Written, oral, and artistic texts for the course will provide us with rich sources for exploring the nuances of slave life, and students will have opportunities to delve deeply into topics that are of particular interest to them.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: AFRC 2760

1 Course Unit

HIST 0720 Ancient Greece

The Greeks enjoy a special place in the construction of western culture and identity, and yet many of us have only the vaguest notion of what their culture was like. A few Greek myths at bedtime when we are kids, maybe a Greek tragedy like Sophokles' Oidipous when we are at school: these are often the only contact we have with the world of the ancient Mediterranean. The story of the Greeks, however, deserves a wider audience, because so much of what we esteem in our own culture derives from them: democracy, epic poetry, lyric poetry, tragedy, history writing, philosophy, aesthetic taste, all of these and many other features of cultural life enter the West from Greece. The oracle of Apollo at Delphi had inscribed over the temple, "Know Thyself." For us, that also means knowing the Greeks. We will cover the period from the Late Bronze Age, c. 1500 BC, down to the time of Alexander the Great, concentrating on the two hundred year interval from 600-400 BC.

Fall

Also Offered As: ANCH 0101, CLST 0101

1 Course Unit

HIST 0721 Ancient Rome

At its furthest extent during the second century CE, the Roman Empire was truly a "world empire", stretching from northern Britain to North Africa and Egypt, encompassing the whole of Asia Minor, and bordering the Danube in its route from the Black Forest region of Germany to the Black Sea. But in its earliest history it comprised a few small hamlets on a collection of hills adjacent to the Tiber river in central Italy. Over a period of nearly 1500 years, the Roman state transformed from a mythical Kingdom to a Republic dominated by a heterogeneous, competitive aristocracy to an Empire ruled, at least notionally, by one man. It developed complex legal and administrative structures, supported a sophisticated and highly successful military machine, and sustained elaborate systems of economic production and exchange. It was, above all, a society characterized both by a willingness to include newly conquered peoples in the project of empire, and by fundamental, deep-seated practices of social exclusion and domination. This course focuses in particular upon the history of the Roman state between the fifth century BCE and the third century CE, exploring its religious and cultural practices, political, social and economic structures. It also scrutinizes the fundamental tensions and enduring conflicts that characterized this society throughout this 800-year period.

Spring

Also Offered As: ANCH 0102, CLST 0102

1 Course Unit

HIST 0722 The Novel and Marriage

The content of the course will vary from semester to semester. All works read in English. Please check the department's website for a description. https://www.sas.upenn.edu/french/pc

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: COML 2500, ENGL 2799, FREN 2500

1 Course Unit

HIST 0723 The Enlightenment

Topics vary. For current course description, please see the department's webpage: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/french/pc

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: FREN 3600

1 Course Unit

HIST 0724 Portraits of Old Rus: Myth, Icon, Chronicle

Three modern-day nation-states – Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus – share and dispute the cultural heritage of Old Rus, and their political relationships revolve around interpretations of the past. Has the medieval Rus state been established by the Vikings or by the local Slavs? Is early Rus a mother state of Russia or of Ukraine, and, therefore, should it be spelled ‘Kyivan Rus,’ or ‘Kievan Rus’ in English? Has the culture of Russian political despotism been inherited from the Mongols, or is it an autochthonous ideology? The constructed past has a continuing importance in modern Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus, and it is keenly referenced, often manipulatively, in contemporary social and political discourse. For example, President Putin invaded Ukraine under a pretense that its territory has “always” been an integral part of Russia and its history. The course covers eight centuries of cultural, political, and social history of the lands that are now within the borders of Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus, from early historical records through the 18th century, a period that laid the foundation for the Russian Empire and the formation of modern nations. Students gain knowledge about formative events and prominent figures, as well as social and cultural developments during this period. The course takes multidisciplinary approach by combining the study of textual sources, objects of art and architecture, music, ritual, and film in their social and historical contexts. Students learn to analyze and interpret primary sources (historical documents and literary texts), identify their intellectual issues, and understand the historical, cultural, and social contexts in which these sources emerged. While working with these primary sources students learn to pose questions about their value and reliability as historical evidence. By exposing students to the critical examination of “the uses of the past,” the course aims to teach them to appreciate the authoritative nature of historical interpretation and its practical application in contemporary social and political rhetoric. The study of pre-modern cultural and political history through the prism of nationalism theories explains many aspects of modern Belarusian, Russian, and Ukrainian societies, as well as political aspirations of their leaders. At the end of the course, students should develop understanding of the continuity and change in the history of Russia, Ukraine and Belarus, their belief systems, and nationalistic ideologies, and will be able to speak and write about these issues with competence and confidence.

Fall

Also Offered As: REES 0100

Mutually Exclusive: REES 6100

1 Course Unit

HIST 0725 National Antiquities: Genealogies, Hagiographies, Holy Objects

Human societies have always wanted to know about their origins, the reasons for their customs, the foundations of their social institutions and religious beliefs, and the justification of their power structures. They have conceived of creation myths and of origins stories for their communities in order to position themselves within the past and present of the natural and human worlds. The newly Christianized kingdoms of Medieval Europe faced the challenge of securing a place in the new vision of universal Providential history, and they inscribed their own histories into the narratives they knew from the authoritative sources of the time - biblical genealogies and heroic stories inherited from the poets of classical antiquity. The deeds and virtues of saintly kings and church hierarchs provided a continuity of historical narrative on the sacred map of time and space. In the 19th century, while interest in medieval antiquity as a source of inspiration for political and cultural renewal brought about a critical study of evidence, it also effected reinterpretation and repurposing of this evidence vis-a-vis a new political concept - that of a nation. This seminar will focus on central, eastern and southeast European nations and explore three categories of "national antiquities" that have been prominent in the workings of their modern nationalisms: (1) stories of ethnogenesis (so-called, origo gentis) that narrate and explain the beginnings and genealogy of peoples and states, as they are recorded in medieval and early modern chronicles, (2) narratives about holy people, who are seen as national patron-saints, and (3) material objects of sacred significance (manuscripts, religious ceremony objects, crowns, icons) that act as symbols of political, cultural and national identities. Our approach will be two-fold: On the one hand, we will read medieval sources and ask the question of what they tell us about the mindset of the authors and societies that created them. We will think about how the knowledge of the past helped medieval societies legitimize the present and provide a model for the future. On the other hand, we will observe how medieval narratives and artifacts have been interpreted in modern times and how they became repurposed - first, during the "Romantic" stage of national awakening, then in the post-imperial era of independent nation-states, and, finally, in the post-Soviet context of reimagined Europe. We will observe how the study of nationalistic mentality enhances our understanding of how the past is represented and repurposed in scholarship and politics.

Also Offered As: REES 1174

1 Course Unit

HIST 0730 Introduction to the Ancient Near East

The great pyramids and mysterious mummies of Egypt, the fabled Tower of Babel, and the laws of the Babylonian king Hammurabi are some of the things that might come to mind when you think of the ancient Near East. Yet these are only a very few of the many fascinating -- and at time perplexing -- aspects of the civilizations that flourished there c. 3300-300 BCE. This is where writing first developed, where people thought that the gods wrote down what would happen in the future on the lungs and livers of sacrificed sheep, and where people knew how to determine the length of hypotenuse a thousand years before the Greek Pythagoras was born. During this course, we will learn more about these other matters and discover their place in the cultures and civilizations of that area. This is an interdisciplinary survey of the history, society and culture of the ancient Near East, in particular Egypt and Mesopotamia, utilizing extensive readings from ancient texts in translation (including the Epic of Gilgamesh, "one of the great masterpieces of world literature"), but also making use of archaeological and art historical materials. The goal of the course is to gain an appreciation of the various societies of the time, to understand some of their great achievements, to become acquainted with some of the fascinating individuals of the time (such as Hatshepsut, "the women pharaoh," and Akhenaten, "the heretic king"), and to appreciate the rich heritage that they have left us.

Fall

Also Offered As: ANCH 0100, NELC 0001

1 Course Unit

HIST 0750 From Shamans to Shoguns: The Texts that Made Pre-Modern Japanese History

This course tackles about a millennium of pre-modern Japanese political, social, and cultural history (roughly, 700-1700). Instead of attempting to cover the period chronologically, as an introductory survey might, this class is structured as a series of case studies. Each of these will take a primary source as its point of departure and explore one or more facets of Japanese history and writing. In the course of each case study, lectures and discussions will branch out from the main source to examine its historical context as well as the (political, cultural, textual) traditions that informed that source s composition. In general, students will read the entire texts of the main sources (or significant portions of them), along with scholarly articles and shorter excerpts from other sources, composed at the same time or in the same vein/genre. During lectures and discussions alike, students will be asked to engage the readings, so as to grasp the specifics of Japanese history and practice the analytical skills required of historical discourse.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: EALC 1742

1 Course Unit

HIST 0751 Japan: The Age of the Samurai

Who (or what) where the samurai? What does it mean to say that Japan had an "Age of the Samurai"? In popular imagination, pre-modern Japan has long been associated with its hereditary warrior class. Countless movies have explored the character and martial prowess of these men. Yet warriors constituted but a tiny portion of the societies they inhabited and ruled, and historians researching medieval Japan have turned their attentions to a great range of subjects and to other classes (elite and commoner alike). This class is designed to acquaint students with the complex and diverse centuries that have been called the "Age of the Samurai"-roughly, the years between ca. 1110 and 1850. In the course of the semester, we will explore the central themes in the historiography of warrior society, while introducing some of the defining texts that have shaped our imagination of this age (from laws to epic poems, from codes of conduct to autobiographies).

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: EALC 1746

1 Course Unit

HIST 0752 Knights with Katanas: Medieval Japan and Europe Compared

This course aims to provide an overview of some of the main themes and problemsin the history and historiography of medieval Japan by drawing on comparisons with European counterparts and interpretive models. To this end, each week's readings on Japan are paired with one or more works on medieval Europe dealing with a similar theme. The primary purpose is not only to draw comparisons between the two civilizations and their development but also to use the great riches of scholarship on the European Middle Ages to shed light on possible new avenues of inquiry and perspectives on Japan.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: EALC 2711

1 Course Unit

HIST 0753 City & Citizenship: Samurai Politics and Commoner Culture in Early Modern Japan

In the early modern period (1600-1867), Japan underwent a staggering urban transformation. Edo, the shogunal capital, grew in barely a century from a new settlement to a sprawling metropolis of over a million. Indeed, most of Japan's current urban centers descend directly from the castle towns built by regional warlords in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries in an effort keep the peace after over a hundred years of civil war. As a result, Japanese cities in the early modern period became a central component of what historians have called a "re-feudalization" of society, and retained strong vestiges of their military origins. At the same time the samurai-centered space of the new cities created opportunities for the development of alternative cultural practices and values by urban commoners. The juxtaposition of the regimented, honor-driven society designed and longed for by samurai and the fluid, money-driven society that grew out of the burgeoning cities' commoner quarters is one of the animating forces of the early modern period. Through study of scholarship and contemporary sources (laws and sumptuary regulations, codes of conducts, but also diaries, novels, plays), this course will explore the many facets of early modern urban society, its medieval antecedents, and its legacies in contemporary Japan.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: EALC 3742

1 Course Unit

HIST 0754 Law and Violence in Pre-Modern Japan

This course will be an exploration of premodern Japanese history through the lens of violence. The centuries under consideration (roughly, the eighth thought nineteenth) were characterized by greatly varying levels of violence, both of the state-sanctioned variety (war, punishments for law-breakers and political losers) and of the non-sanctioned variety (piracy, banditry, warrior and peasant rebellions). Examining a wide variety of translated sources, from diaries to chronicles, from legal codes to fiction, we shall examine the changing social, political, economic, and cultural contexts of violence, in order to interrogate not only why certain periods were remarkably peaceful while others were not, but also why violence took different forms in relation to different circumstances. We shall consider how contempories made sense of the violence that surrounded them (or didn't) and how they divided the acceptable use of force from the wanton and society-threatening abuse of it. The course will feature presentations and severl (very short) papers.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: EALC 3744

1 Course Unit

HIST 0755 History, Culture, and Religion in Early India

This course surveys the culture, religion and history of India from 2500 BCE to 1200 CE. The course examines the major cultural, religious and social factors that shaped the course of early Indian history. The following themes will be covered: the rise and fall of Harappan civilization, the "Aryan Invasion" and Vedic India, the rise of cities, states and the religions of Buddhism and Jainism, the historical context of the growth of classical Hinduism, including the Mahabharata, Ramayana and the development of the theistic temple cults of Saivism and Vaisnavism, processes of medieval agrarian expansion and cultic incorporation as well as the spread of early Indian cultural ideas in Southeast Asia. In addition to assigned secondary readings students will read select primary sources on the history of religion and culture of early India, including Vedic and Buddhist texts, Puranas and medieval temple inscriptions. Major objectives of the course will be to draw attention to India's early cultural and religious past and to assess contemporary concerns and ideologies in influencing our understanding and representation of that past.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: RELS 0003, SAST 0003

1 Course Unit

HIST 0756 Gender and Sexuality in Chinese History

This course examines gender and sexuality in Chinese history from ancient to contemporary times. It focuses on historiographical developments and methods of studying gender and sexuality in history as well as in Chinese history. The readings will include, but not be limited to, works by Robin Wang, Paul Goldin, Jen-der Lee, Patricia Ebrey, Beverly Bossler, Charlotte Furth, Susan Mann, Dorothy Ko, Francesca Bray, Yi-Li Wu, Matthew Sommer, Janet Theiss, Siyen Fei, Judith Zeitlin, Keith McMahon, Nicole Barnes, Gail Hershatter, Tani Barlow, and Lisa Rofel.

Spring

Also Offered As: EALC 3424

1 Course Unit

HIST 0810 The City

Urbs/Hist 210 will focus on Baltimore and use The Wire as one of its core texts. The course will explore the history and development of the city and its institutions, with a thematic focus on issues such as industrialization and deindustrialization; urban renewal and the role of universities; public education and youth; policing and the criminal justice system; drugs and underground markets; public housing and suburbanization; and Baltimore's so- called renaissance amidst persistent poverty. The seminar will include field trips both in Philadelphia and a concluding all-day trip to Baltimore.

Spring

Also Offered As: URBS 0210

1 Course Unit

HIST 0811 Faculty-Student Collaborative Action Seminar in Urban University-Community Rltn

This seminar helps students develop their capacity to solve strategic, real-world problems by working collaboratively in the classroom, on campus, and in the West Philadelphia community. Students develop proposals that demonstrate how a Penn undergraduate education might better empower students to produce, not simply "consume," societally-useful knowledge, as well as to function as caring, contributing citizens of a democratic society. Their proposals help contribute to the improvement of education on campus and in the community, as well as to the improvement of university-community relations. Additionally, students provide college access support at Paul Robeson High School for one hour each week.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: AFRC 1780, URBS 1780

1 Course Unit

HIST 0812 Perspectives on Urban Poverty

This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to 20th century urban poverty, and 20th century urban poverty knowledge. In addition to providing an historical overview of American poverty, the course is primarily concerned with the ways in which historical, cultural, political, racial, social, spatial/geographical, and economic forces have either shaped or been left out of contemporary debates on urban poverty. Of great importance, the course will evaluate competing analytic trends in the social sciences and their respective implications in terms of the question of what can be known about urban poverty in the contexts of social policy and practice, academic research, and the broader social imaginary. We will critically analyze a wide body of literature that theorizes and explains urban poverty. Course readings span the disciplines of sociology, anthropology, urban studies, history, and social welfare. Primacy will be granted to critical analysis and deconstruction of course texts, particularly with regard to the ways in which poverty knowledge creates, sustains, and constricts meaningful channels of action in urban poverty policy and practice interventions.

Fall

Also Offered As: SOCI 2944, URBS 4200

1 Course Unit

HIST 0813 Histories of Race and Science in Philadelphia

The history of race and science has its American epicenter in Philadelphia. Throughout this Academically-Based Community Service (ABCS) course, we will interrogate the past and legacy of racial science in the United States; the broad themes we broach will be met concretely in direct engagement with Penn and the Philadelphia community. As an extended case study, students will undertake independent research projects using primary source documents from local archives, tracing the global history of hundreds of human skulls in the 19th century Samuel G. Morton cranial collection at the Penn Museum, a foundational and controversial anthropological collection in the scientific study of race. These projects will be formed through an ongoing partnership with a Philadelphia high school in which Penn students will collaborate with high school students on the research and design of a public-facing website on the Morton collection and the legacy of race and science in America. In our seminar, we will read foundational texts on the study of racial difference and discuss anti-racist responses and resistance to racial science from the 19th century to the present. Throughout, we will work directly with both primary and secondary sources, critically interrogating how both science and histories of science and its impacts on society are constructed. Throughout this course, we will explore interrelated questions about Penn and Philadelphia's outsize role in the history of racial science, about decolonization and ethics in scholarly and scientific practice, about the politics of knowledge and public-facing scholarship, and about enduring legacies of racial science and racial ideologies. All students are welcome and there are no prerequisites, save for intellectual curiosity and commitment to the course. This course will be of particular interest to those interested in race, American history and the history of science, anthropology, museum studies, education, and social justice.

Also Offered As: AFRC 1401, ANTH 1400, STSC 1400

1 Course Unit

HIST 0814 American Slavery and the Law

In this course, we will work both chronologically and thematically to examine laws, constitutional provisions, and local and federal court decisions that established, regulated, and perpetuated slavery in the American colonies and states. We will concern ourselves both with change over time in the construction and application of the law, and the persistence of the desire to control and sublimate enslaved people. Our work will include engagement with secondary sources as well as immersion in the actual legal documents. Students will spend some time working with Mississippi murder cases from the 19th century. They will decipher and transcribe handwritten trial transcripts, and will historicize and analyze the cases with attention to procedural due process as well as what the testimony can tell us about the social history of the counties in which the murders occurred. The course will end with an examination of Black Codes that southern states enacted when slavery ended.

Spring

Also Offered As: AFRC 3500

1 Course Unit

HIST 0817 Black Feminist Approaches to History and Memory

Topics vary: Black Feminist Approaches to History & Memory - The term black feminism emerged in public discourse amid the social, political, and cultural turbulence of the 1960s. The roots of black feminism, however, are much older, easily reaching back to the work of black women abolitionists and social critics of the nineteenth century. The concept continued to grow and evolve in the work of twentieth century black women writers, journalists, activists, and educators as they sought to document black women's lives. Collectively, their work established black feminism as a political practice dedicated to the equality of all people. More recently, black feminism has been deployed as a tool for theoretical and scholarly analysis that is characterized by an understanding that race, class, gender, and sexuality are inextricably interconnected. Using materials such as slave narratives, social criticism, and archival sources, this course will explore the theoretical and practical applications of black feminist thought in nineteenth and twentieth century North American culture and politics. In particular, we will consider the symbols and practices (storytelling, myth-making, art, archival research) that black women use to document lives. We will ask: how do these methods of documentation inform our understanding of the past and the production of historical knowledge? How can we understand black feminism as both theory and practice? And what are the implications of black feminist approaches for current research and scholarship? We will give particular attention to concepts such as gender, race, memory, the archive, and embodied knowledge to complicate our understanding of historical documentation, epistemology, and authenticity. The course material will include scholarship by Harriet Jacobs, Audre Lorde, Saidiya Hartman, Hazel Carby, Hershini Young, Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, Toni Morrison, and others. (Image: From In Praise of Shadows, Kara Walker (2009). See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: AFRC 4387, GSWS 4387, LALS 4387

1 Course Unit

HIST 0820 Freud: The Invention of Psychoanalysis

No other person of the twentieth century has probably influenced scientific thought, humanistic scholarship, medical therapy, and popular culture as much as Sigmund Freud. This course will study his work, its cultural background, and its impact on us today. In the first part of the course, we will learn about Freud's life and the Viennese culture of his time. We will then move to a discussion of seminal texts, such as excerpts from his Interpretation of Dreams, case studies, as well as essays on psychoanalytic practice, human development, definitions of gender and sex, neuroses, and culture in general. In the final part of the course, we will discuss the impact of Freud's work. Guest lectureres from the medical field, history of science, psychology, and the humnities will offer insights into the reception of Freud's work, and its consequences for various fields of study and therapy.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: COML 1010, GRMN 1010, GSWS 1010

1 Course Unit

HIST 0821 Berlin: History, Politics, Culture

What do you know about Berlin's history, architecture, culture, and political life? The present course will offer a survey of the history of Prussia, beginning with the seventeenth century, and the unification of the small towns of Berlin and Koelln to establish a new capital for this country. It will tell the story of Berlin's rising political prominence in the eighteenth century, and its position as a center of the German and Jewish Enlightenment. It will follow Berlin's transformation into an industrial city in the nineteenth century, its rise to metropolis in the early twentieth century, its history during the Third Reich, and the post-war cold war period. The course will conclude its historical survey with a consideration of Berlin's position as a capital in reunified Germany. The historical survey will be supplemented by a study of Berlin's urban structure, its significant architecture from the eighteenth century (i.e. Schinkel) to the nineteenth (new worker's housing, garden suburbs) and twentieth centuries (Bauhaus, Speer designs, postwar rebuilding, GDR housing projects, post-unification building boom). In addition, we will read literary texts about the city, and consider the visual art and music created in and about Berlin, and focus on Berlin's Jewish history. The course will be interdisciplinary with the fields of German Studies, history, history of art, urban studies, and German-Jewish studies. It is also designed as a preparation for undergraduate students who are considering spending a junior semester with the Penn Abroad Program in Berlin.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: ARTH 2370, COML 1040, GRMN 1040, URBS 1070

