Art & Archaeology of the Mediterranean World (AAMW)

AAMW 401 Introduction to Greek Archaeology

An introduction to the art and archaeology of ancient Greece from the Archaic through Hellenistic periods. Topics to be considered include the formation of the Greek polis, the rising and falling fortunes of Athens and the other Greek city-states in the Classical period, and the world of Alexander the Great. Emphasis is placed on the consideration of the archaeological evidence, e.g., sculpture, painting, pottery, architecture, and other material culture. This course is part of a sequence of introductory courses (with Ages of Homer and Introduction to Roman Archaeology) on the archaeology of the Greco-Roman world. There are no prerequisites, and these courses need not be taken in a particular order.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CLST 275

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 413 Ancient Athletics

The art, archaeology and history of athletics in ancient Greece. Among the topics to be included are: famous Greek athletes, female athletes, the ancient Olympic Games and other athletic festivals, ancient athletic facilities and equipment, the excavation of ancient athletic sites and practical athletics.

Taught by: Romano

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 424 Art of Mesopotamia

A survey of the art of Mesopotamia from 4000 B.C. through the conquest of Alexander the Great.

Taught by: Pittman

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ARTH 224, ARTH 624

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 427 Roman Sculpture

Survey of the Republican origins and Imperial development of Roman sculpture - free-standing, relief, and architectural - from ca. 150 BC to 350 AD. We concentrate on sculpture in the capital city and on court and state arts, emphasizing commemorative public sculpture and Roman habits of decorative display; genres examined include relief, portraits, sarcophagi, luxury and minor arts(gems, metalwork, coinage). We evaluate the choice and evolution of styles with reference to the functions of sculptural representation in Roman culture and society.

Taught by: Kuttner, Rose

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 427, CLST 427

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 428 Hellenistic Art and Spectacle

Hellenistic usually names art in the age of Mediterranean culture from the 4th century BCE and the rise of Alexander the Great's Macedon, and the Greco-Macedonian conquest of the Persian Empire, to Cleopatra of Egypt's defeat by Rome at the end of the Republic. Our course looks also at the age of Augustus and his successors, 1st century CE. While Greek and Macedonian practice in city-states and kingdoms is our launching point, this course also looks at international culture and cultural interaction among peoples from North Africa and Etrusco-Roman Italy, Egypt, (Etrusco) Anatolia, the Mideast and Central Asia. We probe art, artifacts, and visual display from a range of settings, from sanctuary to house, palace and parade, and in all media, from marble monuments to pottery and jewelry. Our archaeology of Hellenistic visual culture also looks at the rich body of Hellenistic and Roman texts of art history, art criticism, and the description of objects and image, to better understand the Hellenistic maker, patron, and viewer. No prerequisites. It is desirable for undergraduates to have experience of research. Of interest to students in AAMW, ARTH, ANCH, CLST, VLST, NELC, RELS and ANTH.

Taught by: Kuttner

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ARTH 428

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 432 Early Christian and Byzantine Architecture

Architecture and its decoration from Early Christian times in East and West until the sixth century A.D., and in the Byzantine lands until the Turkish Conquest.

Taught by: Ousterhout

Also Offered As: ARTH 432

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 435 Medieval Islamic Art & Architecture

An introduction to the major architectural monuments and trends, as well as to the best-known objects of the medieval (seventh-to fourteenth-century) Islamic world. Attention is paid to such themes as the continuity of late antique themes, architecture as symbol of community and power, the importance of textiles and primacy of writing. Suitable for students of literature, history, anthropology as well as art history.

Taught by: Holod

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 435, COML 415, NELC 489

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 477 Archaeological Chemistry

Taught by: McGovern

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: HSPV 577

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 509 Curatorial Seminar

Spring 2015: Practiced in almost all ancient cultures, magic offered ways of managing or understanding the present, controlling supernatural agencies, and seeing the future. The objects and images associated with magical practices are rich and varied and are well represented in the University of Pennsylvania Museum. The aim of the seminar is to prepare an exhibit on magic and divination, working with the archaeological collections of the UPM, specifically the Ancient Near Eastern, Egyptian, and Mediterranean sections. It will include objects such as amulets, curse tablets, incantation bowls, and magical papyri, as well as images representing magical practices. Participating students will select and research objects and prepare wall texts for the exhibit.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 501, NELC 501

