Social Work (SWRK)

SWRK 5950 Effective Communication and Storytelling

Great leaders are storytellers. They are able to engage and entertain their communities, and tell a compelling narrative about how the world works. They use language powerfully and communicate in ways that uplift and inspire others. In this class, we will explore the power of telling great stories, and learn how to do it most effectively when promoting your campaigns to make the world a better place. We will also look at the skills of framing language in ways that will win over an audience. Finally, we will look at other key skills of effective communication, including the best strategies for persuasion, negotiation, and conflict resolution.

Summer Term

Also Offered As: NPLD 5950

1 Course Unit

SWRK 5960 Design and Incorporation of High Impact Nonprofits

Design and Incorporation of High Impact Not-For-Profits is designed for those who have a practitioner's interest in the design, governance, leadership, and management of high impact not-for-profit organizations. This course is taught through learning best practice theory, applying this theory to a simulation experience, and providing students the opportunity to apply their new knowledge and experience in an interview with a current not-for-profit leader. Students, through the combination of theory and practice, are provided with the essential competencies and tools to design and incorporate a not-for-profit, conduct in-depth analysis of a not-for-profit's effectiveness including, but not limited to, governance, leadership, social impact, financial sustainability, and systems and policy influence. Through the mock simulation process of designing, incorporating, and governing, students will leave with a "best practice" for not-for-profit manual that includes articles of incorporation, bylaws, governance deliverables, strategic business plan, organizational scorecard, 3-5 year budget, development plan and public policy strategy.

Spring

Also Offered As: NPLD 5960

1 Course Unit

SWRK 6000 The Penn Experience: Racism, Reconciliation, and Engagement

This new non-credit asynchronous course, consisting of six Modules, aims to establish common basic language and concepts for incoming graduate and professional students to facilitate subsequent difficult conversations about race, racism and difference in the classroom and beyond. Using video interviews, presentations, short readings and podcasts, the course highlights the significance of Penn and Philadelphia's history of racism and other forms of oppression, Penn's evolving relationship to West Philadelphia, and Penn's efforts toward greater engagement and inclusion. Modules also focus on implicit bias, intercultural communication gender identity and disparities in healthcare. A final module was designed primarily to address the antiracist work that must be done to dismantle white supremacy. All incoming SP2 master's students are expected to spend 20 or more hours reviewing the six modules and completing short assessments prior to starting the fall semester. Other graduate and professional schools will assign modules to be completed based on their schools requirements.

Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms

0 Course Units

SWRK 6010 History and Philosophy of Social Work and Social Welfare

This course traces the development of social welfare policy in the United States and its relationship to social work. It analyzes the values and assumptions that form the foundation of existing welfare programs and institutions and explores the social, economic, political and cultural contexts in which they have developed. The course examines the development of cash assistance and social services programs in light of the enduring legacy of poverty, racism, and sexism. The view of "outsiders" in U.S. society - low-income persons, people of color, gays and lesbians - allows us to gain perspective on the source of conflict and consensus in American history, which augments material about institutional racism learned in SWRK 603 and content about behavioral responses learned in SWRK 602. The course traces, as well, the roles that social workers have played in the formulation and implementation of social welfare policy and links these historical examples to contemporary policy practice.

Fall

1 Course Unit

SWRK 6020 Human Behavior in the Social Environment

This course introduces the student to the individual and family components of social interaction in a variety of different milieus. Theories of self and personality are studied, along with theories related to traditional and non-traditional family styles, different social and ethnic groups, and of assimilation and acculturation. Emphasis is given to the impact of different cultures and traditions on individual functioning. Additional attention is given to selected social characteristics of the larger society, such as factors of socio-economic class which influence individual and family behavior and functioning.

Fall

1 Course Unit

SWRK 6030 American Racism and Social Work Practice

This course explores racism in America as an historical and contemporary phenomenon. It emphasizes the development of evidence-based knowledge about institutional systems of racism, analytical skill in understanding the complexity of institutional racism and other forms of oppression more broadly defined, self-awareness, and the implications of racism for social work services and practices.

Fall

1 Course Unit

SWRK 6040 Foundations of Social Work Practice I

This is a first of a four-course sequence designed to help students develop a professional stance and evidence-based framework for social work services to individuals, groups, families, and communities. It integrates the student's theoretical learning with the experience in the field placement agency. The student is introduced to a holistic process-oriented approach to social work practice and to methods for implementation. The course emphasizes the social context for practice with special attention to agency purpose, functions and structure; the client system and its perceptions of need; goals and resources and the social worker as a facilitator of change.

Fall

1 Course Unit

SWRK 6140 Foundations of Social Work Practice II

This is the second in a four-course sequence and continues to examine varied practice frameworks and methods for service delivery in working with individuals, groups, families and communities. It emphasizes the eradication of institutional racism and other forms of oppression along with the integration of a culturally-sensitive approach to social work practice. Attention is given to understanding client problems in the context of different social work practice approaches and service requirements and to increased use of professional values to guide and inform practice.

Spring

Prerequisite: SWRK 6040

1 Course Unit

SWRK 6150 Introduction to Social Work Research

This course presents the broad range of research tools that social workers can use to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of their practice. The course emphasizes the process of theory development, conceptualization, and hypothesis formulation across a broad spectrum of social work practice situations. The course includes methodological considerations relating to concept operationalization; research design (experimental, survey, and field), sampling instrumentation, methods of data collection and analysis, and report preparation and dissemination. The course also emphasizes how social work research can help professionals better understand and more effectively impact problems of racism and sexism in contemporary American society.

Spring

1 Course Unit

SWRK 6200 Integrative Seminar

All Advanced Standing students are required to take this non-credit Integrative Seminar in the summer upon beginning the program. The seminar meets weekly during the second summer session and supports students as they begin their field placement. In order to enroll in the fall, students must achieve satisfactory performance in the Integrative Practice Seminar and summer field placement. Advanced Standing MSW students only.

Summer Term

0 Course Units

SWRK 6260 Health and Social Justice

This course considers various theoretical approaches to justice and health, motivated by the idea that a moral framework is needed to address the ethical challenges posed by inequalities in access, quality, financial burdens, and resource priorities, as well as rising health care costs. The course includes four parts. The first part examines ethical frameworks that involve various approaches to medical and public health ethics. The second part presents an alternative theory of justice and health, the health capability paradigm (HCP), grounded in human flourishing. The third part explores domestic health policy applications of HCP, including equal access, equitable and efficient health financing and insurance, rising costs and allocating resources. The fourth and final part of the course investigates domestic health reform, particularly a normative theory of health policy decision making grounded in political and moral legitimacy. The course scrutinizes the relevance of health justice for governing health at the domestic level, that is within countries, offers a new theory of health and social justice, the health capability paradigm, and of health governance, shared health governance, evaluating current domestic health systems and proposals for reforming them in light of these alternative theoretical frameworks.

Fall

1 Course Unit

SWRK 6270 Global Health Justice and Governance

This course considers various theoretical approaches to global justice and global governance and analyzes their implications for global health. The course includes two parts. The first part examines accounts of cosmopolitanism, nationalism and other theories of global justice, critically assessing duties ascribed by each that may be owed universally to all persons or confined within associative boundaries of communities or nations. The second part explores applications to global health governance encompassing consideration of human rights and the operation and accountability of global institutions such as the United Nations, the World Bank, and the World Health Organization and national health systems. The course scrutinizes the relevance of global justice for governing the global health realm, proposes a new theory of global health justice, provincial globalism, and of global health governance, shared health governance, evaluating the current global health system and proposals for reforming it in light of these alternative theoretical frameworks.

Spring

1 Course Unit

SWRK 6290 Health Capability

This course examines the idea of health capability. Health capability is the ability to be healthy; it integrates health functioning and health agency. Health capability helps us understand the conditions that facilitate and barriers that impede health and the ability to make healthy choices. Health capabilities are key strengths resulting from individual and societal commitment of human, financial, and physical resources with the goal of helping people thrive. Differences in health capability explain why, for example, personal skills and determination or health beliefs are not enough to achieve health, why people with even the best external conditions can still have poor health, and why a narrow biomedical model of disease is insufficient. Health capability captures the dynamic, interactive, multidimensionality of health and flourishing. Health capability has the effect of creating a virtuous circle; developing people's health capability enables them to create and support the conditions for their own and other's health capability and so forth. It offers an evaluation of the aim and success of public policies in terms of people's lived experiences. The course is motivated by the idea that health capabilities ought to be a primary dimension in which equity in health and public policy is sought. The course includes three parts. The first part engages with the health capability model. The second part examines the health capability profile. The third part explores health capability applications. Twin goals of the course include cultivating the development of students' knowledge base, values and competencies as well as aiding students in identifying, assessing and expanding their own health capabilities for individual and community health and flourishing.

Fall

1 Course Unit

SWRK 6680 Economics for Social Policy

Economics allows us to determine the costs and benefits of social policies like cash benefits, unemployment insurance, health insurance, pensions, education, etc. Policies typically affect the behavior of agents like individuals, families and firms, and we have to take these reactions into account when analyzing policy. Economics allows us to predict how policy is likely to affect behavior by understanding how the policy changes individuals' decisions, and what collective outcomes these myriad individual decisions bring about. For example, a universal basic income allows individuals to sustain themselves and their families when they are not working. At the same time, such guaranteed income has the potential to discourage people from looking for a job. If enough people are discouraged from looking for a job, employment in the economy will decrease, leading to lower production and lower tax revenues for the government. Policy makers have to take these phenomena into account in order to design a good income support system.

Fall

Also Offered As: MSSP 6680

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7010 Health and Mental Health Policy

Effective social policy and practice strategies promote social justice and ensure all individuals, groups, and communities have access to high quality, comprehensive, affordable health and social support services. In this course, we use a health equity lens to critically analyze how health and mental health policies are developed and implemented, and how such policies relate to social work practice, program planning, and research. A broad perspective is used in thinking about health and well-being, accounting for intersectional health equity considerations deriving from race, ethnicity, disability or gender. Key policy issues such as financing, cost, access, and the allocation of resources are explored in the context of existing systems and health reform proposals. Students learn about health and mental health policy through inquiry related to the social construction of illness, stigma, social determinants of health, health and behavioral health integration, and specific population groups such as children, families, LGBTQ individuals, or those with specific health conditions, among other topics.

Spring

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7020 Social Work Practice in Health Care

This course focuses on key issues in social work practice in health care settings. Social aspects of health and illness, including cultural variations, health beliefs and behavior, and the impact of illness on the patient and the family, are examined and their relevance for practice is discussed. Appropriate theoretical models for practice are identified and applied to practice in the areas of prevention, primary care, chronic and long-term care. New roles for social work in varied health delivery systems and inter-professional collaboration are explored.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7030 Impacting Government: Policy Analysis & Coalition Building

This course focuses on developing a theoretical foundation for actionabe skills in policy analysis and coalition building across a wide-range of constituencies. The material begins with a structured focus on the ideological underpinnings of social welfare in the United States and the ways in which these perspectives shape our conception of equity, equality, and allocation of resources along the lines of race, class, gender, immigration status, and other identities. We will then utilize this basis for developing analysis frameworks, policy briefs, and media messaging that students will utilize when working with legislative bodies to advocate for and with the populations they serve. Distinct emphasis is placed on becoming conversant across differential systems, ideas, values, and assumptions while remaining grounded in relevant research and empirical approaches.

Not Offered Every Year

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7040 Advanced Clinical Social Work Practice I

Clinical Social Work Practice I and Field Practice builds on the generalist model of practice established in the foundation social work practice courses. The course work and assignments are closely linked to the students' learning objectives and experiences in the field. This course has students critically examine and deepen their understanding of advanced theoretical frameworkks and specific skills to be applied in clinical practice with children, adolescents, adults, and families. Students begin with classic and modern formulations of psychodynamic work and use this as a foundation for understanding theoretically and empirically drive models of family intervention. In addition, use of self and social work values and ethics and working with diverse clients are addressed at an advanced level.

Fall

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7060 Policies for Children and Their Families

This course examines policies for children and their families with a specific focus on child welfare policy. The course examines the interrelationship between: the knowledge base on child abuse and neglect; evaluations of interventions; programs and policies designed to protect maltreated children; and child welfare policy at the state and national level. The course also examines federal and state laws that govern the funding and operation of child welfare systems; the history of child welfare policies; the operation of child welfare systems; and the legal, political and social forces that influence the structure and function of child welfare systems in the United States.

Spring

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7080 Advanced Macro Social Work Practice I

Advanced Macro Social Work Practice I and Field builds on the foundation social work practice courses and focuses on three areas: (1) context of macro practice; (2) organizational structure with a focus on nonprofits; and (3) program design and development. The course begins with providing theoretical frameworks for macro practice and then moves to focus on delivery of services at the community level. Knowledge and skill development focuses primarily on social work practice wihtin communities and organizations. Students learn how to organize and build relationships with communities and develop, plan, manage, fund and assess/evaluate community-based programs. Specific skill development includes learning how to research, develop, write, and pitch a grant proposal. Course content is integrated with fieldwork and is specific to the service needs of the popuations with whom students are working in their field agencies.

Fall

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7100 Supervision Seminar

Students in the Employed Practitioners Program are required to take this non-credit seminar in the fall and spring terms of their second year of study. The class meets every other week. In a limited number of cases, advanced-year students may be placed in agencies where there is no available MSW field instructor. In such instances, the student is required to attend the Clinical or Macro Supervision Seminar (depending on their concentration), which meets every other week during the academic year. Students who are required to participate in the clinical or macro supervision seminars will be given 1.5 hours of compensatory time off from their field placement every other week.

0 Course Units

SWRK 7110 Contemporary Social Policy

This course introduces students to the analysis of contemporary social welfare policy. Several social welfare policy areas, including social inequality, poverty, health care, and housing are examined. Each topic area is also used to illustrate a component of the policy analysis process, including the analysis of ideologies and values as they shape policy formulation, the process by which legislation is proposed and enacted, the roles of advocacy and lobbying organizations, and the challenges of policy implementation and evaluation.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7130 Understanding Social Change: Issues of Race and Gender

This course builds upon the foundation of historical, psychological, sociological, economic, political, and personal knowledge about institutionalized forms of racism and discrimination developed in SWRK 603, American Racism and Social Work Practice. The course uses understanding elements of oppression to critically examine strategies for addressing racism and sexism in organizations and communitites through systematic assessment and planning for social change. The course examines change at three levels: organizations, communitites, and social movements.

Spring

Prerequisite: SWRK 6030

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7140 Advanced Clinical Social Work Practice II

The focus of learning in this semester is theories and skills related to clinical practice with individuals and groups, differential intervention, and the broadening of the professional role and repertoire. The course content and assignments are closely linked with the students' learning objectives and experiences in the field. Students extend and refine their practice knowledge and skills and learn to intervene with cognitive, behavioral, and narrative modalities. This semester focuses also on work with complex trauma across systems and populations. Students consolidate their identification as professionals and learn to constructively use the environment to effect systems changes.

Spring

Prerequisite: SWRK 7040

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7180 Advanced Macro Social Work Practice II

Advanced Macro Social Work Practice II and Field helps students broaden and deepen the specific knowledge and skills required to become an effective and creative social work practitioner. The course focuses on five areas of macro practice: (1) community assessment and practice; (2) policy advocacy; (3) fiscal management and fundraising; (4) global human rights; and (5) emerging areas of macro practice. Students learn how to conduct a community practice analysis, engage in policy advocacy, develop an idea for a social enterprise, write an agency fundraising plan, and conduct an agency fiscal evaluation. Students learn to utilize administrative skills to promote social change within a variety of systems that influence the lives of client populations. Course content is integrated with fieldwork and is specific to the service needs of the populations with whom students are working in their field agencies.

Spring

Prerequisite: SWRK 7080

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7210 Social Work Healthcare Proseminar

This is a mandatory, year long, bi-monthly, non-credit course for all students enrolled in the the Social Work in Health Care Specialization (SWIHCS). SWIHCS aims to prepare students for successful careers across practice settings and with diverse populations and conditions. Grounded in the tenets of biopsychosocial approaches to direct practice, the specialization bridges systems of practice and introduces students to inter-professional collaboration and leadership skills. This proseminar will serve two functions for students in the specialization. First, the cohort will meet together monthly for case conceptualization, and consideration of challenges unique to health-related placements in both macro and direct practice settings. Second, students will meet monthly for special learning opportunities, guest lectures, and professional development. Topics may include, but are not limited to: direct practice work with children, families, the elderly, and communities coping with chronic and terminal illness, palliative and end of life care, health care advocacy, policy development and evaluation, and interdisciplinary collaboration.

Two Term Class, Student must enter first term; credit given after both terms are complete

0 Course Units

SWRK 7220 Practice with Children and Adolescents

This course provides a foundation for social work practice with children and adolescents. Beginning with an overview of normative child and adolescent development and psychosocial developmental theory, the course covers various methods for helping at-risk children and adolescents and their families. Emphasizing the complex interplay between children and adolescents and their social environments, consideration will be given to biological, temperamental, and developmental status; the familial/cultural context; the school context; and other aspects of the physical and social environment. Particular attention is paid to working with socially, emotionally, financially, and physically challenged and deprived children and adolescents and their families.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7230 LGBTQ Certificate Proseminar

This is a monthly, non-credit course for all students enrolled in the LGBTQ Certificate. The LGBTQ Certificate provides supplemental content and skills to existing professional master's degrees at Penn with specialized courses and fieldwork addressing the legal, physical and mental health care, social service, and educational needs of LGBTQ communities and issues of gender and sexuality, more generally, across the lifespan. Because students can enroll in a variety of courses across schools to meet the certificate requirements, the proseminar is designed to serve as a shared community building and peer mentorship experience for each certificate cohort. The instructor will also provide an additional layer of mentorship for integrating field placement into the academic social work experience. The proseminar will take on different formats over the course of the semester including case review, guest lectures, and in-depth discussion of issues relating to ethics, identity, and cross-professional collaboration.

Spring

0 Course Units

SWRK 7240 Developmental Disabilities

This course enhances the students' ability to practice social work with and on behalf of people with developmental disabilities and their families. The course provides a base of knowledge about developmental disabilities and differences, their causes and characteristics. Students learn how disabilities and learning differences impact personal, familial, educational, social, and economic dimensions for the individual, family and society, with attention to the person's special life cycle needs and characteristics. The course also emphasizes legislative, programmatic, political, economic, and theoretical formulations fundamental to service delivery.

Spring

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7250 Relationship Theory

The goal of this course is to introduce the participants to the basic principles and practice of couple therapy. With its rich history as a distinct discipline integrating both individual and systemic theory, students will explore a broad range of theoretical and clinical approaches within this field. Issues such as intimacy, gender, power, class, race, orientation, family of origin, affairs, separation, divorce, domestic violence, sex, parent-child relationships, and money will be discussed.

Fall

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7260 Brief Treatment and Crisis Intervention

This course focuses on theory and practice of planned brief treatment in social work practice, primarily with individuals but with attention to couples, families and other groupings. The course covers the history of and different approaches to brief treatment. Topics include treatment issues such as criteria for selection of clients, understanding the importance of time in the treatment relationship, the use of history, the importance of focusing, the process of termination and other issues related to brief interventions. Particular attention will be paid to the use of brief treatment approaches in crisis situations. The course presents various methods of assessing an individual's crisis and of helping clients mobilize their strengths to utilize customary methods of coping and learn newer ways of coping.

Summer Term

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7270 Practice with Families

This course provides students with assessment and intervention skills for social work practice with varied family/partner configurations. The course begins with a grounding in family systems theory and proceeds to explore patterns of interaction in terms of the wide range of problems that families and partners bring to social agencies. Emphasis is given to exploring ways of supporting change in interaction patterns. Readings are augmented by videotapes of family sessions and simulations of clinical situations from students' field practice.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7280 Taking Down the Prison Industrial Complex

The U.S. incarcerates more people than any other country, and more than any nation has ever done in history. The racial disparities that mark this carceral regime have led scholars to describe the prison industrial complex as a new form of Jim Crow. Philadelphia has one of the highest incarceration rates in the country, and one of the largest populations on parole and probation. This class explores structural and individual-level pathways to re-engage the vast population of recently incarcerated people who cycle through prisons, jails, juvenile homes, and other detention centers. Drawing on practice informed by critical race, postcolonial, feminist, and queer theories, the class prepares the conceptual and practice foundations for a prison abolitionist orientation in social work engagement with this community. Utilizing a daily workshop format that incorporates members of the Philadelphia decarcerate landscape, students will be trained in direct and macro practice, to engage with people and the carceral systems they are embedded in. The class will engage students with the innovative psychotherapeutic and macro practices being implemented in the Center for Carceral Communities at SP2, alternative programs in Philadelphia’s municipal and federal courts, educational degree programs at community colleges in Philadelphia, co-operative business initiatives for people emerging from incarceration, and social movements such as Black Lives Matter that are shaping the prison abolition landscape. The class blends morning sessions dedicated to discussions of texts with afternoon sessions dedicated to hands-on implementation workshops. At the end of the class, students will be prepared to immediately start engaging with members of the community emerging from incarceration.

Fall

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7290 Social Statistics

This course provides students with a broad range of statistical methods and applications. It introduces social work students to the use of quantitative data for planning and evaluating social programs and social policy. Course topics include conceptualization and measurement of variables and basic techniques and concepts for exploring and categorizing data, for generalizing research findings and testing hypotheses, and for statistical data processing. Students will gain experience in using a Windows-based statistical software package on personal computers. Emphasis is placed on the practical application of data to address social policy and social work practice issues. Students have the opportunity to critique the application of data analysis and presentation in technical reports and professional journals.

Fall

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7300 Community Mapping

Geographic space is important to family and community well-being, as we know. community Mapping introduces students to geographic information systems (GIS), computer software for making maps and analyzing spatial data. Students will learn how maps have been used in social welfare history as well as how GIS can be used for needs assessments, asset mapping, program evaluation, and program planning. The course builds on research skills developed in SWRK 615. For the final project, students have an opportunity to apply their GIS skills to creating maps related to their field placement. The use of such maps may lead to both program and policy change in neighborhoods and communities.

Spring

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7310 Clinical and Macro Child Welfare Practice

Students enrolled in this course will learn about the various contexts in which child welfare practice and policy services take place and the skills and modalities that are used with children, youth, and families who are the focus of child welfare intervention. Students learn about the social conditions and unmet needs that have typically precipitated child welfare policy and ideological debates informing child welfare policy. How to structure organizations and implement planning in support of strengthening front-line practice is also addressed. Taking stock of these policies and organizational factors, students gain a firm understanding of how they influence, shape, and govern direct clinical practice in child protection and casework. Particular attention will be devoted to developing students' practice skills in safety assessment and safety planning, risk assessment, and permanency planning. Implementation of evidence-based, trauma-informed interventions to promote positive developmental outcomes among the racially/ethnically diverse pool of children and adolescents placed in out-of-home care will also be a focus of attention. Other topics include separation, loss, and identity development; disproportionality and disparity; and self-care in child welfare practice. In the spirit of bridging connections between macro and clinical practice, course content will delve into how direct casework services influence dependency actions in the juvenile courts. How these direct practices or interventions influence case outcomes as reported by a number of federal data reporting systems will also be discussed. A social justice framework will be applied to understand how child welfare policies and organizational services sustain child and family inequalities, especially for historically oppressed and marginalized populations who are diproportianally represented in the child welfare system.

Fall

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7320 Integrative Seminar in Child Welfare

This capstone course in the Child Well-Being and Child Welfare specialization will integrate direct/micro and macro levels of practice; research in child welfare and related fields, as the research relates to all levels of practice; the relationship of child maltreatment and other social problems; and perspectives from several disciplines, specifically social work, other mental health professions, law, and medicine, as these disciplines address problems of child maltreatment and child welfare. The seminar will highlight issues of social justice, disproporionality - particularly the over-representation of children and families of color in the child welfare system, and disadvantaged populations, including children in general and poor children in particular. Faculty from other disciplines will be features as guest speakers throughout the course.

Spring

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7330 Supporting LGBTQ+ Individuals Across the Lifespan

As recognition and acceptance of individuals across and beyond both the sexual orientation and gender identity spectrums continues to progress within the United States, clinical theory and applications for working with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer plus (LGBTQ+) individuals has also expanded. This course will explore the clinical theories and treatment approaches geared towards affirming and supporting LGBTQ+ individuals within their romantic and/or sexual relationships, families of origin, and families of choice. Areas of development will be addressed across the lifespan including specific milestones related to gender and sexuality development as well as psychological, sociocultural, and spiritual influences upon development. Centering on a social justice approach, learners will be encouraged to critically examine systemic factors impacting LGBTQ+ individuals as well as the intersectionality of various identities including race, ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation, age, ability/disability, socioeconomic status, educational attainment, mental and physical health, and other identities (both self-assigned and externally applied) that can impact development. Each stage of development will include multiple cases for review and consideration of potential practice implications at the individual, relationship, family, community, and systemic levels. Upon conclusion of the course, learners will have a stronger understanding of the practice theories that exist, the practice models that best fit their professional style, and clear understanding of practice application in regards to affirming and supporting LGBTQ+ individuals.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7360 Building Community Capacity

This course provides an introduction to community organization and community capacity building. The course encompasses strategies, models, and techniques for the creation of organizations, the formation of federations of existing organizations; and coalition-building, all designed to address problems requiring institutional or policy changes or reallocation of resources to shift power and responsibility to those most negatively affected by current socio-economic and cultural arrangements. The course emphasizes development of strategies and techniques to organize low-income minority residents of urban neighborhoods, and to organize disenfranchised groups across geographic boundaries as the first required steps in an empowerment process.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7370 Bioethics in Social Work in Diverse Healthcare Settings

As medical technology develops and evoves, ethical dilemmas are occurring more frequently in many diverse healthcare settings. Social workers play an integral and unique role in bioethics: primarily as patient advocates but also as guardians of autonomy and dignity. This can come into direct conflict with decisions patients, families, and healthcare teams are asked to make on a daily basis in healthcare settings. This course will explore many of the major ethical challenges confronting medicine, social work, and biomedical sciences. We will examine legal, institutional and personal positions, beliefs, and values as we consider and debate opposing arguments. You will be challenged to think and write critically, utilizing philosophical, bioethical, and social work frameworks to structure your arguments and ethical decision making. This course will prepare students to actively participate in ethics committees, mediation, patient/family conferences with diverse populations and interdisciplinary collaborative discussions regarding ethical issues in medical settings.

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7380 Anxiety and Depression

Anxiety and depression are two of the most common mental disorders seen in social work clients, and frequently they occur concurrently. This course describes the medical and "physical" concomitants and psychosocial factors associated with both conditions and introduces diagnostic and assessment procedures and methods of intervention that social workers use in working with clients with these conditions. The course also consideers how culture, social class, gender, and other social differences affect the expression of these disorders and their concomitant treatment.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7390 Illness and Family Caregiving

This course focuses on social work practice in medicine and the relationships between physical health, social environments, and psychosocial functioning. Student learning will be grounded in the biopsychosocial-spiritual model, and will address a number of domains, including the impact of illness on families over the life course, the impact of a diagnosis on family functioning, medical decision making, coping, health beliefs and spirituality, culture and social class. Classroom content will include conceptualization of illness challenges from the presentation/prevention of symptoms to the end of life, in addition to writing case material, building self-awareness and identifying clinical interface issues, and the compliation of a "clinician's toolbox" for direct practice on the front lines. Activities will include the unique opportunity to participate in hands-on, interdisciplinary training at the Simulation Center in the School of Nursing.

Fall

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7400 Strategic Planning & Resource Development for Public & Nonprofit Organizations

Resilient organizations engage in a continuous process of self-review and refocusing. Referred to as "strategic planning," this process requires the active participation of a broad range of agency "stakeholders" who, in their work together, seek to realign the organization's goals, structures, and programs to make them more responsive to the changing needs of their service populations. Building on the content of foundation pratice foundation courses, "Strategic Planning and Resource Development" has been designed to strengthen the the student's leadership capacity for engaging in strategic planning and resource development practice across a broad range of governmental (GOs) and civil society organizations (CSOs). The importance of organizational flexibility, innovation, and the creation of cooperative public-private partnerships is emphasized throughout the course.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7410 Gender & Social Policy

Gender and Social Policy develops an advanced understanding of social policies through the lens of gender - a socially constructed classification system based on ideals of femininity and masculinity, which are most commonly understood to be binary, mutually exclusive categories corresponding to sex (female and male). (Gender is) a concept that pervades all aspects of culture: structuring institutions, social identities, cultural practices, political positions, historical communities, and the shared human experience of embodiment*. The class provides students with the opportunity to explore how social policies respond (and contribute) to the needs and risks of different groups of people based on gender classifications. Rather than a survey of "gender" policy, students will be introduced to key feminist and trans concepts and frameworks that can be applied to any social issue and policy intervention. Policy examples may include reproduction, state violence, exclusionary/inclusive space, and national emergencies. The topics and specific readings may change based on the class's interests and current events. Class assignments are designed to provide an opportunity to practice applying gender theory, as well as for each student to examine a policy issue of import to them through a gendered lens. *paraphrasing Garland-Thomson, 2002, "Integrating Disability, Transforming Feminist Theory", NWSA Journal, 14(3): pg 4.

Spring

Also Offered As: MSSP 7410

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7420 Practice with Youth Who are Marginalized

The discourse on juvenile justice in the United States, once driven by themes of treatment and rehabilitation, has been dominated in recent years by vocabularies of punishment and incapacitation. The juvenile court, an enterprise founded by social reformers and the social work profession at the turn of the century to "save children," is now under severe political and legislative pressure to impose harsher penalties on younger and younger offenders who are increasingly portrayed as violent "super-predators," while its most vulnerable segments, children and youth, stand in greatest need of what a social service system can offer. Not surprisingly, those most likely to wind up under supervision are economically poor, under-educated, disproportionately of color and disproportionately at-risk to become victims of violent crimes. How does the profession situate itself in this discourse and what are individual social workers to do?

Fall

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7430 Action Research

Action research is a form of social research that combines research with intervention. It is characterized by a collaborative relationship between the researcher and a client organization that is in an immediate problematic situation. The research process is directed toward addressing the problem situation and producing knowledge that contributes to the goals of social science. Action research is compatible with many of the values and principles of social work. This course also addresses issues of social work ethics and values encountered by the action researcher.

Fall or Spring

Prerequisite: SWRK 6150

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7440 Direct Practice Research

This course provides graduate social work students with research knowledge and skills aimed at enhancing their direct practice with clients. The course examines methods of assessment, methods for choosing and evaluating techniques of intervention, methods for determining the effectiveness of practice and the use of research in social work decision-making. A successful outcome of the course will be that students perceive a more positive relationship between research and social work practice and possess a set of tools that they will be able to utilize in their future careers as social workers. The course starts from an assumption that students have some familiarity with research and are primarily engaged in direct practice with individuals, families or groups.

Fall

Prerequisite: SWRK 6150

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7460 Political Social Work

This course focuses on the role of social workers and the social work profession in advocacy and the political arena. It examines the methods of advocacy (e.g., case, class, and legislative) and political action through which social workers can influence social policy development and community and institutional change. The course also analyzes selected strategies and tactics of change and seeks to develop alternative social work roles in the facilitation of purposive change efforts. Topics include individual and group advocacy, lobbying, public education and public relations, electoral politics, coalition building, and legal and ethical dilemmas in political action.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7480 Microfinance and Women's Empowerment in India

This course examines microfinance and its engagement with marginalized communities such as those in India. It is designed to provide students with an understanding of the phenomena of microfinance and its role in poverty alleviation. By studying the use of self-help groups with NGO facilitation, their impact on women's empowerment will be examined and understood through interaction with women engaged in microfinance activities.