1 Course Unit

HIST 0822 Universal Language: From the Tower of Babel to Artifical Intelligence

This is a course in European intellectual history. It explores the historical trajectory, from antiquity to the present day, of the idea that there once was, and again could be, a universal and perfect language among the human race. If recovered, it can explain the origins and meaning of human experience, and can enable universal understanding and world peace. The tantalizing question of the possibility of a universal language have been vital and thought-provoking throughout the history of humanity. The idea that the language spoken by Adam and Eve was a language which perfectly expressed the nature of all earthly objects and concepts has occupied the minds of intellectuals for almost two millennia. In defiance of the Christian biblical myth of the confusion of languages and nations at the Tower of Babel, they have over and over tried to overcome divine punishment and discover the path back to harmonious existence. By recovering or recreating a universal language, theologians hoped to be able to experience the divine; philosophers believed that it would enable apprehension of the laws of nature, while mystic cabbalists saw in it direct access to hidden knowledge. In reconstructing a proto-language, 19th-century Indo-Europeanist philologists saw the means to study the early stages of human development. Even in the 20th century, romantic idealists, such as the inventor of Esperanto Ludwik Zamenhof, strived to construct languages to enable understanding among estranged nations. For writers and poets of all times, from Cyrano de Bergerac to Velimir Khlebnikov, the idea of a universal and perfect language has been an inexhaustible source of inspiration. Today, this idea echoes in theories of universal and generative grammars, in approaching English as a global tongue, and in various attempts to create artificial languages, even a language for cosmic communication. Each week we address a particular period and set of theories to learn about universal language projects, but above all, the course examines fundamental questions of what language is and how it functions in human society.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: COML 0095, ENGL 1445, REES 1177

1 Course Unit

HIST 0823 Portraits of Russian Society: Art, Fiction, Drama

This course covers 19C Russian cultural and social history. Each week-long unit is organized around a single medium-length text (novella, play, memoir) which opens up a single scene of social history birth, death, duel, courtship, tsar, and so on. Each of these main texts is accompanied by a set of supplementary materials paintings, historical readings, cultural-analytical readings, excerpts from other literary works, etc. The object of the course is to understand the social codes and rituals that informed nineteenth-century Russian life, and to apply this knowledge in interpreting literary texts, other cultural objects, and even historical and social documents (letters, memoranda, etc.). We will attempt to understand social history and literary interpretation as separate disciplines yet also as disciplines that can inform one another. In short: we will read the social history through the text, and read the text against the social history.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: REES 0110

1 Course Unit

HIST 0824 Russia and the West

This course will explore the representations of the West in eighteenth- and nineteenth- century Russian literature and philosophy. We will consider the Russian visions of various events and aspects of Western political and social life Revolutions, educational system, public executions, resorts, etc. within the context of Russian intellectual history. We will examine how images of the West reflect Russia's own cultural concerns, anticipations, and biases, as well as aesthetic preoccupations and interests of Russian writers. The discussion will include literary works by Karamzin, Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Leskov, and Tolstoy, as well as non-fictional documents, such as travelers' letters, diaries, and historiosophical treatises of Russian Freemasons, Romantic and Positivist thinkers, and Russian social philosophers of the late Nineteenth century. A basic knowledge of nineteenth-century European history is desirable. The class will consist of lectures, discussion, short writing assignments, and two in-class tests.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: COML 2020, REES 0190

1 Course Unit

HIST 0825 Portraits of Soviet Society: Literature, Film, Drama

How can art and literature open a window on Russian lives lived over the course of the tumultuous twentieth century? This course adopts a unique approach to questions of cultural and social history. Each week-long unit is organized around a medium-length film, text or set of texts by some of the most important cultural figures of the era (novella, play, memoir, film, short stories) which opens up a single scene of social history: work, village, avant-garde, war, Gulag, and so on. Each cultural work is accompanied by a set of supplementary materials: historical readings, paintings, cultural-analytical readings, excerpts from other literary works, etc. We will read social history through culture and culture through history.

Spring

Also Offered As: REES 0130

1 Course Unit

HIST 0830 Introduction to the Middle East

This is the second half of the Near East sequence. This course surveys Islamic civilization from circa 600 (the rise of Islam) to the start of the modern era and concentrates on political, social, and cultural trends. Although the emphasis will be on Middle Eastern societies, we will occasionally consider developments in other parts of the world, such as sub-Saharan Africa, Central Asia, and Spain, where Islamic civilization was or has been influential. Our goal is to understand the shared features that have distinguished Islamic civilization as well as the varieties of experience that have endowed it with so much diversity.

Spring

Also Offered As: NELC 0002

1 Course Unit

HIST 0835 North Africa: History, Culture, Society

This interdisciplinary seminar aims to introduce students to the countries of North Africa, with a focus on the Maghreb and Libya (1830-present). It does so while examining the region's close economic and cultural connections to sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, and the Middle East. Readings will include histories, political analyses, anthropological studies, and novels, and will cover a wide range of topics such as colonial and postcolonial experiences, developments in Islamic thought and practice, and labor migration. This class is intended for juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: AFRC 1600, NELC 1600

1 Course Unit

HIST 0836 Muslims, Christians, and Jews in the Middle East: Historical Perspectives

A reading- and discussion-intensive seminar that addresses several recurring questions with regard to the Middle East and North Africa. How have Islam, Judaism, and Christianity influenced each other in these regions historically? How have Jews, Christians, and Muslims fared as religious minorities? To what extent have communal relations been characterized by harmony and cooperation, or by strife and discord, and how have these relations changed in different contexts over time? To what extent and under what circumstances have members of these communities converted, intermarried, formed business alliances, and adopted or developed similar customs? How has the emergence of the modern nation-state system affected communal relations as well as the legal or social status of religious minorities in particular countries? How important has religion been as one variable in social identity (along with sect, ethnicity, class, gender, etc.), and to what extent has religious identity figured into regional conflicts and wars? The focus of the class will be on the modern period (c. 1800-present) although we will read about some relevant trends in the early and middle Islamic periods as well. Students will also pursue individually tailored research to produce final papers. Prior background in Islamic studies and Middle Eastern history is required. Middle Eastern history is required. This class is intended for juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: JWST 1605, NELC 1605, RELS 1605

1 Course Unit

HIST 0837 Religion and Society in Africa

In recent decades, many African countries have perennially ranked very high among the most religious. This course serves as an introduction to major forms of religiosity in sub-Saharan Africa. Emphasis will be devoted to the indigenous religious traditions, Christianity and Islam, as they are practiced on the continent. We will examine how these religious traditions intersect with various aspects of life on the continent. The aim of this class is to help students to better understand various aspects of African cultures by dismantling stereotypes and assumptions that have long characterized the study of religions in Africa. The readings and lectures are will be drawn from historical and a few anthropological, and literary sources.

Also Offered As: AFRC 2870, RELS 2870

1 Course Unit

HIST 0838 Medicine, Health and Healing in Africa

This seminar course will examine how sub-Saharan Africans have interpreted and dealt with issues of health, healing, and medicine under colonial and postcolonial regimes. It will also look at how various social, economic, religious, and political factors have impacted health and healing on the continent and shaped African responses. Class discussions will center around both general themes affecting health and healing in Africa as well as case studies drawn from historical and anthropological works.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: AFRC 3110

1 Course Unit

HIST 0840 Love, Anger, Madness: History and Silences in Modern Haiti

On the stage of modern world history, Haiti plays the unique role as both the exceptionally victorious and tragic character. This course interrogates archival documents, oral histories, historical texts, and prose created within the nation and her diaspora in order to establish a nuanced image of the projection of Haiti's modern history. Using two classic Haitian texts, Marie Vieux-Chauvet's Love, Anger, Madness (1968) and Michel-Rolph Trouillot's Silencing the Past: Power and the Production of History (1995),this course examines how, why,and to what end Haiti's history and popular narratives about the country have served to construct and dismantle global movements, popular culture, and meanings of race, gender, and citizenship in the Americas. In our historical examination, we will question some of the iconic representations of Haiti through literature that deepen the affective historical profile of Haiti with interrogations of culture, sexuality, political, and media performance. Students will become familiar with the post -colonial history of Haiti and the region, meanings of race, and the production of history. The course is a research and historical methods seminar. Students will conduct archival research and write narratives from primary source material. This course qualifies as a "methods" course for Africana Studies undergraduate majors and minors.

Spring

Also Offered As: AFRC 3510, GSWS 3510, LALS 3510

1 Course Unit

HIST 0850 Introduction to Modern India

This introductory course will provide an outline of major events and themes in Indian history, from the Mughal Empire in the 16th century to the re-emergence of India as a global player in the 21st century. The course will discuss the following themes: society and economy in Mughal India; global trade between India and the West in the 17th century; the rise of the English East India Company's control over Indian subcontinent in the 18th century; its emergence and transformation of India into a colonial economy; social and religious reform movements in the 19th century; the emergence of elite and popular anti-colonial nationalisms; independence and the partition of the subcontinent; the emergence of the world's largest democracy; the making of an Indian middle class; and the nuclearization of South Asia.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: SAST 0001

1 Course Unit

HIST 0851 India: Culture and Society

What makes India INDIA? Religion and Philosophy? Architectural splendor? Kingdoms? Caste? The position of women? This course will introduce students to India by studying a range of social and cultural institutions that have historically assumed to be definitive India. Through primary texts, novels and historical sociological analysis, we will ask how these institutions have been reproduced and transformed, and assess their significance for contemporary Indian society.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: RELS 0008, SAST 0008

1 Course Unit

HIST 0867 Divinities, Diviners and Divinations: Religions of the African Diaspora

This undergraduate course is designed to provide students with a broad introduction to major themes within African Diasporic Religions. This is an interdisciplinary course. We will be drawing upon various theoretical methods, i.e. historical, ethnographical, and autobiographical. Additionally, we will be examining visual media to understand the presence and value of African Diasporic Religions in the 20th/21st century. Special attention will be given to Vodou, Santeria, and Candomble in the Americas. Thematically, we will work through concepts of the diaspora; memory, myth and authenticity; ritual and material practices; borders, migration, gender and sexuality, religious commodities and exchange. As we traverse through these various religious traditions, it is through the readings, lectures, invited speakers, films and class discussions that we will develop a complex understanding of integrative religious worldviews that impacts every aspect of life: family structure, gender relations, education, healing, economics, politics, arts, and so on. It is with the hopes that we can apprehend how these traditions are indeed an American Religion.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: AFRC 1201, GSWS 1202

1 Course Unit

HIST 0870 Introduction to Digital Humanities

This course provides an introduction to foundational skills common in digital humanities (DH). It covers a range of new technologies and methods and will empower scholars in literary studies and across humanities disciplines to take advantage of established and emerging digital research tools. Students will learn basic coding techniques that will enable them to work with a range data including literary texts and utilize techniques such as text mining, network analysis, and other computational approaches. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: COML 1650, ENGL 1650

1 Course Unit

HIST 0871 The Material Past in a Digital World

The material remains of the human past -objects and spaces- provide tangible evidence of past people's lives. Today's information technologies improve our ability to document, study, and present these materials. But what does it mean to deal with material evidence in a virtual context? In this class, students will learn basic digital methods for studying the past while working with objects, including those in the collections of the Penn Museum. This class will teach relational database design and 3D object modeling. As we learn about acquiring and managing data, we will gain valuable experience in the evaluation and use of digital tools. The digital humanities are a platform both for learning the basic digital literacy students need to succeed in today's world and for discussing the human consequences of these new technologies and data. We will discuss information technology's impact on the study and presentation of the past, including topics such as public participation in archaeological projects, educational technologies in museum galleries, and the issues raised by digitizing and disseminating historic texts and objects. Finally, we will touch on technology's role in the preservation of the past in today's turbulent world. No prior technical experience is required, but we hope students will share an enthusiasm for the past.

Also Offered As: ANTH 1303, ARTH 0127, CLST 1303

1 Course Unit

HIST 0872 Liquid Histories and Floating Archives

Climate change transforms the natural and built environments, and it is re-shaping how we understand, make sense, and care for our past. Climate changes history. This course explores the Anthropocene, the age when humans are remaking earth's systems, from an on-water perspective. In on-line dialogue and video conferences with research teams in port cities on four continents, this undergraduate course focuses on Philadelphia as one case study of how rising waters are transfiguring urban history, as well as its present and future. Students projects take them into the archives at the Independence Seaport Museum and at Bartram's Garden. Field trips by boat on the Schuylkill and Delaware Rivers and on land to the Port of Philadelphia and to the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge invite transhistorical dialogues about how colonial and then industrial-era energy and port infrastructure transformed the region's vast tidal marshlands wetlands. Excursions also help document how extreme rain events, storms, and rising waters are re-making the built environment, redrawing lines that had demarcated land from water. In dialogue with one another and invited guest artists, writers, and landscape architects, students final projects consider how our waters might themselves be read and investigated as archives. What do rising seas subsume and hold? Whose stories do they tell? What floats to the surface?

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: ANTH 1440, COML 1140, ENGL 1589, ENVS 1440, GRMN 1140

1 Course Unit

HIST 0873 Existence in Black

Racial, colonial, and other political formations have encumbered Black existence since at least the fifteenth-century. Black experiences of and reflections on these matters have been the subject of existential writings and artistic expressions ranging from the blues to reggae, fiction and non-fiction. Reading some of these texts alongside canonical texts in European existential philosophy, this class will examine how issues of freedom self, alienation, finitude, absurdity, race, and gender shape and are shaped by the global Black experience. Since Black aliveness is literally critical to Black existential philosophy, we shall also engage questions of Black flourishing amidst the potential for pessimism and nihilism.

Spring

Also Offered As: AFRC 4406, PHIL 4515

1 Course Unit

HIST 0874 The Inclusive City: Participatory Design at Taller Puertorriqueno

The Inclusive City: Participatory Design at Taller Puertorriqueno seminar will provide students in and beyond the Architecture department with the opportunity to learn from and with Taller Puertorriqueno about community, spacemaking, and memorialization in the built environment. Students will learn about a neighborhood and engage in collaborative participatory design, engaging primary sources in the Taller archives, and working on a collaborative design project. Starting from a general (region-urban) to particular (neighborhood) methodology research on site across several categories, and engaging primary sources in the Taller archives, the students will generate relational territorial cartographies and mappings, allowing them to develop a master architectural plan that includes urban strategies, as well as dynamic processes of community development. As a truly interdisciplinary course, students will utilize design concepts, historical methods, and ethnoracial lenses of analysis to collaborate with Taller Puertorriqueno to develop targeted architectural solutions that align with the organization's programmatic goals.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: AFRC 4920, LALS 4910, URBS 4910

1 Course Unit

HIST 0875 Classicism in the Black Atlantic, 1776-1968

During the eighteenth century, Britain, France, and the other imperial powers embraced the classical aesthetic to broadcast their genealogical connections with ancient Greece and Rome. As they expanded across the Atlantic, they brought with them an aesthetic of white marble, symmetry, restraint, and cultivated 'taste' that served to aestheticize the dependence of the imperial system on enslaved labor. This course explores how freed slaves and their descendants negotiated with the ideology of classicism during the long battle for civil rights in the Atlantic world. Beginning with the work of Phillis Wheatley, Olaudah Equiano, Ignatius Sancho, and Ottobah Cugoano, we will investigate how participants in the world of what Paul Gilroy called "the Black Atlantic" embraced, questioned, or rejected the classical aesthetic up to the final collapse of the colonial system in the late 1960s. Along the way, we will ask important questions including: who 'owns' ancient Greece and Rome? Can an aesthetic be inherently political? And was the Black classicism of the 18th-20th centuries effective in fulfilling an agenda of liberation?

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: ANCH 3210

1 Course Unit

HIST 0876 Medicine in History

This course surveys the history of medical knowledge and practice from antiquity to the present. No prior background in the history of science or medicine is required. The course has two principal goals: (1)to give students a practical introduction to the fundamental questions and methods of the history of medicine, and (2)to foster a nuanced, critical understanding of medicine's complex role in contemporary society. The couse takes a broadly chronological approach, blending the perspectives of the patient,the physician,and society as a whole--recognizing that medicine has always aspired to "treat" healthy people as well as the sick and infirm. Rather than history "from the top down"or "from the bottom up,"this course sets its sights on history from the inside out. This means, first, that medical knowledge and practice is understood through the personal experiences of patients and caregivers. It also means that lectures and discussions will take the long-discredited knowledge and treatments of the past seriously,on their own terms, rather than judging them by todays's standards. Required readings consist largely of primary sources, from elite medical texts to patient diaries. Short research assignments will encourge students to adopt the perspectives of a range of actors in various historical eras.

Fall

Also Offered As: HSOC 0400, STSC 0400

1 Course Unit

HIST 1100 North American Colonial History

A survey of the development of American colonial society, 1607-1750, with emphasis on the regional differences between life in early New England, the Mid-Atlantic, and the South, as well as the relationships between British colonists, Native Americans, and African Americans.

Fall

1 Course Unit

HIST 1110 Hamilton's America: US History 1776-1804

In this course, students will learn about the political, constitutional, and social history of the United States from 1776 (the year the colonies declared their independence from Great Britain) to 1800 (the year Thomas Jefferson won the presidency in a heated partisan election for the presidency). Alexander Hamilton, an influential American statesman during this time, will be our guide to the many events and transformations that occurred during these years. The course is not, however, a biographical course about Hamilton. Topics covered include: the politics of independence, the Revolutionary War, the development of state and national republics, the creation of the U.S. Constitution, the role of ordinary people in the politics of the time period, the problem of slavery in the new nation, Native American power and loss, diplomatic affairs, and the rise of partisan politics.

Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 1119 History of American Law to 1877

The course surveys the development of law in the U.S. to 1877, including such subjects as: the evolution of the legal profession, the transformation of English law during the American Revolution, the making and implementation of the Constitution, and issues concerning business and economic development, the law of slavery, the status of women, and civil rights.

Fall

Also Offered As: AFRC 1119

1 Course Unit

HIST 1121 The American South

Southern culture and history from 1607-1860, from Jamestown to seccession. Traces the rise of slavery and plantation society, the growth of Southern sectionalism and its explosion into Civil War.

Two Term Class, Student may enter either term; credit given for either

Also Offered As: AFRC 1121

1 Course Unit

HIST 1122 Sinners, Sex and Slaves: Race and Sex in Early America

This course explores the lost worlds of sinners, witches, sexual offenders, rebellious slaves, and Native American prophets from the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries. Using the life stories of unusual individuals from the past, we try to make sense of their contentious relationships with their societies. By following the careers of the trouble-makers, the criminals, and the rebels, we also learn about the foundations of social order and the impulse to reform that rocked American society during the nineteenth century.

Fall

Also Offered As: AFRC 1122, GSWS 1122

1 Course Unit

HIST 1127 Afro-American History 1550-1876

This course examines the experiences of Africans and African Americans in colonial America and in the United States to 1865. We will explore a variety of themes through the use of primary and secondary sources. Topics include: the development of racial slavery, labor, identity, gender, religion, education, law, protest, resistance, and abolition.

Fall

Also Offered As: AFRC 1176

1 Course Unit

HIST 1150 American Jewish Experience

This course offers a comprehensive survey of American Jewish history from the colonial period to the present. It will cover the different waves of Jewish immigration to the United States and examine the construction of Jewish political, cultural, and religious life in America. Topics will include: American Judaism, the Jewish labor movement, Jewish politics and popular culture, and the responses of American Jews to the Holocaust and the State of Israel.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: JWST 1150, RELS 1150

1 Course Unit

HIST 1151 Race, Space and Place in American History

This course provides with a historical introduction to America's racial and ethnic groupings by examining the social, spatial and historical forces that have defined these groups. Weekly lectures and readings trace American racial formations, identities and experiences from the age of Columbus to the present day. Following the work of historians and geographers who emphasize the importance of space and place in constructions of racial and ethnic identity, most of the class readings chart the evolution of such identities within specific regions or communities. Early readings illuminate the origins of categories such as "white," black, "Native American" and "Asian" by exploring the colonial encounters in which these identities first took shape; while later readings trace how these identities have been maintained and/or changed over time. Less a product of racial attitudes than of economic and political interests, early American conceptions of race first took shape amidst contests over land and labor that pitted European immigrants against the indigenous peoples of North America, and ultimately led to the development of racial slavery. Colonial legal distinctions between Christians and Heathens were supplanted by legislation that defined people by race and ethnicity. Over time these distinctions were reinforced by a variety of other forces. Distinctive from place to place, America's racial and ethnic groupings have been shaped and reshaped by regional economies such as the slave South, political initiatives such as Indian Removal and Chinese Exclusion Acts, a changing national immigration policy, and sexual and social intermixture and assimilation. Course readings will examine the links between race, region, labor, law, immigration, politics, sexuality and the construction and character of racialized spaces and places in America.

Also Offered As: AFRC 1151

1 Course Unit

HIST 1153 Transformations of Urban America: Making the Unequal Metropolis, 1945 to Today

The course traces the economic, social, and political history of American cities after World War II. It focuses on how the economic problems of the industrial city were compounded by the racial conflicts of the 1950s and 1960s and the fiscal crises of the 1970s. The last part of the course examines the forces that have led to the revitalization and stark inequality of cities in recent years.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: URBS 1153

1 Course Unit

HIST 1154 Philadelphia, 1700-2000

Using Philadelphia as a lens, this course will examine the transformation of American cities from the colonial period to the present. Through readings, lectures, and tours, we will consider urbanization and suburbanization, race, class, and ethnicity, economic development, poverty and inequality, housing and neighborhood change, urban institutions, and politics and public policy.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: URBS 1154

1 Course Unit

HIST 1155 Introduction to Asian American History

This course will provide an introduction to the history of Asian Pacific Americans, focusing on the wide diversity of migrant experiences, as well as the continuing legacies of Orientalism on American-born APA's. Issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality will also be examined.

