Political Science (PSCI)

PSCI 010 Freshman Seminars

Freshmen seminars are small, substantive courses taught by members of the faculty and open only to freshmen. These seminars offer an excellent opportunity to explore areas not represented in high school curricula and to establish relationships with faculty members around areas of mutual interest. See www.college.upenn.edu/admissions/freshmen.php

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 107 Introduction to Data Science

Understanding and interpreting large, quantitative data sets is increasingly central in political and social science. Whether one seeks to understand political communication, international trade, inter-group conflict, or other issues, the availability of large quantities of digital data has revolutionized the study of politics. Nonetheless, most data-related courses focus on statistical estimation, rather than on the related but distinctive problems of data acquisition, management and visualization--in a term, data science. This course addresses that imbalance by focusing squarely on data science. Leaving this course, students will be able to acquire, format, analyze, and visualize various types of political data using the statistical programming language R. This course is not a statistics class, but it will increase the capacity of students to thrive in future statistics classes. While no background in statistics or political science is required, students are expected to be generally familiar with contemporary computing environments (e.g. know how to use a computer) and have a willingness to learn a variety of data science tools. You are encouraged (but certainly not required) to register for both this course and PSCI 338 at the same time, as the courses cover distinct, but complimentary material.

Taught by: Hopkins

Course not offered every year

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

PSCI 110 Introduction to Comparative Politics

This course is designed to introduce students to comparative political analysis. How can the political behavior, circumstances, institutions, and dynamic patterns of change that people experience in very different societies be analyzed using the same set of concepts and theories? Key themes include nationalism, political culture, democratization, authoritarianism, and the nature of protracted conflict.

For BA Students: Society Sector

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

PSCI 116 Political Change in the "Third World"

This is a comparative politics course that examines political and socio-economic change in the so-called "Third World," defined here as post-colonial developing areas in Asia, Africa and Latin America. The course is not as concerned with keeping up with current events as with analyzing the relationships between colonial legacies, the initial challenges of post-colonial political and socioeconomic development, and how these interact with contemporary problems and global trends. Although chiefly concerned with "political change" within countries, it will also devote substantial attention to economic, socio-cultural and international factors. The course is divided into three parts. The first examines the common and distinctive features of colonial rule in different regions as well as the varying challenges of political and economic development in diverse post-colonial settings. The second part focuses on elaborating on the themes developed in the first by looking more closely at the developmental experiences of Brazil, India, Algeria, Iran, Nigeria, and South Korea (with passing references to other countries as comparative referents). The third part focuses on trends and challenges that have emerged over the last two decades - including market reforms, democratization, and problems related to gender and the environment -

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Sil

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

PSCI 130 Introduction to American Politics

This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government.

For BA Students: Society Sector

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

PSCI 131 American Foreign Policy

This course analyzes the formation and conduct of foreign policy in the United State. The course combines three elements: a study of the history of American foreign relations; an analysis of the causes of American foreign policy such sa the international system, public opinion, and the media; and a discussion of the major policy issues in contemporary U.S. foreign policy, including terrorism, civil wars, and economic policy.

Taught by: Horowitz, Vitalis

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

PSCI 135 The Politics of Food and Agriculture

Students will use course readings and their community service to analyze the institutions, ideas, interests, social movements, and leadership that shape the "politics of food" in different arenas. Service opportunities include work with the Urban Nutrition Initiative, Community School Student Partnerships, and the possibility of other placements as approved by the professors.

Taught by: Summers

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

PSCI 136 Urban Politics in the United States

This course explores the political character of contemporary urban American life. Particular attention is given to the relationship between urban politics and policymaking -- including the structural and ideological factors (e.g., dynamics of political economy, race, ethnicity, pluralism and gender) that constrain the policy context and shape the urban environment as a terrain for commingling, competition and conflict over uses of space. It makes considerable use of case studies to throw into relief the complex and sometimes subtle processes that shape urban life.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Reed

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

PSCI 139 Politics Of Poverty & Development

This academically based community service seminar will explore the ideas and theories, alliances and opposition that have shaped policy and organizing efforts addressed to the problems associated with urban poverty in the United States. There will be a special focus on the issues of increasing inequality, education, low wage work, health and nutrition, welfare reform and social security. Students will evaluate contemporary policy debates and programs in the light of selected case studies, readings, and their own experience working with community groups, institutions, and federal programs in West Philadelphia.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: Summers

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 144 Communism

The rise and fall of Communism dominated the history of the short twentieth century from the Russian revolution of 1917 to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. As a system of government, Communism is more or less dead, but its utopian ideals of liberation from exploitation and want live on. Communism remains the one political-economic system that presented, for a time, an alternative to global capitalism. In this course, students will gain an introduction to socialist and Communist political thought and explore Communist political and economic regimes - their successes and failures, critics and dissidents, efforts at reform, and causes of collapse. We will learn about the remnants of Communism in China, North Korea, and Cuba and efforts of contemporary theorists to imagine a future for Communism.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Orenstein

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

PSCI 150 Introduction to International Relations

This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Mansfield

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

PSCI 151 International Security

This lecture course introduces students to the subfield of international security or strategic studies. In order to grasp the usefulness of the theoretical ideas presented in readings and lectures, abstract concepts are linked with a study of the national security policies states have adopted in the decades following World War II. Topics include current debates about nuclear proliferation, terrorism, the Iraq war, Europe's changing international role, the rise of China, Asian "flashpoints" (Korea, the Taiwan Strait), and US secruity policy for the 21st century - considering some of the main strategic alternatives to the US as well as their implications for the types of forces deployed (the impact of the "revolution in military affairs," the future of missile defense, and the economic burden to be shouldered).

Taught by: Goldstein

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

PSCI 152 International Political Economy

This course examines the politics of international economic relations. The course will analyze the interplay between politics and economics in three broad areas: international trade, international finance, and economic development. In each section, we will first discuss economic theories that explain the causes and consequences of international commerce, capital flows, and economic growth. We will then explore how political interests, institutions, and ideas alter these predictions, examining both historical examples and current policy debates.

Taught by: Gray,Brutger

Course not offered every year

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

PSCI 153 International Law & Institutions

This lecture course examines the role that international law and institutions play in international relations. The course begins by exploring broad theoretical questions - questions about why states create international law and international institutions; how states design institutions; the impact that institutional design may have on the effectiveness of international institutions; and the conditions under which states are likely to comply with the rules set out by international institutions and the dictates of international law. Specific topics include collective security institutions such as the League of Nations, the United Nations, and NATO; human rights law; the laws of war; international intervention and peacekeeping; international justice and the International Criminal Court; environmental law; international trade law and the World Trade Organization; economic development and the World Bank; and international finance and the role of the International Monetary Fund.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

PSCI 180 Ancient Political Thought

Through reading texts of Plato (Socrates), Aristotle, Augustine and Aquinas, the student encounters a range of political ideas deeply challenging to--and possibly corrosive of--today's dominant democratic liberalism. Can classical and medieval thinking offer insight into modern impasses in political morality? Is such ancient thinking plausible, useful, or dangerous?

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Norton, Green

Course not offered every year

Activity: Recitation

0 Course Units

PSCI 181 Modern Political Thought

This course will provide an overview of major figures and themes of modern political thought. We will focus on themes and questions pertinent to political theory in the modern era, particularly focusing on the relationship of the individual to community, society, and state. Although the emergence of the individual as a central moral, political, and conceptual category arguably began in earlier eras, it is in the seventeenth century that it takes firm hold in defining the state, political institutions, moral thinking, and social relations. The centrality of "the individual" has created difficulties, even paradoxes, for community and social relations, and political theorists have struggled to reconicle those throughout the modern era. We will consider the political forms that emerged out of those struggles, as well as the changed and distinctly "modern" conceptualizations of political theory such as freedom, responsibilty, justice, rights and obligations, as central categories for organizing moral and political life.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Hirschmann, Norton, Goldman

Course not offered every year

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

PSCI 182 Contemporary Political Thought

This course is intended as a general introduction to political theory since 1900, examining prominent theorists of politics including Max Weber, Hannah Arendt, Carl Schmitt, Isaiah Berlin, Jurgen Habermas, John Rawls, Michel Foucault, and Jacques Derrida. Our theme for the Fall 2012 course will be: The Disenchantment of the World? Topics include: the nature of the the political and the concern, particular to the last century, that politics is itself under attack; the spread of liberal democracy across the globe and a critical appraisal of the moral meaning of this regime; contemporary theories of social justice; and an exploration of various issues pertaining to violence and the politics of security.

Taught by: Green, Hirschmann

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

PSCI 183 American Political Thought

Whether America begins with the Puritans and the Mayflower Compact, or with the Declaration of Independence and the Revolution, it is founded in resistance to empire. In the generations between, Americans have desired, dreaded and debated empire. This course will focus on empire and imperialism in American political thought. We will read primary texts addressing empire: from the departure and dissent of the Puritans, and Burke's Speech on Conciliation with the Colonies, to twentieth and twenty-first century debates over America's role in the world. These texts will include political pamphlets and speeches, poetry, novels, policy papers and film.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: Norton, Hirschmann

Course not offered every year

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

PSCI 198 Selected Topics in Political Science

Consult department for detailed descriptions. More than one course may be taken in a given semester. Recent titles have included: The Analysis of Presidential Elections, Conservative Political Economy, and Political Geography.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 207 Applied Data Science: Data Science and American Elections

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

PSCI 208 International Organizations in Latin America

International Organizations play a powerful role in mitigating conflict at the global level. What role do they play in solving problems related to global politics, economic development, corruption, inequality and civil society in Latin America? How much power, influence and control do they possess in the region? This course examines the role and impact international organizations have had on Latin America since the mid-20th century. After a review of theoretical and methodological persectives on the significance of IOs in international relations, students will examine the workings, issues and often controversies surrounding IOs in Latin America, including the IMF, World Bank, UN, OAS and ICC as wellas regional organizations such as the Inter-American Court of Human Rights and area trade blocs and agreements of Mercosur, NAFTA and others. Students will also explore the regional impact of transnational civil society organizations, such as human rights organizations and the International Olympic Committee. Students will be invited to participate in the Washington Model OAS from April 10-17.

Taught by: Bartch

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 210 Contemporary African Politics

This class provides an introduction to contemporary African politics. The core questions that motivate the course are (i) to what extent are political outcomes in contemporary Africa a consequence of its history, culture and geography? (ii.) Why are state structures and institutions weaker in Africa than elsewhere? (iii.) What accounts for Africa's relatively slow economic growth? (iv.) Why have some African countries been plagued by high levels of political violence while others have not? (v.) What explains the behavior of key African actors: parties or politicians?

Taught by: Grossman

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

PSCI 211 Politics in the Contemporary Middle East

This course is an introduction to the most prominent historical, cultural, institutional, and ideological features of Middle Eastern politics. Typical of the questions we shall address are why processes of modernization and economic change have not produced liberal democracies, why Islamic movements have gained enormous strength in some countries and not others, why conflicts in the region--between Israel and the Arabs, Iran and Iraq, or inside of Lebanon--have been so bitter and protracted; why the era of military coups was brought to an end but transitions to democracy have been difficult to achieve; why Arab unity has been so elusive and yet so insistent a theme; and why oil wealth in the Gulf, in the Arabian Peninsula, and in North Africa, has not produced industrialized or self-sustaining economic growth.

Taught by: Vitalis or Lustick

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

PSCI 213 Latin American Politics

This course examines the dynamics of political and economic change in twentieth century Latin America, with the goal of achieving an understanding of contemporary politics in the region. We will analyze topics such as the incorporation of the region to the international economy and the consolidation of oligarchic states (1880s to 1930s), corporatism, populism, and elict pacts (1930s and 1940s), social revolution, democratic breakdown, and military rule (1960s and 1970s), transitions to democracy and human rights advocacy (1980s), makret-oriented reforms (1990s), and the turn to the left of current governments (2000s). The course will draw primarily from the experiences of Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Chile and Mexico. No prior knowledge of the region is required.

Taught by: Falleti

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

PSCI 215 The European Union

This lecture course, after introductory sessions which outline the EU's core institutions, is built on an exposition of the works of major thinkers who have reflected on the European Union's origins, outcomes and significance. It critically reviews their arguments, especially their relevance to major recent crises, notably: the failure of the European Constitution, the current crisis of credibility facing the Euro. Whether the European Union is a confederation, a federation, an empire, or a novel political formation shall be examined. Whether its recent major widening signals an end to its institutional deepening will be discussed. Whether the Union has "a democratic deficit" is examined, as is the claim that in external relations it represents a novel form of soft power.

Taught by: O'Leary

Course not offered every year

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

PSCI 217 Russian Politics

This course will present an in-depth examination of political, economic and social change in post-Soviet Russia within a historical context. After a brief discussion of contemporary problems in Russia, the first half of the course will delve into the rise of communism in 1917, the evolution of the Soviet regime, and the tensions between ideology and practice over the seventy years of communist rule up until 1985. The second part of the course will begin with an examination of the Gorbachev period and the competing interpretations of how the events between 1985 and 1991 may have contributed to the collapse of the Soviet Union. We will then proceed to make sense of the continuities and changes in politics, economics and society in contemporary Russia. Important topics will include the confrontations accompanying the adoption of a new constitution, the emergence of competing ideologies and parties, the struggle over economic privatization, the question of federalism and nationalism, social and political implicatons of economic reform, and prospects for Russia's future in the Putin and post-Putin era.

Taught by: Sil

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

PSCI 218 Politics of Post War Western Europe

This course examines political institutions, processes and events in postwar Western Europe. The focus will be a comparative analysis of such topics as political parties and systems, electoral behavior, as well as social and economic pollicy. We will also examine the way in which domestic processes and policies interact with membership in the European Union.

Taught by: Lynch

Course not offered every year

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

PSCI 219 Contemporary Chinese Politics

This lecture course introduces students to the politics of the Peoples Republic of China. Complementing offerings in other departments, this course emphasizes events in the period since the Chinese Communist Party established its regime in 1949. In addition to surveying the political history of contemporary China, we will assess the meaning of these events by drawing upon theories about the nature and significance of ideology and organization in communist regimes, factionalism and its relationship to policy formulation and implementation, and general issues of political and economic development. Although the principal focus is on the domestic politics of the PRC, the course includes several lectures examining Chinas international relations.

Taught by: Goldstein

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

PSCI 221 Comparative Health Politics

This course examines the relationship between politics and the health of populations in the worlds rich democracies, including the Unites States. The key questions the course addresses are how and why countries differ in their health care policies, public health policies, and policies that affect the social determinants of health. There are no prerequisites, but prior coursework in comparative politics at the 100 or 200 level will be helpful.

Taught by: Lynch

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

PSCI 223 Issues Comp Pol/Gender

Struggles over gender roles and rights have been prominent in the Middle East and North Africa since the 19th century and continue to mark contemporary political and social discourses. Since the colonial period, gender categories and sexualities have been critiqued and negotiated on behalf of empire, the nation, modernity, personal freedom; today debates and struggles over global rights, islamic law, and modernity continue to mark politics. Despite the particularity of ideas and events in the region, a comparative framework helps to overcome exoticization of the region and develop a more acute understanding. The topics of the course include engagement with the discourse of the Exotic Other, the effects of modernity, the role of nationalism and the state, state-society negotiation, islamic formulations, and continously, the question: where does change come from? Issues of the veil and islamic dress the expansion of anti-gay laws, the disciplining of bodies in state and social settings - these issues of gender and sexuality extend the realm of the political into intimate spaces. Assignments include a midterm and a short paper that develops research and analytical skills. The course is 200 level. While background in the study of the Middle East or gender is not necessary, an introductory political science or social science course is required.

Taught by: Harrold

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 224 Political Economy of Development

The course surveys some of the principal themes in the political economies of lower income countries. The questions we shall seek to address cover a broad terrain. Who are the key actors? What are their beliefs, interests and motivations? What are their constraints? How are these being affected by closer economic linkages between national economies? While there is no single integrative framework or paradigm into which these themes neatly fit, a common thread is the changing dynamics and interplay between the local, the national, and the global. A familiarity with basic economic concepts will be helpful, but is not necessary.

Taught by: Kapur

Course not offered every year

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

PSCI 225 Sex and Power

Gender has been a primary way of organizing power relations throughout history.This class asks how transformations in the global economy, technological change, new patterns of household formation, and social movements, have influenced women's access to economic and political positions over the past two centuries. We will examine how women's mobilization contributed to the abolition of slavery, reform of property and franchise laws, and to the formation of the welfare state. Next, we turn to thinking about how women's increasing labor force participation was hindered by institutions like marriage bars and union policy. Third, we look at cross-national patterns of women's political participation and descriptive representation including whether and how the adoption of electoral quotas influences gender equality more generally. Finally we study how institutional norms and gender stereotypes affect political representation. This class will draw on examples from around the world, and will look a experiences of women from all economic, social, and ascriptive backgrounds.

Taught by: Teele

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

PSCI 227 China: Inst & the Econ

The rise of China since its economic reform starting from 1978 is one of the most important developments the world witnessed in the twenty first century. In this seminar course, we explore topics including the political logic of China's economic reform, the institutional foundations of the Chinese economic growth miracle, as well as detailed analysis of Chinese financial markets, housing markets, fiscal reform, corruption/anti-corruption, labor market transitions, China's integration into the world economy, village democracy and its impact on resource allocation, the impact of population ageing, the impact of China on US economy and politics, among others. The discussions will focus on China, but will relate broadly to emerging and developed economies. The course will be based on reading and discussing research articles and books selected by the instructors.

Course not offered every year

Prerequisite: psci 110 recommended

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

PSCI 228 Education for Democracy in Latin America and the U.S.

Taught by: Bartch

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 229 China's Domestic Politics

This is an advanced course on the main issues of contemporary Chinese politics, economy and social change. There is a strong focus on teh reform period (post 1978). We will spend considerable time and energy on understanding the major themes and challenges of China's reforms, including the political system, the legal system, the inequality, foreign direct investment, village elections, lawmaking, environmental degradation, social opposition, corruption, and religion. We also investigate the many political and social consequences of reform and changing landscape of Chinese politics. A prior course on Chinese politics (for example, PSCI219) is highly recommended.

Taught by: Hou

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

PSCI 231 Race and Ethnic Politics

This course examines the role of race and ethnicity in the political discourse through a comparative survey of recent literature on the historical and contemporary political experiences of the four major minority groups (Blacks or African Americans, American Indians, Latinos or Hispanic Americans, and Asian Americans). A few of the key topics will include assimilation and acculturation seen in the Asian American community, understanding the political direction of Black America in a pre and post Civil Rights era, and assessing the emergence of Hispanics as the largest minority group and the political impact of this demographic change. Throughout the semester, the course will introduce students to significant minority legislation, political behavior, social movements, litigation/court rulings, media, and various forms of public opinion that have shaped the history of racial and ethnic minority relations in this country. Readings are drawn from books and articles written by contemporary political scientists.

Taught by: Gillion

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

PSCI 232 Introduction to Poltical Communications

This course is an introduction to the field of political communication, conceptual approaches to analyzing communication in various forms, including advertising, speech making, campaign debates, and candidates' and office-holders' uses of news. The focus of this course is on the interplay in the U.S. between television and politics. The course includes a history of televised campaign practices from the 1952 presidential contest onward.

Taught by: Jamieson

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

PSCI 233 Introduction to African American Politics

This course is an historical survey of the main bases and substances of politics among black Americans and the relation of black politics to the American political order. Its two main objectives are: 1) to provide a general sense of pertinent historical issues and relations as a way of helping to make sense of the present and 2) to develop criteria for evaluating political scientists' and others' claims regarding the status and characteristics of black American political activity.

Taught by: Reed

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

PSCI 234 Changing American Electorate

In 1960, a Democratic candidate won a very narrow Presidential victory with just 100,000 votes; in 2000, the Democratic candidate lost but received 500,000 more votes than his opponent. Still, contemporary scholars and journalists have made a variety of arguments about just how much the American political landscape changed in the intervening 40 years, often calling recent decades a transform ation. This course explores and critically evaluates those arguments. Key questions include: how, if at all, have Americans political attitudes and ideologie s changed? How have their connections to politics changed? What has this meant for the fortunes and strategies of the two parties? How have the parties base voters and swing voters changed? What changes in American society have advantaged some political messages and parties at the expense of others? Focusing primarily on mass-level politics, we consider a wide range of potential causes, including the role of race in American politics, suburbanization, economic transformations, the evolving constellation and structure of interest groups, declining social capital, the changing role of religion, immigration, and the actions of parties and political elites. For three weeks in the semester, we will take a break from considering broader trends to look at specific elections in some depth.

Taught by: Hopkins

Course not offered every year

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

PSCI 236 Public Policy Process

This course introduces students to the theories and practice of the policy-making process. There are four primary learning objectives. First, understanding how the structure of political institutions matter for the policies that they produce. Second, recognizing the constraints that policy makers face when making decisions on behalf of the public. Third, identifying the strategies that can be used to overcome these constraints. Fourth, knowing the toolbox that is available to ticipants in the policy-making process to help get their preferred strategies implemented. While our focus will primarily be on American political institutions, many of the ideas and topics discussed in the class apply broadly to other democratic systems of government.

Taught by: Levendusky, Meredith

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: PPE 312

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

PSCI 237 The American Presidency

This course surveys the institutional development of the American presidency from the Constitutional convention through the current administration. It examines the politics of presidential leadership, and how the executive branch functions. An underlying theme of the course is the tensions bewteen the presidency, leadership, and democracy.

Taught by: Gottschalk

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

PSCI 241 Polarization

Are ordinary Americans polarized? What about political elites? Is there any connection between mass and elite polarization? What do we even mean when we say some group is "polarized"? This class will explore these questions in some detail, and try to sort out all of the discussions about polarizations, red states and blue states, and the like.

Taught by: Levendusky

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 243 Dilemmas of Immigration

Beneath the daily headlines about refugees blocked entry, and undocumented migrants deported there is a set of hard questions which deserve closer attention: Should countries have borders? If countries have borders, how should they decide who is kept out and who is allowed in? How many immigrants is 'enough'? Are immigrants equally desirable? What kinds of obligations do immigrants have to their receiving society? What kinds of obligations do host societies have to immigrants? Should there be 'pathways' to citizenship? Can citizenship be earned? Should citizenship be automatic? This course explores these and other dilemmas raised by immigration.

Taught by: Jones-Correa

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

PSCI 250 C.I.A. Assassinations and Coups in Latin America

Why has the United States government participated in political assasinations and coups d'etat in Latin America? How have these interventions affected Latin American political and economic outcomes? How have they helped or hurt U.S. interests in the region? This lecture course provides an introduction to the history and politics of U.S.-led assassinations and coups in Latin America since 1949. For each event, the course will help students understand (1) the goals of the U.S. government; (2) the historical and political context of the intervention; and (3) the outcomes and consequences, both in Latin America and for the United States. Knowledge of the history of U.S. involvement in regime change is critical for understanding contemporary foreign policy.

Taught by: Kronick

Course offered spring; odd-numbered years

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

PSCI 251 Arab Israeli Relations

In this course the Arab-Israeli dispute from 1948 to the present will serve as a vehicle for understanding how domestic and global political processes interact to shape, contain, or aggravate Middle Eastern wars between states and non-state actors. Particular stress will be placed on understanding how wars affect international politics in states and political organizations and how ideological and structural features of states and organizations find expression in wars and complicate or enable the search for peach. In addition, the key features of the conflict will be interpreted as both a clash between the political interests of national and/or religious groups and as a reflection of global political power struggles. Attention will be given toward the end of the course to alternative ideas about possible resolution of the conflict as well as to the increasingly prominent argument that, in this case, there is no solution.

Taught by: Lustick

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

PSCI 252 War, Strategy and Politics

This class examines the strategy and politics of warfare, focusing on the way actors plan military campaigns and the factors that are likely to lead to victory and defeat. The course readings center in particular on the factors driving changes in warfare and civil-military relations. The course will cover a wide range of topics from theories of war-fighting to historical military campaigns to insurgency warfare, terrorism, and the future of war.

Taught by: Horowitz

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

PSCI 253 International Politics of the Middle East

This course will focus primarily on epidoes of external intervention by Great Powers in the politics of Middle Eastern states. We shall begin by examining the emergence of the Middle Eastern state system after the disappearance of the Ottoman Empire in the early part of the 20th century. This discussion will provide opportunities to develop key concepts in the study of international politics and will serve as crucial historical background. We shall then turn our attention to the primary concern of the course - a systematic consideration of the motives, operational results, and long-term implications of a number of important examples of intervention by Great Powers in the Middle East. Among the episodes to be considered will be British policies toward the end of World War I, in Palestine in the 1930s, and, along with the French, in Suez in 1956. Soviet intervention in the first Arab-Israeli war, in 1948, will be analyzed along with Soviet policies toward Egypt in the early 1970s. American intervention in Iran in 1953 and in the Gulf War in 1991 will also be examined.

Taught by: Lustick

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

PSCI 255 The Causes of War & Peace

The existence and endurance of war provides one of the most important puzzles of politics: why is it that people keep making use of such a destructive and painful way of resolving their disputes? This course addresses this question and the related question of what factors contribute to peace, focusing on both academic and popular explanations for conflict, including among others anarchy, over-optimism, shifting power, diversionary war, the malevolent influence of war profiteers, and a variety of explanations grounded in culture, religion and other ideational variables. In this discussion, we will focus on both interstate and civil wars, and on both the onset and the eventual termination of war. At various points in the course we will discuss a wide range of historical and contemporary cases, including the World Wars, Vietnam, the Gulf War, the Iraq War, the various Arab-Israeli wars, the India-Pakistan rivalry, and a number of recent civil conflicts such as the wars in Yugoslavia, Congo, and Sudan. The course concludes with a discussion of strategies for managing ongoing conflicts and for securing peace in post war settings.

Taught by: Weisiger

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

PSCI 258 International Human Rights

What exactly should be considered a fundamental "human right"? What is the basis for something is a fundamental human right? This course will examine not only broad conceptual debates, but will also focus on specific issue areas (e.g., civil rights, economic rights, women's rights), as well as the question of how new rights norms emerge in international relations.

Taught by: Doherty-Sil

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

PSCI 259 Chinese Foreign Policy

This seminar examines the influences on and patterns of China's international relations. Topics to be covered include the following:theoretical approaches to analyzing foreign policy; the historical legacy and evolution of China's foreign policy; contemporary China's foreign policy on traditional national security concerns as well as economic, environmental, and humanitarian issues; China's military modernization; China's foreign policy in Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America; China's rise and its implications for relations with the United States. The class is a seminar in which student preparation and participation will essential. Students planning to enroll in the course must have taken PSCI 219 (or, with the instructor's permission, its equivalent). You are expected to complete all required readings each week and come to seminar meetings prepared to discuss them.

Taught by: Goldstein

Course not offered every year

Prerequisite: MUST HAVE TAKEN PSCI 219 OR EQUIVALENT

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 260 Ethics & Ir

Course not offered every year

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

PSCI 261 Emerging Technologies and the Future of the World

Technological change is always occurring, but the rate of change seems to be accelerating. Advances in robotics, artificial intelligence, cyber, biotechnology, and other arenas generate promise as well as peril for humanity. Will these emerging technologies unleash the innovative capacity of the world, generating new opportunities that help people live meaningful lives? Alternatively, are automation and other technologies chipping away at the labor market in a way that could create severe generational dislocation at best, and national and international turmoil at worst? These questions are important, and have consequences for how we live our lives, how nations interact, and the future of the world writ large. Emerging technologies could shape public policy at the local, national, and international level, and raise questions of fairness, ethics, and transparency. This course takes a unique approach, combining insights from engineering, political science, and law in an interdisciplinary way that will expose students both to the key technologies that could shape the future and ways to think about their potentia politics, and society.

Taught by: Horowitz

Also Offered As: EAS 261

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 267 Russia and Eastern Europe in International Affairs

For BA Students: Society Sector

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

PSCI 271 Constitutional Law: Public Power & Civil Rights to 1912

This course explores the creation and transformations of the American constitutional system's structures and goals from the nation's founding through the period of Progressive reforms, the rise of the Jim Crow system, and the Spanish American War. Issues include the division of powers between state and national governments, and the branches of the federal government; economic powers of private actors and government regulators; the authority of governments to enforce or transform racial and gender hierarchies; and the extent of religious and expressive freedoms and rights of persons accused of crimes. We will pay special attention to the changing role of the Supreme Court and its decisions in interpreting and shaping American constitutionalism, and we will also read legislative and executive constitutional arguments, party platforms, and other influential statements of American constitutional thought.

Taught by: Smith

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

PSCI 272 American Constitutional Law II

This course examines American constitutional development from the eve of WWI through the second Obama administration. Topics include the growth of the New Deal and a Great Society regulatory and redistributive state, struggles for equal rights for racial and ethnic minorities, women and GLBT Americans, contests over freedoms of religion and expression, criminal justice issues, the Reagan Revolution and the revival of federalism and property rights, and issues of national security powers after September 11, 2001. Lectures are on videos and class time is devoted to in-depth discussions.

Taught by: Smith

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

PSCI 280 Feminist Political Thought

This course is designed to provide an overview of the variety of ideas, approaches, and subfields within feminist political thought. Readings and divided into three sections: contemporary theorizing about the meaning of "feminism";women in the history of Western political thought; and feminist theoretical approaches to practical political problems and issues, such as abortion and sexual assault.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Hirschmann

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

PSCI 282 Lying, Cheating, Stealing, and Killing: How to Think About Professional Ethics

Professionals - in business, medicine, law, and politics - face myriad ethical dilemmas in their daily work life that challenge, and sometimes conflict with, the moral commitments that guide their everyday life. This course systematically examines the ethical dimensions of these four professional roles, asking questions such as: Are there limits to what we should sell? How far should competitors go to "win"? Who should get ventilators in a flu pandemic? Is it morally permissible for physicians to assist in suicide? Should lawyers represent terrorists or child killers? How far does attorney-client privilege go? Is it morally justifiable to torture enemy combatants? Should politicians lie?

Taught by: Allen/Emanuel/Hirschmann/Strudler

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

PSCI 298 Selected Topics in Political Science

Consult department for detailed descriptions. More than one course may be taken in a given semester. Recent titles have included: Leadership & Democracy; Conservative Regimes.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 314 Democracy in Latin America

Since the inception of the twenty first century, Latin America has undergone major economic, social, and political transformations. Many of the neoliberal policies of the last quarter of the twentieth century were reversed or revisited, economic inequality decreased significantly across the region, and anumber of governments turned to the left of the political spectrum, often instituting major public policy and constitutional reforms. How have those changes affected citizenship and democracy in the region? In particular, have citizens' channels for representation and participation changed in the recent past? What has happened to local participatory institutions since the return tothe right in some countries of the region? The course will explore these and related questions. Students will develop their own research projects throughout the semester. While not a requirement, the ability to read Spanish or Portuguese will significantly enhance students' learning experience.

Taught by: Falleti

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 320 Who Gets Elected and Why? The Science of Politics

What does it take to get elected to office? What are the key elements of a successful political campaign? What are the crucial issues guiding campaigns and elections in the U.S. at the beginning of the 21st century? This class will address the process and results of electoral politics at the local, state,and federal levels. Course participants will study the stages and strategies of running for public office and will discuss the various influences on getting elected, including: Campaign finance and fundraising, demographics, polling, the media, staffing, economics, and party organization.Each week we will be joined by guest speakers who are nationally recognized professionals, with expertise in different areas of the campaign and election process. Students will also analyze campaign case studies and the career of the instructor himself. Edward G. Rendell is the former Mayor of Philadelphia, former Chair of the Democratic National Committee, and former Governor of Pennsylvania.

Taught by: Rendell

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

PSCI 327 Modern India

This course attempts to examine the experience of representative democracy in India and the country's development record in a historical framework. It will ask questions such as: How did representative democracy emerge in India and what explains its persistence? What are the sources of its vulnerability? What kind of a sense of nationhood does this democratic experience rest upon? What are the exclusions built into this conception of nationhood? What is the relationship between India's development experience and its democratic experiment? How have India's "traditional" institutions adapted or failed to adapt to modern circumstances? Why has India performed well in certain economic sectors such as IT even while its record in providing basic social services has been poor? How has India's self-perception about its place in the world changed in recent years and what are its implications?

Taught by: Kapur

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 328 Democracy in Trouble: OAS to the Rescue?

Democracy in the Americas is in trouble. Entrenched political, economic, and social inequality, combined with environmental degradation, weak institutions, pervasive health epidemics, weapon proliferation, and other pressing issues pose formidable challenges for strengthening democratic ideals and institutions. TheOrganization of American States (OAS), is uniquely poised to confront and purposively focused to strengthen peace, security, democracy, and human rights. In this community based course, students will study the role and history of the OASwhile working directly with area public high school students in preparation forthe OAS annual high model OAS simulation in Washington, DC.

Taught by: Bartch

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 330 PIW Semester Core Seminar: Conducting Public Policy Research in Washington DC

This seminar is taught in Washington D.C. for students enrolled in the Washington Semester Program. It includes an orientation to observation and research in the Washington Community and a major independent research project on the politics of governance.

Taught by: Martinez

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

2 Course Units

PSCI 332 Survey Research & Design

Survey research is a small but rich acadmic field and discipline, drawing on theory and practice from many diverse fields including political science and communication.This course canvasses the science and practice of survey methods,sampling theory, instrument development and operationalization, and the analysis and reporting of survey data. Major areas of focus include measurement and research on survey errors, application to election polling, new frontiers in data collection, overall development of data management and introductory statistics.

