African Studies (AFST)

AFST 050 World Musics and Cultures

Draws on repertories of various societies from Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas to examine relations between aesthetic productions and social processes. We investigate musical sounds, cultural logics informing those sounds, and social strategies of performance. Topics may include indigenous music theories, music and social organization, symbolic expressions and musical meaning, gender, religion, and social change.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Taught by: Muller

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 050, ANTH 022, FOLK 022, MUSC 050

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFST 062 Land of the Pharaohs

This course provides an introduction to the society, culture and history of ancient Egypt. The objective of the course is to provide an understanding of how ancient Egypt emerged as one of the most successful and long-lived civilizations in world history.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Silverman, Wegner

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: NELC 062

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFST 071 Literatures of Africa and the African Diaspora

This course will serve as an introduction to a particularly rich arena of literature in English. It will also help students to begin to understand many of the racial subtexts underlying the culture wars in America, where too often in the full glare of cameras, an anguished voice informs the audience that "as an African, I cannot expect justice in this America." One of the things at work here is the assumption of a common Africa diasporic identity -- understood as an excluded, marginalized subtext of identity in the new world. But why is Africa being involed here? What does "Africa" mean in this new world context? What is the larger global context of these assumptions about "Africa" and what is its history? Does the term "Africa" itself have a history? What is "African literature?" This course, therefore, will also help students not only to ask fundamental questions about identity but also to understand identity as a moving and dynamic construct. How, for example, does "Africa" travel to South America, to the Caribbean Archipelago, and to Europe? See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 071, ENGL 071

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFST 075 Africa Before 1800

Survey of major themes and issues in African history before 1800. Topics include: early civilizations, African kingdoms and empires, population movements, the spread of Islam, the slave trade era. Also, emphasis on how historians use archaeology, linguistics, and oral traditions to reconstruct Africa's early history.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Babou, Cassanelli

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AFRC 075, HIST 075

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

AFST 076 Africa Since 1800

Survey of major themes, events, and personalities in African history from the early nineteenth century through the 1960s. Topics include abolition of the slave trade, European imperialism, impact of colonial rule, African resistance, religious and cultural movements, rise of naturalism and pan-Africanism, issues of ethnicity and "tribalism" in modern Africa.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Cassanelli

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 076, HIST 076

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

AFST 102 Study of a Theme

This is an introduction to literary study through the works of a compelling literary theme. (For offerings in a given semester, please see the online course descriptions on the English Department website). The theme's function within specific historical contexts, within literary history generally, and within contemporary culture, are likely to be emphasized. Some versions of this course will also serve as an introduction to other members of the English faculty, who will visit the class as guest lecturers. This course is designed for the General Requirement, and is ideal for the students wishing to take an English course but not necessarily intending to major.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: CIMS 112, COML 245, ENGL 102

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFST 140 Elementary Zulu I in Residence

This elementary course is for beginners and it requires no prior knowledge of Zulu. The course will expose students to the Zulu language and culture and will be based in the National Standards for Foreign Language Learning. Students will be engaged in communicative language learning through interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of language learning techniques. They will gain knowledge and understanding of the Zulu culture. They will use their Zulu language and culture learning experience to connect with other disciplines and further their knowledge of these disciplines through perspectives acquired from their Zulu class. They will also develop insight into the nature of language and culture through comparisons of the Zulu language and culture and their own. Through movies, songs, and other cultural activities online students will acquire the natural use of the language which will enable them to acquire linguistic and cultural skill to become life-long learners who can participate in Zulu communities in the U.S. and overseas.

Taught by: Mbeje

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 140

Activity: Lecture

0.5 Course Units

Notes: OBJECTIVE: Attainment of Level 1 (ceiling) in speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills on the Interagency Language Roundtable (ILR) scale.

