Bioethics (BIOE)

BIOE 282 Lying, Cheating, Stealing, and Killing: How to Think About Professional Ethic

Professionals - in business, medicine, law, and politics - face myriad ethical dilemmas in their daily work life that challenge, and sometimes conflict with, the moral commitments that guide their everyday life. This course systematically examines the ethical dimensions of these four professional roles, asking questions such as: Are there limits to what we should sell? How far should competitors go to "win"? Who should get ventilators in a flu pandemic? Is it morally permissible for physicians to assist in suicide? Should lawyers represent terrorists or child killers? How far does attorney-client privilege go? Is it morally justifiable to torture enemy combatants? Should politicians lie?

Taught by: Allen/Emanuel/Hirschmann/Strudler

Also Offered As: PSCI 282

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

BIOE 401 Intro To Bioethics

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: BIOE 601

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

BIOE 402 Foundations of Bioethics

Also Offered As: BIOE 602

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

BIOE 505 SEX AND BIOETHICS

While the topics of sex and sexuality have a long and storied history in medical culture, they have been especially complex and problematic in the past century. With the creation of distinct sexually-minded medical fields since the late 19th-century including sexology, psychiatry, and hormonal studies, medicine has also occasioned the very categories and labels of the homosexual, the hermaphrodite, the invert, and the nymphomaniac, to name a few. While medical historians and queer theorists have paid almost obsessive attention to these subjects, bioethicists have intervened to a lesser degree and on only a handful of relevant subjects. In this course, we will address the range of historical and theoretical matters that speak to this intersection of bioethics and sex, paying special attention to the health concerns of lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, queer, and intersex (LGBTQI) persons. Who has sex with whom? What does it mean to pathologize or diagnose such desires? How do we raise the stakes when considering persons who question their sex or who are in sexual transition? And how do such questions reveal the dilemmas of bioethicists at large, not just those related to matters of sex and sexuality? Accordingly, this course will consider a range of historical and contemporary topics which speak to the bioethical dilemmas of the intersection of medicine, sex, and sexuality, including: the gay adolescent, the intersex person, gay-conversion therapies, the prospect of gay gene studies, sex addiction, and blood/organ donation policies in wake of the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Specifically, we will focus on literary sources (poetry, memoirs, diaries, and films) as well as on non-literary accounts (medical texts, bioethical scholarship, legal cases, and historical records) that explore the emotional and somatic aspects of matters related to sex and bioethics.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

BIOE 540 Challenging Clinical Ethics: Managing patient/caregiver conflicts through mediation.

The contemporary healthcare system in which patients, families, institutions and a multiplicity of caregivers interact over matters of life and death with legal, ethical, emotional and scientific complexities inherently gives rise to a variety of disputes. Such disputes are frequently highly charged and are often emergent in nature. In recent years, mediation has grown exponentially as a dispute resolution mechanism of choice. Not surprisingly, the success of mediation and a wider understanding of the process, has led to its application in the realm of healthcare disputes with encouraging results. This course will initially provide an overview of classical mediation theory and practice. Students will be introduced to negotiation fundamentals critical to the practice of mediation. Similarities and differences between mediation in the healthcare field, as distinct from other contexts, will be examined. All class members will participate in mediation role-plays designed to simulate disputes of the kind prevalent in healthcare landscape

Taught by: Bergman

Course not offered every year

Prerequisites: None.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

BIOE 545 Mediation Intensive I

Students will be placed in a variety of clinical situations in which they will play the roles of disputants and mediators, with ongoing discussions and critiques of mediator performance. Each student will be videotaped during their mediation to elicit feedback from the group and to catalyze self-criticism. As distinct from the course, BIOE 540: Challenging Clinical Ethics, in which negotiation and mediation theory are taught as a prelude to clinical simulations, this ocurse references the literature solely in relation to problems encountered in the hands-on mediation of specific cases. Students may take the mediation intensives in any order; they do not need to be taken from I to IV. Students may take all 4 intensive courses, as the material will not be repeated.

Taught by: Edward J. Bergman, Autumn Fiester, Lance Wahlert

Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for this course.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

BIOE 546 Mediation Intensive II

Students will have an immersion experience, learning mediation through role-playing simulations. Note that the format is similar to Mediation Intensive I, butthe Mediation Intensive II will NOT duplicate simulations. Students in this course will: learn to effectively manage clinical disputes among and between caregivers, patients, and surrogates through mediation; discover how to define problems and assess underlying interests to generate mutually acceptable options; role play in a variety of clinical situations as both disputants and mediators; practice mediation with professional actors;and receive constructive feedback in a supportive environment. Students will also be required to complete a written research paper. Students may take the mediation intensives in any order; they do not need to be taken from I to IV. Students may take all 4 intensive courses, as the material will not be repeated.

Taught by: Edward J. Bergman, Autumn Fiester, Lance Wahlert

Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for this course.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

BIOE 547 Mediation Intensive III

Students will have an immersion experience, learning mediation through role-playing simulations. Note that the format is similar to Mediation Intensive I and II, but med. intensive III will NOT duplicate simulations. Students in this course will: learn to effectively manage clinical disputes among and between caregivers, patients, and surrogates through mediation; discover how to define problems and assess underlying interests to generate mutually acceptable options; role play in a variety of clinical situations as both disputants and mediators; practice mediation with professional actors; and receive constructive feedback in a supportive environment. Students will also be required to complete a written research paper. 6tudents may take the mediation intensives in any order; they do not need to be taken from I to IV. Students may take all 4 intensive courses, as the material will not be repeated.

Taught by: Edward J. Bergman, Autumn Fiester, Lance Wahlert

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

BIOE 548 Mediation Intensive IV

Students will have an immersion experience, learning mediation through role-playing simulations. Note that the format is similar to earlier mediation intensives but the mediation intensive IV will NOT duplicate simulations. Students in this course will: learn to effectively manage clinical disputes among and between caregivers, patients, and surrogates through mediation; discover how to define problems and assess underlying interests to generate mutually acceptable options; role play in a variety of clinical situations as both disputants and mediators; practice mediation with professional actors; use video-tapes of simulations to improve mediation techniques and strengthen interpersonal skills; receive constructive feedback in a supportive environment. Students may take the mediation intensives in any order; they do not need to be taken from I to IV. Students may take all 4 intensive courses, as the material will not be repeated.

Taught by: Edward J. Bergman, Autumn Fiester, Lance Wahlert

Prerequisite: None

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

BIOE 550 Bioethics and Society

This set of courses will deal with bioethical issues in popular culture addressed from a social science perspective. Courses to be offered include: "Sociology of Bioethics," and "Media and the Doctor-Patient Relationship."

Taught by: MERZ,JON

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: This is a topics course - for information on the topic currently being offered, please go to the course listing on the Bioethics website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/mbe.

BIOE 551 Sociological Topics in Bioethics

This set of courses provides a rigorous introduction to the use of sociological methods and perspective to address bioethical topics and issues. Past courses have inclued the "Sociology of Medicine," Medical Errors," and "Sociology of Jewish Bioethics."

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: This is a topics course - for information on the topic currently being offered, please go to the course listing on the Bioethics website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/mbe.

BIOE 552 Anthropological Topics in Bioethics

This set of courses provides an introduction to the use of anthropological methods and approaches to address bioethical issues. Courses might include cross-cultural studies of medicine and doctoring, diversity and the culture of medicine, cross-cultural bioethics.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: This is a topics course - for information on the topic currently being offered, please go to the course listing on the Bioethics website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/mbe.

BIOE 553 Historical Topics in Bioethics

This set of courses provides a historical perspective on the field of bioethics and/or key issues or areas within the field. Courses that might be offered include the history of medicine and the history of science.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: This is a topics course - for information on the topic currently being offered, please go to the course listing on the Bioethics website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/mbe.

BIOE 554 Religious Topics in Bioethics

This set of courses examine the role of spirituality in the field of bioethics. Courses might be taught from a single religious perspective or provide an overview of many different perspectives. Past courses have included "Spirituality and Bioethics."

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: This is a topics course - for information on the topic currently being offered, please go to the course listing on the Bioethics website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/mbe.

BIOE 556 Evidence in Bioethics and Health Policy

The ability to critically appraise scholarly work is a necessary skill to effectively contribute to bioethics and health policy debates, and for development and implementation of health interventions. The object of this course is to provide students with the skills needed to become fluent in reading and assessment of empirical bioethics and health service research. The course will review and evaluate a wide range of qualitative and quantitative methods utilized in bioethics, health policy, and medical research. Specifically, students will learn the conceptual rational for standard qualitative and quantitative methods, their strengths and weekness. At course completion, students should be able to critically evaluate empirical research published in top bioethics, health policy, and medical journals.

Taught by: Maclean

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

BIOE 558 Reproductive Health

Whether dealing with personal decisions or public policy, reproductive health matters are almost always controversial and often intractable. It is almost 50 years since the Supreme Court decision Griswold v Connecticut "settled" the right to contraceptives yet the last several years have been marked by increasing legislative action and judicial review of this right. This course will explore the ethical dimensions of reproductive health controversies including: 1) the moral and legal status of the human embryo and fetus in the context of assisted reproduction, embryonic stem cell research and abortion; 2) contraception, including over-the-counter provision of emergency contraception and contraceptives and legislation challenges to contraceptive insurance coverage in the Affordable Care Act; 3) attempts to restrict access to abortion by restricting later term abortion, mandating informed consent and waiting periods, and regulating abortion clinics; 4) maternal-fetal relationship including prenatal testing and the regulation of women's behavior while pregnant; 5) assisted reproduction and 6) global concerns such as sex selective abortion, forced abortion and sterilization and reproductive rights in relation to population dynamics and environmental concerns.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

BIOE 560 Clinical Approaches to Bioethics

This set of courses examines issues in bioethics from the perspective of the practicing clinician, physician, nurse, or other health care professional. These courses will often use case studies or clinical experience to analyze or understand contemporary problems in bioethics. An example of such a course is "Clinical Dilemmas Through the Life Cycle."

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: This is a topics course - for information on the topic currently being offered, please go to the course listing on the Bioethics website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/mbe.

BIOE 565 Rationing

You have one liver but three patients awaiting a liver transplant. Who should get the liver? What criteria should be used to select the recipient? Is it fair to give it to an alcoholic? These are some of the questions that arise in the context of rationing and allocating scarce health care resources among particular individuals, what is called micro-allocation decisions. There are also macro-allocation decisions that focus on how health care systems distributes resources across populations. Using the cases of organs for transplantation, the rationing for vaccines in a flu pandemic, and oncology drug shortages, the course will critically examine alternative theories for allocating scarce resources among individuals. Using both the need to establish priorities for global health aid and to define an essential benefit package for health insurance, the course will critically examine diverse theories for macro-allocation from cost-effectiveness analysis to age-based rationing to accountability for reasonableness.

Taught by: Ezekiel Emanuel, Harald Schmidt

Prerequisite: None

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

BIOE 570 Bioethics and Policy

This set of courses will look at bioethical topics from either a legal or public policy perspective. Past courses have included: Ethics of Managed Care, Law, Medicine and Policy, and Legal Aspects of Healthcare in America.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: This is a topics course - for information on the topic currently being offered, please go to the course listing on the Bioethics website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/mbe.

BIOE 571 Global Health Policy

This course considers various theoretical approaches to global justice and global governance and analyzes their implications for global health. The course includes two parts. The first part examines accounts of cosmopolitanism, nationalism and other theories of global justice, critically assessing duties ascribed by each that may be owed universally to all persons or confined within associative boundaries of communities or nations. The second part explores applications to global health governance encompassing consideration of human rights and the operation and accountability of global institutions such as the United Nations, the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, and the World Health Organization. The course scrutinizes the relevance of global justice for governing the global health realm, evaluating the current global health system and proposals for reforming it.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

BIOE 572 Global Bioethics

According to the WHO, around 30 million people with HIV/AIDS should receive anti-retroviral treatment. But only 10 million do. Drugs containing tenofovir--the standard of care in developed countries are expensive. Stavudine-based treatments are much cheaper but have worse side-effects. Is it ethical to use stavudine-based rather than tenofovir-based treatments in sub-Saharan Africa? Smoking rates have decreased drastically in most developed countries. But they are increasing in many developing countries. Established public health measures are not implemented, and the tobacco industry pursues a range of marketing activities that would be unacceptable in developed countries. As a consequence, global deaths from smoking are expected to increase to 1bn by the end of the 21st century, with 80% of deaths in developing countries. Is industry s behavior immoral or normal in a global market? ARDS is a disease of premature newborns. Is it ethical to test a new ARDS drug in Bolivia if the drug--if proven to be effective-- will be very expensive and accessible only to the richest people in Bolivia and other developing countries? An overarching question that these different cases raise is whether there are universal ethical standards that should apply to all people, or whether regional variations should be acceptable. Universalists typically argue that there must be no double standards, and that people should be treated the same regardless of where they live. Pragmatists raise concerns about moral imperialism, neo-colonialism, or insufficient respect for cultural or other differences. Increasing globalization fuels debates about which of competing sets of moral standards is the right one. Looking at a range of diverse cases including healthcare research, health policy, flu pandemics, family planning, smoking and obesity policy, and genetically modified crops, this course explores controversies in the cross winds of market forces, politics and ethics, and examines the roles and responsibilities of key actors and international policy guidance.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

BIOE 575 The Future of the American Health Care System: Health Policy and the Affordable Care Act

This course will provide students a broad overview of the current U.S. healthcare system. The course will focus on the challenges facing the health care system, an in-depth understanding of the Affordable Care Act, and its potential impact upon health care access, delivery, cost, and quality. The U.S. health care system is the worlds largest, most technologically advanced, most expensive, with uneven quality, and an unsustainable cost structure. This multi-disciplinary course will explore the history and structure of the current American health care system and the impact of the Affordable Care Act. How did the United States get here? The course will examine the history of and problems with employment-based health insurance, the challenges surrounding access, cost and quality, and the medical malpractice conundrum. As the Affordable Care Act is implemented over the next decade, the U.S. will witness tremendous changes that will shape the American health care system for the next 50 years of more.

Taught by: Ezekiel Emanuel, J. Sanford Schwartz

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: HCMG 250, HCMG 850

Prerequisite: None

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Course open to graduate students and upper level undergradutes. Freshman and Sophmores may request permission to enroll. Email mbe-info@mail.med.upenn.edu

BIOE 580 Research Ethics

This class is intended to give students a broad overview of research ethics and regulation. The students will come out of the class with an understanding of the moral bases of scientific ethics and the historical evolution of biomedical research ethics. Students will be fully conversant with the development, implementation, and limitation of US human subjects regulation. The course will include reading assignments and lectures addressing the following topics: ethics and morality in science, science in society; scientific integrity; misconduct: from FFP to MIM; conflicts of interest; collegiality, publication, and authorship; ethics codes and regulation; research with human subjects; historical review of human experimentation; human subjects regulation (HHS, FDA), Institutional Review Boards; informed consent, waivers, vulnerable populations, privacy and the confidentiality of records; and research on animals.

Taught by: Merz

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

BIOE 585 Ethics of Research in Vulnerable Populations

This is an advanced seminar focused on human subjects research in resource-constrained regions of the world. Students are expected to have a grounding in US regulations and policies. The students will come out of the class with an appreciation for issues raised by research involving populations vulnerable to manipulation and exploitation, a sensitivity to cultural issues, and an awareness of methods for appropriately engaging communities and performing ethically sound research. The course includes reading assignments, lectures, case-based and discussions addressing topics ranging from social and anthropological research, vulnerability and exploitation, biomedical research, pharmaceutical sponsorship, traditional knowledge and biopiracy, and equity and access. Grade will be based on 3 written case evaluations (70%) and class discussion adn participation (30%).

Prerequisites: Either BIOE 580: Research Ethics or a short set of supplemental background reading.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

BIOE 590 Philosophical Topics in Bioethics

This set of courses provides a philosophical perspective on bioethical topics and issues. This can include courses that integrate ethical theory with concern for particular applications of theory or conceptual issues in medicine, health care, and the life sciences. Past courses have included Philosophy of Death and Dying, Genetics and Ethics, Philosophy of Medicine, Pragmatic Bioethics, and Feminism and Bioethics.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: This is a topics course - for information on the topic currently being offered, please go to the course listing on the Bioethics website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/mbe.

BIOE 601 Introduction to Clinical Bioethics

This course is intended to serve as a broad introduction to the field of bioethics. The course will focus on three of the most important areas in bioethics: Genetics & Reproduction, Human Experimentation, and End-of-Life. Each module of the course will cover essential bioethics concepts, relevant legal cases, and classical readings of that theme. Each module will include one guest lecture from our distinguished bioethics faculty.

Taught by: Fiester

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: BIOE 401

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

BIOE 602 Conceptual Foundations in Bioethics

This course examines the various theoretical approaches to bioethics and critically assesses their underpinnings. Topics to be covered include an examination of various versions of deontological theories, utilitarianism, virtue ethics, principlism, casuistry, feminist ethics, narrative theory, and pragmatism.

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: BIOE 402

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

BIOE 604 Empirical Methods in Bioethics

This course provides an introduction to social science research design and methods for students interested in conducting research on issues in bioethics. The course is appropriate for students who, rather than conducting research themselves, will use research findings to make or challenge arguments in policy statements or other writings. Emphasis is placed on the logic of research design as the way to relate topic of inquiry with method so that evidence produced is pertinent and useful. Students will design research projects and xplore a variety of methods available to conduct research. Students will also learn to integrate research ethics into the formulation and design of their inquiries.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

BIOE 605 Mentored Research I

Activity: Masters Thesis

1 Course Unit

BIOE 606 Mentored Research II

Activity: Masters Thesis

1 Course Unit

BIOE 607 Mentored Research III

Activity: Masters Thesis

1 Course Unit

BIOE 608 Mentored Research Iv

Activity: Masters Thesis

1 Course Unit

BIOE 688 Bioethics in China: Research, Industry, and Practice

Course Objective: The intent of this course is to offer students a broad understanding of bioethical issues in China. Students will be challenged to consider whether there is a unique Chinese Ethic , or whether Chinese culture and practice can be understood as harmonized with Western values and morals. Specific topics include: Ethical considerations in outsourcing clinical trials to China; Pharmaceutical marketing practices in China; Physician-Patient interactions and the notions of autonomy; Ethics in health policy; Intellectual property and the regulatory landscape; Challenges in conducting busines and research in China, including organizational practices and business Ethics. Course Format: Students will travel to Bejing, Nanjing and Shanghai where the program will include site visits, academic lectures, and meetings with policymakers, Chinese and expatriate business leaders and others. Visits to significant cultural sites will also be included. Class meetings will be held prior to and following the trip to China and will include distinguished guest speakers from the US and abroad. Student Requirements/Evaluation: Students will be required to read all assigned articles and book chapters and to come to class sessions prepared for discussion. 25% of the course grade will be based on student participation in the breakfast journal club and guest presentations. Students will be required to write a 10-15 page research paper on some aspect of bioethics in China. This paper will count towards 50% of the final grade. Students will be asked to present their paper at the post-trip class, and this presentation will count for the remaining 25% of the course grade.

Taught by: Joe Powers

Prerequisite: None

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

BIOE 996 Research Topics

This course serves the final MBE project. This course requires students to work with faculty to produce original research that is of publishable quality. Past students have published in Nature, Science, and other prominent journals.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

Notes: This course is only open to students in the Master of Bioethics program.

BIOE 999 Independent Study

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

Notes: This course is only open to students in the Master of Bioethics program.