Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering (CBE)

CBE 099 Undergraduate Research and Independent Study

An opportunity for the student to work closely with a professor in a project to develop skills and technique in research and development. To register for this course, the student writes a one-page proposal that is approved by the professor supervising the research and submitted to the undergraduate curriculum chairman during the first week of the term.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

Notes: A maximum of 2 c.u. of CBE 099 may be applied toward the B.S.E degree requirements

CBE 150 Introduction to Biotechnology

The goal of this course is to teach you the fundamentals of biotechnology and introduce you to concepts in Chemical Engineering along the way. Concepts in Biotechnology that will be covered include, DNA, RNA, the Central Dogma, proteins, recombinant technology, RNA silencing, electrophoresis, chromatography, synthetic biology, pull down assays, PCR, hybridization, array technology, DNA machines, DNA sequencing, and forensics. Concepts in Chemical Engineering that will be covered include the mass balance, scaling laws and the Buckingham-Pi theorem, kinetics of enzyme reactions, thermodynamics of molecular binding, the Langmuir isotherm, separations via chromatography.

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: Reserved for Freshmen only

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 160 Introduction to Chemical Engineering

Students will learn to read and understand a process flow sheet. There is a focus on drawing a process flow sheet, and formulating and solving the material balances for the chemical processes involving chemical reactions (some with recycle streams, some with purge streams, and some with bypass streams). Additionally, students will understand the limits of the ideal gas law, and have a working knowledge of the cubic equations of state and the concept of a compressibility factor. The class will study the basic concepts of gas-liquid phase equilibrium and apply Raoult's Law to solve phase equilibrium problems. A final objective is to design flow sheets and solve material balances for simple chemical processes using ASPEN (chemical engineering simulation program).

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 230 Material and Energy Balances of Chemical Processes

This course introduces the principles of material and energy balances and their applications to the analysis of single- and multiple-phase processes used in the chemical, pharmaceutical, and environmental industries. The course focuses on the conceptual understanding of properties of pure fluids, equations of state, and heat effects accompanying phase changes and chemical reactions, and problem-solving skills needed to solve a wide range of realistic, process-related problems.

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: CBE 160

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 231 Thermodynamics of Fluids

Students will understand, evaluate, and apply different equations of state relating pressure, temperature, and volume for both ideal and non-ideal systems. The course will focus on calculating and applying residual properties and departure functions for thermodynamic analysis of non-ideal gases. Students will apply and describe simple models of vapor-liquid equilibrium in multi-component systems (e.g. Raoult's Law, modified Raoult's Law, Henry's Law). Additionally, the class will analyze and describe properties of non-ideal mixtures and their component species. We will also model and predict reaction equilibria (including non-ideal fluid systems), as well as solve problems related to complex phase equilibria of multi-component systems (find equilibrium compositions for non-ideal phases).

Taught by: Holleran

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: CBE 230

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 296 Study Abroad

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 297 Study Abroad

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 350 Fluid Mechanics

This course is designed for students to understand the fundamental characteristics of fluids. We will develop, starting from first principles, the basic equations for fluid statics, and use them to assess buoyancy forces and determine the pressure variations in fluids with rigid body rotation. Students will understand in detail the basic types of fluid flow line patterns (eg. streamlines and streamtubes) and the different types of interchangeable energy forms (eg. kinetic, potential, and pressure). It is also important to develop, starting from first principles, the formulations for inviscid and viscous flow problems. These include the discussion of a control system and system boundaries, the detailed construction of conservations equations of mass, energy, and momentum for Newtonian fluids, the derivation of the Navier-Stokes equations, and the determination of appropriate initial and boundary conditions. A final objective of the course is to solve various fluid mechanics problems using control systems, dimensional analysis, and developed equations. Such problems include, but are not limited to, the terminal velocity of a falling sphere, Stokes flow, the relation between the friction factor and the Reynolds number, and flow profiles in numerous geometries.

Taught by: Hollaran

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: CBE 231

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 351 Heat and Mass Transport

Steady-state heat conduction. The energy equation. Fourier's law. Unsteady-state conduction. Convective heat transfer. Radiation. Design of heat transfer equipment. Diffusion, fluxes, and component conservation equations. Convective mass transfer. Interphase mass transport coefficients.

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: CBE 350

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 353 Advanced Chemical Engineering Science

Applications of physical chemistry to chemical engineering systems. Equilibrium statistical mechanics of ideal gases, dense fluids and interfacial phases. Chemical reaction rates. Collision and transition state theories. Heterogeneous catalysis. Electronic structure and properties of solids.

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: CBE 231

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 371 Separation Processes

The design of industrial methods for separating mixtures. Distillation; liquid-liquid extraction; membranes; absorption. Computer simulations of the processes.

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: CBE 231

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 375 Engineering and the Environment

The course will introduce emerging environmental issues, relevant engineering solutions, and problem-solving techniques to students. The case study approach will be used to assist students to develop and apply the fundamental engineering skills and scientific insights needed to recognize a variety of environmental problems that have profound impacts on all aspects of modern society.

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 400 Introduction to Product and Process Design

Introduction to product design, process synthesis, steady-state and batch process simulation, synthesis of separation trains, second-law analysis, heat integration, heat-exchanger design, equipment sizing, and capital cost estimation.

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: CBE 351, 371

Corequisite: CBE 451

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 410 Chemical Engineering Laboratory

Experimental studies in heat and mass transfer, separations and chemical reactors to verify theoretical concepts and learn laboratory techniques. Methods for analyzing and presenting data. Report preparation and the presentation of an oral technical report.

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: CBE 351, 371

Activity: Laboratory

1 Course Unit

CBE 430 Polymers and Biomaterials

Polymer is one of the most widely used materials in our daily life, from the rubber tires to clothes, from photoresists in chip manufacturing to flexible electronics and smart sensors, from Scotch tapes to artificial tissues. This course teaches entry-level knowledge in polymer synthesis, characterization, thermodynamics, and structure-property relationship. Emphasis will be on understanding both chemical and physical aspects of polymers, polymer chain size and molecular interactions that drive the microscopic and macroscopic structures and the resulting physical properties. We will discuss how to apply polymer designs to advance nanotechnology, electronics, energy and biotechnology. Case studies include thermodynamics of block copolymer thin films and their applications in nanolithography, shape memory polymers, hydrogels, and elastomeric deformation and applications.

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: CBE 510, MSE 430

Prerequisites: MSE 260 or equivalent course in Thermodynamics or Physical Chemistry (such as BE 223, CBE 231, CHEM 221, MEAM 203)

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 451 Chemical Reactor Design

Design of reactors for the production of chemical products. Continuous and batch reactors. Isothermal and non-isothermal operation of reactors. Effects of back-mixing and non-ideal flow in tubular reactors. Mass transfer in heterogeneous reactions.

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: CBE 231 and CBE 351

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 459 Product and Process Design Projects

Design of chemical, biochemical, and materials products and processes based on recent advances in chemical and bioengineering technology. Design group weekly meetings with faculty advisor and industrial consultants. Comprehensive design report and formal oral presentation. Heat exchanger design and profitability analysis.

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: CBE 400

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 460 Chemical Process Control

Dynamics and control of linear single-input, single output (SISO) systems in chemical processes. Laplace transforms. Dynamic responses of linear systems to various inputs. Frequency domain analysis. Feedback control strategies. Stability. Controller tuning. Advanced control, including cascade and feed forward control. Introduction to multiple-input, multiple-output (MIMO) control. Inverse response.

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: CBE 230

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 479 Biotechnology and Biochemical Engineering

An overview of biotechnology from a chemical engineering perspective: DNA, enzymes, proteins, molecular genetics, genetic engineering, cell growth kinetics, bioreactors, transport processes, protein recovery and protein separations. Group projects include a MATLAB kinetics project and a biotechnology company profile. Applications to current practices in biopharmaceuticals, biofuels, and bioremediation are discussed.

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: Junior/Senior Standing in Engineering and CBE 150 or Permission of the Instructor.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 480 Laboratory in Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering

The laboratory methods covered include molecular cloning techniques, cell transformation, DNA gel electrophoresis, ImageJ, PCR, DNA sequencing, SDS?PAGE, mammalian cell culture and enzyme assays. Culture techniques for bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells are taught and practiced. The students write several individual lab reports and keep a weekly lab notebook during the semester. A group presentation and report on a proposal for a new lab experiment is the final assignment for the lab.

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: CBE 479 or Permission of the Instructor.

Activity: Laboratory

1 Course Unit

CBE 508 Probability and Statistics for Biotechnology

The course covers topics in probability theories and statistical techniques, with emphases placed on the practical problems relevant to the subject areas of biotechnology. The course provides a rigorous introduction to such topics as elements of probability, random variables and probability functions, random samples, parameter estimations, hypothesis testing, regression, analysis of variance, lifetime testing, and nonparametric tests.

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 510 Polymer Engineering

Polymer is one of the most widely used materials in our daily life, from the rubber tires to clothes, from photoresists in chip manufacturing to flexible electronics and smart sensors, from Scotch tapes to artificial tissues. This course teaches entry-level knowledge in polymer synthesis, characterization, thermodynamics, and structure-property relationship. Emphasis will be on understanding both chemical and physical aspects of polymers, polymer chain size and molecular interactions that drive the microscopic and macroscopic structures and the resulting physical properties. We will discuss how to apply polymer designs to advance nanotechnology, electronics, energy and biotechnology. Case studies include thermodynamics of block copolymer thin films and their applications in nanolithography, shape memory polymers, hydrogels, and elastomeric deformation and applications.

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: CBE 430, MSE 430

Prerequisites: MSE 260 or equivalent course in Thermodynamics or Physical Chemistry (such as BE 223, CBE 231, CHEM 221, MEAM 203)

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 511 Physical Chemistry of Polymers and Amphiphiles

This course deals with static and dynamic properties of two important classes of soft materials: polymers and amphiphiles. Examples of these materials include DNA, proteins, diblock copolymers, surfactants and phospholipids. The fundamental theories of these materials are critical of understanding ploymer processing, nanotechnology, biomembranes and biophysics. Special emphasis will be placedon understanding the chain conformation of polymer chains, thermodynamics of polymer chains, thermodynamics of polymer solutions and melts, dynamics of polymer and statistical thermodynamic principles of self-assembly.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 520 Modeling, Simulations, and Optimization of Chemical Processes

Nonlinear systems: numerical solutions of nonlinear algebraic equations; sparse matrix manipulations. Nonlinear programming and optimization; unconstrained and constrained systems. Lumped parameter systems: numerical integration of stiff systems. Distributed parameter systems: methods of discretization. Examples from analysis and design of chemical and biochemical processes involving thermodynamics and transport phenomena.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 522 Polymer Rheology and Processing

This course focuses on applications of rheology to polymer process technologies. It includes a general review of rheological concepts, including viscoelasticity and the influence of shear rate, temperature and pressure on polymer flow properties. The course covers the elementary processing steps common in various types of polymer manufacturing operations including handling of particulate solids, melting, pressurizing and pumping, mixing and devolatilization. Specific polymer processing operations including extrusion, injection molding, compression molding, fiber spinning and wire coating are covered. Emerging polymer processing applications in microelectronics, biomedical devices and recycling are also discussed.

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: MEAM 302 and 333 or CBE 350 and 351 or equivalent

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 525 Molecular Modeling and Simulations

Students will explore current topics in thermodynamics through molecular simulations and molecular modeling. The requisite statistical mechanics will be conveyed as well as the essential simulation techniques (molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo, etc.). Various approaches for calculating experimentally measurable properties will be presented and used in student projects.

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: CBE 231 or 618 or equivalent background in physcial chemistry

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 535 Interfacial Phenomena.

This course provides an overview of fundamental concepts in colloid and interface science. Topics include the thermodynamics of interfaces, interfacial interactions (e.g. van der Waal's interactions, electrostatics, steric interactions), adsorption, the hydrodynamics and stability of interfacial systems, self assembly, etc. Connections to self-assembly and directed assembly of nanomaterials and emerging topics are explored. Pre-requisites: undergraduate thermodynamics, some familiarity with concepts of transport phenomena (including fluid flow and mass transfer) and differential equations

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 540 Biomolecular and Cellular Engineering

This course will introduce concepts and methods for the quantitative understanding of molecular and cellular phenomena. Topics include molecular recognition, receptor-ligand binding, viral infection, signal transduction, cell adhesion, motility, and cytoskeletal dynamics. The course requires mathematics at the level of differential equations, and some knowledge of Matlab programming. A basic knowledge of cell biology is suggested, although not required.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: BE 540

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 541 Engineering and Biological Principles in Cancer

This course provides an integrative framework and provides a quantitative foundation for understanding molecular and cellular mechanisms in cancer. The topics are divided into three classes: (1) the biological basis of cancer; (2) cancer systems biology; and (3) multiscale cancer modeling. Emphasis is placed on quantitative models and paradigms and on integrating bioengineering principles with cancer biology.

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: BE 541

Prerequisite: Senior standing or permission of the instructor

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 543 Sust Dev/Water Res Sys

The evaluation of technical, social and economic constraints on the design of water supply and sanitation projects. The focus on sustainable design emphasizes how technical solutions fit within the appropriate social context. Case studies are used to demonstrate these principles across a range of examples from developed and developing countries including detailed studies from rural communities with limited resources.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 544 Computational Science of Energy and Chemical Transformations

Our theoretical and computational capabilities have reached a point where we can do predictions of materials on the computer. This course will introduce students to fundamenta l concepts and techniques of atomic scale computational modeling. The material will cover electronic structure theory and chemical kinetics. Several well-chosen applications in energy and chemical transformations including study and prediction of properties of chemical systems (heterogeneous, molecular, and biological catalysts) and physical properties of materials will be considered. This course will have modules that will include hands-on computer lab experience and teach the student how to perform electronic structure calculations of energetics which form the basis for the development of a kinetic model for a particular problem, which will be part of a project at the end of the course.

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Thermodynamics, Kinetics, Physical Chemistry, Quantum Mechanics. Undergraduatesshould consult and be given permission by the instructor.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 545 Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage.

Fuel cells, electrolysis cells, and batteries are all electrochemical devices for the interconversion between chemical and electrical energy. These devices have inherently high efficiencies and are playing increasingly important roles in both large and small scale electrical power generation, transportation (e.g. hybrid and electric vehicles), and energy storage (e.g. production of H2 via electrolysis). This course will cover the basic electrochemistry and materials science that is needed in order to understand the operation of these devices, their principles of operation, and how they are used in modern applications.

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Introductory chemistry and an undergraduate course in thermodynamics (e.g. CBE 231, MEAM 203)

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 546 Fundamentals of Industrial Catalytic Processes

A survey of heterogeneous catalysis as applied to some of the most important industrial processes. The tools used to synthesize and characterize practical catalysts will be discussed, along with the industrial processes that use them.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 552 Cellular Bioengineering

Application of chemical engineering principles to analysis of eukaryotic cell biological phenomena, emphasizing receptor-mediated cell function. Topics include receptor/ligand binding kinetics and trafficking dynamics, growth factor regulation of cell proliferation, cell adhesion, cell migration and chemotaxis, and consequences of these in physiological situations such as the immune and inflammatory responses, angiogenesis, and wound healing.

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: BE 552

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 554 Engineering Biotechnology

Advanced study of re DNA techniques; bioreactor design for bacteria, mammalian and insect culture; separation methods; chromatography; drug and cell delivery systems; gene therapy; and diagnostics.

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: BE 554

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 555 Nanoscale Systems Biology

Nano-science and engineering approaches to systems in biology are of growing importance. They extend from novel methods, especially microscopies that invite innovation to mathematical and/or computational modeling which incorporates the physics and chemistry of small scale biology. Proteins and DNA, for example, are highly specialized polymers that interact, catalyze, stretch and bend, move, and/or store information. Membranes are also used extensively by cells to isolate, adhere, deform, and regulate reactions. In this course, students will become familiar with cell & molecular biology and nano-biotechnology through an emphasis on nano-methods, membranes, molecular machines, and 'polymers' - from the quantitative perspectives of thermodynamics, statistical physics, and mechanics. We specifically elaborate ideas of energetics, fluctuations and noise, force, kinetics, diffusion, etc. on the nano- thru micro- scale, drawing from very recent examples in the literature. Laboratory experiments will provide hands-on exposure to microscopies in a biological context (eg. fluorescence down to nano-scale, AFM), physical methods (eg. micromanipulation, tracking virus-scale particles or quantum dots), and numerical problems in applied biophysics, chemistry, and engineering. A key goal of the course is to familiarize students with the concepts and technology (plus their limitations) as being employed in current research problems in nanoscale systems biology, extending to nanobiotechnology.

Taught by: Discher

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: BE 555, MEAM 555

Prerequisites: Background in Biology, Physics, Chemistry or Engineering with coursework in Thermodynamics or permission of the instructor.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 557 Stem Cells, Proteomics and Drug Delivery - Soft Matter Fundamentals

Lectures on modern topics and methods in cell and molecular biology and biomedicine from the perspective of soft matter science and engineering. Discussions and homeworks will cover soft matter related tools and concepts used to 1) isolate, grow, and physically characterize stem cells, 2) quantify biomolecular profiles, 3) deliver drugs to these cells and other sites (such as tumors with cancer stem cells) will be discussed. Skills in analytical and professiona presentations, papers and laboratory work will be developed.

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: Background in Biology, Physics, Chemistry or Engineering

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 559 Multiscale Modeling of Biological Systems

This course provides theoretical, conceptual, and hands-on modeling experience on three different length and time scales - (1) electronic structure (A, ps); (2) molecular mechanics (100A, ns); and (3) deterministic and stochastic approaches for microscale systems (um, sec). Students will gain hands-on experience, i.e., running codes on real applications together with the following theoretical formalisms: molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo, free energy methods, deterministic and stochastic modeling.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: BE 559

Prerequisites: Undergraduate courses in numeral analysis and statistical mechanics.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 562 Drug Discovery and Development

Intro to Drug Discovery; Overview of Pharmaceutical Industry and Drug Development Costs, Timelines; High Throughput Screening (HTS): Assay Design and Sensitivity Solid Phase Synthesis and Combinatorial Chemistry; Enzyme Kinetics; Fluorescence, Linearity, Inner-filter effect, quenching; Time dynamics of a Michaelis-Menton Reaction; Competitive Inhibitor; FLINT, FRET, TRF, FP, SPA, alpha-screen; Enzyme HTS (protease); Cell based screening; Fura-2 ratio, loading signaling; Gfpcalmodulin-gfp integrated calcium response; Estrogen/ERE-Luc HTS; Problems with cell based screening (toxicity, permeability, nonspecificity); Instrumentation, Robotics/Automation; Z-factor; SAR, Positioning Scanning; Microarray HTS; IC50, % Conversion in HTS and IC50, Assay Optimization.

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: BE 562

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 563 Dev & Manuf of Biopharm.

New drug development and regulatory compliance related to small molecules and biologics, overview of biopharma industry, regulation and development process for new chemical entities and biolgies, formulation of pharmaceutical dosage forms, current Good Manufacturing Practices, chemistry manufacture and controls, overview of Common Technical Document (CTD), managing post-approval changes - formulatin, process, packaging, and analytical.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 564 Drug Delivery

The topics include drug transport, distribution and interactions in the body, specific challenges for biotherapeutics, pharmacokinetics, drug delivery systems and nanocarriers, gene delivery systems, targeted drug delivery, and translational aspects of new drug delivery systems. Faculty from engineering and medicine will give lectures related to their research interests. The students read current journal articles on drug delivery systems. The major group assignment for the course is a written and oral group proposal on a new drug delivery system.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: PHRM 564

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 580 Masters Biotech Lab.

The laboratory methods covered include molecular cloning techniques, cell transformation, DNA gel electrophoresis, ImageJ, PCR, DNA sequencing, SDS?PAGE, mammalian cell culture, and enzyme assays. Culture techniques for bacteria, yeast and animal cells are taught and practiced. The students write several individual lab reports and keep a lab notebook during the semester. A group presentation and report on a proposal for a new lab experiment is the final assignment for the lab.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Reserved for students in the Master of Biotechnology Program. Not open to SEAS undergraduates.

CBE 582 From Cells to Tissue: Engineering Structure and Function

The goal of this course is to introduce students to engineering concepts in understanding and manipulating the behavior of biological cells. We will try to understand the interplay between cells,their extracellular microenvironment, and intracellular signaling pathways in regulating cellular and multicellular structure and function. In particular, we will explore the use of modern experimental approaches to characterize and manipulate cells for bioengineering applications, and the concepts in scaling cellular engineering functional tissues. In this context, we will focus on several topics, including signal transduction and the molecular regulation of cell function, cellular microenvironment, cell adhesion and mechanics, stem cells, multicellularity, and experimental models of tissue develpment.

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: BE 557

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 597 Master's Thesis Research

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Masters Thesis

1 Course Unit

CBE 599 Master's Indep Study

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

CBE 602 Statistical Mechanics of Liquids

The course will focus on advanced concepts and methods in statistical mechanics with a particular emphasis on the liquid state, e.g. aqueous solutions, capillarity, polymers, colloids, glasses, amphiphilic self-assembly, etc. Principles of both equilibrium and non-equilibrium statistical mechanics will be discussed and connections to experimentally measurable quantities will be made wherever possible.

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Graduate level course in statistical mechanics (e.g. CBE 618, MSE 575, BE 619, BMB 604, PHYS 581, CHEM 521). An advanced statistical mechanics course (e.g., PHYS 611, CHEM 522) is recommended, but not required.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 617 Control of Nonlinear Systems

PID control of nonlinear systems; steady-state, periodic and chaotic attractors. Multiple-input, multiple-output systems; decoupling methods and decentralized control structures. Digital control; z-transforms, implicit model control, impact of uncertainties. Constrained optimization; quadratic dynamic matrix control. Nonlinear predictive control. Transformations for input/output linearized controllers.

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: ESE 617, MEAM 613

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 618 Advanced Molecular Thermodynamics

This course begins with a brief review of classical thermodynamics, including the development of Maxwell relationships and stability analysis. The remainder of the course develops the fundamental framework of statistical mechanics, then reviews various related topics including ideal and interacting gases, Einstein and Debye models of crystals, lattice models of liquids, and the basis of distribution function theory.

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: BE 662, MEAM 662

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 621 Advanced Chemical Kinetics and Reactor Design

Mechanisms of chemical reactions. Transition state theory. Langmuir-Hinshelwood Kenetics. Absorption and cataysis. Simple and complex reaction schemes. Design of idealized reactors. Fluidized reactors. Solid-gas reactions. Residence time distributions. Reaction and diffusion in solid catalysts. Reactor stability and control.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 640 Transport Processes I

This course provides a unified introduction to momentum, energy (heat), and mass transport processes. The basic mechanisms and constitutive laws for the various transport processes will be delineated , and the conservation equations will be derived and applied to internal and external flows. Examples from mechanical, chemical, and biological systems will be used to illustrate fundamental concepts and mathematical methods.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 641 Transport Processes II (Nanoscale Transport)

A continuation of CBE 640, with additional emphasis on heat and mass transport. This course aims to teach transport concepts and methods useful in many current CBE laboratory settings. The emphasis will be on microscopic dynamics and transport in both hard and soft systems (e.g. colloids and polymers), of relevance to a variety of biological and biomolecular systems. Wherever possible, will make connections between classical, macroscopic transport, and what is happening microscopically. Will make use of a comination of analytic and algorithmic/numerical methods to facilitate understanding of the material. Physical topics will include stochastic, "single-molecule", non-ideal, hard sphere and frustrated systems, phase transitions, non-equilibrium statistical mechanics and optics. Concepts will include properties of stochastic functions (Gaussian statistics, correlation functions and power spectra), Fourier methods, Convolution, the Central Limit theorem, anomalous diffusion, percolation, and the Fluctuation/Dissipation theorem. Computational methods will concentrate on Monte Carlo simulations of "toy" models.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 700 Special Topics

Lectures on current research problems or applications in chemical engineering. Recent topics have included heat transfer, polymer science, statistical mechanics, and heterogeneous catalysis.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

CBE 899 Independent Study

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

CBE 990 Masters Thesis

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Masters Thesis

1 Course Unit

CBE 995 Dissertation

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Dissertation

1 Course Unit

CBE 999 Thesis/Dissertation Research

For students working on an advanced research program leading to the completion of master's thesis or Ph.D. dissertation requirements.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit