Latin (LATN)

LATN 101 Elementary Latin I

An introduction to the Latin language for beginners. Students begin learning grammar and vocabulary, with practical exercises in reading in writing. By the end of the course students will be able to read and analyze simple Latin texts, including selected Roman inscriptions in the Penn Museum.

For BA Students: Language Course

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LATN 102 Elementary Latin II

Prerequisite(s): LATN 101 or equivalent. Completes the introduction to the Latin language begun in 101. By the end of the course students will have a complete working knowledge of Latin grammar, a growing vocabulary, and experience in reading simple continuous texts.

For BA Students: Language Course

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: LATN 101 or equivalent.

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LATN 112 Intensive Elementary Latin

An introduction to the Latin language for beginners, with explanation of basic grammatical concepts and intensive exercises in reading and writing. Ideal for undergraduates or graduate students from Penn or elsewhere with some background in learning other languages, or who need to learn Latin rapidly. The course covers the first year of college-level Latin, equivalent to LATN 101 + 102 at more than twice the normal pace. This is an online course. 2 c.u. Students are not required to be in Philadelphia. Course activities will involve a series of intensive online exercises completed each day according the students own schedule, plus one daily video-linked session 5.30-7.00pm EST (Monday thru Thursday). The textbook is Learn to Read Latin (Keller & Russell; textbook only, not workbook). The instructor for summer 2018 is Marcie Persyn, a Ph.D. student in Classical Studies. For further information about the course, please contact Prof. James Ker (jker@sas.upenn.edu).

For BA Students: Language Course

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Seminar

2.0 Course Units

LATN 203 Intermediate Latin Prose

Prerequisite(s): LATN 102 or equivalent (such as placement score of 550). Introduction to continuous reading of unadapted works by Latin authors in prose(e.g., Cornelius Nepos, Cicero, Pliny), in combination with a thorough review of Latin grammar. By the end of the course students will have thorough familiarity with the grammar, vocabulary, and style of the selected authors, will be able to tackle previously unseen passages by them, and will be able to discuss questions of language and interpretation.

For BA Students: Language Course

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: LATN 102 or equivalent.

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LATN 204 Intermediate Latin Poetry

Prerequisite(s): LATN 203 or equivalent (such as placement score of 600). Continuous reading of several Latin authors in poetry (e.g., Ovid, Virgil, Horace) as well as some more complex prose, in combination with ongoing review of Latin grammar. By the end of the course students will have thorough familiarity with the grammar, vocabulary, and style and style of the selected authors, will be able to tackle previously unseen passages by them, and will be able to discuss language and interpretation. Note: Completion of Latin 204 with C- or higher fulfills Penn's Foreign Language Requirement.

For BA Students: Last Language Course

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: LATN 203 or equivalent.

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LATN 212 Intensive Intermediate Latin

An introduction to the basic history and conventions of Latin prose and poetry, with continuous readings from classical authors accompanied by grammar review and exercises. Ideal for undergraduates or graduate students from Penn or elsewhere who have completed the equivalent of one year Latin (e.g., LATN 112). The course covers the second year of college-level Latin, equivalent to LATN 203 + 204 at more than twice the normal pace. This is an online course. 2 c.u. Students are not required to be in Philadelphia. Course activities will involve a series of intensive online exercises completed each day according the students own schedule, plus one daily video-linked session 5.30-7.00pm EST (Monday thru Thursday). The focus of the course will be Romans and Carthaginians, combining readings on Hannibal and the second Punic war (mostly in prose, focusing on Cornelius Nepos Life of Hannibal) with readings from the story of Dido (mostly in poetry, focusing on Ovids Heroides). The instructor for summer 2018 is Brian Credo, a Ph.D. student in Classical Studies. For further information about the course, please contact Prof. James Ker (jker@sas.upenn.edu).

For BA Students: Last Language Course

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Seminar

2.0 Course Units

LATN 308 Latin Love Letters

In this course we look at an intersection between emotion and rhetoric, reading ancient theorists and practitioners in the art of love-letter writing. Readings will include Cicero, Ovid, Propertius, Horace, Seneca, and Petronius. "Love" will include the full breadth of affections from intellectual friendship to erotic desire, and "letters" will include the whole spectrum of written communication, both formal and informal. A special goal of this course will be to gently develop our speaking and writing skills in Latin. Final projects will be flexible, ranging from a traditional term-paper to creative experiments in speaking and writing Latin.

Taught by: Ker

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LATN 309 Triangulating Augustanism: Livy, Horace, and Ovid

What is a Roman? How does the rise of Augustus Caesar change the meaning of Romanness? In this course, we will read selections from the historian Livy and the poets Horace and Ovid as they try (and sometimes fail) to navigate and accommodate the new regime. Livy's prose history of Rome, Ab Urbe Condita, looks to the past for moral guidance and attempts to draw lessons for the imperial future. Horace's Odes veer from ironic to patriotic (and back again) as he works out the new reality and his place in it. Ovid's Fasti, written during the poet's exile from Rome, report the origins of Rome's sacred festival calendar. Through close readings of these three texts, this course will consider Augustanism from several angles and distances, and attempt to construct a richer picture of a complicated and vibrant period.

Taught by: Mulhern

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Reading knowledge of Latin or permission of instructor.

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LATN 399 Supervised Study in Latin Literature

This course is taken by students doing independent work with a faculty advisor, such as students approved to work on a senior research paper in pursuit of honors in the major.

Activity: Independent Study

1.0 Course Unit

LATN 401 Latin for Advanced Students

For graduate students in other departments needing individualized study in Latin literature.

For BA Students: Advanced Language Course

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1.0 Course Unit

LATN 540 The Latin Text: Language and Style

What do we need to read texts in Latin? In these courses we read just one prose text and one poetic text, or a very limited number of texts and passages, with a focus on language and formal analysis (such as diction, grammar, stylistics, metrics, rhetoric, textual criticism). A range of exercises will be used to develop this, including composition, lexical studies, recitation, memorization, exegesis, written close-readings, and sight-translation.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LATN 541 Latin Literary History

In this course we survey an extensive range of readings in a variety of authors in both prose and poetry, and consider the problems and opportunities involved in literary history.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LATN 600 Tacitus' Annals

In this seminar we will read Tacitus' Annals, a work replete with stirring history presented in a style that eschews complacency. Through careful study of this work and selected passages of its predecessor, the Histories, we will develop a richly detailed understanding of Tacitus' historiographical method, principles, and practice. Consideration of surviving epigraphic parallels will allow us to see a particularly important element of his historiographical practice, namely, his awareness of but deviation from the official record of events. Each class session will involve close reading of the text and student-led discussion of important features of Tacitus work. As a group project we will produce a variorum edition of the Annals for on-line publication. Final projects will take the form of papers suitable for presentation at the SCS Annual Meeting.

Taught by: Damon

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: Topics will vary

LATN 605 The Mostly Latin Epigram

In this seminar we will explore the themes and aesthetics of the Latin epigram, a genre (or is it?) best known for its brevity and wit but one whose precise nature is tantalizingly elusive. After orienting ourselves in the epigrams of Hellenistic Greek epigrammatists and late Republican authors like the so-called Neoterics (Catullus, Cinna, Calvus, Caesar), we will turn our attention to the poetry of Martial, whose accounts of Rome, its inhabitants, and their foibles exerted a profound influence on subsequent epigrammatists. Among the themes we will engage are: epigram as a genre; persona in tessellated textual collections; the interaction of refined and obscene language; and the artistic and intellectual implications of replication, anthology, and remix.

Taught by: Bret Mulligan

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LATN 999 Independent Study

For doctoral candidates.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1.0 Course Unit