Yiddish (YDSH)

YDSH 101 Beginning Yiddish I

The goal of this course is to help beginning students develop skills in Yiddish conversation, reading and writing. Yiddish is the medium of a millennium of Jewish life. We will frequently have reason to refer to the history and culture of Ashkenazie Jewry in studying the language.

For BA Students: Language Course

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

YDSH 102 Beginning Yiddish II

In this course, you can continue to develop basic reading, writing and speaking skills. Discover treasures of Yiddish culture: songs, literature, folklore, and films.

For BA Students: Language Course

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: YDSH 101 or permission of the instructor

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

YDSH 103 Intermediate Yiddish I

The course will continue the first year's survey of Yiddish grammar with an additional emphasis on reading Yiddish texts. The course will also develop conversational skills in Yiddish.

For BA Students: Language Course

Course not offered every year

Prerequisite: YDSH 102 or permission of the instructor

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

YDSH 104 Intermediate Yiddish II

Continuation of YDSH 103. Emphasis on reading texts and conversation.

For BA Students: Last Language Course

Course not offered every year

Prerequisite: YDSH 103 or permission of the instructor

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

YDSH 108 Readings in Modern Yiddish Literature

This course will survey modern Yiddish literature through readings of Yiddish prose and poetry from the end of the 19th century through the late 20th century. The class will be conducted in both Yiddish and English. Reading knowledge of Yiddish is required, although some texts will be available in English translation. Authors include I.L. Peretz, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Moyshe-Leyb Halpern, and Kadya Molodowsky.

Taught by: Hellerstein

Course not offered every year

Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of Yiddish

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

YDSH 501 Beginning Yiddish I

The goal of this course is to help beginning students develop skills in Yiddish conversation, reading and writing. Yiddish is the medium of a millennium of Jewish life. We will frequently have reason to refer to the history and culture of Ashkenazie Jewry in studying the language.

For BA Students: Language Course

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

YDSH 502 Beginning Yiddish II

For BA Students: Language Course

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: YDSH 101 or permission of the instructor

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

YDSH 503 Intermediate Yiddish I

The course will continue the first year's survey of Yiddish grammar with an additional emphasis on reading Yiddish texts. The course will also develop conversational skills in Yiddish.

For BA Students: Language Course

Course not offered every year

Prerequisite: YDSH 102 or permission of the instructor

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

YDSH 504 Intermediate Yiddish II

Continuation of YDSH 503. Emphasis on reading texts and conversation.

For BA Students: Last Language Course

Course not offered every year

Prerequisite: YDSH 503 or permission of the instructor

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

YDSH 508 Readings in Modern Yiddish Literature

This course will survey modern Yiddish literature through readings of Yiddish prose and poetry from the end of the 19th century through the late 20th century. The class will be conducted in both Yiddish and English. Reading knowledge of Yiddish is required, although some texts will be available in English translation. Authors include I.L. Peretz, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Moyshe-Leyb Halpern, and Kadya Molodowsky.

Taught by: Hellerstein

Course not offered every year

Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of Yiddish

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

YDSH 509 Topics in Yiddish Literature.

One version of this seminar considers works by Jewish women who wrote in Yiddish, Hebrew, English, and other languages in the late 19th through the 20th century. The texts, poetry and prose, will include both belles lettres and popular writings, such as journalism, as well as private works (letters and diaries) and devotional works. The course will attempt to define "Jewish writing, " in terms of language and gender, and will consider each writer in the context of the aesthetic, religious, and national ideologies that prevailed in this period. Because students will come with proficiency in various languages, all primary texts and critical and theoretical materials will be taught in English translation. However, those students who can, will work on the original texts and share with the class their expertise to foster a comparative perspective. Because we will be discussing translated works, a secondary focus of the course will, in fact, be on literary translation's process and products. Another version of this seminar presents Jewish modernism as an international phenomenon of the early 20th century. The course will attempt to define "Jewish modernism" through the prism of poetry, which inevitably, given the historical events in Europe and America during this time, grapples with aesthetic, religious, and national ideologies and methods. The syllabus will focus mainly on poetry written in Yiddish and English, and will also include German, Russian, and Hebrew verse. All poetry, critical, and theoretical materials will be taught in English translation, although students who know the languages will work on the original texts and will bring to the table a comparative perspective. Because we will be discussing translated poems, a secondary focus of the course will, in fact, be on literary translation's process and products.

Taught by: Hellerstein

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: "Jewish Women Writers" is a graduate seminar also be open to advanced undergraduates. Based in the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures, this course will be cross-listed with Comparative Literature, English, Gender, Sexuality Women's Studies, and Jewish Studies. Topics vary annually.