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 512 Petrography of Cultural Materials

Introduction to thin-section petrography of stone and ceramic archaeological materials. Using polarized light microscopy, the first half of this course will cover the basics of mineralogy and the petrography of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks. The second half will focus on the petrographic description of ceramic materials, mainly pottery, with emphasis on the interpretation of provenance and technology. As part of this course, students will characterize and analyze archaeological samples from various collections. Prior knowledge of geology is not required.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANTH 514, CLST 512

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 520 Topics in Aegean Bronze Age

Topic varies. Spring 2015: Double axes, horns of consecration, and images of a prominent female goddess were powerful cult symbols for both the Minoans and the Mycenaeans. And indeed, it was originally thought that these two cultures practiced the same religion. But closer examination of textual and archaeological evidence reveals that despite the similarities in their respective iconographies, the religions had significant differences, differences that must have arisen from their different cultural backgrounds. In this course we will look at many different types of evidence Linear A and B texts, archaeological sites and mortuary remains, cult objects such as rhyta and figurines, and artistic renderings of religious scenes found on gold rings and frescoes so that together we can attempt to reconstruct the ritual practices of these religions. We will also use these physical manifestations to consider more broadly the nature not only of the Minoan and Mycenaean religions, but also of the Minoan and Mycenaean cultures.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 520

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 522 Topics in Ancient Iranian Art

Topic varies.

Taught by: Pittman

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 522

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 523 Topics in Art of Ancient Near East

Topic varies.

Taught by: Pittman

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 523

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 525 Topics in Greek and Roman Art

Topic varies. Spring 2016: Rome and its world became dense with monuments, artifacts, images, structures, spaces which addressed individual and collective concerns that we can call political. In private and public displays, these concerns included citizenship and class standing, public achievement and power, the construction of social memory, and the very nature of being Roman in a city, republic, empire. Of interest here also are the roles of women and of the empire's indigenous peoples. Such displays often engaged, too, with religion, in a providential understanding of historical event. Cases range from displays of high design, `art', to seemingly crude graphic communications; all shed light on Roman visual language, and its makers, patrons and spectators. Of especial interest to students in ArtH, AAMW, AncH, ClSt, RelSt, Anthro. No prior background in ancient Roman studies or art history/archaeology required. Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor.

Taught by: Kuttner, Brownlee, A.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 525, CLST 521

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 528 Topics in Classical Architecture

Topic Varies

Taught by: Haselberger

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 528

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 529 Vitruvian Studies

Topic varies.

Taught by: Haselberger

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 529, CLST 528

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 530 Vitruvian Studies

Topic varies.

Taught by: Haselberger

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 530

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 534 Problems in Greek and Roman History

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ANCH 535, HIST 535

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 535 Topics in Islamic Epigraphy

Topic varies.

Taught by: Holod

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 535

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 537 Topics in Art of Iran

Topic varies.

Taught by: Holod

Also Offered As: ARTH 537

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 538 Topics in Art of Andalusia

Spring 2016: This pro-seminar will investigate the nature of Cordoba as the capital of the Umayyad realm in Iberia. Topics discussed will include: city and its suburbs, villas as loci of cultural production, the role of the congregational mosque, the city vs. the palace city of Madina al-Zahra. Knowledge of Spanish and/or Arabic desirable, but not necessary.

Taught by: Holod

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 538

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 541 Topics in Early Medieval Architecture

Topic varies.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 541

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 543 Empires Anc Near East

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: NELC 242, NELC 542

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 546 Museum Internship

The Museum Internship in the spring consists of a research project with Penn Museum collections based on a proposal designed and approved during the fall AAMW Proseminar (AAMW 526). It is offered to, and is a requirement for, first-year AAMW graduate students only.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

AAMW 556 Becoming a Professional Archaeologist

This course (cross-listed as ANTH556) is designed to prepare graduate students for a career in academic archaeology. Topics to be covered include project research design (including logistical planning), acquiring funding (proposal writing), managing grants (including budget planning and reconciliation), publishing, and preparing for entering the job market (writing cover letters and CVs). Students are also encouraged to suggest further topics of interest as the semester goes on. The final project will be the development of a NSF grant proposal, which will be presented and critiqued in stages throughout the semester, and which can serve as the basis for later submission. While much of the focus is on archaeology, students in other disciplines, especially those involving field research, will also benefit.

Taught by: Dibble

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ANTH 556

Prerequisites: ANTH 600 and one archaeology area course or permission of instructor

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 557 Seminar in Archaeological Theory and Method: Archaeology of Landscapes

Topic varies.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANTH 557, LALS 557

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 562 Introduction to Digital Archaeology

Digital methods allow archaeologists to approach research questions about the human past with increasing accuracies on larger datasets and at multiple scales. This class introduces students to the three main steps of digital archaeology: data management, analysis, and sharing. Data management involves the design, creation, and curation of digital objects that capture the archaeological process and evidence. Students will gain deep familiarity in working with the main types of digital archaeological data: structured data (relational databases), 3D models/spatial data, and raster images. The class will provide abundant hands-on experience with the latest equipment and software for working with many different kinds of data. We will learn about data analysis techniques through a close examination of a variety of case studies in the literature that demonstrate how other archaeologists have applied digital methods to their archaeological questions. Finally, we will discuss the importance of sharing data through open access data publication and we will apply our skills with structured data to existing online archaeological datasets. The goal of this class is to prepare students to make methodological decisions during future research endeavors, both in the field and in the archaeological lab.

Taught by: Cobb

Also Offered As: ANTH 362, CLST 362, CLST 562

Prerequisite: Prior archaeological classwork and/or experience preferred

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Please note that this is a lecture course with an undergraduate and graduate section.

AAMW 601 Archaeology and Greek History

An examination of archaeological evidence relevant to selected problems in Greek history.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANCH 601, CLST 601

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 603 Archaeology & The Greek Theater

This course will examine the written and especially the archaeological evidence for the production of Greek drama. Topics will include the theater buildings themselves, stage machinery, scene painting, and costumes. The main chronological focus will be on the fifth and fourth centuries B.C., but some attention will be paid to later developments.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 611 Greek Epigraphy

An introduction to the principles and practices of Greek Epigraphy. Study of selected Greek inscriptions.

Taught by: McInerney

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ANCH 611, CLST 611, GREK 611

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 620 Minoan, Cycladic and Mycenaean Art

This course is designed to give an overview of the cultures of the Aegean Bronze Age. The art and architecture of Crete, the Cyclades and the Mainland of Greece are examined in chronological order, with an emphasis on materials and techniques. In addition, larger issues such as the development of social complexity and stratification, and the changing balance of power during the Aegean Bronze Age are examined.

Taught by: Shank

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 220, ARTH 620

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 621 Greek Vase Painting

Spring 2015: Painted vases constitute the most important and comprehensive collection of visual evidence that survives from ancient Greece. In this course, we will examine the development of Greek vase-painting from the 10th to the 5th century BC, with particular emphasis on the pottery of the Archaic and Classical periods that was produced in the cities of Athens and Corinth. An object-based learning course, this class will focus on the close study of Greek vases in the collection of the University of Pennsylvania Museum, and a number of class sessions will meet in the Museum. Several guest lecturers will discuss the conservation and ancient repair of Greek vases and the ceramic analysis of Greek pottery. We will also learn about the making of ceramics in a session in the Addams Hall pottery studio. Some background in art history or classical studies is helpful but not required.

Taught by: Brownlee A.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 221, ARTH 621

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 622 Art of Ancient Iran

This course offers a survey of ancient Iranian art and culture from the painted pottery cultures of the Neolithic era to the monuments of the Persian Empire. Particular emphasis is placed on the Early Bronze Age.

Taught by: Pittman

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 222, ARTH 622

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 624 Domestic Life in Ancient Civilizations

In this seminar course, students will learn what household archaeology is and how daily life of the commoners in ancient civilizations is studied, based primarily on household material culture excavated from different parts of the world. Through such archaeological data, we will examine and compare case-studies from three distinct regions - East Asia, the Near East, and Mesoamerica. Strong emphasis is given to selected cultural aspects such as construction and maintenance of houses, household utensils and installations, daily food and body ornaments, and domestic burials. The course aims to provide students with a strong foundation for further anthropology-, archaeology- and history-related courses.

Taught by: Nishimura

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 625 Greek Art and Artifact

This course surveys Greek art and artifacts from Sicily to the Black Sea from the 10th century BCE to the 2rd century BCE, including the age of Alexander and the Hellenistic Kingdoms. Public sculpture and painting on and around grand buildings and gardens, domestic luxury arts of jewelry, cups and vases, mosaic floors, and cult artefacts are discussed. Also considered are the ways in which heroic epic, religious and political themes are used to engage viewer's emotions and served both domestic and the public aims. We discuss how art and space was considered, along with ideas of invention and progress, the role of monuments, makers and patrons in Greek society.

Taught by: Kuttner

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 225, ARTH 625, CLST 220

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 626 Hellenistic and Roman Art and Artifacts

This course surveys the political, religious and domestic arts, patronage and display in Rome's Mediterranean, from the 2nd c. BCE to Constantine's 4th-c. Christianized empire. Our subjects are images and decorated objects in their cultural, political and socio-economic contexts (painting, mosaic, sculpture, luxury and mass-produced arts in many media). We start with the Hellenistic cosmopolitan culture of the Greek kingdoms and their neighbors, and late Etruscan and Republican Italy; next we map Imperial Roman art as developed around the capital city Rome, as well as in the provinces of the vast empire.

Taught by: Kuttner

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 226, ARTH 626

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 628 Greek Architecture and Urbanism

Introduction to the art of building and city planning in the ancient Greek world, 7th-1st c. BC. Emphasis on concepts of organizing space, on issues of structure, materials, decoration, proportion, and the Mycenean and eastern heritage as well as on theory and practice of urbanism as reflected in ancient cities (Athens, Pergamon, Alexandria) and writings (Plato, Artistotle, and others). Excursions to the Penn Museum and Philadelphia. No prerequisites.

For BA Students: General Requirement in Science

Taught by: Haselberger

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 228, ARTH 628

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 629 Roman Architecture and Urbanism

Introduction to the art of building and city planning in the Roman world, 6th c. BC - 2nd c. AD. Emphasis on concepts of organizing space, on issues of structure, materials, decoration, proportion, and the Etruscan and Greek heritage as well as on theory and practice of urbanism as reflected in ancient cities (Rome, Ostia, Roman Alexandria, Timgad) and writings (Vitruvius, and others). Excursions to the Penn Museum and Philadelphia. No prerequisites.

Taught by: Haselberger

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 229, ARTH 629

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 632 Byzantine Art and Architecture

This course offers a wide-ranging introduction to the art, architecture, and material culture of Byzantium a Christian, predominantly Greek-speaking civilization that flourished in the Eastern Mediterranean for over a thousand years. Positioned between the Muslim East and the Latin West, Antiquity and the Early Modern era, Byzantium nurtured a vibrant and highly sophisticated artistic culture. With emphasis placed upon paradigmatic objects and monuments, we will examine an array of artistic media, from mosaic and panel painting to metalwork, ivory carving, book illumination, and embroidery. We will consider the making, consumption, and reception of Byzantine art in a variety of contexts political, devotional, ritual, and domestic. Topics include the idea of empire and its visual articulation; court culture; the veneration of images and relics; patronage, piety, and self-representation; authorship and artistic agency; materiality and the sensory experience of art; the reception of the pagan Greco-Roman past; and the changing nature of Byzantium s interactions with neighboring cultures.

Taught by: Drpic

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ARTH 232, ARTH 632

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 633 Eastern Medieval Architecture

This lecture course examines major architectural developments in the eastern Mediterranean between the 4th and 14th centuries CE. The focus is on the Byzantine Empire, with its capital at Constantinople. Lectures also devoted to related developments in the Caucasus (Armenia and Georgia), early Russia, the Balkans (Bulgaria and Serbia), Sicily and under the Normans, the Crusader states. Parallel developments in early Islamic architecture are used for comparative purposes. The course examines evidence for religious and secular buildings, as well as urbanism and settlement patterns.

Taught by: Ousterhout

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 233, ARTH 633

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 635 Introduction to Visual Culture of the Islamic World

A one-semester survey of Islamic art and architecture which examines visual culture as it functions within the larger sphere of Islamic culture in general. Particular attention will be given to relationships between visual culture and literature, using specific case studies, sites or objects which may be related to various branches of Islamic literature, including historical, didactic, philosophical writings, poetry and religious texts. All primary sources are available in English translation.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: Holod

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ARTH 235, ARTH 635, NELC 285, NELC 685, VLST 235

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 640 Medieval Art

An introductory survey, this course investigates painting, sculpture, and the "minor arts" of the Middle Ages. Students will become familiar with selected major monuments of the Late Antique, Byzantine, Carolingian, Romanesque, and Gothic periods, as well as primary textual sources. Analysis of works emphasizes the cultural context, the thematic content, and the function of objects. Discussions focus especially on several key themes: the aesthetic status of art and the theological role of images; the revival of classical models and visual modes; social rituals such as pilgrimage and crusading; the cult of the Virgin and the status of women in art; and, more generally, the ideology of visual culture across the political and urban landscapes.

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: ARTH 240, ARTH 640

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 641 Introduction to Medieval Architecture

This course provides an introduction to the built environment of the Middle Ages. From the fall of Rome to the dawn of the Renaissance, a range of architectural styles shaped medieval daily life, religious experience and civic spectacle. We will become familiar with the architectural traditions of the great cathedrals, revered pilgrimage churches, and reclusive monasteries of western Europe, as well as castles, houses, and other civic structures. We integrate the study of the architecture with the study of medieval culture, exploring the role of pilgrimage, courts and civil authority, religious reform and radicalism, crusading and social violence, and rising urbanism. In this way, we will explore the ways in which the built environment profoundly affected contemporary audiences and shaped medieval life.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 241, ARTH 641

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 645 Economy of Ancient Trade

This course will examine theoretical and empirical frameworks for pre-modern forms of exchange. We will focus on substantist and formalist economic theories and will consider the archaeological evidence for such phenomena a barter, gift exchange, administered economies, markets, local exchange, and long distance overland and maritime trade. Our goal is to develop mid-range models for reconstructing ancient economies. The course will emphasize but not be limited to complex societies of the New and Old World.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANTH 645

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AAMW 702 Greek Sanctuaries

The formation and development of key religious sites, including Olympia, Delphi, Cyrene, Selinus, Cos and Lindos.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANCH 702, CLST 702

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 703 The Ancient House

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: CLST 703

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 705 ETHNOARCHAEOLOGY: GREECE

Ethnoarchaeology involves distinctive theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of living societies for the explicit purpose of shedding light on archaeological questions. In this seminar, we will review the intellectual history of ethnoarchaeology in North America and Europe, and explore case studies from Greece, the wider Mediterranean, and beyond. Among the topics will be analogy, cross-cultural comparison, experimental archaeology, oral history research, and archaeologically oriented ethnographic fieldwork. Students will create a proposal for ethnoarchaeological fieldwork in their area of interest in NSF or Wenner-Gren format, to be critiqued by the instructor and their peers.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CLST 705

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 710 Curatorial Seminar: Gordion, Royal City of Midas

The course will focus on the planning for and design of an exhibit on Gordio and the Phrygians that will take place at the Penn Museum in 2016. The exhibit will feature substantial loans from museums in Turkey, including the "Midas Mound" at Gordion and the "Lydian Treasure" from the area around Sardis.

Taught by: Rose

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANTH 708, CLST 710

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 715 Archaeology of Troy

An introduction to the archaeology of Troy, in northwestern Turkey. The course will focus on the results of excavations at the site in 1988, although the earlier excavations of Schliemann, Dorpfeld, and Blegen will also be considered. The course will cover a broad chronological span--from the early Bronze age through the late Roman period, and will include Greek, Roman, and Medieval attitudes toward Troy and the Trojan legend.

Taught by: Rose

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CLST 715

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 720 Topics in Aegean Art

Topic varies. Fall 2017: Depictions of men and women in Aegean Bronze Age art, dating to circa 3,000-1,100 BCE, are extremely evocative. In this class we will examine what fresco art can tell us about the roles of men and women in this prehistoric culture. We will keep several questions in mind: 1) How do images of men and women evolve? 2) Does the artwork available to us allow us to safely draw conclusions about Minoan and Mycenaean society? 3) What are the similarities and differences between the depictions of Minoan and Mycenaean men and women? 4) Can we make a case that certain people were viewed as different (elevated in society, perhaps on a religious or secular level) based on the artistic examples that have been uncovered? We will also study theories that have been proposed about the roles of men and women of the Aegean Bronze Age, a people known for their artistic excellence and ambiguous images. Class discussions will be based on assigned readings, and you will write 3 short papers reviewing assigned articles. Students will also write and present two research papers to the class.

Taught by: Shank

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 720, CLST 614

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 721 Topics in Archaeological Science

Topic varies.

Taught by: Betancourt

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 721

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 722 Topography of Rome

The topographical development of ancient Rome from its prehistoric beginnings to the late Imperial times with emphasis on the city's key historical and architectural monuments.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: CLST 730

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 723 Topics in the Art of the Ancient Near East

Topic varies. Spring 2015: This team taught class will extend from the lead up to the Neo Sumerian Empire through the Empire and its collapse and reorganization of the political landscape of greater Mesopotamia. It will consider the imperial period internally and from the perspective of the northern and eastern neighbors. This class is an upper level graduate research seminar that will include art historical, anthropological and historical approaches. Class participation and a major research paper are required.

Taught by: Pittman

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 723, NELC 740

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 725 Topics in Greek and Roman Art

Topic varies.

Taught by: Kuttner

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 725

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 729 Topics in Roman Architecture and Topography

Topic varies. Fall 2015: This seminar will investigate two ancient architectural masterpieces, the 2nd c. AD Pantheon in Rome and the 6th c. AD Hagia Sophia in Istanbul. The two monuments stand at the forefront of the architectural trends under Hadrian and Justinian respectively, and are best known for their unique designs and domes of unprecedented scale. The seminar will analyze issues of design, structure, aesthetics, and symbolism. No prerequisites; skills in digital visualization are welcome.

Taught by: Haselberger, Ousterhout

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 729

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 732 Topics in Byzantine Art and Architecture

Topic varies. Spring 2016: The graduate seminar will investigate the dynamics of artistic exchange between Constantinople and its Byzantine provinces, as well as areas under its cultural influence. Both architecture and monumental art will be considered, focusing on the period of 6th-12th centuries. Students will produce two research papers: one addressing a Constantinopolitan monument; the second assessing artistic production in a region outside the Byzantine capital.

Taught by: Ousterhout

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 732

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 736 The Archaeology of Coastal Northeast Africa: Cyrenaeca and Marmarica

Prerequisite(s). Exposure to introductory courses. An examination of selected aspects of the Bronze Age to Late Roman period archaeology of the northeastern African coast between Alexandria and Syrtic gulf.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 738 Topics in Islamic Archaeology

Topic varies. Spring 2017: This seminar will trace the development of the field from one that was centered largely on the recovery of major monuments to one in which issues of daily life, demography, chronology and the study of settlement patterns have come to play a major role. The seminar will review work in the major zones of the Islamic world: Central Asia, Iran, Iraq, Anatolia, Syria, Palestine, Egypt, North Africa I (Libya-Tunisia), North Africa II (Algeria- Morocco), Spain. Of special interest this semester will be the study of landscape archaeology and settlement patterns. The seminar will discuss changes in patterns of settlement, trade and material culture 650 - 1300 CE in different areas of the Islamic world, concentrating on sites in Iran, Syria and North Africa.

Taught by: Holod

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 738, NELC 731

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 740 Topics in Medieval Art

Topic varies. Spring 2015: Among the functional genres shaping religious imagery in the Middle Ages and Renaissance, the altarpiece is arguably the most important, and many of the most famous panel paintings that hang today in museums originated as components of altarpieces. The altarpiece in the Latin church bridged the divide between clergy and laypeople, between cult and devotion, between public acclaim and private interests. Such altarpieces developed into extraordinarily dynamic vehicles for staging the religious image, akin to mural painting (in its potential for narrative elaboration), and manuscript illumination (in its potential for interchanging and juxtaposing imagery). As an umbrella for diverse research projects in both medieval and Renaissance art, this seminar affords an overview of the origins, development and articulation of the altarpiece as a functional and pictorial genre in European art, on both sides of the Alps. It also seeks to provide students with the materials and practical training--technical, scholarly, interpretative-- required to study altarpieces as visual, narrative, and material totalities.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 749 Seminar in Field Archaeology

Topic Varies.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 750 Supervised Reading and Research

Two terms. student may enter either term.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AAMW 751 Participation in Archaeological Excavations

Opportunities for qualified students to join in current expeditions. Credit allowed will depend on the length of time spent in the field.

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

AAMW 800 Pedagogy

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

AAMW 999 Independent Study

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

Notes: May be repeated for credit