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Viewing: HIST 346 C2: Bodies, Race, and Rights

Last approved: Tue, 09 Oct 2018 15:55:55 GMT

Last edit: Tue, 09 Oct 2018 15:42:18 GMT

First Name Last Name Userid Title Home School Org Short Name
Kathleen Brown kabrown PROFESSOR School of Arts and Sciences HISTORY
HISTORY
346
Spring 2019
Fall 2018
Bodies, Race, and Rights
What did it mean to be a man or woman in the post-Civil War United States? Was being a man the same as being a citizen? If African-American men were to be fully embraced as both men and citizens in the aftermath of slavery, where did that leave women, white and black? Why did a nation built on immigration become so hostile to certain groups of immigrants during this period? In this course, we consider how the meanings and experiences of womanhood, manhood, citizenship, and equality before the law changed from the period immediately after the Civil War until the present day. We look at political battles over the meaning of citizenship, the use of terror to subdue African Americans politically and economically, and the fears of white Americans that they would lose their political and economic dominance to immigrant groups they deemed irreconcilably different from themselves. We also consider the repercussions of these conflicts for medical, legal, and economic efforts to regulate the bodies of women, children, poor people, immigrants, working class laborers, military men, and African Americans. Throughout the course, we will follow the state's changing use of racial, sexual, and economic categories to assess the bodily and intellectual capacities of different groups of citizens. We will also note some of the popular cultural expressions of manhood, womanhood, and citizenship. The lectures and reading assignments are organized around a series of historical problems, dynamic leaders, and controversies that illuminate these issues.
AFRC 346 - Bodies, Race and Rights: Sex and Citizenship in Modern American History
GSWS 346 - Bodies, Race and Rights: Sex and Citizenship in Modern American History
Every Other Term

Foundational Approach

Course usually offered in spring term
Cultural Diversity in the US
 
Brown
Standing Faculty
Standing Faculty
 
To help students identify the policies and interests that regulate the bodies of citizens, including the intimate politics of sex and reproduction and the state's interest in labor, consumer behavior, and military enlistment.

Methods of Assessment

3 short papers of 3-4 pages each

oral history project 12 pages
take home final exam
attendance at lecture and recitation sections

Cross Cultural Analysis

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Cultural Diversity in the US

 
This course was previously approved for CDUS.
 
This course was previously approved for CDUS.
 
This course was previously approved for CDUS.
 
This course was previously approved for CDUS.
 
This course was previously approved for CDUS.

Quantitative Data Analysis

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Formal Reasoning

 
 
 
 
 
 

Administrative Fields

 
 
College Curriculum Committee
Committee Reader
Molly McGlone
ekochman
 
 
Key: 812