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Viewing: EEUR 010 C1: Central & Eastern Europe

Last approved: Tue, 09 Oct 2018 14:41:49 GMT

Last edit: Tue, 02 Oct 2018 21:08:58 GMT

First Name Last Name Userid Title Home School Org Short Name
K. Ghodsee ghodseek Professor School of Arts and Sciences Department of Russian and East European Studies
EAST EUROPEAN
010
Spring 2019
Fall 2018
Central & Eastern Europe
The reappearance of the concept of Central and Eastern Europe is one of the most fascinating results of the collapse of the Soviet empire. The course will provide an introduction into the study of this region - its cultures, histories, and societies - from the foundation of the Holy Roman Empire to the enlargement of the European Union. Students are encouraged to delve deeper into particular countries, disciplines, and sub-regions, such as Central Europe, Eastern Europe, and the Balkans, through an individual research paper and class presentations.
COML 010 - CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE: CULTURES, HISTORIES, SOCIETIES
RUSS 009 - Central and Eastern Europe: Cultures, Histories, Societies
 

Foundational Approach

Course usually offered in spring term
Cross Cultural Analysis
 
Kristen Ghodsee
Standing Faculty
Standing Faculty
This is a required course for Russian and East European Studies major and minor. This class will also expose other Penn students to an overview of cultures and societies of Central and Eastern Europe.
The reappearance of the concept of Central and Eastern Europe is one of
the most fascinating results of the collapse of the Soviet empire. It has
become the most commonly used term to describe more than twenty
countries and peoples situated politically between Russia and “the West”
(or “Western Europe”), and stretching geographically from the eastern
Alps to the Ural Mountains and from the Adriatic to the Baltic. The nations
of Central and Eastern Europe not only share a complicated history, but
they also possess their own regional identity and unique set of cultures and
languages. Already in the Middle Ages this region acquired a unique
identity. During the rise of nationalism, East Central Europe was contested
terrain between different national ideas and projects. In WWII, the region
suffered from invasion from not one but often two competing totalitarian
entities; in the Cold War era this region acquired yet another unique
identity as the territory “Behind the Iron Curtain.” Sometimes described as
a “shatter zone” of empires, Central and Eastern Europe is complex and
contested. It is, therefore, its own region of study with a peculiar history at
the edge and, at the same time, at the core of European politics and
culture.

The course will provide an introduction into the study of this region – its
cultures, histories, and societies – from the foundation of the Holy Roman
Empire to the enlargement of the European Union. Students are
encouraged to delve deeper into particular countries, disciplines, and subregions,
such as Central Europe, Eastern Europe, and the Balkans, through
an individual research paper and class presentations.

Methods of Assessment

Reaction Papers
Every week, students are required to turn in a one to two page reaction
paper to the readings for the week. 20%

Final Paper
Students are required to complete an individual research paper on a topic
approved in advance by the instructor that fits within the themes of any
week of the course. This paper should be 4000 words using at least five
analytical sources (books or academic journal articles) as well as other
sources. 50%
none
Class Presentations
Students are required to present their individual research paper to the
class in a 10-15 minute talk. 10%

Attendance and Participation
Students are required to attend all class sessions and participate by
speaking in class. No more than three absences per semester will be
excused. 20%

Cross Cultural Analysis

 
The course teaches students to apply methods and approaches of anthropological and cultural analysis, relying extensively on ethnographic material.
 
The course takes an interdisciplinary approach and includes readings on art, religion, literature, social norms and institutions of a number of Eastern and Central European societies. Students learn about the similarities and differences of the peoples of EC Europe. Importantly, they learn to understand foreign cultures and societies and accept them on their own terms.
 
This is a survey course; there is no single focus.
 
Students are exposed both to primary sources (texts, material culture, art, music, etc.) and secondary literature about them. Apart from lecturing, the interactive formats of learning in class include close reading and analysis, discussion groups, reporting on independent research.

Cultural Diversity in the US

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Quantitative Data Analysis

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Formal Reasoning

 
 
 
 
 
 

Administrative Fields

 
 
 
 
 
Key: 825