Spring

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7490 Civil Society Addressing Conflict in Israel/Palestine

This course offers a unique opportunity to experience the challenges and complexities of coexistence in Israel, the Holy Land for Christians, Jews and Muslims; a key point of interest and dispute for the international community, and the homeland shared and claimed by both Israelis and Palestinians. The course will focus on activities carried out by nonprofit organizations operating within the Israeli civil society, dealing with issues related to coexistence and to the protection and advancement of the civil and social rights of different populations, with special emphasis on the Arab-Palestinian population in Israel. These activities include educational and social services programs, community work and advocacy activities, aimed at creating dialogues and building coexistence among the different populations in the Israeli society and Palestine.

Summer Term

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7510 Spirituality and Social Work Practice

Spirituality is a critical anchor of a holistic approach to social work, which views individuals, couples, families, groups, and communities in a bio-psycho-social-spiritual context. It varies in extent to which spiritual aspects of social work practice have been addressed explicitly in social work education. In a post September 11th, 2001 world, however, drawing from the wellsprings of spirituality seems more widespread, and even more crucial. Current trends in social work education, including the Council on Social Work Education's Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards support the inclusion of content on religious and spiritual diversity. Accordingly, this course is an advanced clinical practice elective that focuses on spiritual aspects of social work practice. The professional values of client self-determination and empowerment will be stressed as diverse spiritual perspectives are explored. This course will strive to seek a balance of exploring the universalistic as well as the particularistic in relationship to spirituality. Some particularistic religious and/or spiritual traditions will be studied as they exemplify commitments of spirituality and as they intersect with a more universalistic spirituality. The impacts of spiritual and religious systems in relation to diversity (e.g. by gender, social class, ethnicity, culture, and sexual orientation) will be considered. As a practice elective, this course will make linkages directly to students' practice experience in the field as well as to other curriculum areas such as human behavior theory, social policy, and research.

Spring

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7550 International Social Policy & Practice: Perspectives from the Global South

This interdisciplinary course will introduce students to social policy and practice perspectives from outside the U.S. and especially from communities in the Global South. The course will familiarize them with global professions and help prepare them for overseas/cross-cultural practice. Through the course students will identify numerous strategies and skills professionals have used to collaboratively build interventions within human rights, social policy, social welfare, education, healthcare and sustainable development arenas.

Fall

Also Offered As: MSSP 7550

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7560 Human Sexuality

The aim of this course is to increase students' ability to deal more comfortably with the sexual aspect of human functioning. Readings,written assignments, and classroom presentations are directed to realizing the diversity, complexity, and range of human sexual expression. Current information about sexuality from the biological and physiological sciences is reviewed to increase comfort and skill in discussion and handling of sex-related behavior, personal and societal attitudes will be explored. A variety of sex-related social problems encountered by social workers in family, education, health, and criminal justice settings are discussed. Diagnostic interviewing and treatment methods are presented in role play, group exercises and case studies.

Spring

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7570 Loss through the Life Cycle

This course considers loss as a central theme throughout the life cycle. Content focuses on the physical, psychosocial, spiritual, and cultural aspects of loss, dying and bereavement processes and the interaction among individuals, families and professionals. Students examine historical trends of family, community, and institutional support for the terminally ill and those experiencing traumatic loss and learn ways to advocate for a system of services that supports full decision-making on the part of the client. Course materials, journals, and special projects identify how self and other factors impact service delivery to individuals,families, and communities experiencing loss, including ethical considerations prompted by cost, technology, and end of life issues.

Spring

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7590 Substance Use Interventions

This course addresses intervention approaches used in social work practice with individuals, families, and groups who misuse addictive substances themselves or are affected by another's misuse. Students learn about addictive substances, models of intervention, how to engage and assess clients, and how to intervene and evaluate the effectiveness of their interventions. The course incorporates theory and research findings on various strategies of intervention.

Fall

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7600 Mental Health Diagnostics

This course familiarizes students with mental health and mental disorders within the context of the life cycle, viewed from a biopsychosocial perspective. Prevalent categories of psychiatric disorders are considered with respect to their differentiating charateristics, explanatory theories, and relevance for social work practice, according to the DSM and other diagnostic tools. The course includes biological information and addresses the impact of race, ethnicity, social class, age, gender, and other sociocultural variables on diagnostic processes.

Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7630 Global Human Rights & US Immigration: Implications for Policy & Practice

This course will begin with the history of migration to the US, as well as legal definitions of newcomers, including obtaining documents for lawful permanent residence, refugee status, as well as grounds for exclusion and deportation, and paths to naturalized citizenship. We will then review how a framework of cultural competence, and a strength or asset-based approach can inform service to immigrant clients. The core portion of the course will then focus first on the intersection of immigrants and health, mental health, employment, crimes, public entitlements, and public education. The course will conclude with family issues relevant to immigrant families: women, children, lesbian and gay, and elderly immigrants. Public policy issues will be integrated throughout, and the course will end with specific suggestions on systems change at various levels. By the end of the course students should be able to identify strategies for individual clients advocacy (micro); agency and community strategies (mezzo), and government advocacy (macro) to empower immigrant clients to become full community participants.

Spring

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7650 Supervision and Leadership in Human Services Organizations

This course builds on social work knowledge, values, and skills gained in foundation practice courses and links them to the roles and functions of social workers as supervisors and managers in human service organizations. Course focus is on providing students with an overview of basic supervisory and human resource development concepts so they may be better prepared as professional social workers to enter agencies and provide direct reports (supervisees) with meaningful and appropriate direction, support, and motivation.

Not Offered Every Year

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7660 Enhancing Relationships: Interpersonal, Group and Organizational Transformation

SWRK 766 is for those seeking to increase their interpersonal, group, organizational, leadership and followership skills. It is assumed that participants will have the basics. Therefore the course is designed to uncover, explore and build new ways of understanding. This requires a set of logics that are readily available to us, but are rarely used. In SWRK 766 we will use three ways of thinking: the left-brain, digital, so-called "rational" logic; the right-brain, analogical, paradoxical logic; the links between our emotions and how we individually and collectively think and act. These forms of reasoning will help us recognize when a crisis is a genuine problem, as opposed to a decaying prelude to an emergent transformation. We will study people such as Mother Teresa, Nelson Mandela and Abraham Lincoln, ordinary folk who managed to create relationships at the interpersonal, group and organizational levels that were amazingly transformational. We will examine relationships that need to be reformed. And we will strive to develop enhanced relationship skills that can be applied in all of our endeavors. Members of all Penn graduate programs are welcome. SWRK 766 is designed for those: managing work groups; strengthening new ties with people from different walks of life; facilitating groups in reparative settings; dealing with societal disparities; conducting support groups; leading project groups; chairing committees; functioning as a classroom educator; serving on special task forces; addressing the pernicious societal isms; creating new enterprises; taking up leadership positions; building community resilience; advocating for those located in under-resourced enclaves; celebrating the many successful transformations constantly occurring; bringing latent possibility to life; or engaging in transformation that is sustainable and scalable.

Spring

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7680 Social Policy Through Literature

Also Offered As: MSSP 7680

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7690 Aging: The Intersection of Policy and Practice

This course examines a variety of social welfare policies that affect the rights and interests of older adults. These include policies related to economic security, health, long term care, and civil rights. In addition, the course reviews the policy-making process with a discussion of the influence of legislative sanctions and case law in establishing aging policy in the U.S. The focus of the course is on critical analysis of the key assumptions driving policy and policy change, e.g. social responsibility vs. individual responsibility. Finally, the course includes a critical examination of the intersection between policy and practice, that is, the influence that policy has on the design of interventions and service delivery practices at the state and local level and the impact of changing policies on communities, providers, and older adults.

Spring

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7720 Postcolonial Social Work Practice: International Social Welfare in India

In this course, students examine the global welfare system and its engagement with severely marginalized communities. This six-week course centers around a 700,000-strong sex workers' collaborative based in Sonagachi, Kolkata, India, one of Asia's largest red-light districts. Collaborative engagement with the collective and its grassroots movement is combined with research projects and class discussions (in open classrooms that at times include community members, as well as feminist and queer theory scholars from Indian Universities ) in which students engage with texts on HIV, sex work, feminist postcolonial theory and international social work. The class counts for the Human Rights Certificate, as well as macro, direct practice, and NPL electives. As of this year, this course is also part of a campus-wide group of classes that has been put together by faculty involved in #PoliceFreePenn, that thoughtfully and intentionally foregrounds police state abolition.

Summer Term

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7730 Mental Health Challenges in Childhood and Adolescence

This course will be an opportunity for the student and the instructor to explore the concept "psychopathology" as it has been and is applied to childhood and adolescence. There are some psychopathological challenges that are unique to childhood and some which can manifest themselves throughout childhood into adolescence and adulthood. The social worker/practitioner will encounter a wide range of symptomatic presentations among his/her clients. At this time in the fields of clinical social work, psychology, psychiatry, and psychotherapy there are numerous frameworks available to the practitioner to aid in an understanding of symptoms in children and adolescents. During the next several weeks three conceptual frameworks will be articulated. These three frameworks will elucidate the possible meaning, origin, and/or function of the symptoms and offer to the student a vocabulary with which to engage the situation. At the turn of the 19th century into the 20th century, psychoanalysis emerged in Europe as a method of understanding symptoms from the point of view of internal conflict within the child or adolescent. After World War II in the U.S.A., a model of understanding symptoms from a systemic/cybernetic point of view revolutionized the diagnostic processes involved in working with children and adolescents. Since the late 1980's, postmodern ideas, primarily from Europe and Australia, have greatly influenced and informed the understanding of psychopathology in children and adolescents. Narrative, social constructivist, and linguistic usage patterns have become a common vocabulary in the discourse on psychopathology. This course is not intended to be a reading of the history of child psychopathology. It is intended to expose the student to the most influential paradigms in the field of child psychopathology.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7740 Program Evaluation

This course introduces students to theoretical and practical aspects of social service program evaluation. Students learn about the design and implementation of all phases of an evaluation, from needs assessment to analysis of findings. Skills such as survey construction and budgeting are introduced. Intensive analysis of existing studies illustrates how evaluations are designed and how findings affect social programs and policy.

Fall or Spring

Prerequisite: SWRK 6150

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7750 Intimate Partner Violence

Intimate partner violence (IPV), defined as physical, sexual or psychological harm imposed by a current or former intimate partner, is a public health problem leading to increased morbidity and mortality worldwide. The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the definition, theories, dynamics, scope, consequences of, and interventions to prevent and address, violence among intimate partners. Through this course, students will gain insight into the epidemiology of IPV across the life course, including risk and protective factors and examine unique considerations for vulnerable populations. The course will highlight current measurement issues in the field of IPV assessment and address IPV-related policies to address screening, prevention, and response to IPV. Using a social-ecological framework, we will examine the issue of IPV prevention and intervention from the individual, relationship, community, and society perspectives, and explore approaches to and need for screening, as well as primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of prevention.

Also Offered As: PUBH 5750

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7770 Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

CBT is offered in both a one-week intensive and semester-long format, with the two formats usually offered in various terms throughout the year. The one-week format requires students to start a pre-course assignment approximately 2 months prior to the first day of the course. Students will receive an information request from the instructor during course registration and must reply in a timely fashion. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is the world's most effective, empirically-based psychotherapy with strong scientific evidence. CBT is a collaborative and empowering psychotherapy that educates and helps clients to motivate themselves, set goals, develop, and implement treatment plans to reach those goals. This experiential/didactic advanced clinical skills course will present a CBT model to evidence-based practice that can serve as a conceptual framework for clinical applications to a wide variety of presenting problems and populations. The purpose of this course is to introduce graduate students to the theory of CBT and to begin to apply the basic principles through the stages of a self-directed case.

Fall or Spring

Prerequisite: SWRK 6010 AND SWRK 6020 AND SWRK 6030 AND SWRK 6040 AND SWRK 6140 AND SWRK 6150

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7780 Dialectical Behavioral Therapy

In this course we will examine the underlying theories, empirical foundations, and fundamental skill sets associated with dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT). Students will be expected to participate in role plays, lead mindfulness exercises, and carry out chain analyses.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7800 Policy and Difference in Postmodernity

Social constructions of "difference" permeate the institutions, spaces, and assumptions of our society. These social constructions include but are not limited to the racialized, gendered, sexed, classed, and dis/abled constructions of the body. By leaning on postmodern thinkers such as Iris Marion Young, Pierre Bourdieu, Judith Butler, Jacques Derrida, Ernesto Laclau, and Michel Foucault, this seminar course will begin by engaging the questions of what is "difference" and how is "difference" discursively constructed and reproduced in society. Using a postmodern lens, the remainder of the course will engage various social science texts that deal with the varieties of "difference" (i.e. race, gender, class, sexuality) and the explicit and/or implicit policy implications of these works. Thus, we will critically engage policies such as welfare, affirmative action, economic policies of taxation, and same-gender marriage, among others. The underlying questions throughout the course will be to what extend does social policy enable the possibilities of freedom, justice, and democracy for the "Other", the deviant, the abject, the marginalized, those of assumed "difference"? And, to what extent does policy constrain those possibilities at the same time? This course does assume familiarity with social theory and is an introduction to postmodern thought on the law, the political, and policy.

Spring

Also Offered As: MSSP 7800

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7810 Qualitative Research in Social Work

Qualitative research encompasses a variety of methods that enable the researcher to enter into the "lived experience" of research participants. These methods are particularly sensitive to the voices of populations whose perspectives are silenced by dominant societal discourses. The course begins by giving attention to underlying philosophical issues and traditions of qualitative research and proceeds to examine qualitative research design, methods of data collection, strategies to ensure rigor, data analysis, and presentation of findings. Students will learn about research interviewing, focus groups, and participant observation and ways in which qualitative research can be used to inform and evaluate social work practice and programs. Students will have the opportunity to apply qualitative research methods to in-class activities and individual or group projects.

Fall

Prerequisite: SWRK 6150

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7830 Advanced Mental Health Practice with U.S. Veterans

Although this course is open to all students, it is designed for students in the clinical concentration and is required for students in the Cohen Veterans Network Scholars program. The course will focus on clinical knowledge and evidence-based practice skills for common mental health problems in veteran settings. The course will introduce students to the assessment and treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), Depression and Anxiety Disorders, Substance Abuse, Military Sexual Trauma (MST) and Suicide Assessment and Management among veteran populations. Other topics may include cultural competency, homelessness, and combat stress disorders. Since this is a seminar course, some classes will be taught by social workers/psychologists from the Veterans Hospital in Philadelphia and the Cohen Veterans Outpatient Clinic.

Fall

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7850 Criminal Justice Policies: Implications for Social Work

The United States prison population has risen more than three hundred percent in the last three decades. More people are currently incarcerated than at any other point in the history of the United States, and that of the world. This unprecedented period of incarceration has gone largely invisible although it represents one of the greatest social epidemics in the history of the United States. This course provides a critical analysis of the criminal justice system in the United States from a historical and contemporary perspective. It examines the implications of significant criminal justice policies such as the Rockefeller Drug Laws, 3-Strike Legislations, and Mandatory Minimums on the current state of incarceration, and the phenomenon of "Reentry" and "Recidivism". The intersections of criminal justice and social work practice are unmistakable when examining staples of social work practice such as homelessness, mental health and substance abuse, thus the course is intended to facilitate a more informed/holistic practice for all social work students.

Spring

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7860 Addressing Trauma in Practice

This course integrates trauma theory and practice and expands practice knowledge to include the treatment and assessment of the survivors of trauma. Emphasis is placed on differentiating PTSD from Complex Trauma in order to identify appropriate, evidence-based intervention strategies. Topics covered in the course include an historical overview of the development of our understanding of trauma and the exploration of various types of trauma including war trauma, domestic violence, childhood sexual and physical abuse, natural disasters, the experiences of political refugees and organizational trauma. Among the interventions covered in this course are CBT, EMDR, group and psychodynamic treatment. Students will consider issues that affect those treating the survivors of trauma, such as vicarious trauma, and will explore approaches to self-care. This is an advanced clinical course. Through assignments and class discussions, students are encouraged to use their experiences in the field to deepen their understanding of the material covered in the course.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7870 Social Impact Strategy, Analysis, and Leadership

Around the world, new types of organizations are emerging, advances in technology and access to information continue, and there is a growing recognition that all sectors - business, public, and private nonprofit - have a role to play in creating social impact. While the desire to create social impact is clear, the field is just beginning to grapple with ways to translate these aspirations into real and meaningful change. Since 2006, Penn's Center for High Impact Philanthropy has been a pioneer in developing approaches for identifying, assessing, and growing opportunities for social impact. Team-taught by the center for High Impact Philanthropy, the course will be directed by the Center's founding executive director, Katherina 'Kat' Rosqueta, and will include guest lectures from other leading faculty and social impact innovators working in Philadelphia and around the world. Through hands-on practice, team projects, and highly interactive case-based discussions, students will gain the skills needed to: analyze opportunities for impact and potential for impact, including how to determine the scale and scope of an opportunity and how to use the tools of social impact economics to determine the cost implications of the opportunity; confidently address the strategic issues and key tasks faced by managers/leaders with a social impact mandate; influence others towards social impact by leveraging relevant research and real-world examples of effective communication and stakeholder management; and apply their research and effective storytelling skill to present their impact analysis in projects using different formats (e.g. video short, venture capitalist/donor pitch, policy brief).

Spring

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7880 Harm Reduction on the Borders: Substance Use and HIV Treatment in Puerto Rico

This course examines the U.S.-based substance use and HIV treatment systems, and its engagement with injection drug users in Fajardo, Puerto Rico. It is designed to provide the students with an understanding of the political economy of harm reduction initiatives, and the manner in which it is shaped by the complicated relationship between Puerto Rico and the U.S. Students are expected to gain an understanding of Pureto Rico's welfare environment, the role of social welfare and social workers in such a context, and the interweaving of social control and social change embedded in welfare initiatives in "borderlands" such as Fajardo. During the four week course in Fajardo, students will complete a placement in a needle exchange program, and engage with texts on HIV, substance use, postcolonial theory and international social work.

Summer Term

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7920 Psychodynamic Theory

The purpose of this course is to review the evolution of psychodynamic theory and consider key concepts in psychoanalysis, ego psychology, object relations theory, self-psychology, attachment theory, relational and intersubjective theories and current findings in cognitive neuroscience. Participants will explore human psychological functioning as explained by these various psychodynamic theories and through the biopsychosocial lens that informs social work practice. Students will examine how external factors such as race, class, gender, culture and biology are interwoven with often unconscious, internal psychological determinants, creating the complexities of human behavior that challenge us in our clinical work. Case presentations by students, the instructor and guest lecturers will demonstrate how concepts from psychodynamic theory can be applied to social work practice with diverse clients in varied settings.

Spring

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7930 Foundations of Public Health

This course will provide a topical overview of the inter-disciplinary field of public health and provides grounding in the public health paradigm. Through a series of lectures and recitation sessions, students will learn about the history of public heatlh and the core public health sciences including behavioral and social sciences, biostatistics, epidemiology, environmental health, and policy and management. Other topics include ethics in public health, context analyses (specifically sociographic mapping and urban health), community participation in research, public health promotion, and the prevention of chronic and infectious diseases.

Fall

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7940 Practice with Older Adults and Families

This course focuses on practice with older adults and families within a life course and resiliency perspective. It examines the nature of the aging process, needs and life issues, the ways in which persons adapt to changes, and the ways in which interventions may assist with these adaptations. Students learn assessment, case management, and intervention skills, including the use of rapid assessment and diagnositc tools, needed to work effectively with older populations and family caregivers in a variety of community-based and institutional settings. The course emphasizes evidence-based practices that enhance quality of life, dignity, respect for differences, and maximum independent functioning.

Fall

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7960 Family Economic Mobility: Problems and Policies

The experiences and voices of mothers, fathers, children, employers, children's teachers, human service workers, job training providers, policymakers and others in cities across America graphically show us the "real life" challenges to economic mobility facing today's families and organizations. These voices particularly illustrate how economic, social, and cultural policies, practices, and beliefs intersect to perpetuate economic inequality for low-income and many middle-income working families alike. The labor market, welfare and workforce programs, public schools and government are some of the institutions implicated in this intersection. In the course we deconstruct concepts such as the "work ethic," "family-friendly workplace," and "good jobs" in terms of economic, racial and cultural inequalities and, more broadly, in terms of their meaning, aims and rhetoric. At base, this course examines occupational mobility in America within the broad framework of capitalism, democracy, race, ethnicity and gender. Students from GSE, SAS, City Planning, and Communications often join SP2 students to read and critique classic and contemporary literature from multiple disciplines and explore generative roles for "meso-oriented" social change professionals.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: MSSP 7960

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7980 Advanced Topics

Titles and Topics vary. See department website for descriptions: https://www.sp2.upenn.edu/academics/master-of-social-work/academics/course-desc riptions/

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

SWRK 7990 Independent Study

Independent studies provide a flexile opportunity for standing faculty and students to work together in pursuing a topic of special interest that is not sufficiently covered by other courses in the curriculum. The content of independent studies is highly specialized and, as such, requires a plan of study developed jointly by the student(s) and the supervising standing faculty member. Part-time faculty members are not eligible to offer independent studies.

1 Course Unit

SWRK 8030 History and Philosophy of Social Welfare

This seminar traces the evolution of social welfare from ancient to modern times focusing on its implications for the development of contemporary social welfare in the United States. The course examines the development of social welfare systems and the underlying philosophies inthe context of the social, economic, political, and cultural environments in which they emerged. Topics include the evolution of modern conceptions of the "welfare state,"the role of public, private and voluntary sectors in the social services, trends in social and family history and their relationship to social welfare, the professionalization of social work, and methods of historical and social policy analysis.

Fall

1 Course Unit

SWRK 8040 Methods of Inquiry: Quantitative Research Methods

The purpose of this course is to teach the basics of practice research, with an emphasis on intervention research. This course will focus on research ethics, building a conceptual framework, source credibility, question and hypothesis formulation, design, sampling, measurement, and scale construction and selection. Special emphasis will be placed on the development of designing feasible and practical research studies to answer questions of importance to social work practice. The course will emphasize the selection and development of outcome measures, intervention manuals, and fidelity measures. It will closely examine the use and development of practice guidelines, evidence-based practice and meta-analytic procedures. Registration restricted to majors only.

Fall

1 Course Unit

SWRK 8050 Methods of Inquiry: Qualitative Research Methods

This course will cover the essentials of qualitative research. Students will learn how to "situate themselves" in the research process so as to best capture the lived experience of the subjects under investigation. The course will explore the appropriate use of intensive interviews, grounded theory and ethnography. Mixed methods that employ both qualitative and quantitative approaches, will also be covered. Registration restricted to majors only.

Spring

Prerequisite: SWRK 8040

1 Course Unit

SWRK 8060 Systematic Reviews: Meta-Analysis and Meta-Synthesis

Systematic reviews and the synthesis of their primary studies (meta-analysis for quantitative studies and meta-synthesis for qualitative studies) are proliferating, and emerging scholars need to be conversant in the methodology, so they can contribute this type of valuable evidence to their knowledge areas. Through this course, students will learn how to locate, understand, and critically appraise systematic reviews. They will also learn how to write a protocol for an original systematic review and carry one out within a small student group. At the completion of the course, students will have a finished systematic review.

Spring

Also Offered As: MSSP 8060

1 Course Unit

SWRK 8110 Social Theory

Course reading consists of the original works of theorists who offer classical, contemporary and postmodern perspectives on social thought, social interaction and issues germane to social welfare. Through intensive examination of multiple theoretical frameworks, students are expected to increase their analytical and critical orientation to theory. This ore nuanced understanding about epistemology, underlying assumptions, and theory construction can then be used to inform the student's substantive field of study and methodological orientation to research. This course is conducted in mixed lecture-seminar format. Students have the opportunity to practice pedagogical techniques and exercise class leadership.

Spring

1 Course Unit

SWRK 8120 Clinical Theory I

The purpose of this course is to broaden and deepen participants' mastery of several theories of development, personality, and behavior that have contributed to social work's knowledge base across the decades and continue to inform clinical social work epistemology today. Drawing primarily from original sources, we will consider key assumptions, constructs, and propositions of each theory in terms of its congruence with social work's principles, values, and mission and in relation to the profession's person-in-environment perspective. In this first semester, we will study the evolution of theories central to psychodynamic thought, from Freud's early biological model of the mind, through various relational perspectives, to contemporary work in the fields of attachment and interpersonal neurobiology. This examination will constitute a case study of the manner in which theories are socially constructed and will lay the foundation for critical inquiry into the social and political biases inherent in the Western European intellectual tradition from which most theories of human behavior have emerged. Registration restricted to majors only.

Fall

1 Course Unit

SWRK 8130 Clinical Theory II

The purpose of Clinical Theory II is two-fold: to broaden and deepen students' mastery of theories of behavior and cognition and to develop understanding of psychotherapy integration. We will begin by establishing a clear rationale for the two-fold nature of the course. Then, we will review the history and fundamentals of behavioral theory, and its iterations, to ground students firmly in a tradition that emphasizes empirical research. Students will have opportunities to expand their knowledge base of these theories through application to clinical practice with case conceptualizations and choice of focus in assignments. This process will involve critically examining the empirical support and indications for the use of various cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) approaches, including culturally adapted CBT. We will consider key assumptions, constructs, and propositions of behavioral and cognitive theories from the lens of social work's principles, values, and mission with oppressed and marginalized people. Finally, we will focus on psychotherapy integration approaches which involve the flexible application of various theories and techniques for a diverse range of people and concerns based on the strengths and needs of each client.

Fall

Prerequisite: SWRK 8120

1 Course Unit

SWRK 8140 Applied Statistics

This course is designed to provide students with a range of statistical methods and applications used for research in human services and clinical practice settings. Topics covered include types of measurement and variables, and basic concepts and techniques for exploring and categorizing data, for generalizing data from sample to population and tests of significance. An emphasis will be placed on the practical applications of data to address social work practice issues. Students will learn how to choose and apply statistical tools to data sources, when and how statistical tools can be used to analyze data, and how to interpret others' quantitative studies. Students will gain hands-on experience in using windows-based stastistical software to manage and analyze quantitative data. Registration restricted to majors only.

Spring

0.5 Course Units

SWRK 8150 Dissertation Seminar I

This seminar is designed to prepare participants for dissertation proposal writing and defense. Each component of this workshop moves the student closer to the two culminating assignments: a concisely crafted and well-supported 15-25 page written draft of the disseration proposal and a presentation of the proposal with accompanying Powerpoint.

Fall

1 Course Unit

SWRK 8160 Dissertation Seminar II

This seminar continues the student's dissertation work beyond the proposal. Under the direction of the disseration chair and committee, the student begins the process of collecting and analyzing data in preparation for the final write-up and defense of the disseratation. Registration restricted to majors only.

Fall

Prerequisite: SWRK 8150

1 Course Unit

SWRK 8520 Social Work Research

This is the foundation course in social work research. It deals with the nature of scientific inquiry; theory and its relation to research design and hypothesis testing; and various models of data collection, sampling, and analysis of research and is supported in following personal interests within the structure of ethical scientific research. Each student prepares an original study which demonstrates integration of the semester's work. Students learn to work on their own. Students completing this class are preapared for more advanced coursework in research. Completion of concurrent enrollment in a course on introductory Social Statistics is required.

Fall

1 Course Unit

SWRK 8550 Advanced Research Methods

The methodology of accountability research in human service programs is studied. Emphasis is placed on social program evaluation, idiographic research, and secondary data analysis in policy research as specialized methods of social work research. Students undertake a laboratory experience in an ongoing program evaluation project.

Spring

Prerequisite: SWRK 8520

1 Course Unit

SWRK 8610 Policy Analysis

This course examines alternative models of policy development and applies them to current issues in social welfare. It emphasizes frameworks for policy research and secondary analysis of governmental data. Topics include: race, class, and sex in policy outcomes; major social welfare programs; and the design, implementation, and evaluation of social service systems. Must have successfully completed a course in multivariate statistics as a prerequisite.

Spring

1 Course Unit

SWRK 9000 Clinical DSW

Topics vary; see dapartment for current course descriptions Registration restricted to majors only.

Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms

0.25 Course Units

SWRK 9010 Proseminar

This course is a weekly, 90-minute (.5 course unit) proseminar. The course contains two main components: a research seminar (i.e., faculty and student presentations of their in-progress research) and skills training (e.g., how to write an abstract, software demonstrations). The two are interwoven throughout the academic year (e.g., 2 weeks of the month devoted to the research seminar and 2 weeks of the month devoted to skills training). The proseminar is required of all students until they successfully defend their dissertation proposal.

Fall or Spring

0.5 Course Units

SWRK 9020 The Trauma Spectrum and Its Treatment: The PRISM Meta-Model

The majority of clients who present to a wide variety of social services have been exposed to adversity and trauma, often beginning in childhood. As a result, the current standard of care requires that human service delivery systems of all kinds need to be "trauma-informed." This course will explore what that actually means, since administering "trauma-specific treatment" alone is not sufficient to encompass the complexity of the multi generational, widespread problems that confront us in the world around us. Based on an understanding that our organizations are living systems, students will draw parallels between the individual experience of trauma and the organizational aspects of trauma and loss. Using these parallel processes as a basis, students will explore a trauma-informed, parallel process of organizational recovery called the "Sanctuary Model." Registration restricted to majors only.

Fall

1 Course Unit

SWRK 9030 Relational Theory

This course will introduce the relational turn in theories of developments and psychotherapy. Relational theory emerged in the epistemological shift to postmodernism and social constructionism, characterized by concepts of knowledge as perspectival, constructed increased skill in developing a literature search, 3) developing a capacity to create operational hypotheses or questions, 4) developing a research design, and 5) designing a data analysis and interpretation plan. The aim of this course is to identify the shared principles of relational theories and apply these principles to clinical social work practice. Students will critically evaluate and compare and contrast relational psychoanalysis with relational-cultural theory. Studentss will evaluate the viability of relational theory in the field of cllinical social work and consider the appication of relational theory beyond the therapy room to the supervisory, agency and teaching contexts. The focus on case studies as examples will be key to understanding the clinical applications of the various medications we will discuss.

1 Course Unit

SWRK 9040 Teaching

This class will focus on classroom dynamics, class culture and instructor skills using an organismic model in which the class has a life of its own and is capable of growth and development. In addition, students will learn underlying theories, research, practice wisdom, etc. that we need to communicate to our students. The course should be helpful in thinking about issues that are central to effective teaching regardless of the practice models you present to your students or the content of courses including policy, research, etc. Students will have an opportunity to share their current or past teaching with a particular emphasis on those difficult moments when they had second thought about classroom teaching as a career. Examples will be used to help illustrate the theoretical content and the readings and bring the ideas to life as they address the real day-to-day issues we all face in teaching. Registration restricted to majors only.

1 Course Unit

SWRK 9050 Strengths-Based Interventions in Social Work

This advanced-level course focuses on social work interentions with children, couples and families. Theories and research that ground family-based interventions are explored and interogated. Through case conceptualizations, role plays and other in-vivo exercises, students will practice techniques for assessment and treatment of family systems. Registration restricted to majors only.

Fall

1 Course Unit

SWRK 9060 Culture, Race, and Identity

Spring

0.25 Course Units

SWRK 9100 Advanced Topics in Practice Development

Students will pursue a broad range of topics that advance the theory-base and practice of social work. Historical as well as contemporary social work literature is reviewed vis-a-vis their contribution to the knowledge development needs of the profession.

Spring

0.25 Course Units

SWRK 9110 Social Construction and Social Work Practice: Transforming Dialogues

This course will focus on the application of a social constructionist orientation to social work practice with an emphasis on its transforming potential. A primary objective of this course is to encourage you to reflect on and critically analyze traditional and contemporary issues germane to social work by using social constructionist ideas to explore how assumptions and dominant understandings of these issues are connected to policies and practices and the possibilities for transformative change.

Spring

0.5-1 Course Unit

SWRK 9200 Advanced Topics in Social Work Practice

Topics vary; see department for current titles and descriptions Registration restricted to majors only.

Spring

0.25 Course Units

SWRK 9950 Doctoral Dissertation

Doctoral Dissertation

0 Course Units