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Viewing: PSCI 250 C1: Regime Change in Latin A

Last approved: Fri, 02 Nov 2018 18:20:23 GMT

Last edit: Tue, 23 Oct 2018 14:24:50 GMT

First Name Last Name Userid Title Home School Org Short Name
Dorothy Kronick kronick ASST PROFESSOR A School of Arts and Sciences Political Science
POLITICAL SCIENCE
250
Spring 2019
Fall 2018
Regime Change in Latin A
Why has the United States government participated in regime change in Latin America? How have these interventions affected Latin American political and economic outcomes? How have they helped or hurt U.S. interests in the region? This lecture course provides an introduction to the history and politics of U.S. participation in regime change in Latin America since 1949. For each event, the course will help students understand (1) the goals of the U.S. government; (2) the historical and political context of the intervention; and (3) the outcomes and consequences, both in Latin America and for the United States. One set of short writing assignments will train students to identify the main argument of a reading and assess the quality of the evidence presented in support of that argument; a second set of short writing assignments will train students to make and defend their own argument (see draft syllabus for details).
LALS 250 - U.S. Intervention in Latin America
Every Other Term

Foundational Approach

Course offered spring; even-numbered years
Cross Cultural Analysis
 
Dorothy Kronick
Standing Faculty
Standing Faculty
This is a lecture course meant to build basic knowledge of U.S. foreign policy in Latin America and to develop reading and writing skills. Any upper-level PSCI seminar would naturally follow from it, as would many upper-level LALS courses. It also serves as a complement to any upper-level history course on U.S. involvement in regime change abroad.
The first objective of this course is to improve students' understanding of U.S. involvement in regime change in Latin America. This knowledge is valuable in its own right; it is also critical for understanding contemporary foreign policy.

In addition to building substantive knowledge, the course aims to develop reading and writing skills. One set of short writing assignments will train students to identify the main argument of a reading and assess the quality of the evidence presented in support of that argument; a second set of short writing assignments will train students to make and defend their own argument (see draft syllabus for details).

Methods of Assessment

Four short (800-word) reading response papers and four short (800-word) opinion articles. See syllabus for details.
N/A
Attendance is required.

Cross Cultural Analysis

 
This course examines the social values and political institutions that led the government of the United States (and, in some cases, the U.S. public) to actively support or oppose regime change in Latin America. We also examine choices made by Latin American politicians and publics—choices embedded in their countries' social values, and shaped by their political institutions.
 
Any governmental decision to intervene in another country inherently involves the interplay of social behavior and responses to other cultures. In studying these interventions, this course explores how U.S. responses to Latin American culture and politics interacted with political institutions to shape regime change across the region.
 
While this course focuses in particular on social values related to foreign intervention, we will also explore how these values are embedded in religious values, depictions of foreign countries in popular culture, and concepts of national identity.
 
One of the core requirements of the course is to compose reading response papers that analyze and (in some cases) criticize the authors' arguments. Students will be encouraged to ask whether each author (a) considers the interests only of her own culture or (b) considers the interests of all cultures involved in the event.

Cultural Diversity in the US

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Quantitative Data Analysis

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Formal Reasoning

 
 
 
 
 
 

Administrative Fields

 
 
 
 
 
Key: 828