Spring

Also Offered As: ASAM 0102

1 Course Unit

HIST 1161 American Capitalism

A broad overview of American economic history will be provided by focusing on the following topics: colonial trade patterns, the growth of the market economy, the political economy of slavery, industrial expansion, segmentation in the labor force and changes in work, technological and organizational innovations, business cycles, the rise of the corporate welfare state, the growth of monopoly capitalism, and current economic problems in historical perspective.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: ECON 0610

1 Course Unit

HIST 1162 The American West

This course explores the social and cultural history and current views of the many Wests we think we know, In 1872, President Grant established Yellowstone National Park, only the first of many national and state nature reserves in the west. Even while the Parks were widely celebrated, in 1876 Grant allowed miners and land speculators into the Black Hills, or Paha Sapa, land long considered sacred by the Lakota peoples and 'protected' for them as recently as 1868 Treaty of Laramie. From this pairing of events in the 1870s spring the many overlapping themes this course will address: Native peoples, their beliefs and material cultures, pressured by the arrival of scattered industries (gold rushes, silver and copper mining); irregular sources of industrial and banking capital from England, New York, Chicago, and elsewhere; the arrival of the US Army in 1851, then a break removing troops for the Civil War, then their renewed and constant appearance from 1866 on and the making and breaking of other treaties; the irregular scattering of land speculators and dirt farmers, even while the US government insisted the Sioux and Cheyennes, among other peoples, not disturb the passage of planters on the Oregon Trail, even as their hunting grounds were enclosed by the Union Pacific and North Pacific railroads by 1870. Naturalists, hikers, and artists arrived by rail to the western parks: Yellowstone, Yosemite (1890), and the Grand Canyon (1919). By 1900, American tourists went west to see wild West Indian Shows and wonder at the new parks. They ate at restaurants serving western food, wore western ware and cowboy boots, and listened to western music that finally reached its high point when folklorist Hal Cannon founded the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering in Elko, Nevada, in 1984, still active today with offshoots in Durango, Montana, and Texas.

Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 1163 Modern American Culture

Through the twentieth century, American culture took on new forms and meanings, spurred by technological innovation, commerce, and institutions, and shaped by an ever-changing population. In the process, American culture became self-consciously 'modern'-embraced, contested, repudiated, and continually redefined. This course explores the history of American culture from the 1890s to the 1990s, with a focus on the following questions: Why did culture become such an important part of American economic, social, and political life in the twentieth century? How has culture been created, understood, and mobilized by different groups in American society at different times? What have been the politics of culture over the twentieth century? Topics include the rise of 'culture industries' and mass entertainment, including amusement parks, film, radio, and television; the growth of consumer culture; the impact of gender in such arenas as sports and fashion; the role of working-class peoples, African Americans, and immigrants in American culture; the cultural response to the Depression and World War II; and popular activism. The course emphasizes the study of primary documents-journalism, fiction, letters and diaries, music, photographs, and film-as a means of understanding the past.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 1164 American Monuments: Designs for the Future

Recent protests about monuments have exposed this truth: arguments over the past are arguments about the future. This place-based course examines U.S. public memory in relation to the built environment. Students will learn about the making of the nation’s memorial landscape in the long nineteenth century, its remaking in the twentieth century, and its possible futures in the (un)making. Lectures and readings will cover a variety of commemorative structures and practices, from the permanent and the material to the ephemeral and the virtual. Working in teams, students will create proposals for innovative monuments of their own design. While contextualized in national and international history, student projects will be grounded in present-day Philadelphia, with the goal of joining the academic and the civic.

1 Course Unit

HIST 1165 History of American Education

This course will examine the growth and development of American schools, from the birth of the republic into the present. By 1850, the United States sent a greater fraction of its children to school than any other nation on earth. Why? What did young people learn there? And, most of all, how did these institutions both reflect and shape our evolving conceptions of "America" itself? In an irreducibly diverse society, the answers were never simple. Americans have always defined their nation in a myriad of contrasting and often contradictory ways. So they have also clashed vehemently over their schools, which remain our central public vehicle for deliberating and disseminating the values that we wish to transmit to our young. Our course will pay close attention to these education-related debates, especially in the realms of race, class, and religion. When immigrants came here from other shores, would they have to relinquish their old cultures and languages? When African-Americans won their freedom from bondage, what status would they assume? And as different religious denominations fanned out across the country, how would they balance the uncompromising demands of faith with the pluralistic imperatives of democracy? All of these questions came into relief at school, where the answers changed dramatically over time. Early American teachers blithely assumed that newcomers would abandon their old-world habits and tongues; today, "multicultural education" seeks to preserve or even to celebrate these distinctive patterns. Post-emancipation white philanthropists designed vocational curricula for freed African-Americans, imagining blacks as loyal serfs; but blacks themselves demanded a more academic education, which would set them on the road to equality. Protestants and Catholics both used the public schools to teach their faith systems until the early 1960s, when the courts barred them from doing so; but religious controversies continue to hound the schools, especially on matters like evolution and sex education. How should our public schools address such dilemmas? How can the schools provide a "common" educaiton, as Horace Mann called it, melding us into an integrated whole while still respecting our inevitable differences?

Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 1169 History of American Law Since 1877

This course covers the development of legal rules and principles concerning individual and group conduct in the United States since 1877. Such subjects as regulation and deregulation, legal education and the legal profession, and the legal status of women and minorities will be discussed.

Spring

Also Offered As: AFRC 1169

1 Course Unit

HIST 1170 The American Civil War and Reconstruction

This course will cover the nature of American slavery, the causes of the Civil War, how the aims of the war changed over time, and the emergence and destruction of bi-racial democracy during Reconstruction. This is not a military history course, but we will discuss the course of the war and explore why Americans in the mid-nineteenth century came to believe that they could only settle their political disagreements through violence. We will examine how the revolutionary social and political changes that the war made possible were undermined and how the promise and shortcomings of Reconstruction continue to shape the nation today. Students will be graded on class participation in lecture and three written assignments. No prior knowledge required.

1 Course Unit

HIST 1171 The American South 1860-Present

This course will trace the history of the American South from the end of the Civil War to the present. It will investigate Reconstruction, the New South, Populism, racial disfranchisement and the rise of Jim Crow, the politics of the One-Party South, the South in the Progressive era and its role in the New Deal and World War II, the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 1960s, and the rise of the Republican South. While following the narrative of politics and economic development,we will pay particular attention to race relations and will be more than casually interested in gender roles. In addition, we will take frequent peeks at the evolving Southern identity as reflected in popular culture and literature as well as in other corners of the public sphere.

Two Term Class, Student may enter either term; credit given for either

1 Course Unit

HIST 1172 Bodies, Race and Rights: Sex and Citizenship in Modern American History

What did it mean to be a man or woman in the post-Civil War United States? Was being a man the same as being a citizen? If African-American men were to be fully embraced as both men and citizens in the aftermath of slavery, where did that leave women, white and black? Why did a nation built on immigration become so hostile to certain groups of immigrants during this period? In this course, we consider how the meanings and experiences of womanhood, manhood, citizenship, and equality before the law changed from the period immediately after the Civil War until the present day. We look at political battles over the meaning of citizenship, the use of terror to subdue African Americans politically and economically, and the fears of white Americans that they would lose their political and economic dominance to immigrant groups they deemed irreconcilably different from themselves. We also consider the repercussions of these conflicts for medical, legal, and economic efforts to regulate the bodies of women, children, poor people, immigrants, working class laborers, military men, and African Americans. Throughout the course, we will follow the state's changing use of racial, sexual, and economic categories to assess the bodily and intellectual capacities of different groups of citizens. We will also note some of the popular cultural expressions of manhood, womanhood, and citizenship. The lectures and reading assignments are organized around a series of historical problems, dynamic leaders, and controversies that illuminate these issues.

Spring

Also Offered As: AFRC 1172, GSWS 1172

1 Course Unit

HIST 1173 History of Sexuality in the U.S.

This course introduces students to a relatively new field of inquiry, the history of sexuality in the U.S. It explores the past to consider why sexuality has been so central to American identities, culture, and politics. Primary documents and other readings focus on the history of sexual ideology and regulation; popular culture and changing sexual practices; the emergence of distinct sexual identities and communities; the politics of sexuality; and the relationship between sexual and and other forms of social difference, such as gender, race, ethnicity, age, and class. Topics include many with continuing relevance to contemporary public debate: among them, sexual representation and censorship, sexual violence, adolescent sexuality, the politics of reproduction, gay and lesbian sexualities and sexually transmitted diseases.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: GSWS 1173

1 Course Unit

HIST 1177 Afro-American History 1876 to Present

A study of the major events, issues, and personalities in Afro-American history from Reconstruction to the present. The course will also examine the different slave experiences and the methods of black resistance and rebellion in the various slave systems.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: AFRC 1177

1 Course Unit

HIST 1180 Age of Reagan: US Politics and Society, 1960-2001

This course explores significant political and social developments that shaped the final decades of twentieth century U.S. history, an era notable for declining faith in political institutions, ideological and partisan polarization, and a variety of new rights claims by marginalized citizens. Until very recently, scholars have characterized this period as one of conservative political resurgence spurred by its most towering figure, Ronald Reagan, the nation's 40th president. While Reagan is an essential actor in this class, the course will consider a variety of perspectives, developments, and movements across the political spectrum as well as others that defy easy ideological or partisan categorization. In addition to tracing the transformation of the major political parties and ideologies, topics may include the evolution of the post-1960s civil rights movement and the rise of the incarceration crisis; the rise and trannsformation of the religious right; the AIDS crisis and the LGBTQ movement; and the emergence of the concept of the "free market" as an idealized way of reordering not just social and political commitments but society itself.

Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 1190 American Diplomatic History Since 1776

Survey course tracing the origins and evolution of the great traditions of U.S. foreign policy, including Exceptionalism, Unilateralism, Manifest Destiny, Wilsonianism, etc., by which Americans have tried to define their place in the world. Three hours of lecture per week, extensive reading, no recitations.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 1191 The U.S. and the World since 1898

This class examines the emergence of the U.S. as a world power since 1898, and considers both the international and domestic consequences of U.S. foreign relations. In one respect, the twentieth century was a strange time to become a global empire: it was the period when colonial systems centered in Europe, Russia, Japan, and Turkey collapsed, and new nations emerged throughout Africa and Asia. This class explores the changing strategies of military, economic, and political intervention that the U.S. pursued as colonization lost legitimacy. Within that framework, the class invites students to think about several questions: How did the idea and practice of empire change over the twentieth century? How did the United States relate to new visions of independence emerging in Africa, Asia, and Latin America? How did global interactions both inform and reflect racial ideology in the United States? Finally, how did international affairs transform U.S. politics and social movements?

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 1200 Foundations of European Thought: from Rome to the Renaissance

This course offers an introduction to the world of thought and learning at the heart of European culture, from the Romans through the Renaissance. We begin with the ancient Mediterranean and the formation of Christianity and trace its transformation into European society. Along the way we will examine the rise of universities and institutions for learning, and follow the humanist movement in rediscovering and redefining the ancients in the modern world.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: COML 1201

1 Course Unit

HIST 1201 Foundations of Law

This course explores the history and conceptual underpinnings of modern law in the West. What exactly is law? What is its relationship with politics and religion? Where do our notions of constitutionalism come from? How have we come to think in terms of rights? Using a historical and comparative approach, we will examine legal thought and culture in the European West from the Greek concept of nomos to the main categories of law developed in Roman antiquity, concepts of constitutionalism and rights crafted in medieval Europe, the development of the two main legal traditions of Europe (Common Law and Civil Law), and the emergence of intellectual property, human rights discourse and modern international law. The course will blend intellectual, political and social history. We will study concepts and intellectual categories such as crime, proof, punishment and the public/private distinction alongside illustrative cases that either exemplified the law or pushed it forward, foundational documents such as Magna Carta, and political developments such as the Peace of Westphalia, credited with the birth of modern state sovereignty and modern international law. Together, these subjects form core foundations of how we think and do law today.

1 Course Unit

HIST 1203 Economic History of Europe I

This course concentrates on the economy of Europe in the Early Modern Period, 1450-1750. It was a time of great transition. Europe developed from an agriculturally-based to an industrially-based economy, with attendant changes in society and culture. From subsistence-level productivity, the European economy expanded to create great surfeits of goods, with attendant changes in consumption and expectation. Europe grew from a regional economic system to become part--some would say the heart--of a global economy, with attendant changes in worldview and identity. Economic intensification, expansion, globalization, and industrialization are our topics, therefore. Beginning with economic organizations and practices, we will consider how these changed over time and influenced society and culture. The course takes as its point of departure the experience of individual, working men and women: peasants and artisans, merchants and landlords, entrepeneurs and financiers. Yet, it argues outward: from the particular to the general, from the individual to the social, from the local to the global. It will suggest ways in which the economy influenced developments or changes that were not in themselves economic, shaped, and deflected economic life and practice.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 1205 Reading the Classics

In this course we will study the early roots of Western culture--the Biblical, Greek and Roman traditions--as well as how sixteenth- and seventeenth-century European authors reproduced, rethought and reshaped these early traditions. Instead of reading and discussing the required texts according to the date when they were written (first the early traditions and ending with the Renaissance views), we will focus our attention on a few themes that were central concerns to those living in Classic and Renaissance times, and that continue to influence modern ways of thinking and acting in Western societies: conceptions of God and the place of religion in society; nature of power and authority, and individuals' rights and duties; good, evil, and ethical philosophy; views on women, their nature and roles in society; ethnography and the perception of other cultures and societies. In addition to reading and discussing several of the biblical books--Genesis, Exodus, the Book on Revelation--we will study other seminal classical works--Sophocles' Antigone, Aristotle's Politics and Ethics, Herodotus' The Histories; Plato's Apology-- and works by Michel de Montaigne, Maria de Zayas y Sotomayor, Marie de Gournay, Christopher Marlowe, William Shakespeare, and several others. We will also work with books published in the last decades, analyzing the classics and and their reception in various periods of history, but also books that analyze what the classics tell us today--Dreyfus and Kelly's All things shining, Reading the Western Classics to find meaning in a secular Age; Anthony Grafton's Bring Out Your Dead: the Past as Revelation; James Miller, Examined Lives, from Socrates to Nietzsche; and Sarah Bakewell, How to Live: Or a Life of Montaigne in One Question and Twenty Attempts at an Answer.

1 Course Unit

HIST 1210 The Vikings

The Vikings were the terror of Europe from the late eight to the eleventh century. Norwegians, Danes and Swedes left their homeland to trade, raid and pillage; leaving survivors praying "Oh Lord, deliver us from the fury of the Norsemen!" While commonly associated with violent barbarism, the Norse were also farmers, craftsmen, and merchants. As their dragon ships sailed the waterways of Europe and beyond, they also transformed from raiders to explorers, discoverers and settlers of found and conquered lands. This course will introduce students to various facets of the culture and society of the Viking world ranging from honor culture, gender roles, political culture, mythology, and burial practices. We will also explore the range of Viking activity abroad from Kiev and Constantinople to Greenland and Vineland, the Viking settlement in North America. We will use material and archeological sources as well as literary and historical ones in order to think about how we know history and what questions we can ask from different sorts of sources. Notably, we will be reading Icelandic sagas that relate oral histories of heroes, outlaws, raiders and sailors that will lead us to question the lines between fact and fiction, and myth and history.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: GRMN 1305

1 Course Unit

HIST 1215 LOVE, LUST AND VIOLENCE IN THE MIDDLE AGES

Medieval Europe was undoubtedly gruff and violent but it also gave birth to courtly culture - raw worries transformed into knights who performed heroic deeds, troubadours wrote epics in their honor and love songs about their ladies, women of the elite carved out a place in public discourse as patrons of the arts, and princely courts were increasingly defined by pageantry from jousting tournaments to royal coronations. This course will trace the development of this courtly culture from the eleventh to the sixteenth century, from its roots in Southern France to its spread to Northern France and then to various kingdoms in Europe. Central themes will include the transformation of the warrior into the knight, the relationship between violence and courtliness, courtly love, cultural production and the patronage, and the development of court pageantry and ceremonial. This is a class cultural history and, as such, will rely on the interpretation of objects of art and material culture, literature as well as historical accounts.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: COML 1215, GSWS 1215

1 Course Unit

HIST 1220 The Tudors

This course examines the history of England from the accession of Henry (VII) Tudor in 1485 to the death of Elizabeth I in 1603, with emphases on the political and personal history of this colorful dynasty, the religious revolution known as the protestant Reformation, the arts and literature known as the English Renaissance, imperial and trade ventures overseas, and aspects of popular culture including the witch craze. Unlike most English histories of the period, we will also look closely at the other realms of the British Isles, Scotland, Wales, and Ireland. Readings consist of a textbook with a British scope, and an array of primary sources, some in book form and others (marked with an asterisk on the syllabus) attached to Blackboard or distributed in class. Books are available at the Penn Book Center, except for biographies associated with film critiques. Most of the films noted in the syllabus will be available on PVN; otherwise, they can be viewed at the library or through Netflix. Assignments in square brackets are optional.

Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 1221 Britain's Century of Revolution

England, Ireland, Wales and Scotland experienced revolutions in the first half of the seventeenth century that abolished monarchy and hereditary aristocracy, and carried out the first judicial execution of a monarch in European history. England was re-constructed as a republic, then with Scotland became the United Commonwealth of Great Britain, then declined into a military dictatorship, and finally invited the king back. In 1688, however, the Glorious Revolution deposed that king and declared Britain a strictly constitutional monarchy. This course will explore what motivated ordinarily obedient British subjects to take up arms against their rulers. The works of Milton and Marvell, Cromwell, Hobbes and Locke, and many lesser-known writers of diaries, autobiographies, sermons, statutes, and letters will illuminate the issues. The focus will be on how law, politics and religion interacted in the onset of war and defining of settlement, but with an eye to the larger social and cultural setting in which revolutions happened: this is also an era of both witchcraze and scientific revolution, puritanism and the slave trade, the near-destruction of London by fire and plague and its re-birth as the capital of a commercial empire.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 1230 The French Revolution and the Origins of Modern Politics

This course will examine the social, cultural, intellectual, economic, and especially political history of France and its Empire from the end of the Old Regime through the Napoleonic period. The origins, development, and outcome of the French Revolution, followed by the Haitian Revolution and the Napoleonic Wars, will be our main focus. Particular attention will be paid to the global legacy of these late 18th and early 19th century revolutions in terms of such key modern political concepts as human rights, nationalism, social welfare, feminism, democracy, terrorism, abolitionism, capitalism, and revolution itself. Throughout the course, we will also emphasize the different and often conflicting ways in which historians have interpreted the meaning and consequences of this critical moment of upheaval. Readings will be a mixture of primary and secondary sources, and classes will combine lecture and discussion. Requirements will be one mid-term examination (15%), one short paper (15%), one final paper (30%), and one final examination (30%), as well as class participation (10%).

Not Offered Every Year

1 Course Unit

HIST 1250 Foundations of Modern Thought

"God is dead," declared Friedrich Nietzsche, "and we have killed him." Nietzche's words came as a climax of a longer history of criticism of, and dissent toward, the religious foundations of European society and politics. The critique of religion had vast implications for the meaning of human life, the nature of the person, and the conception of political and social existence. The course will explore the intensifying debate over religion in the intellectual history of Europe, reaching from the Renaissance, through the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, to the twentieth century. Rousseau, Voltaire, Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud. These thinkers allow us to trace the varieties of irreligious experience that have emerged in modern European thought and their implications for both historical and philosophical understanding. Rather than drawing a straight line from belief to non-belief, however, we will also consider whether religion lingers even in secular thought and culture.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: COML 1250

1 Course Unit

HIST 1260 Napoleonic Era & Tolstoy

In this course we will read what many consider to be the greatest book in world literature. This work, Tolstoys War and Peace, is devoted to one of the most momentous periods in world history, the Napoleonic Era (1789-1815). We will study both the novel and the era of the Napoleonic Wars: the military campaigns of Napoleon and his opponents, the grand strategies of the age, political intrigues and diplomatic betrayals, the ideologies and human dramas, the relationship between art and history. How does literature help us to understand this era? How does history help us to understand this great novel? This semester marks the 200th anniversary of Napoleons attempt to conquer Russia and achieve world domination, the campaign of 1812. Come celebrate this Bicentennial with us! Because we will read War and Peace over the course of the entire semester, readings will be manageable and very enjoyable.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: COML 1262, REES 1380

1 Course Unit

HIST 1265 Victorian Britain: Spaces, Places, and Pests

In this course, we will examine the nooks and crannies of Victorian society. It was a period of squalor, but also innovation, devastating diseases, and crucial advances in public health and medical science. Its cities featured depressing slums and lurid crimes, but also new kinds of spectacles, entertainments, and commodities. It was, in many ways, as one of its greatest authors wrote, "the best of times, and the worst of times." Units under study will include "The Docks," "The Germs," "The Empire," "The Church," and "the Museum." We'll investigate killer diseases like cholera and typhus, dazzling buildings like the Crystal Palace, imperial wars and crises, and new scientific movements like Darwinism and mesmerism. Along the way, we will encounter proper and eminent Victorians as well as scandalous and marginalized ones. The aim will be to understand Victorian mentalities and ideas by looking at a diverse array of institutions and inventions. Readings will include novels, stories, pamphlets, essays, and cartoons as well as secondary literature. Classes will be a mixture of lecture and discussion, and no previous experience in British history is necessary.

Not Offered Every Year

1 Course Unit

HIST 1270 World War I

This survey course examines the outbreak, conduct, and aftermath of the First World War. The First World War put an end to the world of the 19th century and laid the foundations of the 20th century, the age of destruction and devastation. This course will examine the war in three components: the long-term and immediate causes of the First World War; the war's catastrophic conduct, on the battlefield and on the home front; and the war's devastating aftermath. While we will discuss military operations and certain battles, this course is not a military history of the war; it covers the social, economic, political and diplomatic aspects that contributed to the war's outbreak and made possible its execution over four devastating years. No preliminary knowledge or coursework is required.