AFST 147 Holy Wars & Jihads

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HIST 147, NELC 187

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFST 169 The Conflicts in Darfur and South Sudan

Sudan is marred by several military conflicts between the state and its citizens not only during colonial times but even after its independence in 1956. The current conflict in Darfu is only one of many wars that ravaged Sudan prior to the ending of Africa's longest civil war (1956-1971, 1983-2005) in the southern part of the country. This course will provide an indepth analysis of the two main conflicts in the Sudan which ends up with the division of the country into two. (1) The first conflict we will study is the Darfur conflict based upon historical and cultural factors, as well as analyzing the ideology of the successive Sudanese states specifically the current government. The course will explore the role of regional and international politics with interest in the ongoing conflict, the "Genocide" and ICC controversies, as well as the local militia, the politics of aid in war-torn areas, and the role of Sudan's neighbors in the Darfur conflict and how this could be related to other conflicts in Sudan. (2) The second conflict that we'll cover is the conflict in southern Sudan, which ends up by its secession as an independent country in 2011. This course aims towards the study of the reasons behind these military conflicts and ethnic conflicts that charaterize the modern history of Sudan.

Taught by: Dinar

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFST 170 Elementary Yoruba I

The Elementary Yoruba I course can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on Nigeria and the diaspora/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Yoruba. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable common daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills at the mid-high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The mid-high novice level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilibilities of the second semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Elementary Yoruba II course materials.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Awoyale

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 170, AFST 517

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 171 Elementary Yoruba II

The main objective of this course is to further sharpen the Yoruba linquistic knowledge that the student acquired in level I. By the end of the course, the student should be able to (1) read, write, and understand simple to moderately complex sentences in Yoruba; and, (2) advance in the knowledge of the Yoruba culture.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Awoyale

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AFRC 171, AFRC 517, AFST 518

Prerequisites: Completion of Elementary Yoruba I, or permission of instructor

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 180 Elementary Swahili I

The Elementary Swahili I course can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on East Africa/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative compentence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Swahili. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable common daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills at the mid-high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The mid-high level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the second semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Elementary Swahili II course materials.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Mshomba

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 180, AFST 580

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 181 Elementary Swahili II

This course continues to introduce basic grammar, vocabulary, and the reading and writing of Swahili to new speakers. During this term, folktales, other texts, and film selections are used to help introduce important aspects of Swahili culture and the use of the language in wide areas of Africa.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Mshomba

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AFRC 181, AFST 581

Prerequisites: Completion of Elementary Swahili I, or permission of instructor

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 190 Introduction to Africa

This course provides an introduction to the study of Africa in all its diversity and complexity. Our focus is cultural, geographical, and historical: we will seek to understand Africa s current place in the world political and economic order and learn about the various social and physical factors that have influenced the historical trajectory of the continent. We study the cultural formations and empires that emerged in Africa before European colonial invasion and then how colonialism reshaped those sociocultural forms. We ll learn about the unique kinds of kinship and religion in precolonial Africa and the changes brought about by the spread of Islam and Christianity. Finally, we ll take a close look at contemporary issues such as ethnic violence, migration, popular culture and poverty, and we'll debate the various approaches to understanding those issues.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Hasty

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 190, ANTH 190

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFST 210 African Religions

Religion permeates all aspects of African life and thought. There is no dichotomy between religion and society in Africa. In this course, we will survey some of the indigenous religions of Africa and examine their nature and their philosophical foundations. We will examine African systems of beliefs, myths, symbols, and rituals, as developed by African societies to express their distinctive worldviews. We will also raise some questions about the interrelationship of religion and culture as well as religion and social change in Africa, and the challenges of modern technologies to African beliefs. We will examine the future of African religions and analyze the extent to which African peoples can hold on to their beliefs in this age of rapid technological and scientific development. Emphasis will be on themes rather than on individual national or tribal religions. Case studies, however, will be limited to West Africa among the Akan of Ghana, the Yoruba of Nigeria, and the Mende of Sierra Leone. Questions are provided (a) to guide and direct reading (b) to form the basis for discussions (c) as exercises and (d) for examinations.

Taught by: Ofosu-Donkoh

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 210, RELS 210

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFST 221 African Women's Lives: Past and Present

Restoring women to African history is a worthy goal, but easier said than done.The course examines scholarship over the past forty years that brings to light previously overlooked contributions African women have made to political struggle, religious change, culture preservation, and economic development from pre-colonial times to present. The course addresses basic questions about changing women's roles and human rights controversies associated with African women within the wider cultural and historical contexts in which their lives are lived. It also raises fundamental questions about sources, methodology, and representation, including the value of African women's oral and written narrative and cinema production as avenues to insider perspectives on African women's lives.

Taught by: Blakely

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 222, GSWS 222

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFST 225 African Languages and Culture

The aim of the course is to provide a general perspective on African languages and African linguistics. No background in linguistics is necessary. Students will be introduced to theoretical linguistics-its concepts, theories, ways of argumentation, data collection, data analysis, and data interpretation. The focus will be on the languages and linguistics of Africa to provide you with the knowledge and skills required to handle the language and language-related issues typical of African conditions. We will cover topics related to formal linguistics (phonology/phonetics, morphology, syntax, and semantics), aspects of pragmatics as well as the general socio-linguistic character of African countries. We will also cover language in context, language and culture, borrowing, multilingualism, and cross-cultural communication in Africa.

Taught by: Mbeje

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 225

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFST 227 Media in Africa

This course examines the recent explosion of media culture in Africa, including radio, TV, film, internet, newspapers, and magazines. We look at the media forms themselves, studying the elements of African culture that shape the language,themes, and imagery of African media. We also study the producers of the media: the African journalists, film directors, disc jockeys, actors, and entertainers who construct the African public sphere through talent and ingenuity, drawing on cultural knowledge and social relationships. Finally, we'll turn to African audiences, learning how Africans actively engage with media forms, using media to participate in national conversations on such topics as gender, environmentalism, corruption, and development. Throughout the course, we study how African media give expression to ethnic, political, and religious identities, playing a crucial role in the construction and interaction of communities within the larger context of nation-states.

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AFST 503, ANTH 227, ANTH 504

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFST 228 African Epic: Performance & Power

Homer's Iliad and Odyssey from ancient Greece and Song of Roland from medieval France are familiar landmarks in world literature. In contrast, Sunjata Epic of Mali, Mwindo Epic of Congo and more than twenty-five other heroic narrative poems throughout Africa are less known but equally valuable for accessing ancient wisdom, exploits of heroes and heroines, cultural values, knowledge systems, and supernatural realms. An additional benefit of studying African epic is that they are performed today or in living memory, so the cultural, performative, and social contexts are not obscured by centuries. These living traditions give us opportunities to more fully understand bards' roles, interaction of bard and audience, transformation from oral to written representation, and the extension of epic themes into other aspects of social life.

Taught by: Blakely

Also Offered As: COML 224

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFST 231 Francophone African Cinema

This course will introduce students to recent films by major directors from Francophone Africa. While attention will be given to aesthetic aspects and individual creativity, the viewing and discussions will be mostly organized arounda variety of (overlapping) themes: History; Tradition/modernity; Urban Life; Gender and sexuality; Politics. Class conducted in French.

Taught by: Moudileno

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 231, CIMS 210, FREN 231

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFST 232 Topics in World History

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: CIMS 233, HIST 232

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFST 233 African Folklore, Popular Culture, and the Diaspora

This course explores African expressive culture in both West and Central Africa and the Americas, considering continuities in visual and verbal art, religion, and ritual, and material culture from Africa to the New World. The topic is interdisciplinary, drawing on research by folklorists, cultural anthropologists, archaeologists, and art historians. This study informs our understanding of both particular historical connections related to specific peoples and genres and fundamental aesthetic values that have shaped and continue to influence the entire Afro-Atlantic region.

Taught by: Blakely

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: FOLK 233

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFST 235 Africans Abroad: Emigrants, Refugees, and Citizens in the New African Diaspora

This seminar will examine the experiences of recent emigrants and refugees from Africa, including many now living in the city of Philadelphia and the surrounding region. In addition to reading some of the historical and comparative literature on migration, ethnic diasporas, and transnationalism, students will have the opportunity to conduct research on specific African communities in Philadelphia or elsewhere in North America, Europe, or the Middle East. African emigres' relations with both their home and host societies will be explored and compared with the experience of other immigrant groups over the past century. Topics include reasons for leaving Africa, patterns of economic and educational adaptation abroad, changes in gender and generational roles, issues of cultural and political identity, and the impact of national immigration policies.

Taught by: Cassanelli

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFST 240 Elementary Amharic I

The Elementary Amharic I course can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on Ethiopia/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Amharic. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable common daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills at the mid-high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The mid-high novice level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the second semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Elementary Amharic II course materials.

For BA Students: Language Course

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 240, AFRC 540, AFST 540, NELC 481

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 241 Elementary Amharic II

Continuation of Elementary Amharic I.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Hailu

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AFRC 241, AFRC 541, AFST 541, NELC 482

Prerequisites: Completion of Elementary Amharic I, or permission of the instructor

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 242 Intermediate Amharic I

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Hailu

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 242, AFRC 543, AFST 543, NELC 483

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 243 Intermediate Amharic II

For BA Students: Last Language Course

Taught by: Hailu

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AFRC 243, AFRC 544, AFST 544, NELC 484

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 247 Advanced Amharic

An advanced Amharic course that will further sharpen the students' knowledge of the Amharic language and the culture of the Amharas. The learners communicative skills will be further developed through listening, speaking, reading and writing. There will also be discussions on cultural and political issues.

For BA Students: Advanced Language Course

Taught by: Zemichael

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 247, AFRC 548, AFST 547

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 249 Amharic Language & Culture

For BA Students: Advanced Language Course

Taught by: Hailu

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Completion of Advanced Amharic I & II.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFST 253 Music and Performance of Africa

This class provides an overview of the most popular musical styles and discussion of the cultural and political contexts in which they emerged in contemporary Africa. Learning to perform a limited range of African music/dance will be part of this course. No prior performance experience required. (Formerly Music 253).

Taught by: Muller

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 253, ANTH 263, FOLK 253, MUSC 256

Prerequisites: Completion of MUSC 050 is recommended.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFST 257 Contemporary African Politics

A survey of politics in Africa focusing on the complex relationships between state, society, the economy, and external actors. It will cover colonial rule, the independence struggle, authoritarian and democratic statecraft, international debt, economic development, military rule, ethnicity, and class.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 257, PSCI 210

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFST 268 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN AFRICAN SOCIETY

This course will deal with law and society in Africa. After surveying the various legal systems in Africa, the focus will be on how and to what extent the countries of Africa "re-Africanized" their legal systems by reconciling their indigenous law with western law and other legal traditions to create unified legal systems that are used as instruments of social change and development. Toward this end, the experiences of various African countries covering the various legal traditions will be included. Specific focus will be on laws covering both economic and social relations. This emphasis includes laws of contracts and civil wrongs, land law, law of succession, marriage and divorce and Africa's laws of International Relations, among other laws. Throughout this course a comparative analysis with non-African countries will be stressed.

Taught by: Imoagene

Also Offered As: AFRC 268, SOCI 268

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFST 270 Intermediate Yoruba I

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Awoyale

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 270, AFST 529

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 271 Intermediate Yoruba II

For BA Students: Last Language Course

Taught by: Awoyale

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AFRC 271, AFRC 534, AFST 532

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 272 Topics: Africa and African Diaspora

This course explores an aspect of the literature of Africa and the African Diaspora intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year.

Taught by: Jaji

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 276, COML 273, ENGL 271

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFST 280 Intermediate Swahili I

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Mshomba

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 280, AFST 582

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 281 Intermediate Swahili II

For BA Students: Last Language Course

Taught by: Mshomba

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AFRC 282, AFST 583

Prerequisites: Intermediate Swahili I, or permission of instructor

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through the Penn Language Center

AFST 284 Advanced Swahili I

This is an advanced Kiswahili course which will engage learners in extended spoken and written discourse. Advanced learners of Kiswahili will listen to, read about, write and speak on authentic video materials, contemporary novels, and newspapers. They will also participate in various discussions on cultural and political issues.

For BA Students: Advanced Language Course

Taught by: Mshomba

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 284, AFST 584

Prerequisites: AFST 280, LING 280, AFRC 280 or permission of instructor

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 285 Advanced Swahili II

For BA Students: Advanced Language Course

Taught by: Mshomba

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AFRC 285, AFST 586

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 370 Advanced Yoruba I

For BA Students: Advanced Language Course

Taught by: Awoyale

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFST 587

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 371 Advanced Yoruba II

For BA Students: Advanced Language Course

Taught by: Awoyale

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AFST 588

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 390 Survey Francophone Lit

This class will explore the African city as a site of colonial and postcolonial exchanges by way of twentieth-century European and African representations. We will examine, on the one hand, the status of the urban located in Africa in European works from the colonial period (fiction and non-ficiton including Gide, Leiris, Londres). On the other hand, we will study Africans, focusing on the dreams and transformations involved in the passage from the village to the city to the metropole. Essays from history, sociology, urban studies and postcolonial theory will supplement the study of the primary texts. All readings, class discussions and written assignments in French.

Taught by: Moudileno

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 391, FREN 390

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFST 399 Independent Study: Language

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 460 Middle Egyptian

Introduction to the grammar of Middle Egyptian.

Taught by: Silverman

Two terms. student must enter first term.

Also Offered As: ANEL 460

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFST 467 Introduction to Egyptian Culture and Archaeology

Covers principal aspects of ancient Egyptian culture (environment, urbanism, religion, technology, etc.) with special focus on archaeological data; includes study of University Museum artifacts. Follows AMES 266/466 - History of Egypt taught in the Fall semester.

Taught by: Wegner

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: NELC 467

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFST 470 Twi Language & Culture I

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFST 471 Twi Lang & Culture II

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFST 484 Swahili Lang/Culture I

This course taught in Swahili will focus on reading/writing skills and speaking/listening skills as well as structural and cultural information. The course will be structured around three thematic units: History, Politics, and Education. The course will provide background on the Swahili-speaking world: Who were the first Swahili speakers and what varieties of the language did they speak? How did Swahili spread from the coast to other Swahili-speaking areas as far inland as Uganda, Rwanda, and Congo? Swahili is a lingua franca and has importance in the spread of religion and trade movements. Influences of other languages on Swahili and influences of Swahili on local languages will be discussed. Political and educational systems will be discussed as well.

For BA Students: Advanced Language Course

Taught by: Mshomba

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFST 590

Prerequisite: Completion of Advanced Swahili I & II

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFST 486 Yoruba Language & Culture I

Taught by: Awoyale

Course not offered every year

Prerequisites: Completion of Advanced Yoruba I & II.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 487 Yoruba Language & Culture II

Taught by: Awoyale

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Completion of Advanced Yoruba I & II.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFST 490 African Language Tutorial - Elementary I

The main objective of this course is to allow students to study an African language of their choice, depending on the availability of the instructor. The course will provide students with linquistics tools which will facilitate their research work in the target country. Cultural aspects of the speakers of the language will be introduced and reinforced.

For BA Students: Language Course

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFST 594

Prerequisite: Permission of Penn Language Center

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 491 African Language Tutorial - Elementary II

Continuation of AFST 490.

For BA Students: Language Course

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 491, AFST 595

Prerequisite: Permission of Penn Language Center

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 492 African Language Tutorial - Intermediate I

For BA Students: Language Course

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFST 596

Prerequisite: Permission of Penn Language Center

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 493 African Language Tutorial - Intermediate II

Continuation of AFST 492.

For BA Students: Last Language Course

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AFRC 493, AFST 597

Prerequisite: Permission of Penn Language Center

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 494 African Language Tutorial - Advanced I

For BA Students: Advanced Language Course

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFST 598

Prerequisite: Permission of Penn Language Center

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 495 African Language Tutor: Adv II Languages will be specified in each section.

Continuation of AFST 494.

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AFRC 495, AFST 599

Prerequisite: Permission of Penn Language Center

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFST 496 Lanugage & Culture I

Aspects of the targeted language's history, language, and culture.

For BA Students: Language Course

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: Permission of Penn Language Center.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered Through Penn Language Center

AFST 509 Arabic: Reading Historical Manuscripts

Arabic language is used by many societies not only in communication but also in correspondence and in documenting the affairs of their daily lives. Arabic script is adopted by many groups who native languages are not Arabic, in writing their language before some moved to the roman alphabet. In many historical documents specific style of writing and handwriting are dominant. This specificity is influenced by the dialectical variations, the historical development of each region and the level of Arabic literacy and use.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARAB 534

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFST 515 African Poltical Economy

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: PSCI 516

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFST 517 Elementary Yoruba I

This is an introductory course in Yoruba whose goals are to introduce students to the history, geographical location of the people who speak Yoruba, their culture, customs, and traditions; and, to enable students to develop communicative skills through listening, speaking, reading and writing.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Awoyale

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 170, AFST 170, AFST 518

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 518 Elementary Yoruba II

The main objective of this course is to further sharpen the Yoruba linquistic knowledge that the student acquired in level I. By the end of the course, the student should be able to (1) read, write, and understand simple to moderately complex sentences in Yoruba; and (2) advance in the knowledge of the Yoruba culture.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Awoyale

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AFRC 171, AFRC 517, AFST 171, AFST 517

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 529 Intermediate Yoruba I

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Awoyale

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 270, AFST 270

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 532 Intermediate Yoruba II

For BA Students: Last Language Course

Taught by: Awoyale

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AFRC 271, AFRC 534, AFST 271

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 540 Elementary Amharic I

An introductory course for students with no previous knowledge of Amharic. Amharic belongs to the southern branch of Hemeto-Semitic languages which is also referred to as "Afrasian." Amharic is the official language of Ethiopia and is spoken by 14 million native Amharas and by approximately 18 million of the other ethic groups in Ethiopia. The goals of this course are to introduce students to the culture, customs, and traditions of the Amharas. Students will develop communicative skills through listening, speaking, reading and writing.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Hailu

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 240, AFRC 540, AFST 240, NELC 481

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 541 Elementary Amharic II

Continuation of Elementary Amharic I.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Hailu

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AFRC 241, AFRC 541, AFST 241, NELC 482

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 543 Intermediate Amharic I

Offered through Penn Language Center

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Hailu

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 242, AFRC 543, AFST 242, NELC 483

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFST 544 Intermediate Amharic II

Offered through Penn Language Center

For BA Students: Last Language Course

Taught by: Hailu

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AFRC 243, AFRC 544, AFST 243, NELC 484

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFST 547 Advanced Amharic

An advanced Amharic course that will further sharpen the students' knowledge of the Amharic language and the culture of the Amharas. The learners communicative skills will be further developed through listening, speaking, reading and wwriting. There will also be discussions on cultural and political issues.

For BA Students: Advanced Language Course

Taught by: Hailu

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 247, AFRC 548, AFST 247

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 560 Introduction to Francophone Studies

SPRING 2016: This seminar will introduce key authors and issues in Francophone studies through texts that specifically focus on various experiences of war in colonial and postcolonial contexts. Significantly, the first piece of fiction by an African author may well be Bakary Diallo's Force Bonte, (1926), the autobiographical story of a WWI Senegalese Tirailleur, physically deformed by his war experience and trying to through his writing. While Force Bont� is unique as an early piece, similar narratives have not ceased to proliferate in French and Francophone fiction. Indeed, writers from all over the former French Empire have repeatedly offered fictional accounts of colonial subjects' involvement in European wars, and especially WWII, with various degrees of ambivalence. As conflicts and genocides continue, the experience of war fukes a new wave of Francophone accounts at the turn of the twenty-first century. We will use an extensive diachronically and synchronically developed reading (and viewing ) list of texts and films from Senegal, Congo, Rwanda, Guinea, Algeria, Martinique, Mauritius, and (Metropolitan) France from the 1920s to 2014. Using this material as the basis for our exploration we will address several questions: What are some of the important tropes deployed in these narratives and how do they relate to broader issues concerning colonial and postcolonial violence? How do the wars of others (e.g. WWI and WWII) complicate the experience of war and questions of engagement and solidarity? How do such experiences lay the groundwork for other wars, of liberation, for example? Finally how does war impact the articulation of memory, survival and writing in colonial contexts, in the postcolony, and in the European Metropole? Primary texts in French. Class discussion in French or English.

Taught by: Moudileno

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 591, COML 590, FREN 590

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: An introduction to major literary movements and authors from five areas of Francophonie: the Maghreb, West Africa, Central Africa, the Caribbean and Quebec.

AFST 563 Old Egyptian

This course is an introduction to the language of the Egyptian Old Kingdom. The grammar of the period will be introduced during the early part of the semester, using Ededl's ALTAGYPTISCHE GRAMMATIK as the basic reference. Other grammatical studies to be utilized will include works by Allen, Baier, Polotsky, Satzinger, Gilula, Doret, and Silverman. The majority of the time in the course will be devoted to reading varied textual material: the unpublished inscriptions in the tomb of the Old Kingdom official Kapure--on view in the collection of the University Museum; several autobiographical inscriptions as recorded by Sethe in URKUNDEN I; and a letter in hieratic (Baer, ZAS 03. 1077. 1-9).

Taught by: Silverman

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ANEL 563

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFST 580 Elementary Swahili I

Beginning level of Swahili which provides training and practice in speaking, reading and writing with initial emphasis on speaking and listening. Basic grammar, vocabulary and cultural skills learned gradually with priority on the spoken language. Especially during the second term, folktales, other texts and films will be used to help introduce important aspects of Swahili culture.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Mshomba

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 180, AFST 180

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 581 Elementary Swahili II

This course continues to introduce basic grammar, vocabulary, and the reading and writing of Swahili to new speakers. During this term, folktales, other texts, and film selections are used to help introduce important aspects of Swahili culture and the use of the language in wide areas of Africa.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Mshomba

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AFRC 181, AFST 181

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 582 Intermediate Swahili I

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Mshomba

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 280, AFST 280

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 583 Intermediate Swahili II

For BA Students: Last Language Course

Taught by: Mshomba

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AFRC 282, AFST 281

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 584 Advanced Swahili I

This is an advanced Kiswahili course which will engage learners in extended spoken and written discourse. Advanced learners of Kiswahili will listen to, read about, write and speak on authentic video materials, contemporary novels, and newspapers. They will also participate in various discussions on cultural and political issues.

For BA Students: Advanced Language Course

Taught by: Mshomba

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 284, AFST 284

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 586 Advanced Swahili II

For BA Students: Advanced Language Course

Taught by: Mshomba

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 285, AFST 285

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 587 Advanced Yoruba I

For BA Students: Advanced Language Course

Taught by: Awoyale

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFST 370

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 588 Advanced Yoruba II

For BA Students: Advanced Language Course

Taught by: Awoyale

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AFST 371

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center

AFST 593 Studies-Francophone Literature

Topics will vary. Seminar will focus on one area, author, or "problematique" in Francophone studies. Examples of area-focused seminar: The African Contemporary novel or Francophone Caribbean writers. Example of single-author seminar: "The Poetry and Drama of Aime Cesaire. Examples of thematic approach: writing and national identity; postcolonial conditions, autobiography.

Taught by: Moudileno

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ENGL 595

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFST 594 Afr Lang Tutor: Elem I

For BA Students: Language Course

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFST 490

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFST 595 African Language Tutorial - Elementary II

For BA Students: Language Course

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFST 491

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFST 597 African Language Tutorial - Intermediate II

For BA Students: Last Language Course

Also Offered As: AFST 493

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFST 598 Afr Lang Tutor: Adv I

For BA Students: Advanced Language Course

Also Offered As: AFST 494

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

AFST 628 Africa in the Wider World: Connections, Contexts, Comparisons

This seminar is aimed at students of history, culture, literature, and the arts in the Americas, Europe, or Asia, who need to know something about African history and culture for their own research or studies. It is intended to help students identify, analyze, and incorporate selected scholarship on Africa into their particular area or disciplinary specializations. Topics covered include slavery and slave societies; diasporas and migrations, linguistic, religious and cultural transfers and survivals; and issues of identity, assimilation, nationalism, and pan-Africanism. we want to ask: how much African history, culture, language, and social structure do Americanists or other non-specialists need to know to do sound scholarship? What comparative questions should we be asking about Africa, and how can we find and utilize data that is reliable and relevant to our our own work.

Taught by: Cassanelli

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFST 630 African History: Core Issues of Social Process

This graduate seminar explores the literature of African history while trying to find ways to understand history which happens on unfamiliar social and cultural terrain. The terrain is unfamiliar because the words professional historians use, and the underlying assumptions about social process, show the marks of many generations of writing about Europe. The standard histories, then, are torn between describing events in terms of European social process, in which case they do violence to the history, or finding a historical language which is closer to being locally grounded but unfamiliar to a western audience. In this course we study a number of core issues of social process. Each one is meant to direct attention to a complex of local social forms, and each is at the heart of a major body of writings of African history. A tentative list of topics includes the following: Oral tradition; knowledge and identity; ecology and ethnicity; forms of local authority and state power; ritual, conquest, and the transformation of political authority; political economy; gender and personal dependency; the ecological history of disease; popular associations and the state; the local bases of nationalism.

Taught by: Feierman

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HIST 630, HSSC 630

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFST 650 Topics in African History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in African history

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 650, HIST 650

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFST 693 Africa Looks to Europe

Topics will vary. Seminar will focus on one area, author, or "problematique" in Francophone studies. Examples of area-focused seminar: The African contemporary novel or Francophone Caribbean writers. Example of single-author seminar: The Poetry and Drama of Aime Cesaire. Examples of thematic approach: writing and national identity; postcolonial conditions; autobiography.

Taught by: Moudileno

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: FREN 693

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFST 696 Postco Theory Francophon

Also Offered As: COML 696, FREN 696

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFST 701 Graduate Seminar in African Studies

Topics vary. Please consult The African Studies Center for details.

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AFRC 701

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFST 705 Seminar in Ethnomusicology

Topics in Ethnomusicogology. Spring 2010: Imagining Africa Musically: This seminar considers ways in which scholars write about and imagine the African continent through the lens of musical performance. We will consider a range of writings about Africa as a continent, regionally, and nationally, including north Africa and the Maghreb through series of themes including: diaspora, cosmopolitanism, gender, spirituality, and as world music. This is a reading and listening intensive seminar.

Taught by: Muller

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 705, ANTH 705, FOLK 715, GSWS 705, MUSC 705

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFST 740 Research Seminar in Middle Eastern History

Research seminar on selected topics in Middle Eastern history.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HIST 740

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

AFST 775 South African Literature

An advanced seminar in anglophone African literature, possibly including a few works in translation.

Taught by: Barnard

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ENGL 775

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit