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Viewing: PSCI 207 M: Applied Data Science

Last approved: Mon, 04 Feb 2019 20:03:12 GMT

Last edit: Thu, 31 Jan 2019 14:26:12 GMT

First Name Last Name Userid Title Home School Org Short Name
Andrew Arenge aarenge ASSOC DIRECTOR B School of Arts and Sciences Program on Opinion Research and Election Studies
POLITICAL SCIENCE
207
Spring 2019
Fall 2018
Applied Data Science
Jobs in data science are quickly proliferating throughout nearly every industry in the American economy. The purpose of this class is to build the statistics, programming, and qualitative skills that are required to excel in data science. The substantive focus of the class will largely be on topics related to politics and elections, although the technical skills can be applied to any subject matter.
 

Foundational Approach

Course not offered every year
Quantitative Data Analysis
 
 
Standing Faculty
Standing Faculty
 
 

Methods of Assessment

 
 
 

Cross Cultural Analysis

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Cultural Diversity in the US

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Quantitative Data Analysis

PSCI 107 or PSCI 338
Both Majors and Non-Majors
 
Yes. In PSCI207, students will learn how to analyze, interpret and communicate survey data.
 
Yes. Students will develop their own hypotheses regarding how different segments of the American public feel about various political issues and will then analyze original, real world data to support their expectations.
 
Students will wrestle with all aspects of conducting a survey including weighting, pulling a sample, stratifying the sample and conducting AB experiments. Additional topics include regression, functions, model selection, and data visualization.

Formal Reasoning

 
 
 
 
 
 

Administrative Fields

 
 
 
 
Kent Peterman (peterman) (Wed, 30 Jan 2019 17:20:19 GMT): Yes, we do a lot of that. From: Peterman, Kent <peterman@sas.upenn.edu> Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2019 11:53:19 AM To: Lapinski, John S Cc: Peterman, Kent; Arenge, Andrew P Subject: Re: PSCI 207 And with the critical edge? That is, not only what do the data support in the way of a claim to knowledge (results), but also how can that claim go wrong? On Jan 30, 2019, at 10:51 AM, Lapinski, John S <lapins@sas.upenn.edu> wrote: Hi Kent, They actually generate a survey that we Analyze and eventually publish results on NBC digital. It is very applied with real world applications. Thanks, John From: Peterman, Kent <peterman@sas.upenn.edu> Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2019 10:40:17 AM To: Lapinski, John S Subject: PSCI 207 John, Your proposal to have this course approved for the QDA requirement has been languishing in a queue for me since October, and I want to apologize for that. While I’ve been involved in developing the new Curriculum Manager system and am conversant with how it works, I still have to change my work habits. That’s hard. Anyway, the course looks solid for the QDA. I just wanted to clarify one point. Do students work with real data and wrestle with the meaning of their analyses about what we have reason to believe about the real world? The concern is that the courses not be just about the techniques of analysis but also that students think critically about what can be inferred from data and with what degree of confidence. We’ve all seen too many cases in which students and others see statistical analysis as a way to add persuasive power what they wanted to believe anyway or what they wanted others to believe, rather than as exposing the conditional nature of what we claim to know. The instance on having students wrestle with some real data in QDA courses is just in service to that critical habit of mind. Is that part of what you are trying to do in the course? Kent
Kent Peterman (peterman) (Wed, 30 Jan 2019 17:20:31 GMT): Yes, we do a lot of that. From: Peterman, Kent <peterman@sas.upenn.edu> Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2019 11:53:19 AM To: Lapinski, John S Cc: Peterman, Kent; Arenge, Andrew P Subject: Re: PSCI 207 And with the critical edge? That is, not only what do the data support in the way of a claim to knowledge (results), but also how can that claim go wrong? On Jan 30, 2019, at 10:51 AM, Lapinski, John S <lapins@sas.upenn.edu> wrote: Hi Kent, They actually generate a survey that we Analyze and eventually publish results on NBC digital. It is very applied with real world applications. Thanks, John From: Peterman, Kent <peterman@sas.upenn.edu> Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2019 10:40:17 AM To: Lapinski, John S Subject: PSCI 207 John, Your proposal to have this course approved for the QDA requirement has been languishing in a queue for me since October, and I want to apologize for that. While I’ve been involved in developing the new Curriculum Manager system and am conversant with how it works, I still have to change my work habits. That’s hard. Anyway, the course looks solid for the QDA. I just wanted to clarify one point. Do students work with real data and wrestle with the meaning of their analyses about what we have reason to believe about the real world? The concern is that the courses not be just about the techniques of analysis but also that students think critically about what can be inferred from data and with what degree of confidence. We’ve all seen too many cases in which students and others see statistical analysis as a way to add persuasive power what they wanted to believe anyway or what they wanted others to believe, rather than as exposing the conditional nature of what we claim to know. The instance on having students wrestle with some real data in QDA courses is just in service to that critical habit of mind. Is that part of what you are trying to do in the course? Kent
Kent Peterman (peterman) (Wed, 30 Jan 2019 17:21:13 GMT): Yes, we do a lot of that. From: Peterman, Kent <peterman@sas.upenn.edu> Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2019 11:53:19 AM To: Lapinski, John S Cc: Peterman, Kent; Arenge, Andrew P Subject: Re: PSCI 207 And with the critical edge? That is, not only what do the data support in the way of a claim to knowledge (results), but also how can that claim go wrong? On Jan 30, 2019, at 10:51 AM, Lapinski, John S <lapins@sas.upenn.edu> wrote: Hi Kent, They actually generate a survey that we Analyze and eventually publish results on NBC digital. It is very applied with real world applications. Thanks, John From: Peterman, Kent <peterman@sas.upenn.edu> Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2019 10:40:17 AM To: Lapinski, John S Subject: PSCI 207 John, Your proposal to have this course approved for the QDA requirement has been languishing in a queue for me since October, and I want to apologize for that. While I’ve been involved in developing the new Curriculum Manager system and am conversant with how it works, I still have to change my work habits. That’s hard. Anyway, the course looks solid for the QDA. I just wanted to clarify one point. Do students work with real data and wrestle with the meaning of their analyses about what we have reason to believe about the real world? The concern is that the courses not be just about the techniques of analysis but also that students think critically about what can be inferred from data and with what degree of confidence. We’ve all seen too many cases in which students and others see statistical analysis as a way to add persuasive power what they wanted to believe anyway or what they wanted others to believe, rather than as exposing the conditional nature of what we claim to know. The instance on having students wrestle with some real data in QDA courses is just in service to that critical habit of mind. Is that part of what you are trying to do in the course? Kent
Kent Peterman (peterman) (Wed, 30 Jan 2019 17:21:50 GMT): Yes, we do a lot of that. From: Peterman, Kent <peterman@sas.upenn.edu> Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2019 11:53:19 AM To: Lapinski, John S Cc: Peterman, Kent; Arenge, Andrew P Subject: Re: PSCI 207 And with the critical edge? That is, not only what do the data support in the way of a claim to knowledge (results), but also how can that claim go wrong? On Jan 30, 2019, at 10:51 AM, Lapinski, John S <lapins@sas.upenn.edu> wrote: Hi Kent, They actually generate a survey that we Analyze and eventually publish results on NBC digital. It is very applied with real world applications. Thanks, John From: Peterman, Kent <peterman@sas.upenn.edu> Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2019 10:40:17 AM To: Lapinski, John S Subject: PSCI 207 John, Your proposal to have this course approved for the QDA requirement has been languishing in a queue for me since October, and I want to apologize for that. While I’ve been involved in developing the new Curriculum Manager system and am conversant with how it works, I still have to change my work habits. That’s hard. Anyway, the course looks solid for the QDA. I just wanted to clarify one point. Do students work with real data and wrestle with the meaning of their analyses about what we have reason to believe about the real world? The concern is that the courses not be just about the techniques of analysis but also that students think critically about what can be inferred from data and with what degree of confidence. We’ve all seen too many cases in which students and others see statistical analysis as a way to add persuasive power what they wanted to believe anyway or what they wanted others to believe, rather than as exposing the conditional nature of what we claim to know. The instance on having students wrestle with some real data in QDA courses is just in service to that critical habit of mind. Is that part of what you are trying to do in the course? Kent
Kent Peterman (peterman) (Wed, 30 Jan 2019 17:41:58 GMT): Yes, we do a lot of that. From: Peterman, Kent <peterman@sas.upenn.edu> Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2019 11:53:19 AM To: Lapinski, John S Cc: Peterman, Kent; Arenge, Andrew P Subject: Re: PSCI 207 And with the critical edge? That is, not only what do the data support in the way of a claim to knowledge (results), but also how can that claim go wrong? On Jan 30, 2019, at 10:51 AM, Lapinski, John S <lapins@sas.upenn.edu> wrote: Hi Kent, They actually generate a survey that we Analyze and eventually publish results on NBC digital. It is very applied with real world applications. Thanks, John From: Peterman, Kent <peterman@sas.upenn.edu> Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2019 10:40:17 AM To: Lapinski, John S Subject: PSCI 207 John, Your proposal to have this course approved for the QDA requirement has been languishing in a queue for me since October, and I want to apologize for that. While I’ve been involved in developing the new Curriculum Manager system and am conversant with how it works, I still have to change my work habits. That’s hard. Anyway, the course looks solid for the QDA. I just wanted to clarify one point. Do students work with real data and wrestle with the meaning of their analyses about what we have reason to believe about the real world? The concern is that the courses not be just about the techniques of analysis but also that students think critically about what can be inferred from data and with what degree of confidence. We’ve all seen too many cases in which students and others see statistical analysis as a way to add persuasive power what they wanted to believe anyway or what they wanted others to believe, rather than as exposing the conditional nature of what we claim to know. The instance on having students wrestle with some real data in QDA courses is just in service to that critical habit of mind. Is that part of what you are trying to do in the course? Kent
Vincent Romano (vromano) (Thu, 31 Jan 2019 14:26:13 GMT): Rollback: checking to see if I can remove extra comments -- vr
Key: 830