Two Term Class, Student may enter either term; credit given for either

1 Course Unit

HIST 1280 Origins of Nazism: From Democracy to Race War and Genocide

Where did the Nazis come from? Was the Weimar Republic bound to fail? Did the Treaty of Versailles or the Great Depression catapult the Nazis into power? What was the role of racism, of Anti-Semitism? How did the regime consolidate itself? What was the role of ordinary people? How do we explain the Holocaust and what kind of a war was the Second World War? Grappling with these and more questions, the first half of the course focuses on Germany's first democracy, the Weimar Republic and its vibrant political culture. In the second half, we study on the Nazi regime, how it consolidated its power and remade society based on the concepts of race and struggle. Discussions of race and race-making are crucial throughout the course. In the name of the "racial purity," the Nazi state moved ruthlessly against Germany's Jewish population and cleansed German society of all "undesirable" elements. These ideas and practices didn't originate with the Nazis and they didn't operate in a geopolitical vacuum. Thinking about Nazi racism and genocide in both its particular specifics and in a larger global historical context is the main goal of this course.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: GRMN 1306

1 Course Unit

HIST 1300 Gunpowder, Art and Diplomacy: Islamic Empires in the Early Modern World

In the sixteenth century, the political landscape of the Middle East, Central Asia, and India changed with the expansion and consolidation of new Islamic empires. Gunpowder had transformed the modes of warfare. Diplomacy followed new rules and forms of legitimation. The widespread use of Persian, Arabic and Turkish languages across the region allowed for an interconnected world of scholars, merchants, and diplomats. And each imperial court, those of the Ottomans, the Safavids, and the Mughals, found innovative and original forms of expression in art and literature. The expansion of these Islamic empires, each of them military giants and behemoths of bureaucracy, marked a new phase in world history. The course is divided in four sections. The first section introduces the student to major debates about the so-called gunpowder empires of the Islamic world as well as to comparative approaches to study them. The second section focuses on the transformations of modes of warfare and military organization. The third section considers the cultural history and artistic production of the imperial courts of the Ottomans, the Mughals, and the Safavids. The fourth and final section investigates the social histories of these empires, their subjects, and the configuration of a world both connected and divided by commerce, expansion, and diplomacy.

Spring

Also Offered As: NELC 3560

1 Course Unit

HIST 1310 Africa and the Transatlantic Slave Trade

This course focuses on the history of selected African societies from the sixteenth through the mid-nineteenth centuries. The primary goal is to study the political, economic, social, and cultural history of a number of peoples who participated in the Atlantic slave trade or were touched by it during the era of their involvement. The course is designed to serve as an introduction to the history and culture of African peoples who entered the diaspora during the era of the slave trade. Its audience is students interested in the history of Africa, the African diaspora, and the Atlantic world, as well as those who want to learn about the history of the slave trade. Case studies will include the Yoruba, Akan, and Fon, as well as Senegambian and West-central African peoples.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: AFRC 1310, LALS 1310

1 Course Unit

HIST 1350 Faces of Jihad in African Islam

This course is designed to provide the students with a broad understanding of the history of Islam in Africa. The focus will be mostly on West Africa, but we will also look at developments in other regions of the continent. We will explore Islam not only as religious practice but also as ideology and an instrument of social change. We will examine the process of islamization in Africa and the different uses of Jihad. Topics include prophetic jihad, jihad of the pen and the different varieties of jihad of the sword throughout the history in Islam in sub-Saharan Africa.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: AFRC 1350

1 Course Unit

HIST 1359 Filming the Middle East

This course will take us through the history of the modern Middle East as told by the region's many film-makers. We will explore how cinema developed and grew throughout countries like Egypt, Iran, Syria, Turkey, Lebanon, Israel and Palestine. Unusually for a typical course on the Middle East, we will also pay close attention to North Africa's film industry, with a deep exploration of the cinema of Algeria, Tunisia and Morocco. Sudanese films will be an important part of our study as well. What does it mean to have a national cinema? Many of these countries' film industries grew under European occupation and colonialism. With independence, were more markets available to Middle Eastern films? Where did directors and screenwriters train? Who were the intended audiences for these films? We will watch canonical films from the region, many of which focus on or reflect the political turmoil and aftermath of wars. But we will also examine the lightness of comedies, which were usually much more popular with Middle Eastern audiences, and which reveal every bit as much about the region's histories. And we will watch and discuss a phenomenon not found in Western cinema - the Ramadan soap operas and historical reenactments that are unique to the Middle East.

Also Offered As: CIMS 1359, NELC 1970

1 Course Unit

HIST 1360 Arab/Israeli Conflict in Literature and Film

This course will explore the origins, the history and, most importantly, the literary and cinematic art of the struggle that has endured for a century over the region that some call the Holy Land, some call Eretz Israel and others call Palestine. We will also consider religious motivations and interpretations that have inspired many involved in this conflict as well as the political consequences of world wars that contributed so greatly to the reconfiguration of the Middle East after the fall of the Ottoman Empire, and after the revelations of the Holocaust in Western Europe. While we will rely on a textbook for historical grounding. the most significant material we will use to learn this history will be films, novels, and short stories. Can the arts lead us to a different understanding of the lives lived through what seems like unending crisis?

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: CIMS 1360, NELC 0675

1 Course Unit

HIST 1388 From Oil Fields to Soccer Fields: The Middle East in the 20th Century

How did the Middle East become modern? This seemingly simple question requires a complex appraisal of civic society. Life changed in spectacular ways for the denizens of the Middle East in the span of a century. Oil -- once considered a scarce natural commodity -- was discovered and exported in substantial quantities that altered the economic landscape of the region and the world. Movie theaters, sewage systems, and public housing projects changed the urban backdrop of Middle Eastern cities and towns. Soccer, swimming, and volleyball became some of the new-fangled sports embraced by Middle Eastern communities. This course will traverse these fascinating and fraught cultural transformations of the Middle East in the twentieth century. Although inclusive of the military battles and conflicts that have affected the region, this class will move beyond the cliches of war to show the range of issues and ideas with which intellectuals and communities grappled. The cultural politics and economic value of oil as well as the formation of a vibrant literary life will be among the topics covered. By considering illustrative cultural moments that shed light on the political history of the period, this course will develop a nuanced framework to approach the history of the U.S. involvement in the region, the Iran-Iraq war, the Arab/Israeli conflict, and the current crises in the Persian Gulf. Students are required to participate in every lecture and recitation, as on Thursdays, part of the class time will be devoted to discussing select documents provided by the instructor. Please keep in mind that lectures do not duplicate readings, but rather supplement them. We will also watch video clips in the course of the lectures. In addition, students are expected to complete each week's radings in a timely fasion. Course requirements include satisfactory performance on a Powerpoint presentation related to the weekly readings, 2-3 short quizzes, and a ten-page paper. The paper should be on a topic of contemporary interested covered in the course that is placed in the proper historical context.

Also Offered As: NELC 0690

1 Course Unit

HIST 1400 Silver and Gold in the Americas from pre-history to the present

Precious metals have shaped pre-Colombian economies and socio-cultural processes in the Americas for thousands of years. After 1492, gold and silver sent from the "New World" to the "Old World" played a key role in changing economies all over the world. Locally, mining centers were places marked by forced labor, conspicuous consumption, and the destruction of ecosystems. Internationally, gold and silver prices have long had outsized effects on monetary and trade policies. This course uses case studies to delve into the fascinating history of precious metals and mining in North and South America. We will analyze documents describing the gold objects ransacked by Spanish conquistadors, examine 17th Century proto-industrial silver mining at Potosi, trace the impact and human cost of the huge gold strikes in Minas Gerais, in colonial Brazil, read new work on the California and Yukon moments of "rush" and their long-term impact on US monetary policy, and follow new reports about the conflicts at the heart of transnational gold mining in the present. Students will gain experience working with primary sources and will produce an in-depth research paper.

Spring

Also Offered As: LALS 1400

1 Course Unit

HIST 1475 History of Brazil: Slavery, Inequality, Development

In the past decade, Brazil has emerged a leading global power. As the world's fifth-largest country, by size and population, and the ninth-largest by GDP, Brazil exerts tremendous influence on international politics and the global economy, seen in its position as an emerging BRIC nation and a regional heavyweight in South America. Brazil is often in the news for its strides in social welfare, leading investments in the Global South, as host of the World Cup and Olympics, and, most recently, for its political instability. It is also a nation of deep contradictions, in which myth of racial democracy -- the longstanding creed that Brazilian society has escaped racial discrimination -- functions alongside pervasive social inequality, state violence, political corruption, and an unforgiving penal system. This course examines six centuries of Brazilian history. It highlights the interplay between global events -- colonialism, slavery and emancipation, capitalism, and democratization -- and the local geographies, popular cultures, and social movements that have shaped this multi-ethnic and expansive nation. In particular, the readings will highlight Brazil's place in Latin America and the Lusophone World, as well as the ways in which Brazil stands as a counterpoint to the United States, especially in terms of the legacy of slavery and race relation. In this lecture, we will also follow the current political and economic crises unfolding in Brazil, at a moment when it has become all the more important to evaluate just how South America's largest nation has shaped and been shaped by global events.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: AFRC 1475, LALS 1475

1 Course Unit

HIST 1550 East Asian Diplomacy

Home to four of the five most populous states and four of the five largest economies, the Asia/Pacific is arguably the most dynamic region in the twenty-first century. At the same time, Cold War remnants (a divided Korea and China) and major geopolitical shifts (the rise of China and India, decline of the US and Japan) contribute significantly to the volatility of our world. This course will examine the political, economic, and geopolitical dynamism of the region through a survey of relations among the great powers in Asia from the sixteenth century to the present. Special emphasis will be given to regional and global developments from the perspective of the three principal East Asian states--China, Japan and Korea. We will explore the many informal, as well as formal, means of intercourse that have made East Asia what it is today. Graduate students should consult graduate syllabus for graduate reading list, special recitation time and graduate requirements.

Fall

Also Offered As: EALC 1711

Mutually Exclusive: HIST 5550

1 Course Unit

HIST 1591 The Vietnam War

A thorough historical, military, and social history of the Vietnam war, which lasted in one form or another from the end of WWII in 1945 to 1975, in which occurred the longest and most humiliating defeat in our history. Since that time the Vietnamese have published hundreds of documents, some in English, which provide an entirely new perspective on what we believed during the war. These, supplemented by other primary and secondary materials, as much as possible written by Vietnamese or by Americans having first-hand knowledge, will form the backbone of the course. The various American and Vietnamese strategies will be scrutinized carefully, and a good deal said about the home front in America. The actual fighting, thatdetermined the outcome, will not be slighted. We expect at least some guest speakers having long diplomatic or military experience in Vietnam. The present will be our conclusion. Lectures TTH 12-1:30; midterm in class, short paper, anregular final. If you want to understand the world you now live in, this coursea good place to start.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: EALC 1790

1 Course Unit

HIST 1593 20th Century China: Democracy, Constitutions, and States

Since 1900 four types of states have ruled China: dynastic, elective parliamentary, authoritarian nationalist, and communist. We will trace each from its intellectual origins to conclusion. By doing so we will present a solid and wide-ranging narrative of China's past century, introducing newly discovered material, some controversial. Above all we will dig into the issues raised by the century's mixture of regimes. Right now China is a dictatorship but once it was an imperfect democracy. Does this prove that Chinese are somehow incapable of creating democracy? That sadly it is just not in their DNA? Or only that the task is very difficult in a country nearly forty times the size of England and developing rapidly? That without dictatorship the Chinese almost inevitably collapse into chaos? Or only that blood and iron have been used regularly with harsh effectiveness? You will be given a solid grounding in events, and also in how they are interpreted, right up to the present. Readings will be mostly by Chinese authors (translated), everything from primary sources to narrative to fiction. We will also use wartime documentary films. Two lectures per week, regular mid-term and final exams, and a paper on a topic of your own choice. No prerequisites.

Fall

Also Offered As: EALC 1731

1 Course Unit

HIST 1594 China and the World: Modern Times

History 394 is a comprehensive introduction to the last hundred years of China's relations with the world, with emphasis on American-Chinese relations, but within the necessary context of China's relations with other countries from Asia to Europe to Africa and elsewhere (as well as Washington's changing relations with Beijing). China's role in the world can be understood only when the full background and international context is made clear. This course has no prerequisites: first year and other students lacking background will find it manageable and interesting. Students who have successfully completed this course will be well positioned to understand some of the most important of current events, and if they like, pursue the topics as careers (there will be no shortage, I assure you). Although much will be said about diplomacy, and Chinese diplomatic strategy in particular, the mile-posts of the course will be a series of wars: World War I and its effects on China; the heroic Chinese war of resistance against Japan (1937-1945) in which, effectively without allies, the Chinese avoided defeat; the bitter Civil War that followed almost immediately (1946-1949) and brought Mao Zedong and his Communists to power while the predecessor Nationalist government fled to the island of Taiwan; then the Korean War (1950-1953) and the close Chinese-Soviet alliance that followed; The Taiwan Straits Crises (1954-1955, 1958, 1996); the Chinese-Indian war (1962) the origin of a situation now heating up; the Sino-Soviet border conflicts (1969); the Vietnam War (1955-1975) which changed the United States profoundly while reorientating China internationally; the (at the time) little noticed Chinese invasion of Vietnam (1979) - and finally the increasingly tense situation today, between Chine and India, and China and her maritime neighbors from Japan to Indonesia, many U.S. allies.

Also Offered As: EALC 1732

1 Course Unit

HIST 1600 Jews and Judaism in Antiquity

A broad introduction to the history of Jewish civilization from its Biblical beginnings to the Middle Ages, with the main focus on the formative period of classical rabbinic Judaism and on the symbiotic relationship between Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

Spring

Also Offered As: JWST 1600, NELC 0350, RELS 1600

1 Course Unit

HIST 1610 Medieval and Early Modern Jewry

Exploration of intellectual, social, and cultural developments in Jewish civilization from the rise of Islam in the seventh century to the assault on established conceptions of faith and religious authority in 17th century Europe, that is, from the age of Mohammed to that of Spinoza. Particular attention will be paid to the interaction of Jewish culture with those of Christianity and Islam.

Fall

Also Offered As: JWST 1610, NELC 0355, RELS 1610

1 Course Unit

HIST 1620 The Rise and Fall of the Spanish Empire 1450-1700

This course will provide students with a solid knowledge of the history of early modern Spain (1450-1700). Through readings of primary and secondary texts that offer a complex vision of the cultural, religious, intellectual, and economic contexts and processes, students will be able to appreciate the intricacies of Spain's historical evolution. The course focuses on the rise and decline of the Spanish monarchy: the conditions that enabled Spain to become the most powerful monarchy in early modern times, and the conditions that led to its decline. This course also touches upon other important aspects critical to understanding early modern Spain: relationships among Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Iberian Peninsula; the conquest and colonization of the New World; and early modern debates about Spain's rights to occupy America and the so-called "destruction of the Indies."

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: LALS 1620

1 Course Unit

HIST 1625 Era of Revolutions in the Atlantic World

This class examines the global ramifications of the era of Atlantic revolutions from the 1770s through the 1820s. With a particular focus on French Saint Domingue and Latin America, it provides an overview of key events and individuals from the period. Along the way, it assesses the impact of the American and French revolutions on the breakdown of colonial regimes across the Americas. Students will learn how to think critically about citizenship, constitutional power, and independence movements throughout the Atlantic world. Slavery and the transatlantic slave trade were seriously challenged in places such as Haiti, and the class investigates the appropriation and circulation of revolutionary ideas by enslaved people and other subaltern groups.

Also Offered As: AFRC 1625, LALS 1625

1 Course Unit

HIST 1630 Witchcraft and Possession

This course explores world witchcraft and possession from the persecutions of the early seventeenth century through the rise of Wicca in the twentieth century. The mere mention of these terms, or of such close cousins as demonology, sorcery, exorcism, magic, and the witches Sabbath, raises clear ethnographic and historical challenges. How can the analysis of witchcraft-- including beliefs, patterns of accusation, the general social position of victims, the intensity and timing of witch hunts, and its relation to religious practice, law, language, gender, social marginalization, and property--lead us to a more humane understanding of belief and action? Films such as The Exorcist, The Blair Witch Project, The Crucible, and Three Sovereigns for Sarah will focus discussion.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: ANTH 1630, GSWS 1630, RELS 1630

1 Course Unit

HIST 1650 Human-Animal Relationships in Historical Perspective

We live in a paradoxical moment in the history of people's relationships with animals. Certain species suffer today more than ever due to environmental degradation and modern food production practices. Yet other mammalian species are subject to a degree of sentimental attention (perhaps) unprecedented in history. This paradox is related to an unresolved tension in Western cultures: do the commonalities that bind humans to other animals unite them more or less than the differences that divide them? The course is organized around three main segments: animal domestication; modes of interaction (hunting, husbandry, pets, science) in early modern Europe; and contemporary science. We will conclude with a consideration of current philosophical and ethical perspectives of our treatment of non-human animals. By considering a variety of disciplinary approaches but with an emphasis on historians' methodologies, we will investigate these questions through careful reading of primary sources as well as secondary sources.

Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 1690 Modern Jewish Intellectual and Cultural History

An overview of Jewish intellectual and cultural history from the late 18th century until the present. The course considers the Jewish enlightenment Reform, Conservative and Neo-Orthodox Judaism, Zionist and Jewish Socialist thought, and Jewish thought in the 20th century, particularly in the context of the Holocaust. Readings of primary sources including Mendelsohn, Geiger, Hirsch, Herzl, Achad-ha-Am, Baeck, Buber, Kaplan, and others. No previous background is required.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: JWST 1690, RELS 1690

1 Course Unit

HIST 1700 The African Diaspora: Global Dimensions

This class examines the cultural and social ramifications of the African diaspora on a global level. It is divided into two major sections. The first section provides the historical background to the African diaspora by focusing on the forced migration of Africans to Spanish and Portuguese colonies in the Americas. We will then delve into the black experience in French and British colonial spaces. In this section, we will also endeavor to move beyond the Atlantic-centric paradigm in studies of the African diaspora by examining free and unfree migrations of African people across the Indian Ocean to places as far away as India and the Philippines. The second half of the class devotes significant attention to the historical legacy of slavery and colonialism in places like Brazil, Cuba and the United States. In this section, we will discuss such issues as race relations, the struggle for civil rights for African-descent people as well as the emergence and the implementation of affirmative action policies in places like Brazil and the US.

Spring

Also Offered As: AFRC 1700, LALS 1700

1 Course Unit

HIST 1702 Introduction to Latin American and Latino Studies

Designed to introduce students to the interdisciplinary field of Latin American and Latino Studies, this is a seminar oriented toward first and second year students. Readings will range widely, from scholarly work on the colonial world that followed from and pushed back against the "conquest"; to literary and artistic explorations of Latin American identities; to social scientists' explorations of how Latinos are changing the United States in the current generation.

Spring

Also Offered As: LALS 0720

1 Course Unit

HIST 1706 Global Environmental History from Paleolithic to the Present

This course explores the changing relationships between human beings and the natural world from early history to the present. We will consider the various ways humans across the globe have interacted with and modified the natural world by using fire, domesticating plants and animals, extracting minerals and energy, designing petro-chemicals, splitting atoms and leaving behind wastes of all sorts. Together we consider the impacts, ranging from population expansion to species extinctions and climate change. We examine how human interactions with the natural world relate to broader cultural processes such as religion, colonialism and capitalism, and why it is important to understand the past, even the deep past, in order to rise to the challenges of the present.

Also Offered As: ENVS 1400

1 Course Unit

HIST 1710 Jews in the Modern World

This course offers an intensive survey of the major currents in Jewish culture and society from the late middle ages to the present. Focusing upon the different societies in which Jews have lived, the course explores Jewish responses to the political, socio-economic, and cultural challenges of modernity.Topics to be covered include the political emancipation of Jews, the creation of new religious movements within Judaism, Jewish socialism, Zionism, the Holocaust, and the emergence of new Jewish communities in Israel and the United States. No prior background in Jewish history is expected.

Spring

Also Offered As: JWST 1710, NELC 0360, RELS 1710

1 Course Unit

HIST 1731 Financial Meltdown, Past and Present

Economic history is increasingly recognized as a crucial source of policy advice and is invoked with growing frequency in public debates. In particular, the subprime crisis in 2008 and after has generated a demand for "historical perspective" that would improve the understanding of the causes of financial turmoil and facilitate the prevention of comparable catastrophes. This course begins with a review of the principal features of the subprime crisis of 2008 and asks, so to speak, "how did we get there?" It answers by providing historical insights that shed light on crucial aspects of financial disasters. This is a history course, engaging with topics pertaining to economics, law and politics (national and international). Students with diverse backgrounds are expected to benefit from this course through acquiring a concrete knowledge of the historical evolution of fundamental institutions of financial capitalism. Ultimately, students enrolling in this course are expected to achieve proficiency in historically informed discussion of the mechanisms that were played out in the subprime crisis and beyond.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: ECON 0620

1 Course Unit

HIST 1733 Free Speech and Censorship

This course will explore the idea of free speech - its justification, its relationship to various forms of censorship, and its proper limits - as a historical, philosophical, legal, and ultimately, political question. In the first half of the course, we will explore the long history across the West of the regulation of various kinds of ideas and their expression, from malicious gossip to heresies, and read classic arguments for and against censorship, copyright protections, and standards of taste and decency and of truth. In the second part of the seminar, after looking at how the idea of freedom of speech came to seem an existential prerequisite for democracy as well as individual liberty, we will take up the historical and philosophical questions posed by such recent dilemmas as whether or not hate speech deserves the protection of the First Amendment, the distinction between art and pornography from the perspective of freedom of expression, speech during wartime, and the transformative effects of the internet on the circulation and regulation of ideas. We will end the semester by thinking about the globalization of the idea of free speech as a human right and its implications, both positive and negative. Readings will range from Robert Darnton's The Forbidden Best-Sellers of Pre-Revolutionary France, to D. H. Lawrence's Lady Chatterley's Lover, to documents concerning the cartoons of Charlie Hebdo and law review articles about Citizens United v. FEC. We will also make considerable use of local resources, from museums to the library.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 1735 Cold War: Global History

The Cold War was more than simply a military confrontation between the United States and the Soviet Union; it was the frame within which the entire world developed (for better or worse) for nearly five decades. This course will examine the cold War as a global phenomenon, covering not only the military and diplomatic history of the period, but also examining the social and cultural impact of the superpower confrontation. We will cover the origins of the conflict, the interplay between periods of tension and detente, the relative significance of disagreements within the opposing blocs, and the relationship between the "center" of the conflict in the North Atlantic/European area and the global "periphery".

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: REES 1370

1 Course Unit

HIST 1740 Capitalism, Socialism, and Crisis in the 20th Century Americas

The United States and Latin America produced a remarkable series of revolutions and reforms during the postwar period. This course examines efforts in the United States, Guatemala, Cuba, and Brazil to define and address problems around land, labor, and property; nation, empire, and autonomy; and racism, democracy, and citizenship. In studying the US and Latin America together, the class invites students to explore central themes of both regions' histories as parts of global processes. We will explore exchanges between social movements in the US, Cuba and Africa, for instance, ask how ideas about poverty traversed national borders, and examine the global rise of human rights consciousness. The class, in other words, not only compares national histories but analyzes the relationships between national upheavals and the global significance of events in the hemisphere.

Fall

Also Offered As: LALS 1740

1 Course Unit

HIST 1759 Technology, Policy & War

Comparative and interdisciplinary examination of successful and failed uses of force in international relations, from ancient to modern times, using case studies. Readings will include Clausowitz, Sun Tzu, and a variety of primary and secondary sources for the wars considered each year. Issues of war's fundamental origins, and its many impacts on society, will also be considered.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 1760 Strategy, Policy and War

Analysis of the political use of force, both in theory and in practice, through analytical readings and study of selected wars. Readings include Sun Zi, Kautilya, Machiavelli, Clauseqitz and other strategists. Case studies vary but may include the Peloponnesian War, the Mongol conquests, the Crusades, the Crimean War, Russo-Japanese War, World War II, Korea, or the Falklands, among others, with focus on initiation, strategic alternatives, decision and termination. Some discussion of the law of war and international attempts to limit it.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 1770 1947-49: British Empire and the Partitions of South Asia and Palestine

The partitions of South Asia and Palestine marked the end of the British Empire in those regions. British colonial rule in India ended in 1947 with the emergence of not one, but two nation states, India and Pakistan. Decolonization was marked by mass migration and ethnic cleansing along their borders. An estimated million people died in the violence in less than a year, and 12.5 million people migrated from their homes. The British Empire also gave up its claims to Palestine in 1947, exhausted by the two nationalisms of Zionists and Palestinians. This partition set up the declaration of the state of Israel, and the War for Palestine. By 1949, almost a million Palestinians found themselves displaced over many borders, some also within the borders of Israel. This comparative course is organized around three themes - the prehistories of these cataclysmic events, the role of Empire in catalyzing them, and the afterlives of these events that continue to haunt us into the present, seventy-five years later. It explores the political history - and the collapse of politics - that led to violence on a scale that was without precedent in the history of the Indian subcontinent. It examines the political, social and cultural events that led to decades of war and exile, and shaped the lives of generations of Palestinians, Israelis and the wider Middle East. Primary sources will help to explore the perspectives of ordinary people whose lives were turned upside down in both places.

Also Offered As: NELC 1650, SAST 1770

1 Course Unit

HIST 1785 American Expansion in the Pacific

This class will focus on America's expansion into the Pacific around the turn of the century with the acquisition of Hawaii and the Phillipines. It can deal with various issues, including the meaning of "frontier," colonialism, development of capitalist economies in the region, diplomacy, racism, migration, an American brand of Orientalism in encountering the "natives" and "heathens,"and histories of the West and the Pacific Islands in general.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: ASAM 3100

1 Course Unit

HIST 1788 Civilizations at odds? The United States and the Middle East

Foe or friend, Satan or saint - America has often been depicted in the Middle East either as a benevolent superpower or an ill-meaning enemy. In America, too, stereotypes of the Middle East abound as the home of terrorists, falafels, and fanatics. This undergraduate lecture course will explore the relationship between the United States and the Middle East by moving beyond such facile stereotypes. Our goal is to understand why a century of interaction has done little to foster greater understanding between these two societies. By reading novels, memoirs, and historical accounts, we will examine the origins of this cultural and diplomatic encounter in the twentieth century. The readings wills hed light on America's political and economic involvement in the Middle East after the Second World War. We will consider the impact of oil diplomacy on U.S.-Middle East relations, as well as the role of ideology and religion, in our effort to comprehend the current challenges that face these societies.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: NELC 0680

1 Course Unit

HIST 1790 China & USSR Compared

A comprehensive and multi-faceted survey of China and Russia, mostly in the twentieth century, through examining preludes and postludes, but focusing above all on their time as Communist states and sometimes quarreling Cold War allies. Of course we will cover the history, the geography, the economics, the leaders (Stalin, Mao), and the great events - not least the Second World War in each - always comparing, contrasting, and drawing linkages. We will also examine, however, daily life and work for ordinary people, developments in society, and not least their common attemps at revolution, at somehow creating new and unprecedented polities, having populations of radically transformed new people. This informative, fascinating quest will take us from folklore to literature and the arts to dissent and religion and ecology, among other topics. As far as possible we will let their people speak for themselves, by assigning mostly translations of original sources including novels and memoirs, even poetry. A comprehensive assessment of the strategically critical Asian heartland - which at over 14 million square miles is larger than Canada, the United States, and Western Europe combined. Lectures, readings, midterm, short paper, and in-class final.

Spring

Also Offered As: EALC 1712, REES 1580

1 Course Unit

HIST 2000 History Workshop

This course introduces newly declared History Majors to the History Department and lays the foundation for future coursework, including research seminars, in History. Students will be introduced to various methods used to reconstruct and explain the past in different eras and places. Drawing on the rich resources available at Penn and in the Philadelphia region, students will also learn how to research and write history themselves. Throughout the semester, small research and writing assignments will allow students to try out different approaches and hone their skills as both analysts and writers of history.

1 Course Unit

HIST 2150 Patriots, Parties, and Progressives: The U.S. 1776-1906

This course examines the history of the “long” nineteenth century in the United States. We will begin with the formation of the republic in the aftermath of the American Revolution and end in the Progressive Era. Particular emphasis will be placed on political and social history. Topics include: the formation and destruction of political party systems, reform movements, religious revivalism and identity, Indian removal, continental expansion, the Civil War and Reconstruction, Jim Crow, labor movements, immigration, and transformations in transportation, communication, and consumption.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 2151 History of Baseball, 1840 to the present

This course explores the history of baseball in the United States. It covers, among other topics, the first amateur clubs in the urban North, the professionalization and nationalization of the sport during and after the Civil War era, the rise of fandom, baseball’s relationship to anxieties about manhood and democracy, tensions between labor and management, the Negro Leagues, the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League, Nisei baseball during World War Two, Jackie Robinson and desegregation, and the Latinization of baseball. The history of baseball is, in many respects, the history of the United States writ large as well as the history of the myths that Americans tell about themselves.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 2152 Work and Workers in America

The subjects to be examined in this seminar on work and workers in the United States, include: industrialization and working-class protests movements in the nineteenth century; transformations of work under corporate capitalism; women, African Americans, immigrants and work; the rise of mass production unionism in the 1930s; deindustrialization and the eclipse of trade unionism; workers in contemporary America and blue color blues; and the future of work and new avenues for labor organizing. A number of films will be shown during the course of the semester and two field trips are planned. Requirements for the seminar include: the leading of discussions; three paper assignments; and engaged participation.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 2153 History Behind the Headlines: Contemporary U.S. Politics and Policy

History Behind the Headlines offers students the opportunity to explore the historical roots and development of current, pressing questions of U.S. politics and public policy. Drawing upon historical methodologies and scholarship as well recent work in political science and sociology, this reading seminar offers deep context for understanding some of the most important contemporary issues in American public life. Topics will likely include political polarization, the incarceration crisis, immigration, lobbying (that is, the role of money in democracy), and, perhaps, impeachment. In addition to a number of short response and op-ed style writing assignments, students will write and present a final project on a contemporary political or policy issue of their choosing. These final projects might take a variety of forms, including traditional historical research essays, policy white papers, long form investigative journalism, or projects using digital media.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 2154 The State of the Union is not Good: The US in Crisis in the 1970s

Vietnam. Watergate. Deindustrialization. Inflation. Disco. These events and forces only begin to scratch the surface of the social, cultural, political, and economic transformations that remade American life in the 1970s and which, by 1975, forced President Gerald Ford to concede “that the state of the union is not good.” Beyond these familiar topics, this reading seminar will explore a range of developments that are crucial for understanding why the 1970s was perhaps the pivotal decade in making modern American politics, economics, and culture. Topics will include the fate of the Civil Rights movement and the war on crime; the rise and impact of second wave feminism; the rise of the modern conservative coalition (e.g., its religious, economic, and white working-class components); the emergence of the finance economy; the reorientation of organized labor and the remaking of the Democratic Party; the explosion of “therapeutic” cultures of self-help, individualism, and entrepreneurialism; and the rise of the Sunbelt as the nation’s dominant cultural, political, and economic region.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 2155 Gender History and American Film

More than any other medium, the motion pictures fostered new ideals and images of modern womanhood and manhood in the United States. Throughout the twentieth century, gender representations on the screen bore a complex relationship to the social, economic, and political transformations marking the lives and consciousness of American men and women. This course explores the history of American gender through film. It treats the motion pictures as a primary source that, juxtaposed with other kinds of historical evidence, opens a window onto gendered work, leisure, sexuality, family life, and politics. We will view a wide range of Hollywood motion pictures since 1900, as well as films by blacklisted artists, feminists, and independent producers.

Spring

Also Offered As: CIMS 2155, GSWS 2155

1 Course Unit

HIST 2156 Life Stories in Early America, 1730-1830

This seminar explores the social and cultural history of early America by focusing on the lives of specific individuals, ranging from Jesuit priests in early Quebec to Philadelphia politicians to Saramaka slaves to Maine midwives. As we critically examine biography and autobiography as two of history's most powerful narrative frames, we will concentrate on the spaces and places in the social landscape that shaped individual understandings of work, sense of self, gender, beliefs, and political power, and why.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 2157 Petrosylvania: Reckoning with Fossil Fuel

Fossil fuel powered the making--now the unmaking--of the modern world. As the first fossil fuel state, Pennsylvania led the United States toward an energy-intensive economy, a technological pathway with planetary consequences. The purpose of this seminar is to perform a historical accounting--and an ethical reckoning--of coal, oil, and natural gas. Specifically, students will investigate the histories and legacies of fossil fuel in connection to three entities: the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, the City of Philadelphia, and the University of Pennsylvania. Under instructor guidance, students will do original research, some of it online, much the rest of it in archives, on and off campus, in and around Philadelphia. Philly-based research may also involve fieldwork. While based in historical sources and methods, this course intersects with business, finance, policy, environmental science, environmental engineering, urban and regional planning, public health, and social justice. Student projects may take multiple forms, individual and collaborative, from traditional papers to data visualizations prepared with assistance from the Price Lab for Digital Humanities. Through their research, students will contribute to a multi-year project that will ultimately be made available to the public.

Also Offered As: ENVS 2400

1 Course Unit

HIST 2200 Florence in History

Florence is justly famous for its art and learning, especially during the era of the Renaissance. It was also one of the most literate states in Europe during this era; thanks to the city’s 3 abundant records, it is one of the best-studied cities in Europe from the later Middle Ages through the early modern era. Our course readings present a mix of major primary sources, synthetic summaries, and important modern scholarship. Most of our class time will focus on the information and issues they raise.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: ITAL 2200

1 Course Unit

HIST 2201 The City of Rome: From Constantine to the Borgias

The great city of Rome outlived its empire and its emperors. What happened to the Eternal City after “the fall of the Roman Empire in the West?” In this course, we will follow the story of this great city, its people, its buildings old and new, and its legacy across Italy, Europe, and beyond. Rome rebuilt and reshaped itself through the Middle Ages: home for popes, destination for pilgrims, power broker for Italy. It became a great Renaissance and early modern city, a center of art and architecture, of religion, and of politics. We will be reading a mix of primary sources and modern scholarship. All required texts are in English, though students who take this course for Italian Studies credit may choose to read some works in Italian.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: ITAL 2201

1 Course Unit

HIST 2202 Taking Things: A History of Property and Law

This class looks at the history of the idea of property from antiquity to contemporary society though various specific themes and problems. We will begin with early development of the idea of property in Roman law. How was the idea of property explained, and what were the basic legal concepts associated with taking, using and owning? How did people lay claim to things wild or unowned? We will then move through medieval, early modern and modern periods to examine specific questions. How were people made into things? How do we create rights in intangibles? What are the limits of rights in property? Property is in many ways a central concept in relations between people in their everyday life. It is also a cornerstone of political ideology. This class will explore the history behind how we make and distinguish between ‘mine’ and ‘yours.’

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 2203 Introduction to Print Culture

This course examines the writing, printing, dissemination, interpretation, and censorship of specific works in Early modern England, France, Italy, Spain and America. The course is an introduction to the history of authorship, publishing, and reading at the age of print culture from Gutenberg to Franklin. All the texts analyzed in the course (the Bible, Montaigne's Essays, Shakespeare's plays, Don Quixote, Pamela among them) are available in English but the course pays particular attention to the massive range of translations in early modern period. its main focus are the relation between the "printing revolution"  and scribal culture, censorship and transgression, the birth of the author and collaborative writing, and reading practices from humanist techniques to reading of the novels. The course is based on the exceptional collections of rare books and manuscripts at  Penn and in Philadelphia and it is taught in the Van Pelt Library.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: ENGL 1609

1 Course Unit

HIST 2204 Food and Diet in Early Europe: Farm to Table in the Renaissance

What did medieval and Renaissance Europeans choose to eat? What did they have to eat? Before the age of mass transportation, was all food locally sourced? In an era when most medicines were plant based, what did it mean to eat a balanced diet? “Feed a cold, starve a fever.” Why? In this course we will examine food, foodways, and diet in European culture, thought, and society with a focus on the later Middle Ages and Renaissance, and with a mix of primary sources and modern scholarship on food, cuisine, religion, and diet.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: ITAL 2204

1 Course Unit

HIST 2250 History, Memory, and Nostalgia in Modern Europe

Karl Marx compared history to a nightmare weighing on the brains of the living, but it can also be a refuge, a source of inspiration, and a constant companion. In this course, we will consider our own relationship to the past as we navigate the boundaries and intersections of history, memory, and nostalgia. Reading will consist of plays, novels, music, film, television, and painting. From the traumas of the Holocaust and of Stalinism to the conflicted memory of empire, from preservation to imagination, we will consider a wide array of methods through which Europeans have engaged their past over the last two hundred and fifty years. How does the academic study of the past relate to individual and collective memories of it? If "living in the past" seems often seems counterproductive, and yearning for it often seems reactionary, in what ways can nostalgia be a force of progress? We will consider these questions as we study topics such as the birth of heritage movements in the nineteenth century, the formation of national museums, representations of war and violence, legacies of imperialism, and the history of memory after the cataclysms of the twentieth century.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 2251 Machiavelli and Modern Political Thought

Niccolò Machiavelli, the Renaissance author best known for The Prince, is frequently regarded as a consummate cynic. Yet he has been not only a provocation but an inspiration throughout the subsequent history of political thought. This was true for the entire twentieth century, which witnessed an ever-growing interest in the Florentine thinker among historians and philosophers alike. One of the most surprising dimensions of this modern engagement with Machiavelli is surely his recurring presence as figure and motif within left-wing philosophical discourse. In light of the failure of the twentieth-century’s revolutionary experiments, as well as its own entanglements with those experiments, how could radical theory understand its past and imagine its future? What vision could supplant the dimming of utopia? Such questions have frequently led recent theorists into melancholic resignation, but they have also provoked innovative and rigorous attempts to rethink the project of radical politics as radical democracy. How is it that Machiavelli, a thinker indelibly associated with the cynical and amoral manipulation of politics, could become an inspiration for theorists of a robust democratic life? This course will examine this curious history of influence and transformation. Starting with an examination of key texts by Machiavelli himself, we will then trace his reception in European intellectual history, focusing upon the twentieth century. Among authors we will consider will be Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Hannah Arendt, Leo Strauss, John Pocock, Quentin Skinner, Antonio Gramsci, Louis Althusser, John McCormick, and Antonio Negri.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: COML 2251

1 Course Unit

HIST 2252 European Intellectual History since 1945

This course concentrates on French intellectual history after 1945, with some excursions into Germany. We will explore changing conceptions of the intellectual, from Sartre's concept of the 'engagement' to Foucault's idea of the 'specific intellectual'; the rise and fall of existentialism; structuralism and poststructuralism; and the debate over 'postmodernity.'

Spring

Also Offered As: COML 2252

1 Course Unit

HIST 2253 Human Rights and History

The idea of universal, inalienable rights--once dismissed by the philosopher Jeremy Bentham as "nonsense upon stilts"--has become the dominant moral language of our time, the self-evident truth par excellence of our age. Human rights have become a source of inspiration to oppressed individuals and groups across the world, the rallying cry for a global civil society, and not least, a controversial source of legitimation for American foreign policy. This seminar asks: how did all this come to be? We will investigate human rights not only as theories embodied in texts, but as practices embedded in specific historical contexts. Are human rights the product of a peculiarly European heritage, of the Enlightenment and protestantism? How did Americans reconcile inalienable rights with the reality of slavery? Did human rights serve as a "civilizing" mask for colonialism? Can universal rights be reconciled with genuine cultural diversity? Through case studies and close readings, the seminar will work toward a genealogy of human rights.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 2254 WORLD WAR I

The First World War marks a watershed in European and world history. We will examine the preconditions for the war--such as European imperialism, the arms race, and the rise of international law. We then move to study the outbreak of the war, and the debate over "war guilt." Our seminar covers the key battles and the course of the war on the various fronts (Western Europe, Italian Front, the Eastern Front, the Middle East), and the war on sea and in the air. We close with an examination of the war's outcome--fascism, communism, revolution, the mandate system and postwar European and colonial order. We will read classics and recent works on what many consider to be the foundational moment for the twentieth century. No prior knowledge is assumed.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 2255 Modern Spain From Civil War to Democracy, 1930-1977

This course will examine the social, cultural, intellectual, economic, and political history of Spain from the 1890s loss of the colonial empire through the end of the Francoist regime (1970s). The history of 20th-century Spain offers the opportunity to study events, processes and ideologies that were and are central to the history of the West in the modern period: imperialism, the rise of communism and fascism, civil war, dictatorship, post-war reconstruction, and wars over cultural memory to control how societies remember their pasts. This course is divided into four parts. Introduction: the loss of the last colonies (1898) and the effect in Spain, and on Spain’s participation in the scramble for Africa. First Part: the Spanish Republic and Civil War (1931-1939), focuses on the rise of a democratic system and its demise after three years of violent civil war. Second Part: Post-war Reconstruction (1939-1975), focuses on the reconstruction of Spain led by an authoritarian and anti-democratic dictator, General Franco, the winner of the Civil War. Third Part: Memory Wars, focuses on the period after 1975 with the restoration of a democratic system. In this section, we will study the different and often conflicting ways Spaniards remembered the origins and causes of the Civil War, the victims of the Civil War, and the characteristics of Franco’s regime. Course readings will be a mixture of primary and secondary sources, and classes will combine short lectures by the instructor and discussion. Requirements: weekly short papers (reactions to weekly readings), oral presentations, and a final paper of 15 pages. Students can opt to write a research paper (20 pages) using original primary sources, to fulfill the department research requirement.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 2290 The Great War in Memoir and Memory (Penn Global Seminar)

World War One was the primordial catastrophe of twentieth-century history. For all who passed through it, the Great War was transformative, presenting a profound rupture in personal experience. It was a war that unleashed an unprecedented outpouring of memoirs and poetic and fictional accounts written by participants. In its wake, it also produced new forms of public commemoration and memorialization - tombs to the unknown soldier, great monuments, soldiers' cemeteries, solemn days of remembrance, and the like. One hundred years after World War One, this course will explore the war through the intersection of these processes of personal and public memory. (Please note: This is not a seminar in military or diplomatic history, but rather an exploration of personal experiences of the War, representations of experience, and the cultural and political dimensions of memory.) The course will end with a one week visit to the Western Front region of northern France. Travel to sites in northern France will allow us to consider the scale and topography of some of the major battles, visit cemeteries and ossuaries and reflect on their various forms of secular and sacred organization, various national war monuments, and WWI museums, including the pathbreaking museum in Peronne and the national WWI museum in Meaux.

1 Course Unit

HIST 2350 Migration and Refugees in African History

This seminar will examine the experiences of recent African emigrants and refugees within and from the continent Africa from a historical and comparative perspective. We will look at the relations of overseas Africans with both their home and host societies, drawing on some of the extensive comparative literature on immigration, ethnic diasporas, and transnationalism. Other topics include reasons for leaving Africa, patterns of economic and educational adaptation abroad, changes in gender and generational roles, issues of cultural, religious, and political identity, and the impact of international immigration policies. Students will have the opportunity to conduct focused research on specific African communities in Philadelphia or elsewhere in North America, Europe, or the Middle East. We will employ a variety of sources and methodologies from different disciplines--including newspapers, government and NGOs, literature and film, and diaspora internet sites--to explore the lives, aspirations, and perceptions of Africans abroad. History Majors may complete the research requirement if their paper is based on primary sources. Students not seeking credit for the research requirement may write papers drawing on secondary sources exclusively. Class will consist of a combination of lectures (including several by invited guests), discussions, video screenings, and presentations by students of their research in progress.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: AFRC 2350

1 Course Unit

HIST 2351 Silencing: Voices of Dissent in the Middle East

The Middle East boasts a rich and vibrant literary tradition. At the same time, modern Middle Eastern literature has incorporated innovative techniques to produce unique literary forms that give meaning to the contemporary circumstances of the region. This course will survey this literary history as a window through which to observe and understand Middle Eastern society. We will begin by reading excerpts from classical texts, since these works resonate strongly in contemporary Middle Eastern culture. Next, we will read Middle Eastern novels from various countries and different eras. The last part of the course will focus on memoirs that shed light on wars and conflicts through personal reflections. We will use literary works (epic poetry, novels, memoirs) as historical texts and analyze the social milieux in which these works emerged.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: NELC 2565

1 Course Unit

HIST 2352 Israel and Iran: Historical Ties, Contemporary Challenges

Israel and Iran have longstanding ties and connections that predate the contemporary feuds in which they are currently engaged. Iranian Jews rank as some of the oldest communities of the Middle East, and their history dovetails with the ancient Iranian past. This course will explore the historical roots of Jewish communities in Iran, with a focus on the post-18th century period, and will end with conversations that contributed to the diplomatic impasses faced by both countries since the 1979 Islamic Revolution. Films, novels, memoirs, and other historical accounts will be incorporated alongside secondary works to give students an opportunity to consider the complexities of this relationship.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: NELC 2566

1 Course Unit

HIST 2353 Sex and Power in the Middle East: Unveiling Women's Lives

How did Islamic women really live? What were their attitudes toward veiling and politics? To what extent did family dynamics and sexuality inform social interactions? This course strives to answer these questions by offering a comparative perspective on the lives of women primarily in the Middle East and North Africa. It combines historical accounts with select fictional works to study women's social and cultural milieux under colonialism, as well as the evolution of women's roles in politics and society with the emergence of independent nation-states in the Middle East and North Africa. By crossing national boundaries, this course highlights the diversity of women's experiences. Active participation is critical to the success of this seminar. Every student is required to prepare a Powerpoint presentation on one week's readings. The presentation must be completed before the start of each class meeting and subsequently distributed to the members of the class. The PPT presentation should offer critical reflections on the topics discussed in the text. Rather than providing summaries, or personal commentary, students should attempt to raise questions and explain the arguments presented in the readings. In addition to the PPT presentation, students must complete a term paper (approx. 20-25 pages) by the end of the semester on a subject approved by the instructor. Students may select a primary text and discuss its relevance by drawing on the readings from the seminar. The text MUST be different from the text chosen for the PPT presentation. Required books are available for purchase at the Penn Book Center at 34th and Sansom Streets.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: GSWS 2353, NELC 2567

1 Course Unit

HIST 2400 Indigenous History of Mexico from the Aztecs to Present

This course will explore the history of indigenous peoples of Mexico from roughly 1400 to the present. Mesoamerica – the cultural region that encompassed what is today Mexico and much of Central America – in the fifteenth century saw the ascendance of the Aztec Empire in central Mexico (and beyond) and the continued independence of numerous Mayan communities. We will begin by looking at a diverse range of sources produced by the linguistically diverse people in these areas, particularly focusing on the “codices,” as the painted deer hide books that recorded history and ritual knowledge are known. Reading sources (in translation) by both European and indigenous languages (primarily Spanish, Nahuatl, and Maya), we will look at the divergent ways that Native communities and individuals responded to Spanish wars of conquest and how they responded to colonialism. The final part of the will look at the impact of Mexican independence and Revolution in the nineteenth century through the present, as well as the ongoing indigenous Mesoamerican diaspora to locales throughout the United States. In addition to written primary and secondary sources, we will consider a diverse array of visual sources – taking advantage of the spectacular holdings of the Penn museum – and contemporary cinema.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: LALS 2400

1 Course Unit

HIST 2401 Indians, Pirates, Rebels and Runaways: Unofficial Histories of the Colonial Caribbean

This seminar considers the early history of the colonial Caribbean, not from the perspective of European colonizing powers but rather from “below.” Beginning with European-indigenous contact in the fifteenth century, and ending with the massive slave revolt that became the Haitian Revolution (1791-1804), we will focus on the different ways in which indigenous, African, European and creole men and women experienced European colonization in the Caribbean, as agents, victims and resistors of imperial projects. Each week or so, we will examine the experiences of a different social group and their treatment by historians, as well as anthropologists, archaeologists, sociologists, and novelists. Along the way, we will pay special attention to the question of primary sources: how can we recover the perspectives of people who rarely left their own accounts? How can we use documents and material objects—many of which were produced by colonial officials and elites—to access the experiences of the indigenous, the enslaved, and the poor? We will have some help approaching these questions from the knowledgeable staff at the Penn Museum, the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, and the Van Pelt Library.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: AFRC 2401, GSWS 2401, LALS 2401

1 Course Unit

HIST 2402 The Haitian Revolution

In August 1791, enslaved Africans on the northern plain of Saint Domingue (colonial Haiti) rose up in a coordinated attack against their French colonial masters, launching the initial revolt in what would come to be known as the Haitian Revolution. In the years that followed, their actions forced the abolition of racial discrimination and slavery throughout the French Empire. When Napoleon Bonaparte threatened to return slavery to Saint Domingue, they waged a war for independence, declaring Haiti the world's first "Black Republic" in 1804. This seminar will examine some of the major themes and debates surrounding Haiti's colonial and revolutionary history. We will begin by considering the colonial paradox: France's leading role in the intellectual movement called the "Enlightenment" coincided with its ascent as a slaveholding colonial power. The seminar will also explore parallels and points of connection between the revolutionary movements in France and Saint Domingue: how did increasingly radical ideas in France shape events in the Caribbean? Likewise, how did west African traditions and political ideologies influence insurgents and their leaders? And how, in turn, did revolution in the Caribbean impact the revolution in France? Finally, we will ask how the Haitian Revolution influenced ideas about liberty, sovereignty and freedom throughout the Atlantic World. We will read a combination of primary and secondary materials each week. A final research paper will be required of all students.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: AFRC 2402, LALS 2402

1 Course Unit

HIST 2403 Animal,Vegetable,Mineral:Culture, Tech, & the Columbian Exchange, 1450-1750

In this course we will explore how Native American technologies shaped the early modern Atlantic World in order to understand the role of culture in what is often called the "Columbian Exchange.” Technologies, for the purpose of this course, include animal practices (such as hunting and taming techniques), foraged and domesticated plants (such as maize, potatoes, and annatto), foods (such as cassava and chocolate), drugs (such as tobacco, quinine and coca), textiles (such as hammocks and featherworks), and precious metals and gemstones (such as pearls, emeralds and gold). We will explore technologies' relationships to other aspects of art and culture, and focus particularly on how and why certain technologies - and not others - moved beyond colonial Latin America in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. We will read intensively in both primary and secondary sources.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: LALS 2403

1 Course Unit

HIST 2450 Coca and Cocaine

This seminar compares practices that center on coca leaf production in indigenous communities, where coca cultivation has been sustained over millennia, on the one hand, with practices linked to the post 1961 “drug war” in the Americas, on the other. Participants will read scholarly work in history and anthropology, support one another through a research process, and explore what historians and other scholars might contribute to discussions about drug policy. Case studies we'll explore include Peruvian Quechua-speakers' ritual use of leaf, the history of Coca-Cola, patterns of violence in Medellín and Northern Mexico, and the evolution of money laundering in 1980-2010. Students will also have the opportunity to define a topic of interest to them and prepare an in-depth literature review.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: LALS 2450

1 Course Unit

HIST 2500 History of Private Life in China

Underneath the grandeur of empires, war, revolutions, history eventually is about people’s life. This seminar explores how the boundaries of private life in China intersect with the public arena and how such an intersection has significantly re-shaped Chinese private life between the 16th century and the present. The first half of the seminar will explore how the private realm in late imperial China was defined and construed by Confucian discourses, architectural design, moral regulation, cultural consumption, and social network. Moving into the twentieth century, the remaining part of the seminar will examine how the advent of novel concepts such as modernity and revolution restructured the private realm, particularly in regard to the subtopics outlined above. Organizing questions include: How did female chastity become the center of a public cult which then changed the life paths of countless families? How did the practice of female foot-binding intersect with marriage choices, household economy, and social status? How did print culture create a new space for gentry women to negotiate the boundaries between their inner quarters and the outside world? What was the ideal and reality of married life in late imperial China? How did people’s life change when the collective pursuit for Chinese modernity placed romantic love, freedom to marry and divorce at the center of public debates? How was “Shanghai modern” related to the emerging middle class life style as evidenced in advertisement posters? How has the ideal of gender equality been re-interpreted and realized under the Communist regime? How have the current market reforms reformulated the contours of private life in China?

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: EALC 2721, GSWS 2500

1 Course Unit

HIST 2501 Cities in Chinese History

This seminar will study the development of Chinese cities over the past two millennia with respect to their spatial structure, social constitution, economic system, political functions, and cultural representation (including cityscape paintings, maps, and films).As China transitioned from a collection of city-states to a united empire to nation state, Chinese urbanism underwent transformations as drastic as those of the country itself. Cities, which serve as a critical mechanism for the operation of a vast agrarian empire/nation like China , offer a unique vantage point for us to observe and analyze the continuities and discontinuities between dynastic empires as well as the radical transition from empire to modern nation state. Topics include: the city-state system in ancient China; the creation and evolution of imperial capitals; the medieval urban revolution and the subsequent collapse of classic city plans; the development of urban public sphere/public space in late imperial China; the rise of commercial power in urban politics; the negotiation of urban class and gender relations via cultural consumption; the role of cities in the building of a modern Chinese nation state; the anti-city experiment under the communist regime; urban citizenship in the reform era; as well as the expanding urbanization and shifting urbanism of Greater China as reflected in cinematic representations of Shanghai, Hongkong, and Taipei.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: EALC 2722, URBS 2501

1 Course Unit

HIST 2551 History of Hong Kong

Hong Kong is almost explosively alive today, as Professor Waldron discovered on a recent trip to prepare for this course. From 1842-1997 the British Colony was a sleepy city having a mostly transient population until 1945; then she swelled with refugees after 1950 to become a rapidly growing economy now richer than Britain. In 1997 she was turned over to China under the “one country two systems” motto. Since then, however, relations with China have proven increasingly fraught. The legislative election of autumn 2016 saw the pro-China candidates crushed in a massive vote that returned a number of young people (Hong Kong politics are generational) to the Legislature who explicitly favor the independence of the city from China—the worst of heresies from Beijing’s point of view. Nearly all favor democracy and real law—also anathema to Beijing. As the course is being taught, a new Chief Executive election will be going on. Hong Kong is not simply a fascinating city. She is also a window of sorts into China and her politics.. We will read everything from colonial accounts to campaign leaflets, examining the situation in three dimensions, integrated with China and the region. Seminar meets T 1:30-4:30; readings, discussion, and a short paper on a topic of your choice.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: EALC 2732

1 Course Unit

HIST 2600 Witches, Whores and Rogues

What should we make of the disorderly people of the past? Were they acting out their dissent against powerful customs and institutions in their lives? Or were they the victims of those customs and institutions? In this course, we consider the lives of these disorderly people: the witches, prostitutes, criminals, escaped servants and slaves, criminals, cross dressers, and rowdies of early modern Europe and the Americas. The course will focus on several case studies featuring people considered to be troublemakers, or at the very least, non-conformist, by their contemporaries. We will use films, primary sources, book-length studies, and works of theory to develop our analyses of the problem of dissent, disorder, and resistance in the early modern past

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: GSWS 2600

1 Course Unit

HIST 2605 The Jewish Book from Scroll to Screen

Through much of their history, Jews have been known as a “people of the book” and have, often, prided themselves on such an association. The very definition of a book, what books contained, and who might use them are not so easy to define, and their study opens up new ways to think about the Jewish past. Books are perhaps the most important way people share ideas and change minds. But they are also commercial goods, collectors’ items, community memories, and cherished heirlooms. This course offers a cultural history of communication and knowledge in Jewish experience through an exploration of the history of the book. It will use primary sources, scholarly articles, and hands-on encounters with books in different shapes and sizes to explore the way people of the past engaged with books both texts and material objects. It will also offer examples of new methods in the study of the book drawn from the digital humanities. Tracing changing conceptions and uses of the book from the ancient world until the present, we will consider the way that books have shaped religion, caused upheaval, and changed over time, even to face their possible obsolescence in our own age.

Also Offered As: JWST 2605

1 Course Unit

HIST 2700 Utopia

Western thinkers from the ancient Greeks to the present have speculated about what the ideal human society would look like. We can study the resultant utopias as works of literature, philosophy, religion, psychology or political science; we must understand them in their historical contexts. This seminar will take a multidisciplinary approach to utopian thought from Plato's Republic to the ecological utopias of the 1980s. Works to be examined include More's Utopia; seventeenth century scientific utopias like Bacon's New Atlantis; the political theory of Rousseau (Social Contract); essays of the French utopian socialists and Hawthorne's version of the Brook Farm experiment; Morris' News from Nowhere; its American counterpart, Bellamy's Looking Backward; Gilman's feminist blueprint, Herland; BF Skinner's psychological utopia, Walden Two; and the utopian science fiction of LeGuin. Huxley's dystopia, Brave New World, will be set against his later utopia, Island.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 2701 Travel, Trade and War in the Modern Mediterranean

The Mediterranean Sea links together many societies, cultures, cuisines, and economies. Long after the Roman Empire and the Italian Renaissance, the Middle Sea continued to function as a cohesive geographic and cultural space. Contacts and conflicts in the Mediterranean shed light on the major themes of modern history: relations between East and West, encounters among Christians, Muslims, and Jews, brutal wars of imperial expansion, economic migration, catastrophic epidemic disease, and the birth of a globalized economy. We’ll read travel narratives by French scholars who helped Napoleon invade Egypt, and we’ll investigate how the Egyptians responded. We’ll study how Mediterranean nationalism began the First World War. We’ll look at the first massive Mediterranean migrant crises and compare them with the news we’re hearing today. Studying trade, travel, and war in the modern Mediterranean will provide students with a unique lens on European, Middle Eastern, North African, and Global history. **Students can get credit for the Europe or Africa/Middle East requirement depending upon their research paper topic.**

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 2702 How to Rule an Empire: Intro to European and American Imperialism

Over the last five centuries, European and American powers developed changing strategies of empire designed to order societies at home and overseas. The practice of empire spurred worldwide debates that continue today: how did imperialism operate, what purposes did it serve, could it come to an end, and what might replace it? Over the course of two hundred years, these questions inspired some of the world’s great historical writing, and this seminar introduces students to a sample of it. Together we’ll explore varied forms of political, economic, military, and cultural power involved in imperial expansion; the experience and consequences of empire for both colonized and colonizer; and the emergence of anti-imperialist movements. We will read an average of 150 pages per week. No background is required. The books we’ll read reward slow, careful reading. What you learn in this class, and the quality of our experience together, depends on your reading closely, coming to class with informed questions, and being prepared to help your classmates answer theirs. Active, informed class participation will account for forty percent of your grade.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 2703 Decades of Extremes: Protectionism, Fascism, Imperialism, 1917-1945

The rise of Fascism in Italy, the Russian Revolution, anti-colonial struggles in India, the New Deal in the United States, the Spanish Civil War, and the emergence of populist Juan Perón in Argentina. These events – as distinct as they are – all responded to the crisis of the global economy following World War I. These were decades of ideological extremes: liberal democracy pitted against fascism, socialism versus capitalism, imperialist expansion in some parts of the world and struggles for self-determination in others. What did the world look like in 1917, and why did it give rise to such revolutionary politics? This course studies the ideological conflicts and economic crises of the interwar decades (1917-1945) through firsthand accounts produced by intellectuals, economists, dictators, and ordinary citizens. We will read from the 1917 Soviet Constitution, George Orwell’s personal account of the Spanish Civil War, and Mussolini’s writings to understand the revolutionary visions at stake. We will debate alongside John M. Keynes and Friedrich Hayek to engage one of the driving questions to arise in these years: what is the role of the state in economic life? We explore the policy experimentation that arose in response to this crippling economic situation, from the New Deal in the United States to the rise of populism in Latin America. Finally, we consider how these interwar struggles explain the outbreak of World War II, an extreme experience of totalitarianism, destruction, and genocide. The key concepts we explore – fascism, imperialism, protectionism, capitalism, socialism, authoritarianism, liberalism – are of enduring relevance. What lessons – if any – can we learn from these interwar decades of extremes?

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 2705 Wars and Postwars

This course focuses on the study and analysis of the political and social challenges posed in, and faced by, post-war societies in the modern period, 1800-1950. Casting a large net from the early nineteenth century to the twentieth century it looks at the process of rebuilding after wars, both international and civil wars. The course will be organized thematically – Conducting War; Reconstructions; Vengeance and Justice; Public Memory. Cases will include the Napoleonic Wars, the American Civil War, the Spanish Civil War, and WWII, with references to other conflicts in various world regions.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 2706 Wastes of War: A Century of Destruction

This seminar examines the human and environmental consequences of violent conflict from the South African War at the beginning of the 20th century to the War on Terror. War violently transforms the social and physical environment. War reshuffles ideologies, reimagines futures and reshapes alliances, destroys bodies, spaces, societies, habitats, ecosystems and cultures. And of course, there’s no war that doesn’t produce a whole host of wastes, and as a result, inspires a multitude of strategies to combat and eradicate them. In this course, we approach war as an engine of destruction and transformation rather than as politics gone awry. The wastes of war will serve as our focal point as we study the new worlds (technological, social and environmental) that war not merely leaves in its wake but systematically generates. Critically examining two key categories – “waste” and “war” in tandem, we discover how together they fundamentally restructure our social, cultural and natural worlds in unexpected ways.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 2707 Extreme Heat: White Nationalism in the Age of Climate Change

The Amazon is burning. The glaciers are melting. Heat waves, hurricanes, earthquakes, floods, wildfires, and droughts devastate ever larger swaths of the earth, producing crop failures, air pollution, soil erosion, famine and terrifying individual hardship. At the same, time the so-called Western World is literally walling itself off from the millions who are fleeing from disaster and war with what little they can carry. White militants chant "blood and soil" and "Jews will not replace us," social media spreads memes and talking points about "white genocide" and "white replacement" and online ideologues fantasize about building white ethnostates. Are these developments connected? Is there a causal relationship? Or are these conditions purely coincidental? Increasingly, arguments about limits to growth, sustainability, development and climate change have come to stand in competitive tension with arguments for social and racial equality. Why is that case? What are the claims and underlying anxieties that polarize western societies? How do white nationalist movements relate to populist and fascist movements in the first half of the 20th century? What is new and different about them now? What is the relationship between environmentalism, rightwing populism and the climate crisis? And how have societies responded to the climate crisis, wealth inequality, finite resources and the threat posed by self-radicalizing white nationalist groups?

Also Offered As: ENVS 2440

1 Course Unit

HIST 2708 War and the Arts

War, it is often forgotten, is powerfully reflected in the arts. This highly flexible student-driven seminar will examine the phenomenon. Each student will choose a topic and materials for us all to examine and then discuss after an interval of 1-2 weeks. With benefit of discussion they will write a paper 10pp maximum, summing up topic and reactions, as we seek broader understanding. The material is very rich. Goya (1746-1829) Picasso ( 1881-1973) both dealt with war in ways that scholars have examined, as did John Singer Sargent (1856-1925) whose immense canvas “gassed” (1919) not yet received monographic treatment. Of musicians, Shostakovich (1906-1975) is very promising; sculptor and artist Käthe Kollwitz (1867-1945) is of an inexpressible profundity that takes us to issues of mourning. Novels of Zola (1840-1902) and Proust (1871-1922) are great literature that deals in places with military issues. Students are of course strongly encouraged to choose their own topics. We will begin with several weeks on Vietnam, our understanding of which has been completely transformed by the pivotally important work of Lien-Hang Thuy Nguyen, Penn Grad and Professor at Columbia, who may join us. For the first two classes we should read a short play, “The Columnist” by David Auburn, about Joseph Alsop (1910-1989) a highly influential writer of the Vietnam era, and relative of the professor. That should get things started. Then dig into “The Centurions” (1960) by Jean Laterguy (1920-2011) an absorbing novel.

1 Course Unit

HIST 3150 Wartime Internment of Japanese-Americans

This research seminar will consist of a review of representative studies on the Japanese American internment, and a discussion of how social scientists and historians have attempted to explain its complex backgrounds and causes. Through the careful reading of academic works, primary source materials, and visualized narratives (film productions), students will learn the basic historiography of internment studies, research methodologies, and the politics of interpretation pertaining to this particular historical subject. Students will also examine how Japanese Americans and others have attempted to reclaim a history of the wartime internment from the realm of “detached” academia in the interest of their lives in the “real” world, and for a goal of “social justice” in general. The class will critically probe the political use of history and memories of selected pasts in both Asian American community and contemporary American society through the controversial issue of the Japanese American internment.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: ASAM 2100

1 Course Unit

HIST 3151 The Civil Rights Movement

This course traces the history of the Civil Rights Movement from its earliest stirrings in the 1st half of the twentieth-century to the boycotts, sit-ins, school desegregation struggles, freedom rides and marches of the 1950s and 1960s, and beyond. Among the question we will consider are: What inspired the Civil Rights movement, when does it begin and end, and how did it change American life? Readings will include both historical works and first-hand accounts of the movement by participants.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: AFRC 3151

1 Course Unit

HIST 3152 Law and Social Change

This is a course in the history of law and social change. Discussion of assigned readings and papers will focus on the role law, lawyers, judges, other public officials and policy advocates and social movements and networks have played in proposing solutions to specific problems. The course will focus on evaluating the importance or lack thereof of historical perspective and legal expertise in making social change. Assigned readings will be discussed in class. Each student will submit a paper based on primary and secondary material on a topic of her choosing within the overall subject matter of the course. Paper drafts will be discussed in class. The Final Paper is due at the beginning of the final examination period.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: AFRC 3152

1 Course Unit

HIST 3153 American Feminist and LGBT Movements, 1960s-1980s

This seminar explores the history of the feminist and LGBT movements from the mid-1960s to mid-1980s in Philadelphia. Although there will be some attention to national organizations, we will focus on social and political activism as it was made in local groups and spaces. We will explore the social and cultural web that fostered activism, for example, in gay and lesbian coffee houses, campus women's centers, bookstores, and radio shows. We will also pay attention to groups and actions that may not have been self-consciously defined as "feminist" or "gay liberationist," but had important effects on social change related to gender and sexuality; these include African American, Latino/a, and working-class organizations. This is a hands-on research seminar, with students exploring local archives and special collections to document and analyze these complex movements. Each student will conduct an oral history, analyze a set of published and printed sources, and write a paper based on archival research.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: GSWS 3153

1 Course Unit

HIST 3154 Performing History

This seminar concentrates on the ways that various peoples in the world make their history by means other than relying on written texts alone. Over the course of the semester, we therefore may be examining such different public events and civic rituals as parades, political and religious processions, local historical pageants, carnivals, historic preservation, museums, military reenactments, and history theme parks. The emphasis in each of these forms, places, and semiotic processes will be on their identity and function as key performances that transform consciousness, shift individuals alternately into both actors and spectators, reframe the everyday as the metaphysical, and intensify the status of cultural values in the histories they present to view. Course requirements: a seminar paper, the topic of which you will discuss with me no later than week five of the course; and a working annotated bibliography and statement of your paper's main thesis. I will say more about these assignments as they approach.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: ANTH 2154, ARTH 3790

1 Course Unit

HIST 3155 Fake News and American Democracy

At separate moments, Thomas Jefferson famously declared both that newspapers were crucial to sustain a nation and that a person who never looked at a newspaper was better informed than a regular reader of the press. The ideal of an informed citizenry occupies a central spot in our understanding of the democratic project in the United States, and, consequently, the news and the news media play a vital role. But the news may also be a means to manipulate and distort, not simply inform. As Americans on both the Left and Right wonder today, what happens to our democratic prospects when public information and the media are unreliable? In this class we will consider the history of fake news in the United States and its implications for democracy and citizenship. We will dig into an array of episodes – from the Jefferson-Hamilton debates in the press to battles over what could be printed about slavery; from McCarthyism to the ways in which different racial and ethnic groups often engaged with different accounts of the news. We will examine in depth the moment of a global rise in fascism and America’s best-known news hoax, the “War of the Worlds” radio program. Throughout, we will explore the importance of the different media that conveyed news in the past – and think about what that means for us in the present moment as news travels through new channels.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 3156 Liberalism in the 20th Century

At a moment when American liberalism is embattled and in a profound state of flux, this research seminar explores the development of the political ideology of the Democratic Party since its first modern articulation in Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal. In addition to examining key moments of reform, expansion, and reimagining through the Cold War, Lyndon Johnson’s Great Society, and under Bill Clinton’s New Democrats, students will explore the ways in which liberals and liberalism have both succeeded and often failed to meaningfully incorporate the interests of a diverse array of Americans including women, organized labor, African Americans, immigrants, rural constituencies, immigrants, and LGBTQ citizens. Over the course of the semester, students will develop a significant piece of original, primary source-based, historical research on a theme of their choosing within the modern history of liberalism, broadly construed.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 3158 ¡Huelga! The Farmworker Movement in the United States

This intensive research seminar invites students to explore the history of farmworkers in the United States during the twentieth century. Research will primarily but not necessarily exclusively focus on the west coast, a region in which many archival sources have been digitized. Students may explore a wide variety of topics, including but not limited to: farmworker unions; the relationship between farmworker mobilizations and other movements in the US and abroad; the experiences of workers from the Philippines and Latin America and the role of US imperial and immigration policies in the lives of farmworkers; farmworkers' confrontations with and participation in systems of racism; the Great Depression in rural communities; the history of gender and family in farmworker communities; the history of environment and health; struggles over citizenship and social rights; counter-mobilizations of growers and the right; religion in farmworker communities; legislative and legal strategies to obtain rights denied agricultural workers in federal law; artistic, musical, and cultural production; or the relationship between consumers and the workers who produced their food.

Also Offered As: LALS 3158

1 Course Unit

HIST 3173 Penn Slavery Project Research Seminar

This research seminar provides students with instruction in basic historical methods and an opportunity to conduct collaborative primary source research into the University of Pennsylvania's historic connections to slavery. After an initial orientation to archival research, students will plunge in to doing actual research at the Kislak Center, the University Archives, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, the American Philosophical Society, the Library Company, and various online sources. During the final month of the semester, students will begin drafting research reports and preparing for a public presentation of the work. During the semester, there will be opportunities to collaborate with a certified genealogist, a data management and website expert, a consultant on public programming, and a Penn graduate whose research has been integral to the Penn Slavery Project.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: AFRC 3173

1 Course Unit

HIST 3200 War and Conquest in Medieval Europe

This course will focus on wars of conquest in the medieval period. The code of chivalry demanded that knights not only display great prowess in battle, but also adhere to Christian virtue. How did these square in practice? What constitutes acceptable violence and military intervention? We will seek to understand the medieval mentality of warfare in order to think about the place of war in society, how war was justified, why war was fought, and how it was fought. War, however, cannot be separated from its goals. We will thus go beyond the battlefield to look at how conquest of territories was cemented with the establishment and enforcement of a new order. Themes will include the rise of knighthood, ideas of just war, crusade, laws of war, territorial control and colonization. The course will also include two fabulous field trips to visit Penn’s manuscript collection and the arms and armor collection at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 3201 Capitalism and Charity: The Long, Complicated Connection

Capitalism and charity seldom appear in the same sentence, much less the same title. They seem diametrically opposed. While capitalism is commonly understood as “an economic system based on the private ownership of the means of production and their operation for profit”, according to Merriam-Webster, charity refers to “generosity and helpfulness especially toward the needy or suffering, also aid given to those in need”. The former implies self-interest, while the other breathes common interest. Yet, the two are closely, dynamically connected. As capitalism has emerged and evolved historically, so has charity changed to meet new circumstances and find new legitimations. From simple charity in the form of indiscriminate alms-giving have emerged “poor relief”, “work relief”, “social welfare” and, more recently “effective altruism” to name but a few permutations. Charity as a personal, face-to-face interaction between rich and poor has become cloaked in varieties of impersonal programs and institutions. This research seminar will explore the tensions (and synergies) between capitalism and charity over time. Through readings and discussions of primary sources, students will come to understand something of this historical dynamic. By completing independent research projects, they will contribute to that understanding as well.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 3250 Great War in Memoir and Memory

World War One was the primordial catastrophe of twentieth-century history. For all who passed through it, the Great War was transformative, presenting a profound rupture in personal experience. It was a war that unleashed an unprecedented outpouring of memoirs and poetic and fictional accounts written by participants. In its wake, it also produced new forms of public commemoration and memorialization – tombs to the unknown soldier, great monuments, soldiers’ cemeteries, solemn days of remembrance, and the like. On the centenary of World War One’s outbreak, this course will explore the war through the intersection of these processes of personal and public memory. The first ten weeks will be devoted to shared readings on these themes. In the remaining weeks, students will pursue independent research projects investigating the literature of the Great War or aspects of public or private commemoration. Please note: This is not a seminar in military or diplomatic history, but rather an exploration of personal experiences of the War, representations of experience, and the cultural and political dimensions of memory.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 3251 Modern Spain: Civil War and Postwar, 1930-1970

This RESEARCH SEMINAR is divided into three parts. Part I centers on the Spanish CIVIL WAR, 1930-1939. The beginnings of the conflict, the main causes and motivations, the debates in the international arena, the main events and ideologies, some of the main characters, personal experiences (men and women) during the war, violence and repression. Part II focuses on the consequences of the Civil War (1939-1970), both from internal and international perspectives - the constitution of the Francoist regime and its internal politics; the repression of political dissidence; the situation of the Francoist regime during WWII and during the Cold War, how political and cultural dissidence started under Franco's regime, the social history of Spain, and the construction of the historical memory of the Civil War. Part III, Research and Writing: this course is designed to model the research and writing process professional historians use, beginning with a paper proposal and bibliography of primary documents and secondary sources. It then proceeds through the various stages of the research process to produce drafts of the essay and finally the finished essay. All written work is for peer review.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: LALS 3251

1 Course Unit

HIST 3252 Marx, Nietzsche, Freud: Masters of Suspicion

In his influential book Freud & Philosophy, the French philosopher Paul Ricoeur identified three master thinkers whose influence on the twentieth century was inestimable.  What these figures shared was what Ricoeur called a “hermeneutics of suspicion”; that is, in their different ways, each developed a style of interpretation aimed at unmasking, demystifying, and exposing the real from the apparent.  “Three masters, seemingly mutually exclusive, dominate the school of suspicion: Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud.” Taking its inspiration from Ricoeur, this seminar will explore some of the key writings of Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud.  We will encounter the hermeneutics of suspicion above all in these authors’ attempts to unmask religion and reveal its true origin and function.  And we shall also pursue the hermeneutics of suspicion in the specific concerns that form the core of each thinker’s work: Marx’s critique of capitalism, Nietzsche’s genealogy of Judaeo-Christian morality, skepticism about ‘truth’, and proto-deconstruction of the human self, and Freud’s theory of the unconscious.  The final weeks of the course will be devoted to independent research and writing of an original essay in intellectual history.

Also Offered As: COML 3252

1 Course Unit

HIST 3350 Religion and Colonial Rule in Africa

This course is designed to introduce students to the religious experiences of Africans and to the politics of culture. We will examine how traditional African religious ideas and practices interacted with Christianity and Islam. We will look specifically at religious expressions among the Yoruba, Southern African independent churches and millenarist movements, and the variety of Muslim organizations that developed during the colonial era. The purpose of this course is threefold. First, to develop in students an awareness of the wide range of meanings of conversion and people's motives in creating and adhering to religious institutions; Second, to examine the political, cultural, and psychological dimensions in the expansion of religious social movements; And third, to investigate the role of religion as counterculture and instrument of resistance to European hegemony. Topics include: Mau Mau and Maji Maji movements in Kenya and Tanzania, Chimurenga in Mozambique, Watchtower churches in Southern Africa, anti-colonial Jihads in Sudan and Somalia and mystical Muslim orders in Senegal.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: AFRC 3350

1 Course Unit

HIST 3351 Africa and the Mid-East

This seminar will explore the historical relationship between these two regions from the early modern age to the present. We will examine the history of trade, particularly the slave trade, and its cultural and political legacy. We will compare the experiences of European imperialism--how the scramble for Africa dovetailed with the last decades of the Ottoman Empire--with an eye to how this shaped nationalist movements in both regions. The course will also explore the decades of independence with a special eye towards pan-Africanism and pan-Arabism. We will also study the ramifications of the Arab-Israeli conflict on the relationship between African and Middle-Eastern countries, from Uganda to Ethiopia, from OPEC to Darfur. The course will pay close attention to migrations through the regions, whether forced or economic or religious. Whenever possible we will explore, through film and literature, how people in Africa and the Middle East see their connections, and their differences.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: AFRC 3351, NELC 3550

1 Course Unit

HIST 3500 Women and the Making of Modern South Asia

This course on women in South Asian history has four objectives - 1. To acquaint ourselves with the historiography on South Asian women. 2. To gain an understanding of evolving institutions and practices shaping women's lives, such as the family, law and religious traditions. 3. To understand the impact of historical processes - the formation and breakdown of empire, colonialism, nationalism and decolonization - upon South Asian women between the sixteenth and twentieth centuries. 4. To become familiar with some of the significant texts written about and by women in this period. We will read a wide variety of primary sources including a Mughal princess' account, devotional verse authored by women, conduct books, tracts, autobiographies and novels.

Spring

Also Offered As: GSWS 2601, SAST 2260

1 Course Unit

HIST 3550 Chinese Foreign Policy

An examination of China’s policies since 1950 not so much in general terms, but rather by looking at policies toward specific countries, such as Korea 1950-53, Taiwan 1958, India 1962, Japan 1963, USSR 1969, US recognition 1971-79 and failure of Kissinger policies. Vietnam both wars: i.e. we cover the ongoing conflict that began in 1979 as well as the war that ended in 1975, toward Cambodia, and not least the South China Sea and the whole world today. We will also examine China’s immense military build up (for what purpose?) the concept that China is rising, the US declining, and Beijing is foreordained lord of the East. The goal is to start from empirical information then build some sense of whether policy has continuity, common features etc. or not, and to what extent it is domestically driven or not. Lots of political background but little theory or grand generalization. A serious research paper will be required.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: EALC 1733

1 Course Unit

HIST 3551 Pacific World

Following ongoing attempts by historians to move beyond the confines of national and imperial histories, this research seminar highlights the interaction of peoples and cultures across what may be described as the most dynamic world region of the twenty-first century. While discussions of Mediterranean, Atlantic and Indian Ocean Worlds are now commonplace, scholars have, to date, paid less attention to the idea of a Pacific World. How useful is it to identify a “Pacific World” before and after the Age of Discovery—that is, to locate distinctive patterns of human, material and cultural exchange across the Pacific before and after the flood of European power from the fifteenth century? What has been the effect of the rise of the nation-state, modern empires, modern war and globalization? How critical are national and/or imperial legacies to enduring patterns of human interaction and exchange in the twenty-first century Pacific? As global economics, politics and culture increasingly tilt toward the Pacific, we will attempt to uncover the source of the region’s extraordinary energy.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: EALC 1792

1 Course Unit

HIST 3552 Constitutionalism and Democracy in China: 1900-present

Research on constitutional thought in China from the late Qing to the present, as well as the political and practical aspects of attempts at implementation. A presentation and a research paper of moderate length are expected. Chinese language is not necessary, though if you have it, that will be useful.

Also Offered As: EALC 3532

1 Course Unit

HIST 3600 Human Rights in the Age of Revolutions

This seminar is designed as both as an introduction to the question of the origins of the idea of human rights and as an opportunity to develop a sustained research project related to the Age of Revolutions in Europe, the Americas (North or South), or Caribbean, mid-18th century to 1848. Topics to be discussed include: the relationship and tension in Enlightenment thought between equality and liberty, the idea of “the rights of man” and its exclusions, the emergence of abolitionism in the context of slave societies, the roots of feminism, the problem of the poor and the question of social and economic rights, rights and national self-determination, and left- and right-wing critiques of rights language. Primary source readings will range from the Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen, to 18th-century slave codes, to the writings of Mary Wollstonecraft and Jeremy Bentham. Secondary source readings will introduce students to interpretative problems in thinking about human rights in the context of the American, French, Haitian, and Latin American revolutions. Throughout the seminar, emphasis will also be placed on the development of a historical research project, including framing a question, building a bibliography, analyzing various kinds of sources, constructing an effective outline, and writing an argument-driven and well substantiated seminar paper. **Note for History Majors and Minors: if your research paper addresses a Latin American/Caribbean or US topic, then you may use this course to fulfill that particular geographic requirement.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 3601 The Horse in World History

Around 8000 years ago, communities in the western part of the Eurasian steppe began to breed and ride horses. This process of domestication made horses central participants in human history. The domestication of the horse transformed military tactics, human mobility and communication, agriculture, and entertainment. Humans have transformed the horse as well, producing about 200 breeds with unique characteristics matched to human goals. This course traces the history of equine-human relations across the globe, using the horse as a focal point to think about animal-human relations in societies ranging from prehistoric Europe to the Spanish conquests of Latin America. Our inquiry will address not only the place of horses in these particular phases of world history, but also by extension the debates about human-animal relations in our society today. The Major or Minor geographic requirement fulfilled by this course will be determined by an individual student’s research paper topic.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 3602 The Mediterranean and the World, 1450-1700

Using as our guides the works of Miguel de Cervantes, Michael de Montaigne, William Shakespeare, Baldassare Castiglione, Antonio de Sosa, Elias al-Musili, Ogier Ghiselin de Busbecq, Aḥmad ibn Qāsim Ibn al-Ḥajarī, Maria de Zayas y Sotomayor, and many others, this seminar will analyze the social mutations, religious confrontations, political conflicts, cultural productions and circulation of books and ideas that characterized the Mediterranean world during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Based on a close reading of the authors mentioned above, this seminar will focus on the study of the central transformations – political, religious, cultural, and literary – in the early modern Mediterranean world. Students will also be introduced to original materials belonging to the Rare Books and Manuscripts Collections of the Library: early modern editions of some of the books read in the class, printed ephemera, or manuscript documents belonging to the Lea Collection. Students are expected to be active participants in this class; class attendance, participation, and oral presentations will be required. Students will write a final paper, around 15 pages. Students majoring in History can opt to write a research paper (20 pages) using original primary sources, to fulfill the department research requirement.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: ENGL 2179

1 Course Unit

HIST 3700 Abolitionism: A Global History

This class develops a transnational and global approach to the rise of abolitionism in the nineteenth century. In a comparative framework, the class traces the rise of abolitionism in Europe, the Americas, Africa, and Asia, examining the suppression of the transatlantic slave trade, the rise of colonialism in Africa, and the growth of forced labor in the wake of transatlantic slave trade. We will deal with key debates in the literature of African, Atlantic and Global histories, including the causes and motivations of abolitionism, the relationship between the suppression of the slave trade and the growth of forced labor in Africa, the historical ties between abolitionism and the early stages of colonialism in Africa, the flow of indentured laborers from Asia to the Americas in the wake of the slave trade. This class is primarily geared towards the production of a research paper. *Depending on the research paper topic, History Majors and Minors can use this course to fulfill the US, Europe, Latin America or Africa requirement.*

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: AFRC 3700, LALS 3700

1 Course Unit

HIST 3701 Capitalism and Humanitarianism

Reviewing David Brion Davis’ Problem of Slavery in Western Culture for the New York Review of Books in 1967, the great ancient historian Moses Finley concluded that Davis’s book was “one of the most important to have been published on the subject of slavery in modern times.” Yet he found the book inconclusive on the “decisive question” of why slavery was finally abolished in the West. “Nothing is more difficult perhaps than to explain how and why, or why not, a new moral perception becomes effective in action,” Finley wrote. Almost 50 years after this statement was made, the complicated processes that are being played out at the heart of capitalism, mobilizing both ethical issues and the pursuit of profit are still imperfectly understood, yet more fascinating than ever. This course’s working hypothesis is that, from a better understanding of the entanglements of capitalism and humanitarianism a better understanding of the nature of the “material civilization” can be achieved. For this purpose, the course does provide a multi-pronged approach including sessions discussing analytical arguments about the reasons for the entanglements of capitalism and humanitarianism, sessions devoted to historical turning points and sessions devoted to case studies and the exploration of specific mechanisms whereby capitalism and humanitarianism connect with one another. I wish in particular to try and make students aware of the problem of “quality” and its social construction, which is found at the heart of both capitalism and humanitarianism. By awakening them to this question, I also hope to provide an engaging way to understand the importance of economics in cultural history. Last, while the course will make verbal references to work on more recent periods, the focus is on a time frame that ends with World War I. This seems warranted given that the purpose is to unpack the entanglements of finance and humanitarianism “as they got intertwined.” Nota Bene, some a few non-mandatory readings in French.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 3702 Feminism in the Americas

Students in this seminar will choose their own research topic in the history of feminism. With guidance and support each person will produce a twenty-page paper based on intensive work with primary sources. Readings will range across Latin America, the Caribbean, and the United States. We’ll take a long view, beginning in the sixteenth century, and use an expansive frame. Our purpose will not be to decide who was or wasn’t ‘a feminist’ but instead to try to understand actors within their contexts. Readings include scholarship on Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, Sojourner Truth, the struggle for voting rights across national lines, opposition to dictatorship, and organizing against racism and homophobia. *For History Majors and Minors: Geographic requirement fulfilled by this seminar is dependent on research paper topic.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: GSWS 3702, LALS 3702

1 Course Unit

HIST 3703 Taking Off: How Some Economies Get Rich

What makes an economy grow? This question has been asked – and answered – many times over in the modern era. From Adam Smith’s classic Wealth of Nations (1776) to today’s political leaders, many have debated the ingredients necessary for a nation to prosper, or policies to promote growth. Some point to the need for fiscal responsibility, others an educated labor force, or to tariffs, natural resources, and the right laws. This seminar explores the deep history of this problem of economic growth. Students will read works by economists, social scientists, and historians that present different theories for why some nations develop faster than others. With case studies from across the globe, we will tackle topics like why Europe industrialized first, or the paradox of why the abundance of natural resources does not necessarily contribute to long-lasting economic development. This course also asks students to think critically about the metrics used to measure “success” and “failure” across nations, as well as how such comparisons between societies have been mobilized to legitimize imperial expansion, human exploitation, environmental destruction, or political repression. By discussing how governments, corporate interests, and individual actors have implemented strategies to increase national wealth, students will also be asked to grapple with some of the consequences of economic growth for the environment, human welfare, and social inequality. *Students may fulfill one geographic requirement for the History major or minor with this course. The specific requirement fulfilled will be determined by the topic of the research paper.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: LALS 3703

1 Course Unit

HIST 3704 Re-reading the Holocaust

This course explores how the Holocaust has been constructed as an historical event. Beginning in the mid-1940s, with the first attempts to narrate what had transpired during the Nazi era, this seminar traces the ways that the Holocaust became codified as a distinct episode in history. Taking a chronological approach, the course follows the evolution of historical and popular ideas about the Holocaust and considers the different perspectives presented by a variety of sources. We will examine documentary films, memoirs, survivor testimonies, as well as other scholarly and popular representations of the Holocaust. Students will be introduced to unfamiliar sources and also asked to reconsider some well-known Holocaust documents and institutions.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: JWST 3704

1 Course Unit

HIST 3705 Jews and the City

Jews have always been an extraordinarily urban people. This seminar explores various aspects of the Jewish encounter with the city, examining the ways that Jewish culture has been shaped by and has helped to shape urban culture. We will examine European and American cities as well as some in Palestine/Israel, covering an expansive view of urban culture. We will consider Jewish involvement in political and cultural life, the various neighborhoods in which Jews have lived, relations with other ethnic groups, as well as many other topics. We will read some classic works in the field along with contemporary scholarship. No prior background in Jewish history is required. *This course may be applied toward the US, European, or Middle East requirements for the History Major or Minor, depending upon the research paper topic. Students must consult with the instructor to determine which geographic requirement will be fulfilled.*

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: JWST 3705, URBS 3705

1 Course Unit

HIST 3706 Oral History

From wax cylinders to reel-to-reel to digital video, recording technologies expanded the historical profession dramatically during the twentieth century. We will read some classics, such as Barbara Myerhoff’s Number Our Days and Alessandro Portelli’s Death of Luigi Trastulli, as well as scholarly pieces aimed at working historians. This course centers on methodology—students will learn about ‘best practices’ in the field and will work toward creating an interview record that can be housed in an archive and accessed by other researchers. All students will use digital video and will practice creating accessible links to both video and audio material, although your interviewees may choose an audio format.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: LALS 3706

1 Course Unit

HIST 3707 The Vietnam War

The Vietnam war was a great watershed in twentieth century history that rearranged geo-politics while changing the United States through dissent and social unrest. Frankly, things have never quite recovered. It was a catastrophic and humiliating defeat, but that is all the more reason to study it, for failure often has more to teach us than success. This course provides a framework of free discussion and basic readings—ranging from battlefield memoirs to Graham Greene’s great novel The Quiet American—in which to pursue research on whatever aspect of the war they choose, from strategy to cinema and the arts. We will start with a look at the Empire of Vietnam that lasted a millennium, producing a uniquely refined and pure culture. Then we turn to the century of French colonialism and its end in 1954, which was followed by an invasion of South Vietnam from the north, through Laos. American policy was both arrogant and uninformed, converting a protracted loss (1955-1975) into what could easily have been a relatively bloodless success. That process we trace in its many strands. Finally we spend some time on contemporary Vietnam, on how the war is now understood, remembered, and memorialized, as well as how the country seeks to advance. And not least, without removing our focus from Vietnam, we assess how the United States has been changed. For every Tuesday meeting we will have some reading, to provide a common time line and set of issues. As the semester progresses, students will make informal presentations about their work. This is a “Research Seminar” which means a 15-20 page paper on a topic you choose yourself. This can be the most enjoyable and interesting part of the course.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: EALC 1791

1 Course Unit

HIST 3708 History of Truth

Truth has become a controversial topic lately. This course will take a historical look at truth and its opposites, including lies and false beliefs, in the history of the West from the Renaissance to the present. We will consider changing conceptions of evidence and knowledge in law, religion, science, the arts, and politics and the media. We will also consider the historian's responsibility to truth, in the past and today. Part of the course will focus on the discussion of readings in common, including both primary sources and secondary sources that introduce students to interpretive problems in this field. Part will be devoted to the construction of an extensive research paper in which students grapple with a problem of their choice related to the history of truth claims or lies. Class time will also be devoted to discreet steps involved in this process, including framing a question, building a bibliography, analyzing various kinds of evidence or sources, constructing an effective outline, and writing an argument-driven and well-substantiated seminar paper.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 3709 Global Blackface, Minstrelsy and Passing

Global Blackface, Minstrelsy and Passing is an undergraduate seminar that will explore the performance of blackface across the world. We will look at the practice of "blacking up" in theater, opera, vaudeville and film through the Middle East, Africa, Europe, India, the Caribbean and put these historical practices in dialogue with British and American blackface performance. We will also look at how performers enlisted themselves or were hired for minstrelsy shows and how these translated around the world. The seminar will also explore the concept of passing, and whether it is just a matter of skin color, but also of language. This is a cultural history course that will also investigate constructions of blackness and whiteness around the world.

Also Offered As: AFRC 3408

1 Course Unit

HIST 3710 Introduction to Business, Economic and Financial History

Business, Economic and Financial History plays a crucial role today in informing the views of business leaders, policy makers, reformers and public intellectuals. This seminar provides students with the opportunity to acquire a command of the key elements of this important intellectual field. The seminar format enables us to do this engagingly through reading and discussion. Students acquire a knowledge of the fundamental texts and controversies. Each meeting focuses on one foundational debate and provides a means to be up to date with the insights gleaned from rigorous economic history. We will examine twelve important debates and students will be asked to write a paper. The debates will include such questions as: What is growth and how can it be measured? What caused the "great divergence" in long run development among countries? How can we "understand" the rise and fall of slavery and its long shadow today? What is globalization and when did it begin? Did the Gold Standard and interwar fiscal and monetary policy orthodoxy cause the great depression? How can we explain the evolution of inequality in the very long run?

Also Offered As: ECON 0625

1 Course Unit

HIST 3711 Uses and Abuses of History

This course is designed for junior and senior history majors in any regional or thematic concentrations. Using case studies from around the world, it will explore the roles of history and historians in shaping national and ‘ethnic’ outlooks and identities; in offering ‘lessons’ to guide policy makers in a variety of diplomatic, political, and social contexts; and in contributing to the numerous controversies surrounding the most appropriate ways to remember and represent painful events in a society’s past. Because nations, regimes, and interest groups invariably want to believe that ‘history is on their side,’ they typically produce partisan narratives which use historical evidence selectively and subjectively. How effective have historians been—or can they be—in countering egregious ‘myths’ about the past, in uncovering ‘silences’ in the historical record, and in acknowledging that the same ‘objective’ events can leave different memories and carry different meanings for the various parties involved. Does fuller knowledge of the past constrain or empower our capacities to deal with challenges in the present and future? In examining these and other ‘meta-questions’ through a series of specific case studies, you will almost certainly learn something about contested histories in parts of the world you may not be familiar with, but which should help you situate your own regional interests in a wider comparative framework. During the last five weeks of the course, students will have an opportunity to research a topic of their choice and to present their findings to the class.

1 Course Unit

HIST 3712 From Tablets to Tablets: A Long History of Technology and Communication

The invention of new communications technologies is often accompanied by a swell of hope. Enthusiasts expect people to become more connected, new ideas to become more accessible, and information to be shared more rapidly and in more fixed forms than ever before. While there are always nay-sayers, who warn against the effects of such inventions, the narrative linking new communications technologies and progress is so strong that these detractors are most commonly painted as luddites, and the narrative itself is used to justify and promote yet newer media as well as new configurations of state and media relations. In this class, we will examine some of the most significant transformations in the history of communications technology—from orality to writing, from tablet to scroll to codex, manuscript to print, hand-press to steam-press, print to radio, radio to tv, and tv to streaming and other forms of new media. We will ask some basic questions: How were these technologies made? How and by whom were these technologies used? How did contemporaries perceive them and the transformations they did or did not work? We will also ask some bigger questions: why do certain communications technologies emerge and get adopted when and where they do? Conversely, why are some communications technologies resisted at some times and in some places? What impacts do communications technologies have on the societies in which the appear? Do they alter the course of events? Do they change the way in which we think? If so, then how? Is the history of communication substitutive or additive? How is the digital age in which we live similar to or different from those that came before? History Majors may use this course to fulfill the pre-1800 requirement depending on the topic of their research paper.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: COML 3712

1 Course Unit

HIST 3820 Renaissance Europe

This course will examine the cultural and intellectual movement known as the Renaissance, from its origins in fourteenth-century Italy to its diffusion into the rest of Europe in the sixteenth century. We will trace the great changes in the world of learning and letters, the visual arts, and music,along with those taking place in politics, economics, and social organization. We will be reading primary sources as well as modern works.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: ITAL 3820

1 Course Unit

HIST 3920 European Diplomatic History 1789-1914

This course will examine the international politics of Europe in the 18th and 19th centuries, up to the outbreak of World War I. During these centuries, the European great powers experienced significant internal transformations and also a revolution in their relations, both of which reinforced and accelerated each other. In the process, Europe asserted a dominant position in world politics, but also sowed the seed for the terrible catastrophes of the 20th Century. The course will address this transformation of European diplomacy with special attention to the rivalries between the great powers, the impact of nationalism and emerging mass politics, the interplay between military and economic power, and the relationship between the European powers and the rest of the world.

Fall

1 Course Unit

HIST 3921 Europe and the World since 1914

This course looks at Europe's interactions with other world regions throughout the twentieth century. Over the course of roughly a hundred years, Europeans have shaped the fates of peoples living beyond the western world, for instance through the impact of two world wars, European colonialism, and the global Cold War. At the same time, European societies 'at home' were not left unaffected by these interactions. Even today, Europeans are facing the legacies of some of these histories in immigration and the politics of religion and secularism for example. The past century also saw a dramatic shift in Europe's position in the world - from dominance to a loss of influence in the shadow of the United States and more recently, China. The course spends significant time covering the histories of world regions other than Europe. It furthermore considers some interactions and exchanges between world regions from a social and cultural point of view. Because the class spans roughtly a century, the content has to remain introductory and general, although a very basic familiarity with 20th-century international history is helpful.

Two Term Class, Student may enter either term; credit given for either

1 Course Unit

HIST 3922 Nineteenth Century European Intellectual History

Starting with the dual challenges of Enlightenment and Revolution at the close of the eighteenth century, this course examines the emergence of modern European thought and culture in the century from Kant to Nietzsche. Themes to be considered include Romanticism, Utopian Socialism, early Feminism, Marxism, Liberalism, and Aestheticism. Readings include Kant, Hegel, Burke, Marx, Mill, Wollstonecraft, Darwin, Schopenhauer, and Nietzsche.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: COML 3922

1 Course Unit

HIST 3923 Twentieth Century European Intellectual History

European intellectual and cultural history from 1870 to 1950. Themes to be considered include aesthetic modernism and the avant-garde, the rebellion against rationalism and positivism, Social Darwinism, Second International Socialism, the impact of World War One on European intellectuals, psychoanalysis, existentialism, and the ideological origins of fascism. Figures to be studied include Nietzsche, Freud, Woolf, Sartre, Camus, and Heidegger.

Spring

Also Offered As: COML 3923

1 Course Unit

HIST 3930 The History of Foreign Aid and Intervention in Africa

This course examines the history, politics, and significance of foreign aid to Africa since the late 19th century. While we do not typically think about the European colonial period in Africa in terms of 'foreign aid,' that era introduced ideas and institutions which formed the foundations for modern aid policies and practices. So we start there and move forward into more contemporary times. In addition to examining the objectives behind foreign assistance and the intentions of donors and recipients, we will look at some of the consequences (intended or unintended) of various forms of foreign aid to Africa over the past century. While not designed to be a comprehensive history of development theory, of African economics, or of international aid organizations, the course will touch on all of these topics. Previous course work on Africa is strongly advised.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: AFRC 3931

1 Course Unit

HIST 3960 Histories of the Information Economy

This course provides a perspective on the role of information as a historical actor. Moving beyond common narratives of the progress of the information economy driven by technological factors, the course underscores the significance of what may be called the political economies of information. We will approach major works, dealing with the historical importance of information (Foucault, Cohn, Habermas) and simultaneously engages with the history of institutions to store and circulate information. We will emphasize the importance of value (social, political, economic) which is at the heart of information gathering and producing. In particular, we will discuss the rise and fall of institutions to store and circulate information. We will study the importance of information in historical processes such as imperialism and colonization, state building, propaganda, the Enlightenment, as well as the informational aspects of the rise of global NGOs and international organization, police and spying. Information may be accumulated or lost; it can be safeguarded or debased; it can confer power or undermine it. In the age of fake news, these are issues worthy of a closer interest.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 3965 The International Monetary System from Sterling to Cryptocurrencies (1720-2020)

The course will cover the modern evolution of the international monetary system going all the way back to the era when sterling became the leading international currencies. It is arranged thematically and chronologically both. The lessons and readings will introduce students to the principal evolutions of the international monetary system and at the same time, it will give them an understanding of regimes, their mechanics and the geopolitical economies behind systemic shifts. Students need not have an economic background but must be prepared to read about exchange rates (and world politics). Special focus on: The early modern international monetary system. How Amsterdam and London captured the Spanish treasure. Beyond the West (Ottoman Empire, India, China). The Napoleonic wars and the rise of sterling. Hong-Kong: Silver, Opium, and the Recycling of Surpluses. The emergence of the Gold Standard. Bimetallism: The US election of 1796. Sterling and Key Currencies before WWI. The First World War and the origins of dollar supremacy. When the dollar displaced sterling (1920s). The collapse of the international gold standard (1930s). The Bretton Woods System. The rise and rise of the US dollar. Currency competition (Dollar, Euro, Yuan Renminbi). The meaning of cryptocurrencies.

Also Offered As: ECON 0615

1 Course Unit

HIST 4997 Junior Honors in History

Open to junior honors candidates in history. Introduction to the study and analysis of historical phenomena. Emphasis on theoretical approaches to historical knowledge, problems of methodology, and introduction to research design and strategy. Objective of this seminar is the development of honors thesis proposal.

Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 4998 Senior Honors in History

Open to senior honors candidates in history who will write their honors thesis during this seminar.

Two Term Class, Student must enter first term; credit given after both terms are complete

1 Course Unit

HIST 5240 The Rise and Fall of the Russian Empire, 1552-1917

How and why did Russia become the center of the world's largest empire, a single state encompassing eleven time zones and over a hundred ethnic groups? To answer this question, we will explore the rise of a distinct political culture beginning in medieval Muscovy, its transformation under the impact of a prolonged encounter with European civilization, and the various attempts to re-form Russia from above and below prior to the Revolution of 1917. Main themes include the facade vs. the reality of central authority, the intersection of foreign and domestic issues, the development of a radical intelligentsia, and the tension between empire and nation.

Also Offered As: REES 5310

Mutually Exclusive: HIST 0240

1 Course Unit

HIST 5550 East Asian Diplomacy

Home to four of the five most populous states and four of the five largest economies, the Asia/Pacific is arguably the most dynamic region in the twenty-first century. At the same time, Cold War remnants (a divided Korea and China) and major geopolitical shifts (the rise of China and India, decline of the US and Japan) contribute significantly to the volatility of our world. This course will examine the political, economic, and geopolitical dynamism of the region through a survey of relations among the great powers in Asia from the sixteenth century to the present. Special emphasis will be given to regional and global developments from the perspective of the three principal East Asian states--China, Japan and Korea. We will explore the many informal, as well as formal, means of intercourse that have made East Asia what it is today. Graduate students should consult graduate syllabus for graduate reading list, special recitation time and graduate requirements.

Also Offered As: EALC 5711

Mutually Exclusive: HIST 1550

1 Course Unit

HIST 6100 Topics in US History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in US history.

Fall

1 Course Unit

HIST 6110 Topics in Early American History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in Early American history.

Fall

1 Course Unit

HIST 6120 Topics in 19th-Century US History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in 19th Century US history.

Fall

1 Course Unit

HIST 6130 Topics in 20th- and 21st-Century US History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in 20th & 21st US history.

Fall

1 Course Unit

HIST 6200 Topics in European History

Reading and Discussion course on selected topics in European History.

Fall

1 Course Unit

HIST 6210 Topics in Medieval European History

Reading and Discussion course on selected topics in Medieval European History.

Fall

1 Course Unit

HIST 6220 Topics in Early Modern European History

Reading and Discussion course on selected topics in Early Modern European History.

Fall

1 Course Unit

HIST 6230 Topics in Modern European History

Reading and Discussion course on selected topics in Modern European History.

Fall

1 Course Unit

HIST 6300 Topics in Asian History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in Asian History.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 6310 Topics in Premodern Asian History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in Pre-Modern Asian History.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 6320 Topics in Early Modern Asian History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in Early Modern Asian History.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 6330 Topics in Modern Asian History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in Modern Asian History.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 6400 Topics in Middle Eastern History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in Middle Eastern history.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 6410 Topics in Pre-Colonial Middle Eastern History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in Pre-Colonial Middle Eastern history.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 6420 Topics in Colonial-Era Middle Eastern History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in Colonial Middle Eastern history.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 6430 Topics in Post-Colonial Middle Eastern History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in Post-colonial Middle Eastern history.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 6500 Topics in African History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in African history

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 6510 Topics in Pre-Colonial African History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in Pre-Colonial African history

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 6520 Topics in Colonial-Era African History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in Colonial Era African history

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 6530 Topics in Post-Colonial African History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in Post-colonial African history

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 6600 Topics in Latin American and Caribbean History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in Latin American and Caribbean history

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 6610 Topics in Pre-Colonial Latin American History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in Pre-Colonial Latin American and Caribbean history

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 6620 Topics in Colonial-Era Latin American

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in Colonial Latin American and Caribbean history

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 6630 Topics in Post-Colonial Latin American

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in Post-Colonial Latin American and Caribbean history

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 6680 History of Law and Social Policy

This is a course in the history of law and policy-making with respect to selected social problems. Discussion of assigned readings and papers will elaborate the role law, lawyers, judges, other public official and policy advocates have played in proposing solutions to specific problems. The course will permit theevaluation of the importance of historical perspective and legal expertise in policy debates.

Fall

1 Course Unit

HIST 6700 Seminar: Transregional History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in Transregional History

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 6710 Seminar: Transregional Economic History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in Transregional Economic History

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 6720 Seminar: Transregional Gender History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in Transregional Gender History

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 6730 Seminar: Transregional Intellectual History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in Transregional Intellectual History

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 6740 Seminar: Transregional Religious History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in Transregional Religious History

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 6750 Seminar: History of Transregional Race and Slavery

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in History of Transregional Race and Slavery

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 6760 Seminar: Transregional Nationalisms

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in the History of Transregional Nationalisms

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 6770 Seminar: TransRegional History of War and Diplomacy

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in the History of Transregional War and Diplomacy

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 6780 Seminar: History of Transregional Migrations and Diasporas

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in the History of Transregional Migrations and Diasporas

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 6790 Seminar: History of Transregional Empires and Colonialisms

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in the History of Transregional Empires and Colonialisms

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7000 Proseminar in History

Weekly readings, discussions, and writing assignments to develop a global perspective within which to study human events in various regional/cultural milieus, c. 1400 to the present. This course is required for all PhD students, and is taken in the first year of study.

Two Term Class, Student must enter first term; credit given even if second term not complete

1 Course Unit

HIST 7100 Research seminar in US history.

Research seminar on selected topics in US history.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7110 Research seminar in Early American history.

Research seminar on selected topics in Early American history.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7120 Research seminar in 19th Century US history.

Research seminar on selected topics in 19th Century US history.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7130 Research seminar in 20th & 21st Century US history.

Research seminar on selected topics in 20th & 21st Century US history.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7200 Research Seminar in European History

Research seminar on selected topics in European history.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7210 Research Seminar in Medieval European History

Research seminar on selected topics in Medieval European history.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7220 Research Seminar in Early Modern European History

Research seminar on selected topics in Early Modern European history.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7230 Research Seminar in Modern European History

Research seminar on selected topics in Modern European history.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7300 Research Seminar in Asian History

Research seminar on selected topics in Asian History.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7310 Research Seminar in Pre-Modern Asian History

Research seminar on selected topics in Pre-Modern Asian History.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7320 Research Seminar in Early Modern Asian History

Research seminar on selected topics in Early Modern Asian History.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7330 Research Seminar in Modern Asian History

Research seminar on selected topics in Modern Asian History.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7400 Research Seminar in Middle Eastern History

Research seminar on selected topics in Middle Eastern history.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7410 Research Seminar in Pre-Colonial Middle Eastern History

Research seminar on selected topics in Pre-Colonial Middle Eastern history.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7420 Research Seminar in Colonial Middle Eastern History

Research seminar on selected topics in Colonial Middle Eastern history.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7430 Research Seminar in Post-Colonial Middle Eastern History

Research seminar on selected topics in Post-Colonial Middle Eastern history.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7500 Research Semianr in African African History

Research Seminar on selected topics in African history

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7510 Research Semianr in Pre-Colonial African History

Research seminar on selected topics in Pre-Colonial African history.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7520 Research Seminar in Colonial African History

Research Seminar on selected topics in Colonial African history

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7530 Research Seminar in Post-Colonial African History

Research Seminar on selected topics in Post Colonial African history

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7600 Research Seminar in Latin American History

Research Seminar on selected topics in Latin American and Caribbean history

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7610 Research Seminar in Pre-Colonial Latin American History

Research Seminar on selected topics in Pre-Colonial Latin American and Caribbean history

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7620 Research Seminar in Colonial Latin American History

Research Seminar on selected topics in Colonial Latin American and Caribbean history

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7630 Research Seminar in Post-Colonial Latin American History

Research Seminar on selected topics in Post-Colonial Latin American and Caribbean history

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7700 Research Seminar in Transregional History

Research seminar on selected topics in Transregional history.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7710 Research Seminar in Transregional Economic History

Research seminar on selected topics in Transregional Economic history.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7720 Research Seminar in Transregional Gender History

Research seminar on selected topics in Transregional Gender history.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7730 Research Seminar in Transregional Intellectual History

Research seminar on selected topics in Transregional Intellectual history.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7740 Research Seminar in Transregional Religious History

Research seminar on selected topics in Transregional Religious history.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7750 Research Seminar in Transregional Race and Slavery

Research seminar on selected topics in Transregional Race and Slavery

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7760 Research Seminar in Transregional Nationalisms

Research seminar on selected topics in Transregional Nationalisms.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7770 Research Seminar on Transregional War and Diplomacy

Research seminar on selected topics in Transregional War and Diplomacy.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7780 Research Seminar in TransRegional Migration and Diasporas

Research seminar on selected topics in Transregional Migration and Diasporas.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 7790 Research Seminar on Transregional Colonialism and Empires

Research seminar on selected topics in Transregional Colonialism and Empires.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

HIST 9810 The Craft of Writing

This faculty-led workshop for advanced doctoral students focuses on dissertation writing. The course will be adapted to meet the needs of enrolled dissertators, but expected topics include: finding your historical writing voice; telling an evidence-based narrative; what to do when you have too much or too little evidence; structuring your material into chapters; developing effective titles; streamlining and signposting; the best use of quotations; knowing when to revise and when to overhaul; knowing when and how to stop.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit