Demography (DEMG)

DEMG 524 Advanced Topics in the Sociology of the Family

The course will review a series of theoretical issues in the sociology of the family and examine major empirical studies in which theoretical advances have been made. Special attention will be given to work that has a historical and comparative perspective. Opportunities will be provided for original research on the family.

Offered by: Demography

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: SOCI 524

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

DEMG 535 Quantitative Methods in Sociology I

This course is an introduction to the practice of statistics in social and behavioral sciences. It is open to beginning graduate students and--with the permission of the instructor--advanced undergraduates. Topics covered include the description of social science data, in graphical and non-graphical form; correlation and other forms of association, including cross-tabulation; bivariate regression; an introduction to probability theory; the logic of sampling; the logic of statistical inference and significance tests. There is a lecture twice weekly and a mandatory "lab."

Offered by: Demography

Taught by: Allison, Smith

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: SOCI 535

Prerequisite: Basic algebra

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

DEMG 536 Quantitative Methods in Sociology II

As the second part of a two-semester sequence, this graduate course focuses on regression analysis as used in social science research. In particular, we discuss features and assumptions of linear regression and logistic regression models. We learn how to apply regression models to real social science data using Stata and how to interpret the results.

Offered by: Demography

Taught by: Allison, Kohler, Park, Schnittker, Smith

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: SOCI 536

Prerequisite: SOCI 535 or permission of instructor

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

DEMG 604 Methodology of Social Research

This course will give students familiarity with the common research methods social scientists use to conduct research. Ethnographic, interview, survey, experimental and historical/comparative research methods will be covered. Four themes will be explored: 1) the basics of solid research design, 2) the various advantages and disadvantages of each method, 3) when the use of a method is appropriate or inappropriate for the research question, and 4) how to evaluate researchers' claims on the basis of the evidence they present. These themes will be explored by reading examples of and conducting exercises designed to give students hands-on experience in each of the methods. Students will conduct the exercises on a topic of their choice, which together will culminate in their final paper. The course is required and restricted to second year students in sociology and demography.

Offered by: Demography

Taught by: Smith, Wilde, Zuberi

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: SOCI 604

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

DEMG 607 Introduction to Demography

A nontechnical introduction to fertility, mortality and migration and the interrelations of population with other social and economic factors.

Offered by: Demography

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: SOCI 607

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

DEMG 609 Basic Methods of Demography

The course is designed to introduce students to basic concepts of demographic measurement and modeling used to study changes in population size and composition. The course covers basic measures of mortality, fertility and migration; life table construction; multiple decrement life tables; stable populations; population projections; and age patterns of vital events. Students will learn to apply demographic methods through a series of weekly problem sets.

Offered by: Demography

Taught by: Elo, Guillot, Smith

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: SOCI 609

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

DEMG 611 STRUCT. EQUATION MODEL

Statistical modeling with multiple equations and latent variables. The first part of the course will focus on linear models that could be estimated with any of the well-known SEM programs (e.g., LISREL, EQS, or Amos). Both Mplus and SAS will be used exclusively in this part of the course. The second part will focus on Mplus models for variables that are categorical, count, or censored. Maximum likelihood methods for missing data will also be covered.

Offered by: Demography

Taught by: Allison

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: SOCI 611

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

DEMG 612 CATEGORICAL DATA ANALYSS

This course deals with techniques for analyzing multivariate data which the dependent variable is a set of categories (a dichotomy or polytomy). Topics will include linear probability models, logit (logistic) regression models, probit models, logit analysis of contingency tables, cumulative logit and probit (for ordinal data), multinomial logit, conditional logit (discrete choice), unobserved heterogeneity, log-linear models, square tables, response-based sampling, and repeated measures. Methods will be illustrated using the Stata System. There will be several assignments using Stata to analyze data provided by the instructor.

Offered by: Demography

Taught by: Allison

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: SOCI 612

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

DEMG 613 Event History Analysis

An applications-oriented course on statistical methods for the analysis of longitudinal data on the occurrence of events, also known as survival analysis, failure-time analysis, hazard analysis or duration analysis. Emphasis on regression-like models in which the risk of event occurrence is a function of a set of explanatory variables. Topics include accelerated failure-time models, hazard models, censoring, Cox regression models, time-dependent covariates, completing risks, repeated events, unobserved heterogeneity, discrete-time methods.

Offered by: Demography

Taught by: Allison

Also Offered As: SOCI 613

Prerequisite: SOCI 536 or equivalent

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

DEMG 622 Fertility

The biological, social and demographic factors explaining the levels, trends and differentials in human fertility. Data, measures, and methods used in the context of the more and the less developed countries, with an demphasis on the historical and current course of the fertility transition.

Offered by: Demography

Taught by: Smith, Kohler, H

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: SOCI 622

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

DEMG 630 Advanced Special Topics

Topics vary from semester to semester. Course titles include: Race, Colonialism & Methods; Mistakes, Errors, Accidents & Disasters, Graduate Research Practicum, Sociology of Violence: Gangs & Organized Crime.

Offered by: Demography

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: SOCI 630

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

DEMG 633 Population Processes I

This is one of two courses that serve as an introduction to core areas of demography and important developments in the field. Population Processes I introduces students to broad set of issues in health, mortality, and aging. Readings cover overviews of major topics as well as recent approaches to the subject. Attention is focused on description and explanation of variation in health across time, space and social groups. One consequence of mortality decline is population aging. We will cover some of its implications for individuals, families and societies.

Offered by: Demography

Taught by: Elo, Guillot, Parrado, Schnittker

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: SOCI 633

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

DEMG 634 Population Processes II

Population Processes II is part of a two-course sequence designed to introduce students to the core areas of demography (fertility, mortality, and migration) and recent developments in the field. PP II is divided into two parts. The first focuses on family demography and the biological, social and demographic factors explaining levels, trends, and differentials in human fertility transition with an emphasis on the historical and current course of fertility transition in developed and developing countries. The second part of the course provides a comprehensive review of theories and research on international migration. Readings examine patterns and processes of global migration during the classic age from 1800-1914 as well as during the postwar period from 1945 to the present. The course also covers a history and evaluation of immigration policies around the world, and devotes significant attention to theoretical and empirical perspectives on immigrant adaptation, including the relationship between gender and migration.

Offered by: Demography

Taught by: Flippen, Harknett, Kohler, Parrado, Smith

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: SOCI 634

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

DEMG 643 Social Stratification

This is an advanced level graduate seminar where we will review contemporary research on social stratification and mobility. We will examine empirical and theoretical studies not only in the US but also in other countries to address how the pattern of social stratification varies across societies and over time. The main topics to be discussed are social mobility, occupational attainment, educational inequality, gender and race, and family processes and stratification. We will also examine studies that address how national contexts mediate social stratification. Advanced undergraduate students will be admitted with permission.

Offered by: Demography

Taught by: Jacobs, Park

Also Offered As: SOCI 643

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

DEMG 662 Panel Data Analysis

Offered by: Demography

Also Offered As: SOCI 662

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

DEMG 670 Family Data

This two semester course will engage each graduate student in an analysis project with qualitative and quantitative components, using a linked qualitative longitudinal data set. Students will use survey data from the baseline and 12 month wave of the Fragile Families study (described at http://crcw.princeton.edu/fragilefamilies/), a national survey of unwed and married parents who have just had a child (with unmarried parents over sampled) They will also use transcripts and coded data from the TLC3 study, which involved qualitative couple and individual interviews conducted with a subset of 75 of the couples in the FF survey in 3 waves: about 3 months after the birth and then again 12 and 24 months after the birth. Most of these are low-income, unmarried, cohabiting parents. The goal of the course is for each student to use these two data sets, and the analytic techniques and literature covered in the course, to write a paper that can be submitted for publication. The spring will also include lots of tips on how to construct a publishable paper. Students should only enroll in this course if they plan to take the spring sequel course as well.

Offered by: Demography

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: SOCI 670

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

DEMG 677 International Migration

A comprehensive review of theories and research on international migration. The course introduces the basic precepts of neoclassical economics, the new economics of labor migration, segmented labor market theory, world systems theory, social capital theory and the theory of cumulative causation. Readings examine patterns and processes of global migration during the classic age from 1800-1914 as well as during the postwar period from 1945 to the present. The course also covers a history and evaluation of immigration policies around the world, and devotes signification attention to theoretical and empirical perspectives on immigrant adaptation. Within this larger topic, we will also discuss internal migration and urbanization; the relationship between gender and migration; the spatial distribution of immigrants within the United States, immigrant communities, and ethnic enclaves; and the undocumented population in the United States.

Offered by: Demography

Taught by: Flippen

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: SOCI 677

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

DEMG 707 Second-Year Research Seminar I

This course is intended to hone the skills and judgment in order to conduct independent research in sociology and demography. We will discuss the selection of intellectually strategic research questions and practical research designs. Students will get experience with proposal writing, the process of editing successive drafts of manuscripts, and the oral presentation of work in progress as well as finished research projects. The course is designed to be the context in which master's papers and second year research papers are written. This is a required course for second year graduate students in Demography. Others interested in enrolling in only one of the courses may do so with the permission of the Chair of the Graduate Group in Demography.

Offered by: Demography

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: SOCI 707

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

DEMG 708 Second-Year Research Seminar II

Demography 708 is the second part of a two-course sequence designed to introduce and familiarize second year students with current norms for academic research, presentation and publishing in the field of Demography. In Demg708 students are expected to finalize the analyses and to complete their second year research paper. This is a required course for second year demography students. Others interested in enrolling in the course may do so with the permission of the Chair of the Graduate Group in Demography.

Offered by: Demography

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: SOCI 708

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

DEMG 731 Advanced Demographic Methods

This course considers a variety of procedures for measuring and modeling demographic processes. We will consider both deterministic (drawn from classic demographic methods, stable population theory, and the like) and stochastic (drawn from statistics) perspectives and methods, including their integration. Pre-requisites: DEMG 609 and SOCI 536 (or its equivalent).

Offered by: Demography

Taught by: Smith

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: SOCI 731

Prerequisites: DEMG 609 and SOCI 536 (or its equivalent)

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

DEMG 777 Special Topics in Demography

Special Topics in Demography

Offered by: Demography

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: SOCI 777

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

DEMG 796 Demographic, Economic, and Social Interrelations

The course investigates economic and social determinants of fertility, mortality, and migration, and it discusses the effects of population variables on economic and social conditions, including economic and social development. Topics discussed in the course include: How do economic changes affect marriage, divorce, and child bearing decisions? How do households make decisions about transfers and requests? How can economic and sociological approaches be combined in explanatory models of demography change? How does immigration to the US affect the ethnic composition of the population, the earnings of native workers, taxes on natives, and the macro-economy? What causes the aging of populations, and how will population aging affect the economies of industrial nations, and in particular, pension programs like Social Security? What accounts for the rise in women's participation in the wage labor force over the past century? How are family composition and poverty interrelated? Does rapid population growth slow economic development with low income countries? In addition to these topics, the course also covers selected methods not included in Dem/Soc 535/536 and 609.

Offered by: Demography

Taught by: Kohler

Course offered spring; even-numbered years

Also Offered As: SOCI 796

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

DEMG 999 Independent Study

Primarily for advanced students who work with individual instructors upon permission. Intended to go beyond existing graduate courses in the study of specific problems or theories or to provide work opportunities in areas not covered by existing courses.

Offered by: Demography

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit