Psychology (PSYC)

PSYC 001 Introduction to Experimental Psychology

This course provides an introduction to the basic topics of psychology including our three major areas of distribution: the biological basis of behavior, the cognitive basis of behavior, and individual and group bases of behavior. Topics include, but are not limited to, neuropsychology, learning, cognition, development, disorder, personality, and social psychology.

For BA Students: Living World Sector

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 005 Grit Lab: The Science and Practice of Passion and Perseverance

The aims of Grit Lab are two-fold: (1) equip you with generalizable knowledge about the science of passion and perseverance (2) to help you apply these insights to your own life. At the heart of this course are cutting-edge scientific discoveries about how to foster passion and perseverance for long-term goals. As in any undergraduate course, you will have an opportunity to learn from current research. But unlike most courses, Grit Lab encourages you to apply these ideas to your own life and reflect on your experience.

Taught by: Duckworth

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: OIDD 005

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 006 The Pursuit of Happiness

What is happiness? Can it be successfully pursued? If so, what are the best ways of doing so? This interactive course will consider various ways of answering these questions by exploring theoretical, scientific, and practical perspectives on flourishing, thriving, and wellness. We will discuss approaches to happiness from the humanities and the sciences and then try them out to see how they might help us increase our own well-being and that of the communities in which we live.

Taught by: Pawelski

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 097 Psych Abroad

Psych Abroad

Taught by: TBD

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 109 Introduction to Brain and Behavior

Introduction to the structure and function of the vertebrate nervous system, including the physiological bases of sensory activity, perception, drive, motor control and higher mental processes. The course is intended for students interested in the neurobiology of behavior. Familiarity with elementary physics and chemistry will be helpful.

For BA Students: Living World Sector

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: BIBB 109, BIOL 109

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 111 Perception

How the individual acquires and is guided by knowledge about objects and events in their environment.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: VLST 211

Prerequisite: PSYC 001 or COGS 001

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 127 Physiology of Motivated Behaviors

This course focuses on evaluating the experiments that have sought to establish links between brain structure (the activity of specific brain circuits) and behavioral function (the control of particular motivated and emotional behaviors). Students are exposed to concepts from regulatory physiology, systems neuroscience, pharmacology, and endocrinology and read textbook as well as original source materials. The course focuses on the following behaviors: feeding, sex, fear, anxiety, the appetite for salt, and food aversion. The course also considers the neurochemical control of responses with an eye towards evaluating the development of drug treatments for: obesity, anorexia/cachexia, vomiting, sexual dysfunction, anxiety disorders, and depression.

Taught by: Grill

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: BIBB 227

Prerequisite: PSYC 001

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 149 Cognitive Neuroscience

The study of the neural systems that underlie human perception, memory and language; and of the pathological syndromes that result from damage to these systems.

Taught by: Epstein or Mackey

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: BIBB 249

Prerequisite: PSYC 001 or COGS 001

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 151 Language and Thought

This course describes current theorizing on how the human mind achieves high-level cognitive processes such as using language, thinking, and reasoning. The course discusses issues such as whether the language ability is unique to humans, whether there is a critical period to the acquisition of a language, the nature of conceptual knowledge, how people perform deductive reasoning and induction, and how linguistic and conceptual knowledge interact.

Taught by: Trueswell

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: LING 151

Prerequisite: PSYC 001 or 207 or COGS 001 or LING 105

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 159 Memory

This course presents an integrative treatment of the cognitive and neural processes involved in learning and memory, primarily in humans. We will survey the major findings and theories on how the brain gives rise to different kinds of memory, considering evidence from behavioral experiments, neuroscientific experiments, and computational models.

Taught by: Schapiro

Also Offered As: BIBB 159

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 160 Personality and Individual Differences

This course provides an introduction to the psychology of personality and individual differences. Many psychology courses focus on the mind or brain; in contrast to those approaches of studying people in general, the focus in this course is on the question "How are people different from each other?" It will highlight research that take a multidimensional approach to individual differences and attempts to integrate across the biological, cognitive-experimental, and social-cultural influences on personality.

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: PSYC 001

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 162 Abnormal Psychology

The concepts of normality, abnormality, and psychopathology; symptom syndromes;theory and research in psychopathology and psychotherapy.

Taught by: Ruscio

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: PSYC 001

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 170 Social Psychology

An overview of theories and research across the range of social behavior from intra-individual to the group level including the effects of culture, social environment, and groups on social interaction.

For BA Students: Society Sector

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: PSYC 001

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 181 Intro to Developmental Psychology

The goal of this course is to introduce both Psychology majors and non-majors majors to the field of Developmental Psychology. Developmental Psychology is a diverse field that studies the changes that occur with age and experience and how we can explain these changes. The field encompasses changes in physicalgrowth, perceptual systems, cognitive systems, social interactions and and much more. We will study the development of perception, cognition, language,academic achievement, emotion regulation, personality, moral reasoning,and attachment. We will review theories of development and ask how these theories explain experimental findings. While the focus is on human development, when relevant, research with animals will be used as a basis for comparison.

Taught by: Brannon

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: PSYC 001

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 207 Introduction to Cognitive Science

How do minds work? This course surveys a wide range of answers to this question from disciplines ranging from philosophy to neuroscience. The course devotes special attention to the use of simple computational and mathematical models. Topics include perception, learning, memory, decision making, emotion and consciousness. The course shows how the different views from the parent disciplines interact and identifies some common themes among the theories that have been proposed. The course pays particular attention to the distinctive role of computation in such theories and provides an introduction to some of the main directions of current research in the field. It is a requirement for the BA in Cognitive Science, the BAS in Computer and Cognitive Science, and the minor in Cognitive Science, and it is recommended for students taking the dual degree in Computer and Cognitive Science.

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: CIS 140, COGS 001, LING 105, PHIL 044

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 210 Functional Neuroanatomy Laboratory

A laboratory course designed to familiarize the student with the fundamental gross and histological organization of the brain. The mammalian brain will be dissected and its microscopic anatomy examined using standard slide sets. Comparative brain material will be introduced, where appropriate, to demonstrate basic structural-functional correlations.

Taught by: McLean

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: BIBB 310

Prerequisite: BIBB 109

Activity: Laboratory

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 217 Visual Neuroscience

An introduction to the scientific study of vision, with an emphasis on the biological substrate and its relation to behavior. Topics will typically include physiological optics, transduction of light, visual thresholds, color vision, anatomy and physiology of the visual pathways, and the cognitive neuroscience of vision.

Taught by: Stocker

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: BIBB 217, VLST 217

Prerequisite: PSYC 109

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 225 Drugs, Brain, and Mind

The course will begin with a review of basic concepts in pharmacology including: routes of drug administration, drug metabolism, the dose response curve, tolerance and sensitization. Following a brief overview of cellular foundations of neuropharmacology (neuronal biology, synaptic and receptor function), the course will focus on several neurotransmitter systems and the molecular and behavioral mechanisms mediating the mind-altering, additive and neuropsychiatric disorders, including depression, schizophrenia, and anxiety with an emphasis on their underlying neurobiological causes, as well as the pharmacological approaches for treatment.

Taught by: Kane

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: BIBB 270

Prerequisite: BIBB 190 or PSYC 109

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 231 Evolution of Behavior: Animal Behavior

The evolution of social behavior in animals, with special emphasis on group formation, cooperation among kin, mating systems, territoriality and communication.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: BIBB 231, BIOL 231

Prerequisite: BIOL 102 OR 121 or PSYC 001

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 233 Neuroethology

In course, students will learn how neurobiologists study the relationship between neural circuitry and behavior. Behaviors such as bat echolocation, birdsong, insect olfaction, spatial navigation, eye movement and others will be used to explore fundamental principles of brain function that include brain oscillations, population codes, efference copy, sensorimotor maps and sleep replay. The course will also discuss the various methodologies that are used to address these questions. The reading material will be derived mostly from the primary literature.

Taught by: McLean

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: BIBB 233

Prerequisite: BIBB 109

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 235 Psychology of Language

This course describes the nature of human language, how it is used to speak and comprehend, and how it is learned. The course raises and discusses issues such as whether language ability is innate and unique to humans, whether there is a critical period for the acquisition of a language, and how linguistic and conceptual knowledge interact.

Taught by: Dahan

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: PSYC 151 or LING 001

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 239 Neuroendocrinology

This course is designed to examine the various roles played by the nervous and endocrine systems in controlling both physiological processes and behavior. First, the course will build a foundation in the concepts of neural and endocrine system function. Then we will discuss how these mechanisms form the biological underpinnings of various behaviors and their relevant physiological correlates.

Taught by: Flanagan-Cato

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: PSYC 109

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 247 Neuroscience and Society

Cognitive, social,and affective neuroscience have made tremendous progress in in the last two decades. As this progress continues, neuroscience is becoming increasingly relevant to all of the real-world endeavors that require understanding, predicting and changing human behavior. In this course we will examine the ways in which neuroscience is being applied in law, criminal justice, national defense, education, economics, business,and other sectors of society. For each application area we will briefly review those aspects of neuroscience that are most relevant, and then study the application in more detail.

Taught by: Gerstein

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: PSYC 109 or 149

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 253 Judgment and Decisions

Thinking, judgment, and personal and societal decision making, with emphasis on fallacies and biases. Prerequisite: One semester of Statistics or Microeconomics.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: PPE 153

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 265 Behavioral Economics and Psychology

Our understanding of markets, governments, and societies rests on our understanding of choice behavior, and the psychological forces that govern it. This course will introduce you to the study of choice, and will examine in detail what we know about how people make choices, and how we can influence these choices. It will utilize insights from psychology and economics, and will apply these insights to domains including risky decision making, intertemporal decision making, and social decision making.

Taught by: Bhatia

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: PPE 313

Prerequisite: ECON 001

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 266 Introduction to Positive Psychology

An introduction to the study of positive emotions, positive character traits, and positive institutions. The positive emotions consist of emotions about the past (e.g., serenity, satisfaction, pride), about the future (e.g., hope, optimism, faith), and emotions about the present (pleasure and gratification). The distinction among the pleasant life, the good life, and the meaningful life is drawn. The positive traits include wisdom, courage, humanity, justice, temperance, and spirituality, and the classification of these virtues is explored. The positive institutions are exemplified by extended families, free press, humane leadership, and representative government.

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: PSYC 001

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 272 Evolutionary Psychology

This course introduces the field of evolutionary psychology, which is an approach to the study of human behavior. We will consider the threoretical underpinnings of the field, including evolutionary threory, development, kinship, and adaptations for social life, and will sample some of the recent empirical contributions to this growing area.

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: PSYC 001

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 273 Neuroeconomics

This course will introduce students to neuroeconomics, a field of research that combines economic, psychological, and neuroscientific approaches to study decision-making. The course will focus on our current understanding of how our brains give rise to decisions, and how this knowledge might be used to constrain or advance economic and psychological theories of decision-making. Topics covered will include how individuals make decisions under conditions of uncertainty, how groups of individuals decide to cooperate or compete, and how decisions are shaped by social context, memories, and past experience.

Taught by: Kable

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: BIBB 273

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 275 Introduction to Political Psychology

This course will explore psychological approaches to understanding political beliefs, attitudes, and actions at the levels of both individual citizens and national leaders. It will also explore the possibility that psychological science itself is not immune to the political debates swirling around it. Specific topics will include: the workings of belief systems (and their power to shape what we "see"), cognitive biases (and their power to cause miscalculations), sacred values and their role in stabilizing belief systems and social interaction, personality and ideology (the linkages between the personal and the political), and clashing conceptions of morality and distributive and corrective justice (striking variations among people in what they consider to be fair). We shall also explore some topics that have sparked controversy in the psychological research literature and that tend to polarize opinion along political lines, including work on intelligence and unconscious bias. Prerequisite: Note: Students who are more interested in business-related issues may want Wharton 276x which is a modified version of this course specifically for Wharton undergraduates.

Taught by: Tetlock

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: PPE 275

Prerequisite: PSYC 001 or COGS 001

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 280 Developmental Psychology: Social and Emotional Evelopment

This course will cover theory and research related to the development of attachment, emotional regulation, peer and intimate relationships, personality, moral reasoning, and emotional and behavioral disorders. The course will emphasize the degree to which family, peer, and community contexts influence development from infancy into adulthood. Efforts will be made to integrate biological and environmental accounts of development across the lifespan.

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: PSYC 001

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 281 Cognitive Development

What infants and young children come to know about the world, and how they learn it. Topics will include changes in children's thinking, perceptual development, language acquisition, and current theories of cognitive development.

Taught by: Swingley

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: PSYC 001 or COGS 001

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 311 Research Experience in Perception

In this research course, students will begin by first replicating earlier experiments to measure human visual memory capacity. After several class discussions to discuss ideas, each student will design and conduct their own experiment to further investigate visual and/or familiarity memory. Prerequisite: One semester of Statistics, and one of the following: PSYC 111 or 149 or 151 or 217, or permission of instructor.

Taught by: Rust

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: VLST 212

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 351 Research Experience in Cognitive Psychology

Students will work in small groups to develop, empirically test, and report on a research question in the field of cognitive psychology. Through this process,students will learn how to to conduct and report a psychological study, including the appropriate statistical tests. Class discussions will help students craft their projects, and in-class presentations will provide the opportunity to develop and refine presentation skills. Psychology majors only. Class size is limited to 16 students. Prerequisite: One semester of statistics.

Taught by: Weisberg

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 362 Research Experience in Abnormal Psychology

Prerequite: PSYC 362, 301 is a two-semester course starting in the Fall. Class size limited to 8 students.

Taught by: Dr. Melissa Hunt

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 370 Research Experience in Social Psychology

In this course students will work in small groups to develop, empirically test, and report on a research question within one of the domains of social psychology. Depending on the nature of the project, students will employ survey,experimental, or observational research methodology, and learn how to to conduct and report the appropriate statistical tests with Excel and/or SPSS (typically, correlations, t-tests, ANOVA and ANCOVA, multiple regression, , factor analysis, and measures of reliability). Class discussions will help students craft their projects, and in-class presentations will provide the opportunity to develop and refine presentation skills. Psychology majors only. Class size is limited to 12 students. Prerequisite: PSYC 170 and one semester of statistics is required.

Taught by: Royzman

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 380 Research Exp Develop Psy

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 399 Individual Empirical Research

Individual research involving data collection. Students do independent empirical work under the supervision of a faculty member, leading to a written paper. Normally taken in the junior or senior year.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 400 Senior Honors Seminar in Psychology

Open to senior honors candidates in psychology. A two-semester sequence supporting the preparation of an honors thesis in psychology. Students will present their work in progress and develop skills in written and oral communication of scientific ideas. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Honors Program in Psychology.

Taught by: Thompson-Schill

Activity: Seminar

0.5 Course Units

PSYC 421 Neurobiology of Learning and Memory

This course focuses on the current state of our knowledge about the neurobiological basis of learning and memory. A combination of lectures and students seminars will explore th emolecular and cellular basis of learning invertebrates and vertebrates from a behavioral and neural perspective.

Taught by: Gerstein

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: BIBB 442, BIOL 442, NGG 575

Prerequisites: BIOL 251 and BIBB 251

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 429 Big Data, Memory, and the Human Brain

Advances in brain recording methods over the last decade have generated vastly more brain data than had been collected by neuroscientists during the previous century. To understand the human brain, scientists must now use computational methods that exploit the power of these huge data sets.This course will introduce you to the use of big data analytics in the study of human memory and its neural basis. Through hands-on programming projects, we will analyze multi-terabyte data sets both to replicate existing phenomena and to make new discoveries. Although the course has no formal neuroscience or psychology prerequisites it does require CIS121 and Python experience. Because of the heavy computing resources required to perform the assignments enrollment is limited to 15 students and there is a required course application. https://forms.gle/CfeogYQm5mwUBk3x7

Taught by: Kahana

Also Offered As: BIBB 429

Prerequisite: CIS 121

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 434 Computational Neuroscience Lab

This course will focus on computational neuroscience from the combined perspective of data collection, data analysis, and computational modeling. These issues will be explored through lectures as well as Matlab-based tutorials and exercises. The course requires no prior knowledge of computer programming and a limited math background, but familiarity with some basic statistical concepts will be assumed. The course is an ideal preparation for students interested in participating in a more independent research experience in one of the labs on campus. For the Spring 2019 semester, the course will focus on the topic of visual memory.

Taught by: Nicole Rust

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: BIBB 334

Prerequisite: BIBB 109

Activity: Laboratory

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 435 Psycholinguistics

Taught by: Dahan

Prerequisites: PSYC 151 or 235, or LING 001

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 439 Neuroendocrinology Seminar

This course is designed to examine the various roles played by the nervous and endocrine systems in controlling both physiological processes and behavior. First, the course will build a foundation in the concepts of neural and endocrine system function. Then, we will discuss how these mechanisms form the biological underpinnings of various behaviors and their relevant physiological correlates. We will focus on sexual and parental behaviors, stress, metabolism, neuroendocrine-immune interactions, and mental health.

Taught by: Flangan-Cato

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: BIBB 460

Prerequisite: PSYC 109

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 440 Sleep and Sleep Disorders

This class will provide an introduction to sleep and sleep disorders, focusing on current research in the field. Students will learn about the neurobiology of sleep/wake regulation, the relationship between sleep and memory and how sleep is related to physical and mental health. Sleep disorders, including sleep apnea, insomnia, and narcolepsy will be covered in terms of pathophysiology, assessment and treatment.

Taught by: Gehrman

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisite: PSYC 001

Activity: Online Course

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 447 Neurological Insights into Cognition and Behavior

Our modern understanding of the brain began with very humble foundations. Long before transgenic mice, MRI scans, and neuronal recordings, most knowledge about brain function was based on clinical observations of human patients with neurological lesions. This advanced seminar will focus on the cognitive neuroscience of perception, emotion, language, and behavior -- through the unique perspective of real-life patients -- to illustrate fundamental concepts of brain function. Tuesday classes will explore different cognitive neuroscience topics through student presentations and discussion. Thursday classes will involve observing medical history taking and examination of a patient with cognitive deficits pertinent to the Tuesday topic, with opportunity for students to interact with the patient. Pre-requisites: Instructor permission required and PSYC 109/BIBB 109.

Taught by: Gottfried

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Instructor permission is required. Prerequisite: PSYC 109/BIBB 109.

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 449 Seminar in Cognitive Neuroscience

Topics vary each semester. PSYC 449 (Gerstein) Neuroscience for Policymakers: This seminar will provide an overview of the neuroscience behind some of the most relevant issues in public health policy today. We will examine the primary scientific literature as well as delve into lay articles about the science and policy surrounding each issue. /PSYC 449 (Epstein) Consciousness: Consciousness is our subjective experience of the world, including both perceptions and felt internal states. In this seminar, we will explore the the burgeoning scientific literature on the neural basis of consciousness. We will focus in particular on three topics: What are the neuralsystems underlying visual awareness? What are the mechanisms that control the progression of conscious contents to create our stream of thought? What is the relationship between consciousness and behavior? /PSYC 449 (Jenkins) The Social Brain: This seminar examines the cognitive and neural mechanisms that enable humans to predict and understand people's behavior.We will be propelled throughout the course by fundamental questions about the human social brain. For example, why are humans so social? Does the human brain have specialized processes for social thought? Consideration of these questions will involve advanced treatment of a range of topics. Prerequisite: PSYC 449, 601 are LPS courses. PSYC 449, 301, 303 are Psych Department courses.

Prerequisite: PSYC 149

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 453 Seminar in Decision Making: Judgment and Decisions

This seminar will be a series of engaging discussions on a variety of topics that are important to the field of behavioral decision theory. We'll cover issues such as constructed preferences, loss aversion, nudging, emotions, well-being, other-oriented decisions, intuitive predictions, unethical choices,and more. Students will be asked to present papers and generate ideas for potential research projects each week. Grades will be based on class contributions and a paper that is either a literature review or a careful and detailed proposal for a research project.

Taught by: Mellers

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: PSYC 253 or 265

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 462 Seminar in Abnormal Psychology

Topics vary each semester.

Prerequisite: PSYC 162

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 466 Seminar in Positive Psychology

This intensive, discussion-based seminar focuses on the key research that has shaped Positive Psychology. This seminar will equip students with useful insight and critical analysis about Positive Psychology by emphasizing scientific literacy. The workload for this seminar requires intensive reading. To excel in this seminar, students must be willing to enthusiastically read, dissect, and critique ideas within Positive Psychology. This requires students to articulate various ideas in verbal and written form.

Taught by: Connolly

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 470 Seminar in Social Psychology

Topics vary each semester.

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: PSYC 170

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 472 Behavioral Biology of Women

A course that explores female behavior focusing on evolutionary, physiological,and biosocial aspects of women's lives from puberty, through reproductive processes such as pregnancy, birth, lactation to menopause and old age. Examples are drawn from traditional and modern societies and data from nonhuman primates are also considered.

Taught by: Apicella

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: PSYC 272 or BIOL 102 or ANTH 104 or 143

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 473 Neuroeconomics

This course will review recent research that combines psychological, economic and neuroscientific approaches to study human and animal decision-making. A particular focus will be on how evidence about the neural processes associated with choices might be used to constrain economic and psychological theories of decision-making. Topics covered will include decisions involving risk and uncertainty, reinforcement learning, strategic interactions and games, and social preferences.

Taught by: Joseph Kable

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: BIBB 473, NGG 706

Prerequisite: PSYC 149 or 253 or 265

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 474 PSYC 474-301: Being Human; PSYC 474-601: Cultural Psychology

Prerequisite: Undergraduates only. PSYC 474 and 601 are LPS courses.

Taught by: Platt (PSYC 474-301); Abiola (PSYC 474-601)

Prerequisite: PSYC 001

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 478 Capstone: Social Psychology

Social psychology explores how an individual's judgements and behaviors can be influences or determined by others and their social context. Prerequisite: As a PPE Capstone, this is an intergrative senior seminar (open to others by departmental permission).

Taught by: Royzman

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: PPE 477

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 479 Neural Systems and Behavior

This advanced course will investigate neural processing at the systems level. Principles of how brains encode information will be explored in both sensory (e.g. visual, auditory, olfactory, etc.) and motor systems. Neural encoding strategies will be discussed in relation to the specific behavioral needs of the animal. Examples will be drawn from a variety of different model systems.

Taught by: Medina/Schmidt

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: BIBB 479, BIOL 451

Prerequisite: BIOL 251 or BIBB 251

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 480 Seminar in Developmental Psychology

PSYC 480-301 (Brannon): The field of educational neuroscience is an emerging field with the goal of joining knowledge gained from the disciplines of neuroscience, cognitive science, developmental psychology,and education. This interdisciplinary course will focus on how scientific exploration of the mind and brain can inform educational practices. PSYC 480-302 (Connolly): This advanced discussion-based seminar will focus on approaches to success in domains of modern life such as social living and academia. The first portion of this seminar will be a psychology book club where we read various books written by psychology researchers. This will contribute to an ongoing discussion about scientific communication, and the presentation of psychological research to various audiences. From there, students will focus on a specific area of interest, and write a literature review based on contemporary empirical research critiquing their given topic. Students must understand the workload for this seminar requires intensive reading culminating in a large written assignment.

Taught by: Weisberg, Brannon, or Connolly

Prerequisite: PSYC 001

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 482 Inside the Criminal Mind

This seminar explores the development of antisocial behavior including psychopathy, aggression, and violence. At its core, this course examines what increases the risk that children will develop behavior problems and go onto more chronic and extreme forms of violence and psychopathic personality that results in harm to others. We will examine psychiatric diagnoses associated with these antisocial behaviors in both childhood and adulthood and how they link to other relevant forms of psychopathology (e.g., substance use, ADHD). We will explore research elucidating the neural correlates of these behaviors, potential genetic mechanisms underlying these behaviors, and the environments that increase risk for these behaviors. Thus, there will be a focus on neurobiology and genetics approaches to psychiatric outcomes, as well as a social science approach to understanding these harmful behaviors, all while considering development across time. We will also consider ethical and moral implications of this research.

Taught by: Waller

Prerequisites: PSYC 162 and 181

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 490 The Science of Behavior Change

The objective of this 14-week discussion-based seminar for advanced undergraduates is to expose students to cutting-edge research from psychology and economics on the most effective strategies for changing behavior sustainably and for the better (e.g., promoting healthier eating and exercise, encouraging better study habits, and increasing savings rates). The weekly readings cover classic and current research in this area. The target audience for this course is advanced undergraduate students interested in behavioral science research and particularly those hoping to learn about using social science to change behavior for good. Although there are no pre-requisites for this class, it is well-suited to students who have taken (and enjoyed) courses like OIDD 290: Decision Processes, PPE 203/PSYC 265: Behavioral Economics and Psychology, and MKTG 266: Marketing for Social Impact and are interested in taking a deeper dive into the academic research related to promoting behavior change for good. Instructor permission is required to enroll in this course. Please complete the application if interested in registering for this seminar: http://bit.ly/bcfg-class-2020. The application deadline is July 15, 2020. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor required.

Taught by: Katherine Milkman and Angela Duckworth

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: OIDD 490

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 492 Social Cognition

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 511 Prob Models of Perceptio

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 521 Judgment & Decisions

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 525 Controversies in Psychology and Neuroscience

In this seminar, we will discuss several recent controversies in psychology and neuroscience, for example: "p-hacking," replicability, methodological terrorists, neural activity in dead salmon and failures to control the false positive rate in neuroimaging, "voodoo correlations" and double dipping, whether Tic-Tacs can improve self-control and whether reading "old" makes you walk slower. Our goal is not just to engender ennui and/or schadenfreude, but also to ask what we can learn from these discussions about how to do science in the most rigorous, reproducible manner possible.

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 539 Theoretical and Computational Neuroscience

This course will develop theoretical and computational approaches to structural and functional organization in the brain. The course will cover: (i) the basic biophysics of neural responses, (ii) neural coding and decoding with an emphasis on sensory systems, (iii) approaches to the study of networks of neurons, (iv) models of adaptation, learning and memory, (v) models of decision making, and (vi) ideas that address why the brain is organized the way that it is. The course will be appropriate for advanced undergraduates and beginning graduate students. A knowledge of multi-variable calculus, linear algebra and differential equations is required (except by permission of the instructor). Prior exposure to neuroscience and/or Matlab programming will be helpful.

Taught by: Vijay Balasubramanian

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: BE 530, BIBB 585, NGG 594, PHYS 585

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 541 Sleep and Memory

Why do we sleep? This question has puzzled scientists for centuries, but one reason emerging from research in the area is that sleep is critical for forming, retaining, and transforming our memories over time. This seminar explores human and animal research in psychology and neuroscience that has shed light on how sleep carries out these functions. Topics will include the different stages of sleep and their roles in memory consolidation, the neural systems involved in representing memory at different timescales, and the role of dreams in processing memories.

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 547 Foundations of Social, Cognitive, and Affective Neuroscience

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 549 A Neuroscience Perspective of Artificial Intelligence

This seminar course asks what would be required to achieve Strong Artificial Intelligence, also referred to as Artificial General Intelligence (AGI), in light of what we know about the emergence of life and mind in the universe. Specifically, we will consider the question whether it is possible for machines to become self-aware by asking what Natural Intelligence is, and considering what it implies about whether and how AGI can be achieved. To grapple with this question, in Part I of the course we will examine what is known about the emergence of Natural Intelligence in the universe. This study includes the phenomena of: (1a) Abiogenesis, (1b) The Universal Role of Entropy and Information in Evolution, (1c) Signal Transduction, intracellular signaling, and Mechanism of Stimulus-Response Coupling in Unicellular Organisms; (2a) The Evolution of the Metazoa during the Cambrian Explosion, (2b) The Consequences of Motility and Preditor - Prey Dynamics in the Metazoa for the Evolution of Complex Nervous Systems and Behaviors; (3a) The Implications of Invertebrate Navigation by Dead Reckoning for Understanding Insect Behavior, (3b) Insect Behavior in Relation to Robotics; (4a) Origin of the Vertebrates and the Evolution of the Vertebrate Nervous System, (4b) The Mammalian Neocortex; (5) Molecular Mechanisms of Synaptic Plasticity; (6) The Evolution of the Hominins and the Hominin Brain; (7) Higher-Order Thinking and Epistemology; (8a) Meta-awareness as the Foundation of Human Consciousness, (8b) The Fluidity of Mind Embodiment, (8c) Theories and Philosophy of Human Consciousness. (9a) Other Minds: The Atypical Nervous System of the Ctenophore and The Nervous System and Mind of the Octopus, (9b) Animal intelligence. (10a) The History and Trajectory of AI, (10b) Superintelligence, Human Cognitive Fluidity and the Existence of a Global Network of Human Superintelligence.

Taught by: Di Rocco

Prerequisite: PSYC 109 or 149

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 551 Eye Movements in Perception, Language and Cognition

In this course, we examine how the recording of eye movements can provide a moment-by-moment record of perceptual, cognitive and linguistic processes. Four areas of research will be discussed: (1) task-based scene perception; (2) language processing (in both reading and spoken language); (3) category learning, and (4) decision making. In all of these domains, eyetracking research has led to a greater understanding of how attention and information selection supports real-time cognitive processes. Students will have access to eyetracking systems, giving them hands-on experience in designing, running, and analyzing eyetracking experiments. By the end of the semester, students will have collected pilot eyetracking data. Projects will be done individually or within small research teams. Requirements: Weekly readings; class presentations and discussion; and a paper.

Taught by: Trueswell

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: For undergraduate students: PSYC 001, COG 001, or LING 001. For graduate students: None

Activity: Hybrid Course

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 557 Neuroscience, Ethics & Law

How does the neuroscience of human decision-making and emotion impact our understanding of ethics and law? What can neuroscience tell us about why people find actions moral or immoral, worthy of praise or punishment? What, if anything, can it tell us normatively about morality, agency and responsibility? And what other insights might neuroscience offer regarding other morally and legally relevant phenomena such as stereotyping and bias, the causes of antisocial behavior and the detection of deception?

Taught by: Farah

Also Offered As: LAW 557

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 562 Anxiety Disorders, OCD, and PTSD: Theory, Diagnosis, and Evide

Anxiety disorders are among the most commonly occurring disorders in the United States. This course will provide a theoretical and empirical review of anxiety, obsessive compulsive, and trauma-related disorders. Theoretical approaches will be presented to conceptualize and understand the etiology and development of these disorders. After reviewing diagnosis and relevant theories, the course will review the concept of evidence based practice and how it applies to the treatment of anxiety, obsessive compulsive, and trauma-related disorders. We will then review the general concepts of cognitive behavior therapies with an emphasis on exposure-based therapies. Specifically, the following disorders will be covered: Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Specific Phobias, Panic Disorder.

Taught by: Tyler

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 573 Seminar in Neuroeconomics

This seminar will review recent research that combines economic, psychological, and neuroscientific approaches to study decision-making. The course will focus on our current state of knowledge regarding the neuroscience of decision-making, and how evidence concerning the neural processes associated with choices might be used to constrain or advance economic and psychological theories of decision-making. Topics covered will include decisions involving risk and uncertainty, decisions that involve learning from experience, decisions in strategic interactions and games, and social preferences.

Taught by: Kable

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 579 Exp Methods Perception

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 600 Proseminar in General Psychology

Choice of half or full course units each sem. covering a range of subjects and approaches in academic psychology.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 609 Systems Neuroscience

This course provides an introduction to what is known about how neuronal circuits solve problems for the organism and to current resarch approaches to this question. Topics include: vision, audition, olfaction, motor systems, plasticity, and oscillations. In addition, the course aims to provide an overview of the structure of the central nervous system. A number of fundamental concepts are also discussed across topics, such as: lateral inhibition, integration, filterting, frames of reference, error signals, adaptation. The course format consists of lectures, discussions, readings of primary literature, supplemented by textbook chapters and review articles.

Taught by: Yale Cohen, Christopher Pierce

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: NGG 573

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 611 Applied Regression and Analysis of Variance

An applied graduate level course in multiple regression and analysis of variance for students who have completed an undergraduate course in basic statistical methods. Emphasis is on practical methods of data analysis and their interpretation. Covers model building, general linear hypothesis, residual analysis, leverage and influence, one-way anova, two-way anova, factorial anova. Primarily for doctoral students in the managerial, behavioral, social and health sciences.

Taught by: Rosenbaum

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: BSTA 550, STAT 500

Prerequisite: STAT 102 AND STAT 112

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 612 Introduction to Nonparametric Methods and Log-linear Models

An applied graduate level course for students who have completed an undergraduate course in basic statistical methods. Covers two unrelated topics: loglinear and logit models for discrete data and nonparametric methods for nonnormal data. Emphasis is on practical methods of data analysis and their interpretation. Primarily for doctoral students in the managerial, behavioral, social and health sciences. May be taken before STAT 500 with permission of instructor.

Taught by: Rosenbaum

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: STAT 501

Prerequisite: STAT 102 or 112

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 671 Violence: A Clinical Neuroscience Approach

Developed for both Psychology and Criminology graduate students, this interdisciplinary course outlines a clinical neuroscience approach to understanding violence in which the tools of neuroscience- neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neurocognition, neuroendocrinology, neuropharmacology, molecular and behavioral genetics- are used to help inform the etiology and treatment of violence. Clinical components include psychopathy, proactive and reactive aggression, homicide domestic violence, conduct disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, antisocial personality disorder, crime, and delinquency as well as their comorbid conditions (schizophrenia, drug abuse, hyperactivity). The interaction between social, psychological, and neurobiological processes in predisposing to violence will be highlighted, together with neurodevelopmental perspectives on violence focusing on prospective longitudinal and brain imaging research. Key implications for the criminal justice system, neuroethics, forensics psychology, and intervention will also be outlined.

Taught by: Raine

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: CRIM 671

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 675 Language and Cognition

This is a seminar on how language relates to perception and cognition. The seminar pays particular attention to the question of whether and how language might affect (and be affected by) other mental processes, how different languages represent the mental and physical world, and how children acquire language-general and language-specific ways of encoding human experience. The course incorporates cross-linguistic, cognitive and developmental perspectives on a new and rapidly changing research area.

Taught by: Papafragou, Trueswell

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: LING 675

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 698 Laboratory Rotation.

Lab rotation for psychology grad students.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

3.0 Course Units

PSYC 699 Individual Research for First-Year Graduate Students

Two terms. student must enter first term.

Activity: Independent Study

3.0 Course Units

PSYC 703 Special Topics in Psychology

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 704 Research Methods and Statistical Procedures for Social and Clinical Sciences

This course has three primary objectives: 1) developing criteria and strategies for strong inference of causal relationships in social and clinical psychology research; 2) examining the array of research designs employed in the social/clinical sciences together with the threats to internal and external validity associated with each; 3) learning and applying statistical analytical methods appropriate for questions in the social/clinical sciences. The course will employ a seminar format and a project-oriented approach to learning. Students will be encouraged to utilize examples from their own research programs in applying the design and analysis concepts covered in the course.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 705 Neuroethics

Neuroscience is increasingly affecting all aspects of human life, from the relatively familiar medical applications in neurology and psychiatry, to new applications in education, business, law,and the military. Today's neuroscience graduate students will be among the scientists, citizens,and policymakers who will lead society through the maze of decisions regarding the appropriate uses of neuroscience.This course provides a survey of the key ethical, legal,and social issues at the intersection of neuroscience and society.It will include a combination of traditional classroom lectures, discussion and debates, as well as an online component coordinated with a course at Wisconsin's Neuroscience and Public Policy graduate program.

Taught by: Farah

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 709 Special Topics in Clinical Psychology

A developmental approach to the study of psychopathology focuses on how psychological processes from normal to abnormal developmental trajectories. In this seminar we will cover theory, methods, and key constructs in the study of developmental psychopathology. Readings will include seminal empirical papers and chapters.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 711 Basic Problems in Developmental II

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 712 Regression & Anova II

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 744 Brain Development & Society

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 745 Special Topics in Cognitive Neuroscience

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 747 Contemporary Research Issues in Social, Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 810 Psychodiagnostic Testing

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 811 Psychodiagnostic Interviewing

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 815 Introductory Practicum

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 820 Advanced Practicum

Intensive studies of single individuals including interviews, tests, and experiments; also clinical experience at appropriate community agencies.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PSYC 999 Individual Study and Research

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

0.5 Course Units