Taught by: Dutwin

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 333 Political Polling

Political polls are a central feature of elections and are ubiquitously employed to understand and explain voter intentions and public opinion. This course will examine political polling by focusing on four main areas of consideration. First, what is the role of political polls in a functioning democracy? This area will explore the theoretical justifications for polling as a representation of public opinion. Second, the course will explore the business and use of political polling, including media coverage of polls, use by politicians for political strategy and messaging, and the impact polls have on elections specifically and politics more broadly. The third area will focus on the nuts and bolts of election and political polls, specifically with regard to exploring traditional questions and scales used for political measurement; the construction and considerations of likely voter models; measurement of the horserace; and samples and modes used for election polls. The course will additionally cover a fourth area of special topics, which will include exit polling, prediction markets, polling aggregation, and other topics. It is not necessary for students to have any specialized mathematical or statistical background for this course.

Taught by: Dutwin

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 334 Emergency Response

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 335 Healthy Schools

This Fox Leadership and academically based community service seminar will use course readings and students' own observations and interviews in their service learning projects in West Philadelphia schools to analyze the causes and impact of school health and educational inequalities and efforts to address them. Course readings will include works by Jonathan Kozol, studies of health inequalities and their causes, and studies of No Child Left Behind, the CDC's School Health Index, recess, school meal, and nutrition education programs. Course speakers will help us examine the history, theories, politics and leadership behind different strategies for addressing school-based inequalities and their outcomes. Service options will focus especially on the West Philadelphia Recess Initiative. Other service options will include work with Community School Student Partnerships and the Urban Nutrition Initiative.

Taught by: Summers

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 336 Congress, Elections and American Democracy

Taught by: Lapinski

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 338 Statistical Methods PSCI

The goal of this class is to expose students to the process by which quantitative political science research is conducted. The class will take us down three separate, but related tracks. Track one will teach some basic tools necessary to conduct quantitative political science research. Topics covered will include descriptive statistics, sampling, probability and statistical theory, and regression analysis. However, conducting empirical research requires that we actually be able to apply these tools. Thus, track two will teach us how to implement some of these basic tools using the computer program R. However, if we want to implement these tools, we also need to be able to develop hypotheses that we want to test. Thus, track three will teach some basics in research design. Topics will include independent and dependent variables, generating testable hypotheses, and issues in causalit You are encouraged to register for both this course an PSCI 107 at the same time, as the courses cover distin but complementary, material. But there are no prerequi nor is registering for PSCI 107 necessary, in order to take this course. The class satisfies the College of A Science Quantitative Data Analysis (QDA) requirement.

Taught by: Meredith

Course not offered every year

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

PSCI 354 Forced Migration & Educ

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 355 Topics in Race and International Relations

This seminar focuses on issues of race in internatioanl relations. The specific focus of the course will vary by semester.

Taught by: Vitalis

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 358 International Law

This course intends to familiarize the student with the concept of "law", its use as a constitutive and regulative force in the international arena, and the expanding scope of international law through the inclusion of transnational law and human rights.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

PSCI 374 Communication & Congress

Taught by: Felzenberg

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 395 Power Sharing in Deeply Divided Places - BFS

This course examines conceptual, explanatory and normative debates over power-sharing systems. We explore the circumstances in which federal, consociational and other power-sharing institutions and practices are proposed and implemented to regulate deep national, ethnic, religious or linguistic divisions. We evaluate these systems, seeking to explain why they are formed or attempted, and why they may endure or fail, paying special attention to bi- and multi-national, multi-ethnic, multi-religious and multi-lingual environments.

Taught by: O'Leary

Course not offered every year

Corequisites: Benjamin Franklin Scholars, seniors and juniors in Political Science, seniors in PPE; others by permission.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 398 Selected Topics in Political Science

Consult department for detailed descriptions. More than one course may be taken in a given semester. Recent titles have included: Sustainable Environmental Policy & Global Politics; Shakespeare and Political Theory.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 402 Us-Latin American Rel

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

PSCI 404 Media and Politcs

Media and Politics will examine multiple issues specific to the past and present political media environment in the United States. Focus will be primarily, though not exclusively on the contemporary news media (as opposed to political advertising and other marketing- oriented communications). Topics will include the rise of partisan media, selective exposure, news as entertainment, etc. Reading expectations will be relatively heavy, and under the supervision of the professor, students will be expected to write a research paper on a topic not directly a part of the course material.

Taught by: Mutz

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 412 Comparative Politics

This seminar focuses on comparative political systems. Themes include political participants, leadership, institutions, instability, and system transformation in developed and less developed countries.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

PSCI 413 Evidence Based Policies of Economic and Political Development

This class provides a "hands-on" introduction to the promises and limitations of using Randomized Control Trials (RCTs) to inform policy makers, practitioners, and academics of the conditions under which policies likely would have a positive effect on economic and political outcomes, in the context of international development. This course has three parts: the first is devoted to understanding the "nuts and bolts" of running field experiments / RCTs in developing countries. In part, we will be reading Glennester and Takavarasha's Running Randomized Evaluations: A Practical Guide. In addition, we will discuss core behavioral concepts from both behavioral economics and social psychology (prospect theory). The second part of the course will be devoted to demonstrating how schools have used RCTs to inform core policy debates (e.g. What are some effective ways to reduce corruption? How can we improve the performance of frontline service providers? How can politicians be more responsive to their constituents?) In the third part, students will be presenting their own research proposals, explicitly designed to address either a core policy question in the developing world or--for those interested--in the USA. Here students will have an opportunity to partner with the Social and Behavioral Sciences Team (https://sbst.gov), which is under the National Science and Technology Council.

Taught by: Grossman

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 418 Evolution, Politics and Computer Simulation

In this course we shall explore how recent developments in evolutionary theory relate to larger questions raised by students of complexity and complex adaptive systems. We shall study how they together provide a basis for important critiques of standard approaches in political science and enable fascinating and powerful understandings of politics and political phenomena -- including national identity and identity change, state formation, revolution, globalization, and leadership. An important vehicle for the application of these insights for understanding politics is computer simulations featuring agent-based modeling. Students will use "PS-I" an agent based computer simulation platform, to develop their own models, conduct experiments, test hypotheses, or produce existence proofs in relation to popular theoretical positions in contemporary political science. No knowledge of computer programming is required.

Taught by: Lustick

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: PPE 476

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 433 Social Movements

Social movements and political protest have become some of the most effective tools for citizens and non-citizens to influence the political system. This course is designed to introduce students to the theoretical and methodological approaches taken in understanding these behaviors. Analyzing social movements that range from civil discontent to contentious political protest, the course will address a variety of questions: What is the origin of movement behavior and why do individuals turn to these actions in lieu of simply engaging in institutional modes of political action such as voting? What were the strategies of these movements? What are the political conditions that allow social movements to resonate with the American public? In addition to addressing these topics, this course surveys the policy successes of major social and political movements. From the Civil Rights and Women's Right Movement to the recent Tea Party movement and Hong Kong demonstrations over democracy, this course explores the various public policies that have resulted from citizens' protest actions. While state level and local level government responsiveness will be addressed, special attention will be given to how political protest influences public policy in all three branches of the federal government.

Taught by: Gillion

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 434 Advanced Topics in American Politics

This seminar is designed to serve as a "capstone" experience for advanced undergrduates interested in American politics. It exposes students to some of the issues currently being studied and debated by the leading scholars in the field. For each topic we will read works that take competing or opposing positions on an issue; for example we will examine the current controversy over the causes and and consequences of divided government. Students will write a research paper analyzing one of the debates.

Taught by: Gillion

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 436 Political Psychology

How do campaign advertisements influence voters' perceptions and behavior? What roles do emotions play in politics? Do we all harbor some measure of racism, sexism, or homophobia, and what role do these stereotypes play in political behavior? How and why do ideologies form, and how does partisanship influence the way that voters understand the political world? How do people perceive threat, and what are the psychological consequences of terrorism? These questions, and many others, are the province of political psychology, an interdisciplinary field that uses experimental methods and theoretical ideas from psychology as tools to examine the world of politics. In this course, we will explore the role of human thought, emotion, and behavior in politics and examine the psychological origins of citizens' political beliefs and actions from a variety of perspectives. Most of the readings emphasize politics in the United States, though the field itself speaks to every aspect of political science.

Taught by: Margolis

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 437 Race & Criminal Justice

Why are African Americans and some other minority groups disproportionately incarcerated and subjected to penal sanctions? What are the political, social and economic consequences for individuals, communities, and the wider society of mass incarceration in the United States? What types of reforms of the criminal justice system are desirable and possible? This advanced seminar analyzes the connection between race, crime, punishment, and politics in the United States. The primary focus is on the role of race in explaining why the country's prison population increased six-fold since the early 1970s and why the United States today has the highest incarceration rate in the world. The class will likely take field trips to a maximum-security jail in Philadelphia and to a state prison in the Philadelphia suburbs.

Taught by: Gottschalk

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 439 Experimental Methods of Inquiry

The main goal of this course is to familiarize students with experiments, quasi-experiments, population-based survey experiments and field experiments as they are widely used in the social sciences. By the end of the course, students will be expected to understand what it is about a study that allows for a strong causal inference. Whether one is reading about studies in a newspaper or reading academic journal articles, it is important to know how to distinguish convincing versus unconvincing evidence of any given claim. As a final project, students will be expected either to develop their own original experimental design or to analyze the evidence pertaining to a causal claim of their own choosing based on what they have learned in class. Throughout the course of the semester, we will also consider how to deal with the issue of causality as it occurs in observational studies, and draw parallels between experimental and observational research.

Taught by: Mutz

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 484 Meaning of Democracy

This course provides a broad, humanistic survey to some of the most important ideas, debates, and problems connected to the study of democracy. The course is divided into three segments: the democratic citizen (in which we explore ethical issues pertaining to the experience of democracy as a way of life); the democratic People (in which we investigate some of the best and most recent attempts to come to grips with the difficult, yet fundamental, notion of the People); and the democratic world (in which we examine issues pertaining to democratization and development, including the tension between democracy and individual liberty and the relationship between democracy and global capitalism).

Taught by: Green

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 496 Dcc Research Seminar: Democracy, Citizenship & Constitutionalism Research Seminar

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

0.5 Course Units

PSCI 497 Political Science Honors

This is a mandatory seminar for all students planning to submit an honors thesis for the purpose of possibly earning distinction in Political Science upon graduation. The course is aimed at helping students identify a useful and feasible research question, become familiar with the relevant literatures and debates pertaining to that question, develop a basic understanding of what might constitute "good" and "original" research in different subfields, and set up a plan for conducting and presenting the research. The course is also aimed at building a community of like-minded student researchers, which can complement and enrich the honor student's individual experience of working one-on-one with a dedicated faculty thesis advisor. Students apply in the spring of their junior year for admissions to the honors program and enrollment in PSCI497.

Taught by: Doherty-Sil

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 498 Selected Topics in Political Science

Consult department for detailed descriptions. Recent topics include: Globalization; Race & Criminal Justice; Democracy & Markets in Postcommunist Europe.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 499 Independent Study - Honors

Individual research to be taken under direction of faculty member. Students wishing to complete work on an honors paper should contact the Political Science Department.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

PSCI 511 Society and Politics in India

This course examines the experience of representative democracy in India and the country's development record in a historical framework. It will ask questions such as: How did representative democracy emerge in India, and what explains its persistence? What are the sources of its vulnerability? What kind of a sense of nationhood does this democratic experience rest upon? What are the exclusions built into this conception of nationhood? What is the relationship between India's development experience and its democratic experiment? How have India's "traditional" institutions adapted or failed to adapt to modern circumstances? Why has India performed well in certain economic sectors even while its record in providing basic social services has been dismal? How have the Indian State and its public institutions managed and coped with these changes? And how has India's self-perception about its place in the world changed in recent years, and what are its implicatons?

Taught by: Kapur, Frankel

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 517 Russian Politics

This course will present an in-depth examination of political, economic and social change in post-Soviet Russia within a historical context. After a breif discussion of contemporary problems in Russia, the first half of the course will delve into the rise of communism in 1917, the evolution of the Soviet regime, and the tensions between ideology and practice over the seventy years of communist rule up until 1985. The second part of the course will begin with an examination of the Gorbachev period and the competing interpretations of how the events between 1985 and 1991 may have contributed to the collapse of the Soviet Union. We will then proceed to make sense of the continuities and changes in politics, economics and society in contemporary Russia. Important topics will include the confrontations accompanying the adoption of a new constitution, the emergence of competing ideologies and parties, the struggle over economic privatization, the question of federalism and nationalism, social and political implicatons of economic reform, and prospects for Russia's future in the post-Yeltsin era. This course may also be taken as a graduate seminar (PSCI 517) with the permission of the instructor and the completion of additional requirements.

Taught by: Sil

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

PSCI 525 Introduction to Political Communication

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 531 Public Opinion & Elections

This course is designed to give advanced undergraduates and graduate students exposure to the literature on political behavior in American politics (the course is part of the departments 3-course graduate sequence in American politics). The course will cover both the classics of public opinion and political behavior from the Columbia, Michigan, and Rochester schools, as well as more current topics and debates in the literature. Topics include (but are not limited to) the early voting studies, the role of partisanship, the nature and origins of ideology, mass-elite interactions, heuristics and low information rationality, the nature of the survey response, campaign and media effects, framing effects, and the role of institutions in structuring behavior. Undergraduates are welcome in the class, but they should know that the class assumes familiarity with quantitative approaches to studying politics.

Taught by: Levendusky

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 534 Political Culture and American Cities

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 535 Inequality & Race Policy

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 545 Politics & Education

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 550 International Politics

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 552 Game Theory

This course provides an introduction to non-cooperative game theory and its applications to political science. The goal of the course is to provide students with the background and understanding necessary to read published game-theoretic work in political science journals. To that end, the course covers the basic concepts of game theory, including Nash equilibrium and its main refinements, simultaneous and sequential games, repeated games, evolutionary game theory, and games of incomplete and private information. In addition, we will cover some of the central models used in political science, notably models of public choice (such as the median voter theorem) and models of bargaining.

Taught by: Weisiger

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 558 Human Rights

This course will examine the theoretical, historical and political foundations of contemporary human rights debates. The course will cover not only broad conceptual issues, but also specific issue areas (e.g., civil rights, economic rights, women's rights, business and human rights), as well as the question of how new rights norms emerge and diffuse in the international arena. The course is open to students in the Master of Liberal Arts Program, as well as students who are actively pursuing the Graduate Certificate in Interdisciplinary Studies in Global Human Rights.

Taught by: Doherty-Sil

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

PSCI 584 Political Philosophy

An examination of basic theoretical problems of political science divided into three parts. First, specific features of social sciences will be examined and three most important general orientations of social sciences (analytical, interpretative and critical) will be compared and analyzed. Second, basic concepts of social and political sciences will be studied: social determination, rationality, social change, politics, power, state, democracy. Third, the problem of value judgments will be considered: Is there a rational, objective method for the resolution of conflicts in value judgments? Is morality compatible with politics?

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 598 Selected Topics

Consult department for detailed descriptions. More than one course may be taken in a given semester. Recent titles have included: Race Development and American International Relations, Hegel and Marx, and Logic of the West.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 600 International Relations Theory

This purpose of this course is two-fold. First, the survey course is designed to introduce students to a wide range of theories of international politics. During the course of the semester we will examine neo-realism, power transition theory, hegemonic stability theory, the modern world system, international regimes and interdependence, the democratic peace, bureaucratic politics, organizational theory, constructivism, and decision making theory. Second, the course will sharpen students' research design skills. The written assignments require students to take the often abstract theories presented in the readings and develop practical research designs for testing hypotheses derived from the theories. The papers will not include data collection or the execution of actual tests. Rather, they will focus on the conceptual problems of designing tests which eliminate competing hypotheses, operationalizing variables, and identifying potential sources of data. Student's grades will be based on five short research designs and discussion leadership.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 605 Great Books Comp Pol

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 610 Comparative Political Analysis

This seminar is aimed primarily at graduate students planning to take doctoral exams in comparative politics. It provides a critical survey of the field of comparative politics, tracing the intellectual history of the field, examining shifts in conceptual frameworks and research traditions, and comparing alternative methodological approaches. The first half of the course generally examines how processes of political, economic, and social change have been theorized in the social sciences from the mid-19th century to the present. In this process, particular attention is paid to the bifurcation between theories that emphasize the "universal" (e.g. the homogenizing effects of specific processes or variables) and the "particular" (e.g. the persistence of distinctive historical legacies and trajectories). Since this bifurcation is reinforced by distinct styles and methods of research, the seminar also probes the recent battles between rational-choice, cultural, and structuralist scholars, while considering the trade-offs between varieties of formal, quantitative, and qualitative methods. In the second half, the focus shifts to the range of substantive problems investigated by scholars in the field of comparative politics. These topics cover the complex relations among nations, states and societies; the origins, consolidation, and patterns of democratic governance; political economy in relation to development processes and social policies; the intersection of international/global economy and domestic politics; the dynamics of revolutions and social movements; and alternative problematiques constructed from the point of view of real actors such as workers, women, and local communities. In all cases, As a whole, the course is designed to provide an introduction to important issues and debates that comparativists have regularly engaged in; to help you understand the assumptions behind, and differences between, particular approaches, methods, and styles of research; to examine whether current debates are spurring new or better research in a given field in light of past approaches; and to gauge whether there has been progress, fragmentation, or stagnation in the field of comparative politics as a whole.

Taught by: Sil

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 614 Political Identity & Political Institution

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 615 Political Economy of Development

This course examines the debate in development studies arising from recognition that economic models, theories, methods, and strategies abstracted from the specific experience of western societies and cultures do not have general applicability. A broader social science approach is adopted, one which emphasizes the need to understand the social structures and cultures of the developing countries, the capabilities of weak versus strong states, and the links with the international system that influence transformative processes to which industrializing economies are subjected. The readings offer an overview of the most influential theories of development and underdevelopment that structured debate from the 1960's through the 1990's,and focus on the elements of these approaches that advance understanding of development and stagnation in several key countries, including Brazil, Mexico, India and selected countries in East and Southeast Asia.

Taught by: Grossman

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 618 International Political Economy

Examination of the relationship between the international, political, and economic systems from a variety of theoretical perspectives that have emerged in the postwar period, including liberalism, transnationalism, statism, Marxism, and dependency.

Taught by: Mansfield

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 619 Strategic Studies Seminar

This seminar offers graduate students an introduction to the subfield of international relations labeled strategic studies (or security studies). In addition to exploring key theoretical issues, we consider their usefulness for understanding relevant events in international politics since World War II. Although the course emphasizes the distinctive features of great power strategy in the nuclear age, we also look at the continuing role of conventional forces, the strategic choices of lesser powers, and selected security problems in the post-Cold War world (e.g., proliferation, terrorism).

Taught by: Goldstein

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 631 American Political Development

Analyzes important patterns of continuity and change in American politics by examining the development of the American State from a comparative and historical perspective. Covers issues and debates central to not only the subfield of American politics, but also the discipline of political science more broadly. These include the role of the state, political culture, interests, ideas, and institutions in politicadevelopment, and the role of history in political analysis. Open to advanced undergraduates with the permission of the instructor.

Taught by: Gottschalk

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 633 Hegemonic Analysis: Theories and Applications

An important strain within contemporary political science has been the attempt to explain how power is exercised through the manipulation or exploitation of consciousness, habits, and cultural predispositions. One of the key concepts in the study of these issues is that of "hegemony" --the establishment of particular beliefs as commonsensical presumptions of political life. In this course that notion will be systematically explored. Of particular interest will be how authors who conduct hegemonic analysis cope with the problem of analyzing the effect of what the objects of their analysis, by definition, do not and, in some sense, cannot, think about. Illustrations of hegemonic phenomena and attempts to analyze them will be drawn from a variety of fields, such as political theory, historiography, comparative politics, American politics, rational choice theory,agent based modeling, and epistemology.

Taught by: Lustick

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 635 Exp Design & Iss Causal

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 637 Survey American Institut

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 638 Race & Criminal Justice

Taught by: Gottschalk

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 655 Democracy in Comparative Perspective

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 692 Advanced Statistical Analysis

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 696 Qualitative Methods

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 710 The Politics of Africa and the African Diaspora After World War II

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 711 Fascism and Racism: A Love Story

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 798 Selected Topics in Political Science

Consult department for detailed descriptions. More than one section may be given in a semester. Recent titles have included: Interpreting the Canon; State, Self, & Society; U.S. Policy in Europe; and Dissertation Writing.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

PSCI 805 Analysis Election Data

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit