Organizational Dynamics (DYNM)

DYNM 500 Foundations of Research and Scholarship

A main objective of this foundation course is to improve the academic papers and presentations in all Organizational Dynamics work, including the capstone. Because the discipline of writing for academic purposes is based on skills that are not common to business writing and because the writing process is central to learning in this program, Organizational Dynamics offers this course designed to assist participants in developing efficient, reliable, and fruitful academic writing and presentation techniques.

Taught by: Barstow, Greco, and Shapiro

Prerequisites: Non-DYNM students must complete a course permit request form: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: F

DYNM 501 Perspectives on Organizational Dynamics

"Perspectives" is both a fundamental and integrating course intended for MSOD students at any point in the program who wish to understand and deploy a multiplicity of dynamics operative in organizations and in the minds that create and inhabit them. It is particularly useful for those in their first year and for non-MSOD students. One key focus is on understanding the implicit mental and emotional frameworks or metaphors that "inform" organizing so that we can virtually see more robust and complex approaches to effectiveness and to leadership within them. Several faculty members highlight their specialties. One special theme examines new management models and thinking frameworks designed to prevail in a 21st century context. Lectures, discussion, and experiential learning are used to build an informed grounding in the history, philosophy, theory and practice of Organizational Dynamics. The course requirements are active class participation, potential application projects/weekly journal, a midterm paper and a final paper.

Taught by: Greco

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Non-DYNM students must complete a course permit request: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: F; DYNM Concentrations: LMC, GL, OC, SD

DYNM 542 Theories, Models, and Practices that Inform Coaching

This course will examine how theory guides the effective practice of coaching. Students will be introduced to a theory and model that encompasses a multi-disciplinary approach to coaching in an organizational setting. With this framework as a basis, students will select, research, and present a theoretical model of their own choosing and design a coaching application that demonstrates theory in action. Students will leave the course with an array of theoretical frameworks and practical techniques that will enhance their own coaching capabilities as managers and consultants. Undergraduates may enroll in 500-level courses only with permission of the instructor.

Taught by: Orenstein

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Permits for Non-DYNM students: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Course Category: F; DYNM Course Concentrations: LMC, OC. Course Schedule: 6/1, 3, 13, 15, 17, 20, 22, 24, 27, 29.

DYNM 551 Devil's Advocate: Power of Divergent Thinking

Short-term or long-term? Us or them? Build or buy? Margin or volume? My way or the highway! Ad infinitum, apparent forced choices--or no choice--and limited perspectives can create costly tugs of war or constricted judgment without our minds (and hearts) and in organization dynamics, persuasive, and often hidden, divergence in thinking offers great opportunity for learning, creativity, and sound decision-making. This course offers several robust, practical techniques for bringing the value of diverse perspectives in politically productive ways to leadership thinking, communications, and organization dynamics. This course will meet between May 23rd and June 23rd.

Taught by: Greco

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Permits for non-DYNM students: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Course Category: A; DYNM Course Concentration: LMC

DYNM 552 Strategic Crowdsourcing & Business Models

This online course offers insight on how innovative firms are organizing strategically to gain advantage from engaging online with the value distributed resources held by a global pool of individuals. Through cases derived from original research, including Amazon, Facebook, Netflix, oDesk, Kiva, Wikipedia, among others, this course unveils the business models that these organizations use to create new value by working with "crowds" online. Open, distributed, online approaches to work and innovation have been widely studied over the past decade in the context of the computer and software industry (e.g. Benkler 2002; Chesbrough 2003; von Hippel and von Krogh 2003). Many of those concepts have since then permeated other industries, eventually giving birth to a distributed organizational paradigm referred to as "crowdsourcing" (e.g. Howe 2008; Villarroel 2008). The crowdsourcing model has proven valuable for innovation, work, entrepreneurship, among other applications. For example, in 2011, a crowd innovation initiative involving 57,000 individuals solved a decade-old scientific problem in molecular biology in only 3 weeks. In 2012, the top 3 crowd labor platforms brou ght skilled work to 6 million people in over 200 counties. In 2013, US $5 billion are expected to be invested in crowd-funded projects around the world. The aims of this course are (1) to gain a solid understanding of the business models in crowdsourcing; (2) to benefit from first-hand experience with the "power of the crowd", (3) to critically analyze the potential and limitations of this new organizational paradigm.

Taught by: Villarroel

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For additional information, please see our website at: http://www.organizationaldynamics.upenn.edu

DYNM 553 Becoming a Courageous Follower

This course will examine both personal and professional behaviors that constitute effective followership. While the leadership literature is saturated with books on becoming better leaders, there is a dearth of awareness on finding and supporting those who follow those leaders effectively. Students will use surveys from the limited literature on effective followership to profile their own organization's dynamics on styles of followership, and stories of success and failure in confronting organization mistakes and leadership errors will be researched. The outcome of the class will be a personal profile on followership style and an organizational profile on its followership culture.

Taught by: Eldred

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

0.5 Course Units

Notes: For additional information, please see our website at: http://www.organizationaldynamics.upenn.edu

DYNM 555 The Idea of Nationalism

Nationalism has been the most important geo-political phenomenon of the past two hundred years. Its continuing power has been amply demonstrated by recent events in many parts of the world. The principle of national self- determination and closely related notions of individualism and human rights shape the global context in which businesses, governments, organizations, and individuals must operate in the 21st century. This seminar course will explore the ideology of nationalism through the lens of institutions and organizationscorporations, nonprofits, government, NGOs, unions, religious communities, etc. Starting with concrete examples from students own experiences and the contemporary conflicts confronting governments, organizations, and businesses, we will examine the ideology of nationalism, its meaning and content, its philosophical foundations, its underlying assumptions about the nature of human identity, and its contemporary expressions in nationalist movements and ethno-political conflicts around the world. In the process, we will explore such questions as: What is a nation? Does every identifiable ethnic or national group have a valid claim to a nation-state of its own? How are claims to national self-determination justified? Why do nationalist movements seem so often to engender political extremism and violent ethno-political conflicts? Is national self- determination compatible with our commitments to individualism, rationality, and universal human rights? What are the best strategies to cope with the persistence of nationalism in the 21st century?

Taught by: Steinberg

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Permits for non-DYNM students: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: A; DYNM Concentration: GL

DYNM 558 Social Media and the Organization

If you don't yet believe in the social media revolution, then watch this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZQzsQkMFgHE. Facebook. Twitter. Pinterest. Tumblr. Path. Delicious. Digg. Youtube. LinkedIn. It's been less than a decade since many of these social media services have launched, yet they've transformed society in many significant ways. Social Media and the Organization will deepen your understanding of and offer real time practical experience with social media. The course will examine the current trends and use of social media in marketing, product development, customer service, networking and other facets of organizational policy and practice. Students will have hands-on participation online with the class blog, http://upennsocialbook.wordpress.com, sharing relevant case studies, analyzing social media campaigns and critiquing their own organization's culture and values surrounding social media including social media policy, staff challenges, and evaluation of challenges and opportunities in its use.

Taught by: Havely/Warren

Prerequisites: Non-DYNM students must complete a course permit request: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: A; DYNM Concentration: LMC

DYNM 559 Research Methods to Develop Dynamic Expertise

It's not enough to be competent, educated, smart and professional. Globalization, technology, and vastly improved communications have increasingly led to "Winner Take All" markets. Consider the local opera house: 100 years ago, Iowa alone had more than 1,500 of them. Thousands of sopranos earned adequate, if modest, livings from the live performances, but now, thanks to i-pods, the world's best soprano can be literally everywhere at once. And since it costs no more to transmit MP3s of Renee Fleming's Mozart arias than her understudy's, most opera fans listen to Fleming. Thus, Fleming earns several million dollars a year while most other sopranos, many of whom are almost as talented, struggle to get by. The same is increasingly true of other professions: Those who are recognized for being the best at what they do can sell their services anywhere and everywhere at top dollar, whereas those who lack such recognition find their services valued less and less--if they are valued at all. As graduate students at the University of Pennsylvania, you have an extraordinary opportunity to become the leading expert in a given domain in a few short years, maybe less.

Taught by: Freeman

Activity: Lecture

0.5 Course Units

Notes: For additional information, please see our website at: http://www.organizationaldynamics.upenn.edu

DYNM 601 Gender Issues in Organizational Leadership

This seminar will explore the intersection of gender and organizational behavior as it has evolved and in the current social and economic context in this country. We will examine the social, cultural and structural dynamics within organizations that differentially affect women and men, as well as the gender-linked resources each brings to organizations. Topics that will be addressed include the debate over the currect situation of women in the workforce; the social construction of gender; the relationship of gender and power in understanding gender dynamics in the workplace; the intersection of gender and class; gender issues in organizational leadership; policy and practice as reinforcers of gendered dynamics; the interaction of culture and organizational structure; and restructuring organizations to better meet the needs of women and men in today's culture. The course will 1) address the development of a theoretical framework for understanidng gender issues in the workplace; 2) explore more specific ways in which policies and practices have different effects on employees and managers by virtue of gender and; 3) focus on alternative conceptualizations, structures, policies and practices that could make it possible for both men and women to be successful in the workplace and to avoid gender-based discrimination. In this last section, we will specifically discuss various organizational change processes that address gender issues within organizations.

Taught by: Vanderslice

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For additional information, please see our website at: http://www.organizationaldynamics.upenn.edu

DYNM 602 Leader-Manager as Coach

New work technologies, increased competition, and employees' desire for more involvement in their work are changing the traditional role of the manager. Rather than directing, planning, and controlling the work, managers and leaders are facilitating processes and coaching and developing their employees. Team-based organizations are built on coaching as a core requirement of the team leader role. This course explores the theory and practices of individual coaching as leadership behavior. The focus is on helping managers develop their skills and improve their performances as coaches. We will examine the need to provide others with successful performance strategies, timely feedback on strengths and on development needs, and growth opportunities in order to challenge others to reach their potential. We will explore workplace environments that foster the growth and achievement of those we lead.

Taught by: Russo

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Course permits for Non-DYNM students: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: A; DYNM Concentrations: LMC, OC. Course Schedule: 9/16; 10/7, 14, 11/18; 12/2

DYNM 603 Leading Emergence: Creating Adaptive Space in Response to Complex Challenges

This seminar is designed to be highly experiential so that participants can engage in the practices necessary to enable innovation and adaptation. Participants will examine emergent innovation theory by addressing the dynamics and conditions in which ideas emerge in an informal manner, garner organizational attention, and gain momentum towards becoming successful innovations or bold changes within complex organizations. This will include examining the need for adaptive space in generating value that drives growth by enabling an environment of idea generation, entrepreneurship and innovation while leveraging the benefits of existing, formal systems to scale these ideas. Participants will explore and engage in such topics as creative experimentation, idea emergence, organizational network analysis, social capital, design thinking, organizational analytics and complexity leadership.

Taught by: Arena

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Permit requests for non-DYNM students: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Categories: F, A; DYNM Concentration: LMC. Course Meeting Schedule: 1/28-29; 3/3, 4 5; 4/8-9.

DYNM 604 Managing Enterprise Risk

Can operations undertake effective risk management in our globalized, inextricably networked economy? What risk management role do we play in our organizations? We will apply readings and engage in case studies to discuss whether our organizations do or should manage risks as strategically as opportunities. We'll also examine our involvement with risk management in our organizations. By the conclusion of the course, you should have a strong understanding of organizational risk and a framework for addressing risk in your organization.

Taught by: Combrinck-Graham

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisites: Non-DYNM students must complete a course permit request form: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Categories: DE, A; DYNM Concentration: LMC

DYNM 605 Resolving Project Risk, Uncertainty, and the Unexpected

DYNM 605 is a uniquely blended content of thought leadership vetted by subject matter experts worldwide. This participant-centered seminar is an opportunity to increase both awareness and knowledge of risk and uncertainty by examining causes of unexpected events in predictive (classic) and adaptive (agile) project frameworks. Successful applications of non-deterministic approaches are explored as antidotes to constrained command and control project environments. Course content is valuable in roles, organizations, and sectors of all types. Prominent project/operational risk management methodologies are included in this seminar. Processes advanced by the Project Management Institute, U.K. Association for Project Management, International Council on Systems Engineering, and by the International Organization for Standardization are contrasted with industry specific practices, including the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, NASA, and the Departments of Defense and Energy. Case examples are based on relevant experience. Participants perform hands-on implementation of processes in realistic team working sessions and facilitated dialogue. Spreadsheet/network analysis using Monte Carlo Simulation tools will be included in the course and clinics (see syllabus).

Taught by: Hornbacher

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Course permits for non-DYNM students: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: DE, A; DYNM Concentrations: LMC. Course Schedule: 9/9, 23; 10/7, 14, 21; 11/4, 18; 12/2, 9.

DYNM 606 Leading from the Center: Unleashing Your Leadership Potential

This seminar is designed to support existing and emerging leaders who recognize their need for more adaptive leadership skills to effectively respond to rapidly changing environments. We will weave leadership theory and practice in a highly experiential seminar so that participants can actively engage in a leadership lab including deep reflective thinking, rapid prototyping and experimenting with new behaviors and practices. The purpose of the seminar is to evoke personal leadership at more impactful levels and improve organizational performance and personal satisfaction. Participants will examine their own, and others', leadership theories by identifying assumptions about leading, creating a preferred model for individual leadership, and field testing actual shifts in behavior. Participants will engage in a three-part exploration over the course of the seminar: first, we will have an opportunity to examine our own models and those of the leading theorists in the field; second, participants will be asked to articulate and improve their own model; and finally, participants will be asked to activate and test their model and report back on the experience. This course is designed to create an 'action-learning' community in which you will integrate your professional experience, this class, and other graduate course work with a final exploration of leadership concepts, theory, and applied practice. This course is also designed to strengthen your ability to lead, including as a colleague who can support leadership behavior in peers and as one who can promote leadership behavior in supervisors and subordinates.

Taught by: Arena and Benjamin

Course not offered every year

Prerequisites: Permits for non-DYNM students: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: F, A; Concentration: LMC. Course Meetings: 6/23-25 7/28-30

DYNM 607 Psychodynamics of Organizations

As an area of study, the psychodynamics of organizations draws out attention to the tacit, implicit, and unconscious dimensions of organizational life. It presumes that a person takes up his or her role at work by drawing on both individual history and the organizational context that helps define a role, its boundary, and the resources available to take it up. In both these aspects, the organizational context, and one's individual biography, people are often unaware of the thoughts and feelings that animate their behavior. This course will introduce students to some basic concepts of psychoanalysis, which focuses on individual motivation, and systems psychodynamics, which focuses on group dynamics and group psychology. System psychodynamics also emphasizes how an organization's primary task, or its "reason for being," influences individual experience. Readings include case studies as well as expositions of theory. The instructor will also draw on his own consulting cases.

Taught by: Hirschhorn

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Course permits for Non-DYNM students: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: A; DYNM Concentration: LMC. Course Meetings: Thursdays 9/14 to 11/2. Saturdays: 10/14 11/4.

DYNM 608 Organizational Dynamics of Working in a Global Marketplace

This course examines some of the sources of confusion, conflict, misperception and error that arise when representatives of U.S. organizations interact and work in the global marketplace.The aim is to heighten awareness, help avoid personal or professional pitfalls, and to more effectively manage some of the organizational and business challenges that arise when operating across dissimilar environments. We will focus on areas including: ethics, culture, language, ethnicity, religion, gender, the political and legal systems, labor, corruption, and corporate organization. Each class session will begin with a short, interactive introductory lecture, followed by discussion around assigned readings and mini-cases.

Taught by: Tschoegl

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For additional information, please see our website at: http://www.organizationaldynamics.upenn.edu

DYNM 609 From Traditional Project Management to Transformational Project Leadership

The primary objective of this course is to provide a comprehensive framework for analyzing both current and future expectations for success of Project Leaders in the context of Project Management, Project Teams, and the Project/Program/Portfolio Management Office (PMO) by addressing the following questions: 1) What is the track record of Project Management and what capabilities are required to succeed as a Project Leader in a complex and evolving business environment? 2) What characteristics does a Project Leader possess and can every Project Manager become a successful Project Leader? 3) How can Project Managers better integrate their left-brained analytic intelligence with their right-brained emotional intelligence to become successful Project Leaders? 4) What are the desired attributes of a transformational leader and what organizational barriers may impede transformational change? 5) What are the roles and responsibilities of the Project Leader as Team Leader, Coach, and Mentor? 6) How can Project Managers and Project Leaders better prepare themselves for integration into PMOs within their organizations?

Taught by: Bayney

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Course permits for non-DYNM students: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: A; DYNM Concentrations: LMC. Course schedule: Saturdays: 1/14, 28; 2/11, 25; 3/11, 25; 4/8, 22. Fridays: 1/20; 2/17; 3/17; 4/14

DYNM 610 Knowing Yourself: The Coach as an Instrument of Change

Note: This class is predicated on the assumption that prior to offering coaching assistance, a coach should have a deep understanding of his or her own behavior and its impact on a client. Utilizing validated tools and strategies available for coaches, the students practice sets of coaching skills on each other. This includes practice in interviewing and observational skills. In addition, students will have the opportunity to give and analyze 360 degree feedback data, as well as use a variety of other instruments that can be foundational for a useful coaching experience. Premise: Coaching others is very serious business. Intrepid individuals willing to take on this responsibility should be willing to answer the following questions: Who am I as a leader and helper? What are the assets I bring to the coaching relationship? What are my deficits, overused strengths, or underutilized skills and behaviors? What historical influences from my family of origin influence my capacity to build a positive relationship with my coaching client? Are there discrepancies in relation to my self-perceptions and those who know me well--family members, peers, colleagues, friends, boss, and direct reports? As a result, are these specific areas of personal development that I need to address as I move? Similar to most traditional programs where the focus is on the management of change, the course is organized to: 1) A diagnostic phase in which the values, history, assumptions, and behaviors of the client will be assessed. In this case the client will be the student/coach. 2) The applied phase in which analysis, interpretation, and formal learning will be the central focus. The end result will be individuals with a deep and abiding understanding of their own psychodynamics and their personal impact. Finally, by modeling many of the tools and strategies useful in any effective coaching effort and practicing them on themselves and their student peers, it is hoped that the experiential nature of the course will allow maximum transference to the real work of coaching.

Taught by: Napier

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Non-DYNM students must complete a course permit request form: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: A; DYNM Concentrations: LMC, OC. Course schedule: January 14 15; February 25 26; March 18

DYNM 611 Effective Collaboration for a Changing Global Workplace

Effective collaboration requires a combination of strong self-awareness and an ability to make adjustments at the individual and group level. This course provides tools for building teams that leverage individual strengths and a mutual learning process of continuously addressing collaboration barriers to improve team performance. This seminar/lab is designed to extend each participant's analytical skills and gain practice implementing high performance practices through a team-based simulation. Specific learning objectives are to: 1. Understand leading-edge frameworks for building effective teams. 2. Learn and apply tools for diagnosing barriers to collaboration. 3. Develop implementation plans for teams and organizations consistent with best practices. 4. Provide tools for self-assessment of participants to leverage their strengths for teamwork success. 5. Apply learning from classroom-based teamwork simulation to participants' real life experiences.

Taught by: Hirshon, Legatt, and Newberry

Course not offered every year

Prerequisites: Non-DYNM students must complete a course permit request form: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Categories: F, DE; DYNM Concentrations: LMC, GL. Course Schedule: 9/9 10; 10/7 8; 10/28; 11/19.

DYNM 612 Mastering Organizational Politics and Power

The purpose of this course is to explore, enhance, and expand the participants' competence in organizational politics. Students will observe political dynamics as they occur in their own organizations and will interview senior managers in other organizations to learn how political realities vary from one organization to another. Theoretical ideas about a dimension of organizational politics of particular interest to each individual participant will be analyzed in a term paper. In addition, each participant will keep a personal diary of political dynamics in his or her own workplace. The course will also explore ways to master the political skills of networking, negotiating, influencing, leading, and following, as well as developing a political strategy.

Taught by: Eldred

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Course permit requests for non-DYNM students: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: A; DYNM Concentration: LMC

DYNM 613 Is Bigger - Inevitable, Better or Worse in Organizations?

Is the modern large corporation alienating, inflexible, unproductive? Is the small organization or work team engaging, innovative or creative, productive? Has it always been this way in the U.S.? Is change possible? In this unique, informal, "turbo" seminar, we will examine the large corporation in terms of history, governance and control, and delivery of (office) work. We will consider whether "bigness" and bureaucracy are inevitable, and how organizations of the present, and probably the future, are affected by those of the past. This seminar has been structured to cover a good deal of ground ina short time. The seminar will meet on six Saturdays. The subject matter of theseminar is the large-scale organization. Questions to be raised include: 1) Is the modern large corporation alienating, inflexible, and unproductive? 2) Are bigness and bureaucracy inevitable? 3) Is the small organization or work team engaging, innovation, creative, and productive? 4) What does the historical record for the United States reveal? 5) Are organizational alternatives and change possible?

Taught by: Licht

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Non-DYNM students must complete a course permit request form: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: F; DYNM Concentration: LMC. Course Schedule: 1/16, 23, 30; 2/6, 20 27. 1/16 is 9 to 12; all other meetings are 9 to 5.

DYNM 614 Consulting/Coaching Tools and Techniques

This course will offer a conceptual comprehension of the tools and techniques used in effective internal and external organizational consulting engagements. By contrasting the theory and practice of alternative coaching models, we will build tools and techniques for effective coaching as a leadership competency. Through an analysis of the coaching relationships in your organization, you will learn to develp a personalized approach to coaching and expand upon and within organizational settings. Participants learn the "how and why" as well as well as consulting frameworks. Additionally, the relevant and often symbiotic connection between consulting and coaching will be studied. What process tools are most useful to today's executive coach in a consultative environment? How do approaches to consulting and coaching differ? How are they similar? How can a confluence of coaching and consulting lead to more effective decision-making and wide-scale organizational performance? This course will be presented over five class meetings. The class sessions will be taught utilizing lectures, case studies, structured small group deiscussions, individual and team presentations, faculty and participant experience, and guest speakers.

Taught by: Russo

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Non-DYNM students must complete a course permit request: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: DE; DYNM Concentrations: OC. Course Schedule: 1/21, 2/4, 4/8, 4/22, 4/29

DYNM 615 Global PENNovation: The Food-Water-Energy Nexus

Environmentalist Paul Hawken challenged a class of 2009 college graduates that they would have to "figure out what it means to be a human being on earth at a time when every living system is declining, and the rate of decline is accelerating." That theme is at the heart of this course. While we have seen the notion of sustainability gaining some traction in recent years, our quality of life in the near future very likely hinges on the development and implementation of sustainable solutions to enormously complex environmental and social problems. This course is designed to foster the thinking that is needed to address those enormous problems. It involves focusing on a critical global problem with sustainability and social dimensions - in this case, the need to balance global food, water, and energy needs in a manner that allows the world to feed 9.6 billion citizens by 2050 while preserving the environmentfor future generations. PENNovation is a course about innovation, idea generation, collaboration, leadership, communication, research, decision- making, sustainability, sustainable solutions, creative thinking, leading change, and complex problem-solving. Class members take a deep dive into a major sustainability challenge while also gaining experience in how to lead global teams. The nexus: the world faces the imminent challenge of feeding roughly 9.6 billion citizens by 2050, an increase of about 2.3 billion (31%) from 2015. Yet we are not successfully feeding the global population today. FAO reports that about 800 million global citizens are hungry, and nearly 2 billion suffer from micronutrient deficincies. The World Economic Forum reported that global freshwater demand is expected to exceed current supply by over 40% by 2030-- just 15 years from now--while evidence of shortages is increasingly clear in heavily populated areas such as California, Sao Paolo, and China. Demand for energy continues to rise; the International Energy Agency notes that global energy demand is set to grow by 37% by 2040. An increasingly affluent population is straining the world's already scarce resources, particularly in end goal of this course will be to produce a world-class product including the quest for animal protein, yet we continue to waste vast amounts of food (between 1 and 2 billion tons annually) and exacerbate social and environmentalproblems in the process. How can the world balance all of these challenges, meeting global needs for food, water, and energy security while protecting the quality of the environment and preventing social unrest? What approaches are needed? How can the needed changes be implemented?

Taught by: Finn

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: Non-DYNM students must complete a course permit request: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: A; DYNM Concentrations: LMC, GL, SD. Course schedule: 1/25, 2/1,13, 22 29; 3/19 28; 4/9 25.

DYNM 616 Myths to Media: Stories on a Mission

What determines our behavior? How do we come to understand? Who determines our purpose? Is now the only time? When asked "What if there were nothing in the universe," one professor replied, "How do we know there isn't?" The more our world seems to dis-integrate into discrete and unpredictable units and actors, the more we crave guidance from robust human models and conceptual frameworks of intellect, emotion, psyche, and action. Fortunately, our 100,000-year-old brains retain mechanisms enabling us even now to enhance our choice usingthe "stories beneath the stories" that--in form and content--have driven our purposes and actions since sentient beings could communicate. Yoda you should ask. This course offers several means of deploying these powerful ancient sense-making tools--myths and stories--to purposefully communicate and foment action with individuals, groups, and organizations, particularly in our global social media milieu. We will learn many practical story-based ways to apply this power to several "missions": enaging others in individual and collective action, increasing understanding of patterns in human behavior, and harnessing the driver of purpose for business and social enterprise. Seek help from Prometheus.

Taught by: Greco

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Course permits for non-DYNM students: https://sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: A; DYNM Concentration: LMC

DYNM 617 Economics of Human Behavior and Organizational Life

As a society, we choose many different ways to organize different aspects of our lives. The institutions and organization we choose to provide us with the necessities and comforts of life range from the fundamental institutions of family and religious organizations, to firms in the capitalistic market and democratically elected governments. We respond to this environment in unique ways: we marry, we worship, we buy and sell goods and services, and we vote. The primary goal of this course is an examination of the various aspects of human behavior in the context of organizational and institutional life from an economic perspective. We recognize that the choices we make are sensitive to the costs and benefits of different actions and use this economic perspective to gain insights into social, economic and political behavior in our daily lives. We start the course with an examination of how micro economists view the world and examine their favorite toolkit. We discuss concepts such as: efficiency, opportunity cost, marginal analysis, externalities, incentives, free-riding, rent-seeking, and transaction costs. These concepts are fundamental if an economic perspective and they will be presented using every day examples. Before concluding the course, we will look at several topics such as: Human capital and investment in education (Should you invest in an Ivy League school education?); Law and enforcement (When is it profitable to break the law?); Bribes and gifts (Quid pro quo?); Economics of information (Used cars and the market for "lemons"); Why we discriminate against minorities?; Property rights and externalities (The tragedy of the commons: Should we have smoke-free environments?); and Free-riding (Should I vote in the next election? Should I volunteer to clean up?)

Taught by: Handy

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisites: Course permits for non-DYNM students: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: F; DYNM Concentrations: LMC, SD

DYNM 618 Strategic Crowdsourcing and Business Models 2.0

Crowdsourcing is among the most impactful innovations in organization of the 21st century, enabling the rise of distributed organizations. In this course, we will learn the radical business models used by a new generation of companies that transcend the format boundaries of the firm--e.g. Uber, oDesk, Kickstarter, among hundreds of such distributed organizations. The crowdsourcing economy is rapidly expanding, with at least 117 distrubuted work companies receiving venture capital in 2013--up from 17 in 2009 and 55 in 2011 (The Economist, 2015). Entrepreneurs taking this course will understand how crowdsourcing startups made big strides in the global economy. For example, five-year-old Uber-- founded in 2009--developed operations in more than 50 countries, reaching sales of $1 billion in 2014. It received $3.3 in venture capital, valued at more than $41 billion in December 2014 (The Wall Street Journal, 2014). Uber offers an online platform connecting self-selected drivers and users who use a smartphone app to interact with the service. Any interested driver, who has a car and a smartphone, can sign up to be an Uber driver.

Taught by: Villarroel

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

0.5 Course Units

Notes: This course will be in a hybrd in-person and online course.

DYNM 619 Organizational Project Management

The course provides an overview of the concepts, procedures, and fundamental processes of project management for working professionals. Participants are introduced to the principles, tools, and techniques of project management within an integrative framework. The course emphasizes that, for most organizations, projects are the primary means for implementing strategic initiatives. Course Objectives: 1) Understand and critically evaluate expectations, procedures and processes of program management as currently practiced in large for-profit enterprises; 2) Understand the content and processes and standards of practice as defined by the Program Management Institute (PMI); 3) Understand how to build and manage effective project teams; 4) Become familiar with the critical components of effective project plans. In addition to the scheduled meeting dates, additional class activities will be planned between faculty and students.

Taught by: Choukroun

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Non-DYNM students must complete a course permit request form: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Categories: F, A; DYNM Concentration: LMC. Course schedule: 9/9, 16; 10/7, 14, 28; 11/4, 18; 12/2, 9

DYNM 620 The Coach: Applying Tools and Skills in the Field

Coaching insinuates change, and most meaningful change is, at some level, therapeutic. This course will explore the dynamics of change as a therapeutic process. Whenever individuals have the nerve to "help" others, self-understanding must come front and center. As a master coach once said, "Who in the hell do we think we are helping others unless we are willing to take a very hard look at ourselves-our behavior, our impact, our projections and biases?" Not only must we ask hard questions of ourselves and resolve our own issues that could corrupt our effectiveness, but we also need to model the most productive behaviors possible. The questions for students of this course include: 1) Are you willing to look? 2) Are you willing to be fiercely honest with yourself and with your fellow students? 3) Are you prepared for the responsibility that goes with mucking around in someone else's life? What makes this particular coaching course unique is that it affords students the opportunity to experience a full range of coaching practices in a relatively short amount of time. The expectation is that the students will have identified a potential client that will be discussed during the first class (although no firm agreement would have to be reached prior to that time). The student/coach will be guided each step of the way through the coaching process which will include a) contracting with the client; b) engaging in a thorough diagnostic exercise for the client including interviews, observations and a complete 360 feedback cycle, c) analyzing the data, d) feeding the results back to the client, e) engaging the client in problem solving and an action plan designed to help increase the client's effectiveness.

Taught by: Napier

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For additional information, please see our website at: http://www.organizationaldynamics.upenn.edu

DYNM 621 Project Portfolio Management

The primary objective of this course is to enable participants to gain a thorough understanding of and appreciation for the discipline of Project Portfolio Management. Ill-defined and poorly utilized in many organizations, Portfolio Management has struggled to become inculcated within the fabric of these cultures without direct intervention and sponsorship from the highest levels of Senior Management. Beginning with a decidedly strategic focus, the course brings together the very essence of Portfolio Management--technically robust analytics--with the softer elements of communication and decision- making to enable portfolio value maximization. The course is structured in sucha way that it follows a unique Portfolio Management framework--CREOPMTM-- created by the authors Bayney & Chakravarti in their book titled Enterprise Project Portfolio Management: Building Competencies For R&D and IT Investment Success. In each of the first 6 classes, the framework is followed sequentiallyand is then applied holistically to a case study in the final classes. The impact of risk and uncertainty to the quantification of project, program, and portfolio value is addressed through classic program and portfolio optimizationStudents will be expected to apply many of the principles taught in this courseto their own organizations and to deliver class presentations that address portfolio strategy, linkages between organizational plans, decomposing complex decisions, project prioritization, portfolio optimization, and Stage Gate Review (SGR) processes. In their final paper, students will be presented with a choice of analyzing their organizations portfolio health or a selected Kellogg School of Management case study in Portfolio Management using the CREOPMTM framework.

Taught by: Bayney

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Non-DYNM students must complete a course permit request: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Course Category: A; DYNM Course Concentration: LMC

DYNM 623 Building Intercultural Competence in A Global Work Environment

This engaging course will promote intercultural competence and heighten cross-cultural awareness. You will engage in activities, simulations, and discussion about culture, values, perceptions, communication styles, and cultural patterns of thought and behavior that will help you understand the basic concepts, theories, and issues of intercultural communication related to intercultural relationships and how these concepts apply to your personal and professional lives. This fun and stimulating course will also explore ways to create an interculturally-competent work environment. Learning opportunities will examine tools to interact more positively with each other. As we build intercultural competence, we will sometimes encounter barriers as we interact with people whose cultural backgrounds vary from our own. As learners of intercultural communication, we will be bringing different cultural experiences and perspectives. As we interact and learn together, you will be exposed to different viewpoints and cultural lenses. We will all realize that as we unravel differences, you will find that what is acceptable and appropriate in one culture may be disrespectful from another cultural vantage point. As we cultivate, learn, and shape our intercultural competences, we may need to have an open mindset to learn new things and unlearned misinformation. The cultural competency of learning and unlearning, shaping and reshaping is a life skill that will be useful and extended well beyond the course to our work settings and personal lives.

Taught by: Altamirano

Course not offered every year

Prerequisites: Course permits for non-DYNM students: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: A; DYNM Concentrations: LMC, GL

DYNM 624 Program Leadership Skills and Systems

Program Leadership Skills and Systems takes a fresh look at how organizations (and the people who work for them) pursue strategic goals via initiatives that can be recognized as programs. Taking a broad view of the nature of programs, it examines the role of teams in delivering program success and how an individual team member's knowledge, skills, and behaviors, should contribute to that success. Program Leadership Skills and Systems will progress through content that examines: 1) The important of programs: What are programs and why are they critical to organizational, professional, and personal success? 2) The challenges of programs: Why do most programs fail to deliver their intended benefits? 3) The leadership nees of programs: How does an individual's leadership style and focus influence the likelihood of success of their programs--and the likelihood that they will get promoted? 4) The ideal program team: What should one look for when building a program team? 5) An individual's role on a program team: What should program team members do to be a more successful team leader, manager, or member? 6) What experts say: What are the current "standards" of program management and how can you learn from them? It is expected that students who take Program Leadership Skills and Systems will achieve a greater understanding of how programs can be used to pursue organizational, professional, and personal goals. They will learn what it takes to effectively fill the role of a program team member, manager, and/or leader and to achieve personal and professional success in their roles.

Taught by: Heaslip

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Non-DYNM students must complete a course permit request: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Course Category: A; DYNM Course Concentrations: LMC, OC

DYNM 625 Ethnography of Everyday Life: A Master Class

Ethnography is a fundamental method within the social sciences that concerns the systematic study of culture. It involves a "thick description" of how people actually live their everyday lives, personal or professional. Ethnographers study how human groups form institutions and how these structures grow, function, maintain themselves, and persist. Also at issue is how people share their understandings and develop ideologies pertaining to these processes. Social negotiation and the development of "local knowledge" in the culture of interpersonal affairs will be emphasized, particularly as it is transmitted from one generation to the next. Through direct observation and discussion, students will treat Philadelphia as an "urban laboratory" and seek to identify, to study, and to learn about local people and places. In this vein, the class will visit communities and organizational settings to gain exposure to ordinary people but, particularly, to apply ethnographic methods to the complexities of the modern workplace as well as to everyday life of the city. The final paper will be a synthesis of ethnographic literature and observations of local urban life and culture, particularly as these issues apply to understanding and organization or a local community.

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisites: Course permits for non-DYNM students: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

0.5 Course Units

Notes: DYNM Categories: DE, A; DYNM Concentration: LMC. Meeting Schedule: 7/15, 16, 23, 30; 8/6.

DYNM 626 Leading the Professional Service Organization

The purpose of this seminar is to understand appropriate leadership behaviors for professional services. Students will gain first hand exposure to prominent leaders of diverse service organizations, and will research how those leaders both develop and deploy their leadership agenda. This course fills the following Organizational Dynamics requirements: Categories: A Concentrations: LMC

Taught by: Eldred

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For additional information, please see our website at: http://www.organizationaldynamics.upenn.edu

DYNM 627 Classics of Organizational Behavior

The purpose of this seminar is to critique the thought and practice of several "big names" in organizational behavior, while establishing the continuing relevance of their work to today's organizations. Federick Taylor (Scientific Management), The Hawthorne Studies (Human Relations), Kurt Lewin (Group Dynamics), Eric Trist (Socio-Technical Systems) and others will be read in their primary sources, giving participants the opportunity to form their own opinion of these classic field studies. Participants will read primary sources in the field as well as more recent critical scholarship. They will then present short papers to the class in the model of an academic conference, followed by discussion. Participants will debate their own views in this conference atmosphere as if both the founders and their critics were present. In addition to the readings and discussion, participants will view a taped oral-history interview with Eric Trist and a film of Kurt Lewin's famous experiment on leadership styles. Each participant will present two brief papers to the class and will submit a longer final paper.

Taught by: Barstow

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For additional information, please see our website at: http://www.organizationaldynamics.upenn.edu

DYNM 628 Organizational Diagnosis: Diagnostic Strenths for Effectiveness

This seminar is designed to help participants learn multiple approaches to diagnosing the complex ways in which issues and/or problems manifest themselves in organizations. Frequently, when organizations find themselves in trouble, i.e., there are rumblings in the system about such things as lack of leadership, poor communication, diminished productivity, low morale, etc., there is a tendency to frame the problem(s) simplistically and/or locate blame in a few difficult individuals or groups. However, upon closer examination, problematic issues are often found to be symptomatic and/or symbolic of multiple issues within the organization. This course will help students understand how problems which appear at one level of the system (for example, at the personal or interpersonal level) often represent problems at other levels of the system (e.g., at the group and/or institutional level) or signify a range of inter-related issues. It will provide students with the theoretical constructs and application skills necessary for identifying and framing problem areas, collecting data, and organizing feedback to client systems. Real-time examples will inform our discussions as we consider the relationships between diagnosis, organizational reflection and appropriate action.

Taught by: Kaminstein

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Course permits for non-DYNM students: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Categories: DE, A; DYNM Concentration: LMC

DYNM 629 Strategic Approaches to Human Capital Management and Its Implications for Leaders

In this course we look at how human capital strategy is changing in response to increasing demands for results and more purposeful practice. We look first at the broader landscape of human capital management and see what's new in the way an organization should approach its human capital practice. Then, we look more closely at the specific challenges--demographically, structurally, and organizationally--facing managers and Human Capital professionals in an age of uncertainty, and learn what they can do to remain adaptive and competitive. By the end of the course, through meetings and discussions, assignments, presentations, case studies, research, and required reading, participants will: 1) Learn how to assess and adjust Human Capital Development (HCD) policies, processes, and practices; 2) Think strategically about the critical human capital concerns in their own organization; 3) Connect and align individual and organizational learning imperatives; 4) Learn how to reshape human capital goals to meet continuously changing global, political, and economic environments; 5) Inspire leadership of human capital that is results-oriented and ethical; 6) Identify and explore a specific human capital issue relevant and important to their organization and develop a strategic approach for addressing it.

Taught by: Hart

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Course permits for non-DYNM students: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Categories: F, DE; DYNM Concentration: LMC

DYNM 630 The Discipline of Value-driven Business Process Management: Strategy Execution in a Digital World

Business strategies and operations are driven by scores of ever-shifting factors: from demographic changes and capital availability to increasing regulations, technological innovations and al all present digitalization. Static business models are no longer able to keep pace with such dynamic change. Companies need a next generation management approach that fits to this environment and drives collaboration across organizational boundaries. In effect, they need to know how and when to modify or enhance their business processes, which processes are best candidate for intervention, and how to move rapidly and at the lowest risk from business strategy to execution. Business Process Managment (BPM) helps organizations master change successfully and create immediate as well as durable competitive advantage. It uses the opportunities of our digital world systematically. BPM has become a management discipline that delivers significant business value by converting strategy into people and technology-based executiion--at pace with certainty. It is implemented through the "process of process management" that addresses all aspects of the lifecycle of a business process: design, implementatino, execution, an controlling of processes. It is about identifying the right focus to improve what really matters and to sustain those improvements. framework, approaches, methods and software for achieving and maintaining a

Taught by: Kirchmer and Naidoo

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: Course permits for non-DYNM students: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: A; DYNM Concentration: LMC

DYNM 631 Everyday Intergenerational Conversations: Baby Boomers and Millenials

This hybrid course delves into three big questions around the burning theme of everyday intergenerational conversations. The class-experience will be a living such conversation with Dr. Barstow, a Baby Boomer, and Amrita Subramanian, a millenial. The course format is 20% in person and 80% on a virtual platform. It's a learner-centric and a learner-driven course. It is created to mine the practical know-how and life experiences of all participants, so all generations within the class can have a revealing experience that they can immediately apply at work and their personal relationships in life. At this exact point in time there are 300+ million people in the workforce and four generations at play. We begin to see the tiers of own understanding falling apart. It's no longer about sterotyping or simply managing by default or banking on quick-recall labels--and here's why--workplace performance or productivity or engagement or intergenerational respect and trust cannot be left to chance or opinions. We have to pause and consider the following questions: 1) Wht: What are the generation names and labels we use? What purpose do they serve? How do they help and how do they hurt? What do they help us see? What do they hide, obstruct or make us miss? 2) So what? Intergenerational communication is poor and we can do better. Understand it and skills (strategies and tactics) to prosper and cope. How to use agency and brokerage? What of cognitive dissonance? Responding versus reacting to Fake News? 3) What's next? What have we learned from this whole century about the 4 generations at work? At home? At meetings or webinars or potluck parties? What of families at Thanksgiving? How can we expect to have valuable and meaningful conversations and relationships with all generations--current and future?

Taught by: Barstow and Subramanian

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Course permit for Non-DYNM students: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: TBA; DYNM Concentration: TBA. Course schedule: In person session: 9/9 from 1:30-5:30.

DYNM 633 Leadership from the Middle of the Organization

Durable organizations have learned to encourage innovation from within. This course's objective is to give Organizational Dynamics graduates the skills andppractical knowledge to organize change and improvement from a middle position within an existing organization. The course seeks to prepare students to assumeresponsibility for acting without authority by becoming the leader they have been looking for. The course's learning objectives are: (a) to gain a working understanding of the pragmatic, ethical/moral, and cognitive foundations for leading informally from mid organization; (b). to adapt an existing Leading from the Middle (LftM) process to each student's actual situation; and (c) to carru out small scale actions in accordance with the process between classes, and in each class to coach students in learning by doing leadership arts and skills such as negotiating, maximizing the feasibility of change plans, enlisting and coordinating cooperation on a team, identifying and addressing stakeholder points of view, maintaining legitimacy of an initiative, and crediting all who help. Students who take this course should already be concerned about one or more important opportunities or upsetting challenges in their present or previous organizational surroundings. The ionstructor will coach the class in functioning as an idealized design team. The design process has two phases, a base case projection and an idealized design. Phase 1, the base case projection, formulates the current reality without change, and projects the likely undesired effects and outcomes of maintaining status quo. Phase 2, idealized design, creates a leadership approach that all stakeholders would wish for, if all their feasible, sustainable and adaptable wishes could come true today. By participating in a design process, the class itself models many group dynamics of an actual LftM situation. Scholarly COmmons describes the work done in this class with examples. (Please see Stankard, Martin (2011). Guest speakers from earlier years are invited to share experiences with course content and answer questions. This course fills the following Organizational Dynamics requirements: Categories: DE, A Concentrations LMC, OC

Taught by: Stankard

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For additional information, please see our website at: http://www.organizationaldynamics.upenn.edu

DYNM 634 Process Improvement Tools and Strategies

Process improvement as taught in this course often provides high-leverage, high visibility opportunities for showcasing coaching and leadership skills as a member, coach, or leader of cross-functional process improvement teams. Cross-functional process improvement teams (running lean and six sigma projects) have evolved into a major pathway for developing leadership and coaching talent in such organizations as Baptist Healthcare, Federal Express, Ritz Carlton, Toyota Motor Co., and General Electric. Process improvement project leaders and team members use specific tools and capabilities to analyze as-is processes and to define and deploy new or improved processes that deliver better outcomes and customer satisfaction with less non-value added effort. Leading or serving on cross-functional process improvement teams creates opportunities to work and network with people from other parts of your organization and creates opportunities for visibility to executives and managers sponsoring strategic improvements. Participating in or leading process improvement is also a great leadership, coaching and professional development activity.

Taught by: Stankard

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Course permit for non-DYNM students: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Categories: DE, A; DYNM Concentration: LMC. Course Schedule: 9/9 23; 10/7, 21; 11/4, 18. (Back up date in case of cancellation: 12/2)

DYNM 635 Organizational Essentials for Leadership

Through presentations by expert speakers, case discussions, and participation in team projects, students will review and evaluate critical issues from across the frames of business, including general; human resource; marketing; information and stakeholder management; leadership; corporate culture; communications; organizational behavior; sales, marketing and public relations; finance and financial reporting; ethics and social responsibility; unions and government relations; and business law. Each of these elements will be studied in light of changing environmental conditions, including the economy; society; consumer behavior; market trends; regulation; politics, unpredictable events such as 9/11; organizational change; history; and internationalism.

Taught by: Choukroun

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisites: Course permits for non-DYNM students: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Course Category: F; DYNM Course Concentration: LMC. Course meeting schedule: 7/8, 15, 22, 29; 8/5

DYNM 636 21st Century Leadership Development: Integrating Cultural Influences into Coaching Practice

Coaching has been used to support high-level leadership, to develop high potential talent, to overcome or remediate deficiencies or unproductive behaviors, and to support or manage performance during periods of change. As the use of organizational coaching has grown over the last decade, globalization of the economy has transformed organizational markets, operations, and workforces so that "culture" routinely influences interpersonal, group, and organizational interfaces. In this context leadership requires an ability to recognize and leverage the "cultural diversity" inherent in teamwork, communication, collaboration, conflict, and change. Coaching, as a leadership development practice, must help leaders grow in their ability to recognize and leverage the national, professional, functional, and organizational cultures that influence workforce engagement, productivity, satisfaction, and innovation. This course is intended for students with an interest in culturally complex leadership and organizational development. This course has a dual purpose. First, through reading, class discussion, and written reflection, the course will enhance student understanding of coaching models, methods, and cases informed by cross-cultural psychology, intercultural communication, anthropology, and international business disciplines. Secondly, through guided practice, students will develop their skills in coaching across cultural differences. Students will coach one another through a self-assessment, development planning process, and initial movement toward their objectives using Rosinski's global coaching process as one illustrative example of this kind of coaching. This course is a hybrid of online and in-person meetings on the following schedule: 6/1: In-person and online; 6/25 & 26; 7/23 & 24: In-person; 8/10: In-person and online.

Taught by: Reyes

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Course permits for non-DYNM students: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Course Category: A; DYNM Course Concentrations: LMC, GL, OC. Meeting Schedule: 6/1, 25, 26; 7/23 24; 8/10.

DYNM 637 Creating High-Performing Groups and Teams: A Course in Real-Time Experiential Learning

This course will be offsite in Pennsylvania, August 4th through 9th, 2017. This course will have an additional course fee to cover lodging and other program logistics. Registration permits will be issued upon signed Travel Agreement being returned to the Organizational Dynamics program office. This course is limited to 12 students. This five-day, offsite program is more about the "how" to develop high performing teams than the intellectual "what" of such teams. For five days the twelve members will immerse themselves into what differentiates a high performing team from the dysfunctional teams with which we are familiar. We will take a deep dive into the fundamentals of any group or team in our efforts to become such a team. We will, along the way, learn about the art of design --internalizing the skills and tools essential for building strategic interventions into a team in real time. Not only will we design them, but alsowe will be critiqued in relation to the quality of our efforts as well as to the facilitation skills we used during the process.

Taught by: Rodney Napier

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Course Category: A; DYNM Course Concentrations: LMC, OC. Residential course: 8/4 to 8/9.

DYNM 638 THE PRACTICE OF ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP

This is a practical course designed to help participants engage in reflective practice regarding their own leadership and their relationship to leadership by others. Students will present for discussion case material from their workplaces or other settings and we will also explore leadership through in-class experiential exercises. Foundational readings will provide a common langage and conceptual framework. Along the way, we will revisitthe fundamental questions : What is leadership? What is good leadership? What do I intend to do difvferently going forward?

Taught by: WING

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

DYNM 639 Sustainable Change: Managing Organizational Culture to Achieve Leadership Goals

"Culture eats strategy for breakfast," as management guru Peter Drucker famously said. We know that leaders who can effectively manage their organization's culture are better at adapting to market trends, retaining employees, and engaging external stakeholders who demand more corporate transparency and social responsibility. Yet most of us find it difficult to understand what culture really is, let alone manage it successfully. This challenge is magnified at a time when technological and demographic trends have made organizational boundaries more porous and ambiguous than ever, threatening to make traditional models of top-down change management ineffective. This course will therefore takea bottom-up, contextual approach to helping students understand and manage organizational culture in order to achieve their strategic and career goals. We will start with the individual, learning how culture works to shape organizational politics. We will discuss ways in which students can develop strategies for navigating organizational culture to achieve their career goals. We will then move to the group level, examining how cultural barriers form between teams, functions, and divisions, harming communication and coordination. The final section of the course will build to the organization level and provide students with a toolkit for creating strategies to achieve sustainable cultural change. The course will be heavily focused on practical application: students will conduct semester-long cultural research/consulting projects with organizations located in Philadelphia. We will also apply course frameworks and tools to case studies of leaders attempting to create sustainability-oriented cultures in their organizations.

Taught by: Newberry

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Course Permits for Non-DYNM Students: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: TBA; DYNM Concentrations: LMC. Course Schedule: 1/21; 2/4, 18; 3/18; 4/1, 15

DYNM 640 Virtual Collaboration

NOTE: Logitech ClearChat Headphones and Logitech QuickCam Pro9000 are required for this course. Please see the syllabus for other requirements. Across the globe companies, both large and small, are increasingly conducting culturally complex work thorugh tecnnology channels and virtual personnel transfers, making multi-cultural organization and virtual work inextricably intertwined. In this context electronically mediated collaboration and communication capabilities across time, distance, organization, culture, and other knowledge boundaries have become necessary for the everyday work of telecommuters, virtual teams, remote managers, professional knowledge communities, and electronic marketplaces. This course is primarily intended for students with an interest in globally distributed work and collaborative virtual organizations. The purpose of this elective is to enhance student understandings of virtual forms of human collaboration and to develop student abilities to work jointly with others via electronic tools. This course design makes typical social patterns encountered in virtual organizations visible so that students can learn from participating and collectively reflecting on their course experiences. This course has an online course fee of $150.

Taught by: Reyes

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Non-DYNM students must complete a course permit request: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Online Course

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Course Category: A; DYNM Course Concentrations: LMC, GL

DYNM 641 The Art and Science of Organizational Coaching

Coaching has become a primary tool for consultants, human resources professionals and administrators interested in promoting and sustaining leadership and executive development, behavioral change, and role transition. This course explores the theory and practices associated with organizational coaching. We examine and practice the steps of the normative coaching process, the issues and boundaries that effect coaching, and pitfalls to avoid. This is an introductory course that follows a hybrid model of instruction, learning and application in class and in virtual class. The first class will be a weekend face-to-face experience followed by consecutive virtual classroom sessions with a variety of different applications. Students will practice phone coaching and virtual coaching as well as virtual group written discussion. Throughout the course we will contrast theory and practice through our own experience and observation via assignments and behavioral experimentation.

Taught by: Pennington and Subramanian

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Permits for non-DYNM students: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Hybrid Course

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Categories: F, DE; DYNM Concentration: OC

DYNM 645 Project Based Laboratory

Course not offered every year

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

DYNM 650 Outdoor Dynamics

This course explores the implications of past and future changes in land use and population changes over time in one of the least densely populated areas of the country, but which serves as both a winter and summer playground for millions of urban residents each year. Set in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, only a day's drive for over 10 million Americans, the area boasts some of the most pristine and exotic microenvironments in the world, left from the last Ice Age. Over 250,000 people visit the summit of Mt. Washington, the region's highest peak, every year, driving, hiking or riding the cog railway to the top. The focus of this course is the growing interest in promoting "sustainable development," which most people envision as protecting the environment and wild species from human encroachment and pollution. The course will examine the human sphere and the natural sphere as common ground in the analysis of competing issues; areas of compatibility; and future plans to promote a sustainable environment in this region. The course will focus on three themes: 1) how the people and institutions tasked with being the environment's guardians go about their jobs; 2) how the area is used by visitors; and 3) how industry and its stakeholders have worked with local regulators and politicians to create jobs and promote growth. The course will ask students to overlay the principles of sustainability and issues management, in managing the increasing concern that the trajectory of land use and industrial growth will compromise the region's native ecology and wilderness and backcountry attractiveness. Left to its own momentum, how will the future of the area fare versus promoting and implementing more sustainable goals? Changes in behavior will be needed to bring the two into line, and that leads to organizational dynamics. How will stakeholders resolve the natural tensions of the institutions' (primarily those that operate in the region) mission and development goals with outsiders' desires? What leverage do they and others have in the debate over the future of the region? In addition to an active outdoor week in the White Mountains, participants will meet with key players and leaders from the area and come away with a deeper understanding of the major issues in the tentions between "the place no one knew and the place that got loved to death."

Taught by: Barstow/Havely

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Course Category: A; DYNM Course Concentrations: LMC, SD. Travel Course Dates: 8/4 to 8/12.

DYNM 651 Group Team Dynamics: Understanding the Overt and Covert Dynamics that Support Effective Work

Although groups and teams are often lauded as the mechanisms that provide the competitive edge for organizations in today's challenging economic environment, there is often little attention paid to the deeper social and psychological currents influencing group and team dynamics. Organizational leaders and facilitators frequently lack an in-depth understanding of how work groups, multifunctional teams, and cross-national executive groups develop, operate, accomplish their goals--or not--and end. Team members often struggle to make meaning of the myriad spoken, as well as unexpressed, factors influencing the process and outcomes of the groups of which they are a part. This course, by emphasizing both theory and practice, provides students with a thorough grounding in the ways groups and teams develop and learn. The class will also examine approaches to building group and team competencies related to effective communication, conflict-resolution, and solving complex strategic problems as well as ways to manage the range of intentional and more hidden dynamics that both support and challenge high performance. The course is designed to include seven 3-hour classroom meetings across the semester and two extended sessions that will afford students the opportunity to explore various theoretical frameworks. In addition to drawing on the extensive literature and research in group dynamics and team building, the class will rely on experiential methods to help students develop keener understanding and insight into the ways in which their own leadership and followership dynamics, as well as the dynamics of the group-as-a-whole, influence their team's ability to accomplish its tasks.

Taught by: Kaminstein

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Non-DYNM students must complete a course permit request: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Categories: DE, A; DYNM Concentrations: LMC, OC

DYNM 653 Coaching Others to Manage Conflict

Not a day goes by when you or I, or a person we are coaching, is not faced with some tantalizing, challenging conflict. It may be with someone we love, a conflict in a team, a struggle between two direct reports, a difference with our boss, or the challenge of a difficult, perhaps aggressive persona in a meeting we facilitate. The problem is not that there is a conflict. The problem is that most of us have a very thin, often inadequate repertoire of responses to the conflicts that engage us on a daily basis. The result is that all too often we are predictable in our responses. Thus, if we take these same limited skills and attempt to provide them to a client in our role as a coach, the consequences will more than likely be similar. This course is about expanding your repertoire of responses to a wide array of conflict situations. In the process, you will increase your understanding of the theoretical constructs that underlie successful conflict management. Not only will your strategies for managing a variety of conflicts expand, but you will be better able to design unique responses that relate to the particular situation with which your client is faced. How you translate these ideas to your clients and, in the process, provide them the confidence to use them, will be a central theme throughout the course. This course provides a balance between intellectual theory, skills, and applied strategies along with the time to practice them.

Taught by: Napier

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Course permits for non-DYNM students: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: A; DYNM Concentration: OC. Meeting Schedule: 8/26 27; 9/23 24; 10/28

DYNM 655 Using the Political Process to Effect Organizational Change

At one time or another, each of us has said something like, "I know what to do to make some really effective--and possibly even profitable--changes in this organization,but the politics make it almost impossible to get anything done." The sense is that, althaough there are changes that should be made to improve organizational performance, politics (internal, external, governmental) simply obstructs our ability to make a difference. Frustrations notwithstanding, depending on how it is employed, politics can be either an impediment or, more importantly, a source of opportunities for improving organizations. Politics is the art and science of coordinating individuals, departments, management, markets--the entire organizational environment-to effect a balance between the organization's objectives and the methods used to achieve them. As with the other factors that are employed to affect organizational performance-the methods used to improve manufacturing, marketing, sales, finance, and so on-politics is a means that organizations can use to initiate and maintain critical personal and institutional relationships One of the seminar readings--Latimer's "Why Do They Call It Business If It's Mostly Politics?" is used to provide illustrations of the ambiguous nature of much of what is regarded as organizational politics. What is critical to understand and appreciate from the outset, however, is that politics is not an external factor that is imposed on organizations. Politics is not only a means for achieving personal or institutional power; it is also a method for developing and maintaining personal and institutional relationships within and among individuals and organizations of all types. This seminar will discuss organizational politics and the ways that it is used to identify, characterize, and effect change--both within and among organizations. After reviewing several perspectives on organizations and the roles that political processes play in decision-making, a series of cases is presented that illustrate the contexts and conditions for effective political communication and coordination.

Taught by: Gale and Brady

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: GAFL 555

Prerequisites: Course Permits for non-DYNM students: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: A; DYNM Concentration: LMC

DYNM 656 The New Normal: Racial and Ethnic Diversity in the 21st Century Workplace

This course examines the social construction of race and ethnicity, including relations within and across groups, with a particular focus on their implications for organizational culture and management. In a very real sense, the workplace is a microcosm of the larger society; a place where our individual experiences, beliefs, and biases related to race and ethnicity intersect, creating both opportunities and challenges. Our capacity to understand the different backgrounds and experiences that individuals and groups bring to the organization, as well as recognizing our own biases and the biases of others are directly implicated in our ability to both manage and be managed in the organizations that we are a part of. A primary objective in this course is to increase our capacity to first understand the contours of racial and ethnic diversity in twenty-first century America by investigating (1) the historical context that influences present-day understandings of racial/ethnic diveristy (2) how and why individuals from different racial/ethnic backgrounds can "see" the same thing but interpret it very differently, depending on experience, culture, and social position relative to race/ethnicity (3) the meaning and importance of dominant and minority groups, the degree to which a racial hierarchy exists, and the implications of that hierarchy for important outcomes (4) the degree to which the workplace is, indeed, a microcosm of the larger society (5) the pitfalls of "colorblindness" (6) the nature of stigma and its workplace implications and (7) the benefits and drawbacks of affirmative action policy in the workplace.

Taught by: Charles

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For additional information, please see our website at: http://www.organizationaldynamics.upenn.edu

DYNM 661 Organizational Culture Change: Theory and Practice

The importance of organizational culture as a factor that can influence organizational performance either positively or negatively gained renewed attention beginning in the mid-1990's. The success of high-profile firms with "quirky cultures" like Ben & Jerry's, the entrepreneurial cultures of high tech firms that countered the cultures of traditional corporations, a recognition that organizational culture can be a major factor in organizational performance and the related emergency of "high performance organizations", acknowledgment that organizational culture can trump the implementation of organizational strategy, differences in values of workers from different generations, competition among companies to attract the best employees, and the failure of many once-promising mergers and acquisitions all pointed to the importance of understanding and intentionally managing organizational culture. This course will address many of the major debates about organizational culture as well as provide students with tools for better assessing and understanding organizational culture and managing culture change. Course material and discussions will consistently address issues related to both theory and practice. Course meeting schedule: Mondays: 1/23; 2/6, 27 (Conference Call); 3/13, 20 (Conference Call). Saturdays: 1/28; 2/18; 3/4; 4/1.

Taught by: Vanderslice

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Non-DYNM students must complete a course permit request: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: A; DYNM Concentration: LMC. Course Schedule: This course will meet on specific Monday evenings and Saturdays. Exact dates are listed below.

DYNM 662 Entrepreneurship and Leadership: Creating Winners

Peter Drucker once famously said that "entrepreneurs innovate." The course looks at how innovation drives the entrepreneurial process in both large organizations and in startup ventures. It stresses the importance of bringing entrepreneurial vision and energy to all organizations: profit and non-profit, as well as government and institutional. The course examines the characteristics of successful entrepreneurs. Participants will learn how to develop their own entreprenuerial instincts and how to encourage an entrepreneurial culture in their organizations. The course examines the challenges of startup ventures and provides practical information to participants who are considering an entrepreneurial venture. It explores strategies for identifying opportunities, creating successful business models, valuing a business, raising capital and managing the business. The course builds understanding of how a culture of entrepreneurhip and innovation are critical to any organization that wants to survive and prosper in the future. The course discusses how sustainability is becoming a global force for change, creating exceptional entrepreneurial opportunities. The course looks closely at the leadership roles of both the CEO in a large organization and the entrepreneur in a venture. The course examines how leaders in all kinds of organizations set priorities, identify game-changing opportunities, shape the organizational culture and motivate their teams to achieve outstanding performance or, sometimes, fail. The course stresses the leadership responsibilities of the board of directors in providing governance and oversight in both for-profit and non-profit organizations.

Taught by: Keech

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Course permits for non-DYNM students: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: A; DYNM Concentrations: LMC, SD

DYNM 663 Green Skepticism: Communicating and Implementing Sustainable Business

Green initiatives are creating competitive advantage for businesses. Smart companies are integrating environmental stewardship into their strategies, operations, marketing, and product innovation. Companies that successfully embed sustinability in their their core business strategy and culture--rather than "bolting it on" as a peripheral activity - are gaining the most value added. Embedding sustainability requires the active engagement of all organizational stakeholders, many of whom may be green skeptics, dubious of the need to change. "Many people who feel passionately about sustainability cannot relate to those who have a harder time understanding the need for a change..." - Corporate associate & MBA candidate. The business case for sustainability has been made many times, yet skepticism about the need for change remains widespread. While adopting sustainable business practices must make sense financially, an economic argument alone may not be enough to convince people to purchase green business products and services or to implement sustainability practices. The course is based on the assumption that "task significance" is an important factor for implementing sustainable business practices. This means helping people see the connection between small tasks they are being asked to do and the big picture of global sustainable business.The first part of the course focuses on understanding sustainability driven changes in the global business landscape through a coherent framework. The second part of the course focuses on what those changes mean for business fundamentals: consumption, production systems, innovation, and emerging economies. The third part of the course focuses on communicating and implementing sustaianable business strategies and initiatives. Students will have the opportunity, with a team, to design a communication and implementation program for an organization. Throughout the course, strategies and tactics that work to engage skeptics who do not understand the need for change, as well as tactics that don't work, will be studied. The course is based on the instructor's experience leading hundreds of business and environmental professionals from skepticism to enthusiasm for sustainable business over the past decade. This course is designed for everyone tasked with engaging others in implementing sustainable business practices and for entrepreneurs selling green business products and services. It will provide strategies for enhancing a technical and economic sales pitch. The course is also for those who may be skeptical themselves, and want to reconsider their skepticism. Categories: A Concentrations LMC, SD

Taught by: Heller

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For additional information, please see our website at: http://www.organizationaldynamics.upenn.edu

DYNM 664 Organizational Culture and Learning

What is organizational culture? What is organizational learning? How do organizations learn effectively and change their culture? A learning organization is skilled at creating, acquiring, and transferring knowledge, and at modifying its behavior to reflect new knowledge (Garvin, 1993). According to Ray Stata, Chairman of Analog Devices, "The rate at which individuals and organizations learn may become the only sustainable competitive advantage." However we define and prioritize organizational learning, we must still struggle with how to do it. This is a tougher question. The thesis of this seminar is that an enriched understanding of culture can enhance organizational learning. Participants will explore the concept of culture, study the work of Chris Argyris, and discover practices and behaviors that promote organizational learning and culture change. The objective of this seminar is to help participants get beyond highly abstract philosophy and develop a deeper understanding and useful skills based on these concepts. This course will meet on the following Wednesdays: May 27th; June 3rd, 10th, and 17th; July 22nd and 29th.

Taught by: Barstow

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For additional information, please see our website at: http://www.organizationaldynamics.upenn.edu

DYNM 666 Systems and Design Thinking

This class is designed to challenge the traditional thinking of basic management strategy and practice. Through a series of lectures, interactive cases, and group discussions, faculty will challenge participants to rethink their assumptions and move beyond the traditional practice of management strategy formulation and execution. The prevailing pattern of thought employed by management is analytical. Analysis has come to dominate thought in the western world. But no amount of analysis can explain systemic interaction and organizational behavior. A new pattern of thought is required: synthetic. Systems Thinking involves both analysis - to produce knowledge of organizations (systems) - and synthesis to provide understanding. Without both, effective solutions to problems cannot be obtained. To go beyond understanding to wisdom requires awareness of the difference between doing things right (efficiency) and doing the right thing (effectiveness). The better we do the wrong thing, the more wrong we become. Today a great deal of energy is expended by organizations in an effort to increase the efficiency with which wrong things are done.

Taught by: Pourdehnad

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: Course permits for non-DYNM students: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: F; DYNM Concentrations: LMC, SD

DYNM 667 Building a Business Case for Sustainability

What are the systemic changes that an organization must undergo in order to become sustainable? (Sustainability is defined here to mean that no aspect of business operations is harmful to the planet or future generations.) We will examine the issues of sustainability using Peter Senge's work on learning organizations, the Swedish sustainability model, The Natural Step, and Russell Ackoff's idealized design as our frameworks for building a business case for sustainability within an organization or department. Class participants will be asked to build a business case for sustainability within an organization or department and to prepare an interim progress report (5-7 pages) plus a final paper (15-20 pages) using the concepts and principles covered in this course and then will present their case to the class in the last sessions of the course.

Taught by: Barstow

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For additional information, please see our website at: http://www.organizationaldynamics.upenn.edu

DYNM 669 The Power of Confusion

Confusion is a lack of clarity about some situation that matters to you, which causes you to feel so uncertain or uncomfortable that you have a hard time making decisions. You may be confused about whether you fit into an organization; or about what work makes you feel great versus work that you are good at or about the right thing to do when you are frightened. The power of confusion is that it forces you to stop and seek clarity in your life and career. This seminar addresses seven types of personal and organizational confusion encountered in organizational life during a professional career: 1) confusion over which personal ethics, skills, and talents you find most meaningful; 2) confusion over discovering what is really going on in an organization; 3) confusion of who is in charge--leadership and which direction 'we' are moving toward? 4) confusion over 'what's in it for me?' How motivation and satisfaction relate to incentives and pay schemes; 5) confusion caused by blaming, rather than developing skills needed to make lasting changes and improvements; 6) confusion about how teams pull together 7) confusion caused by committing random acts of improvement instead of building a system for making customer-oriented organizational innovations and improvements. You were not born with any inherited knowledge or wisdom, yet you are certain to face fear and confusion during your lifetime. You were born with curiosity and the ability to ask 'why?' when you face a confusing situation. You were also born with the ability to think for yourself, listen to others, and learn from experience. Confusion spurs you to use these abilities to gain the clarity that leads to understanding and wisdom; you will need tools to guide your learning. This seminar will show you how to use simple tools to achieve that clarity.

Taught by: Stankard

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Non-DYNM students must complete a course permit request: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: A; DYNM Concentrations: LMC, OC. Course Schedule: 1/14, 28; 2/11, 25; 3/11; 4/1. Snow make up day: 4/8

DYNM 671 Workplace Ethics: Ownership, Participation, Productivity

In this course, you will have the opportunity to: 1) examine ethical, religious, legal, technological, and economic bases for different ownership systems from early human history through the 20th century; 2) develop a theoretical framework for understanding ownership issues in the contemporary workplace; 3) review social science concerning ownership and the related organizational issues of motivation, performance, productivity, profitability, culture, diversity, and equity; 4) analyze a variety of cases to measure ownership's effects across many industries and business situations; 5) learn about various forms of ownership and compensation in use today in small and large organizations, both public and private; 6) utilize a diagnostic tool for assessing the ways in which your own organization's culture and business outcomes are impacted by the firm's ownership system; 7) describe your own experiences of the different ownership systems with which you may have engaged, including: family, schools, little leagues and professional sports, volunteer service organizations, charities, religious institutions, professional service providers (e.g., doctors, lawyers, veterinarians), the places where you shop (e.g., think about Genuardi's before and after it was sold to Safeway), and the different places you have worked...as a way of systems; 8) assess and refine your views regarding ownership in light of your own social, political, religious, andethical commitments. Who is going to own what we all have a part in creating? The history of American business is an evolving answer to the question of ownership. Of all the issues relevant to organizational dynamics, ownership is arguably the most important and least understood. Matters of ownership have also been and remain of intimate concern to ordinary Americans-the slave yearning to be free, the young couple with a dream of home ownership, the entrepreneru who wants to be his own boss, the consultant who wants to form a partnership with her best friends, and the indebted, mid-level manager reviewing last year's 401(k) statement.

Taught by: Lamas

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: Non-DYNM students must complete a course permit request form: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: F; DYNM Concentration: LMC

DYNM 672 A Systems Approach to Crisis Preparation and Organizational Resilience

Educational Objectives: 1. Awareness of crisis as a part of life and social systems; macro-level crises that could affect you; organizational/individual crisis vulnerability; types of organizational crises; group, family and individual crises. 2. Understanding of: nature and phases of crisis; what to do before, during and after a crisis; crisis psychology/decision-making; security strategies-anticipation vs. resilience; Skills, models and practices of resilience; systemic vulnerability/systemic resilience. 3. Enhance ability to: think critically; develop expertise; adopt a systems perspective; articulate and communicate your thoughts cogently, concisely and compellingly. 4. Apply course-related knowledge to be able to successfully foresee and weather crises. General Education Philosophy. This course fills the following Organizational Dynamics requirements: Categories: A Concentrations: LMC, SD The course includes travel to New York and the World Trade Center site, and lectures at Columbia University to understand what can happen during and after a crisis.

Taught by: Freeman

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For additional information, please see our website at: http://www.organizationaldynamics.upenn.edu

DYNM 673 Stories in Organizations: Tools for Executive Development

As we all know, living in--and out--of organizations is getting exponentially harder. Things seem to be multiplying, splintering, and coalescing kaleidoscopically, and each of us is increasingly taxed to make sense of it all, let alone create meaning for ourselves and those we manage and care about. Remarkably, a powerful tool for helping us is one we have already mastered: stories. As humans we think, feel, speak, listen, explain, and believe in narrative form. Yet this capability is dramatically under-exploited at work. This course examines a variety of ways to bring the power of stories to organizational life. We will look at how stories enhance communication, support change, and intensify learning and development in individuals and organizations, thus informing your leadership style and effectiveness. We will have many opportunities in class to apply "story-based technologies" to issues you face in personal or professional life. Readings come from the literatures of human development, narrative psychology, organizational change, executive learning, and, of course, from literature itself.

Taught by: Greco

Course not offered every year

Prerequisites: Course permits for non-DYNM students: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: A; DYNM Concentration: LMC

DYNM 676 Communication Competence: Extracting Value in Key Organizational Interactions

Often an organization can facilitate its own success by employing fundamental communication practives during value-latent interpersonal interactions. In this course we explore the direct relationship between competent communication and the ability to extract maximum value in most Key Organizational Interactions. Starting off on a personal development note and building off time-tested principles, participants will conduct their own communication skills assessment to determine their own communication strengths and identify specific areas for improvement. Qualities such as effective empathy and active listening are also explored. Moving into the organizational realm, together we define then locate those Key Organizational Interactions, both within and external to the organization, that significantly impact how that organization is perceived.We explore all the possible value points within these Key Organizational Interactions, how they tie into the organization's strategic objectives, and how to best approach them interpersonally.

Taught by: Brian Shapiro

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Course Category: A; DYNM Course Concentrations: LMC

DYNM 677 Human Capital and Human Nature: Sources of Creativity and Innovation

Goal: To mine the resources within yourself, cultivate and engage others, and build with them. Every one of us is potentially wired for creativity, however, each of us is unique. How can we understand the research and use it to understand ourselves, our colleagues, and our world? How do we know what is real?

Taught by: Bauer

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For additional information, please see our website at: http://www.organizationaldynamics.upenn.edu

DYNM 679 To Thrive Or To Survive? Our Question in the Evolving World

The seminar focuses on the implications for our own work and personal lives as we reinvent ourselves, our organizations, and our society in what is often called "the new normal." We begin with a realistic exploration of the relationship of the global economy to the widely different political systems which provide individuals with safety nets. We compare the United States to China and Europe and the ways in which our different systems both compete and support each other. Each participant will research a portion of the regional job market, analyzing the source of investments, patents, required skill level and experience of employees, and competitive outlook. The final presentation and paper will fit their regional analysis into the global picture. Where does it fit? What are its risks?

Taught by: Bauer

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: A; DYNM Concentrations: LMC, GL

DYNM 683 Quantitative Project Risk Analysis Methods and Tools

DYNM 683 is an unusual opportunity for students to develop a working knowledge and set of skills in a seminar conducted by an experienced subject-matter whileusing their own Windows PC computers. Quantitative project risk analysis of cost estimates, critical path networks, and integrated cost-schedule models is a highly specialized capability that industry and government organizations increasingly seek to deploy. Sophistocated tools and methods used in this course can be applied across industry domain boundaries and are scalable from mega projects to volatile start-ups. These world-class tools and best practiceshave been validated through use in public and private organizations. (Academic licenses will be provided with the course.) Prospective students need previous experience using spreadsheet software (an installed version of Microsoft Excel is required). Also, it is preferable, but not required, for students to have some experience with planning/scheduling software (for example, Microsoft project or Oracle Primavera P6). Please contact the instructor with questions and to clarify expectations. The course is composed of 4 modules, each of which will be approximately two sessions in duration. Learning objectives are to answer these important questions--How confident are you in achieving your project's cost and schedule objectives? What can you do to improve your confidence? Will the right resources be available to implement your responses when needed? Module 1: Develop project plans with resources and costs during uncertain conditions Module 2: Implement spreadsheet quantitative cost risk analysis (Monte Carlo simulation) Module 3: Implement Monte Carlo simulation of plans, CPM schedules, and decision trees Module 4: Integrate cost and schedule risk analysis using Monte Carlo Simulation.

Taught by: Hornbacher

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Course permits for non-DYNM students: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Categories: DE, A; DYNM concentrations: LMC, SD. Course Schedule: 9/10, 17; 10/1, 15, 29; 11/5, 19; 12/3, 17. This course will have a software fee, TBA.

DYNM 689 Balance of Power in the Global New Normal

The economy is global and every successful business in every nation must operate with awareness of its place in the interconnected dynamics of local, national, and global issues. This course uses many lenses, such as history, culture and economy to understand the global issues, their interconnections, and the impact they may have in different places, on different organizations, and in our personal decisions. Each of us needs to be able to engage systems thinking as we aim to understand others from the inside and ourselves from the outside. The ecentral relationship in the global new normal is the United States and China. The weekly readings begin with recognition of the centrality of a liberal for the United States and the effect that has on China and the cultures of East Asia. This sets up three frames of reference: Human Rights, Democracy, and Capitalism. Current and potential Organizational Dynamics students with interest in Global Studies, particularly those focusing on Systems Thinking, (Sustainable) Development Policy, and international courses will find this course helpful. MPhil students with MSOD background can use this course as a foundation for advanced research in Global Studies.

Taught by: Bauer

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Course permits for non-DYNM students: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: F; DYNM Concentrations: LMC, GL, SD

DYNM 691 Small Group Processes

We survive in the work world not by our own devices alone, but through the interaction of individuals working as a group toward common goals. Using a group process format, we will look at how individuals work together, addressing questions such as: What invididual behaviors contribute to the success of groups in accomplishing tasks? What group behaviors are productive and which interfere with the task? Who belongs to the group and who does not? We will examine how people in small groups influence one another through direct, generally face-to-face contacts. Participants will develop and report on projects relevant to their own work or home environment. Readings will include a retrospective on the field of human relations and group dynamics, the social psychology of group process and group dynamics, with specific application to the world or work and complex organizations.

Taught by: Ramsden

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

DYNM 692 Innovation in Organizations

Most serious study of innovation has focused on its dynamics and how these dynamics can be managed. A broader range of studies also consider the nature of creativity and techniques to facilitate innovation. We survey these areas, emphasizing the relationship between innovation and organization, which are central to innovation both as facilitators and impediments. More generally, we consider the process of Organizing Innovation, the role of individuals, teams and organizations in effecting change and realizing its benefits. I cover one additional theme--improvisation--because it provides insight into dealing with novel situations, and also as antidote to the relentless organizational and institutional pressues that crush the "impulsivity" and "deviance" that we need for creativity and innovation. In the end, though, the core of the course are the real issues of your life and work. Creativity begins with questions, innovation begins with problems, and education begins with you. Reflect on the central issues o fyour life and work and ocme prepared to share them with the class. The succe ss of your experience rests on a willingness to explore your core interests and take a leadership role in molding the course to meet them. This course fills the following OrganizationalDynamics requirements: Categories: A Concentrations: LMC, SD

Taught by: Freeman

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For additional information, please see our website at: http://www.organizationaldynamics.upenn.edu

DYNM 693 The Global Leader

The "Global Leader" is a co-listed INTS/DYNM course, developed as part of the Lauder Institute's new Global Program that will prepare students for leadership roles in international and culturally diverse envrionments. The course will focus on deveoping skills through a hands-on approach that includes using case students, in-class exercises, movie clips, and class discussion, with readings that emphasize theory and application. The ocurse is comprised of two modules. The first module - Globally Capable Leadership - will ingtroduce students to the core qualities of leadership that transcend culgtures, as well as examine how cultural context influences leadership efficacy. The second module - Managing Across Borders - will teach students how to negotiate effectively in a variety of contexts, including conflict resultion,k transactional settings, conflict resultion, and across borders, such as those of gender, ethnic identity, national culture, and differences in values and beliefs.

Taught by: Taheripour

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: INTS 693

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For additional information, please see our website at: http://www.organizationaldynamics.upenn.edu

DYNM 705 Capstone Course

This course requires the student to study a topic of their own choice, discuss their progress with the class in regular meetings and to deliver a final paper that meets the following criteria: 1. Makes an argument, describes or summarizes a position that is unique, original, or which directly applies to the student; 2. Uses primary sources or applies to a primary organization as much as possible; 3. Conforms to the style and format of good academic writing and the MSOD Capstone Presentation Guidelines; 4. Allows a student to demonstrate competencies gained from the courses completed in the Organizational Dynamics program. The role of the capstone professors is to coordinate the development of each student's capstone committee, to offer facilitation during peer-review discussion, to discuss the student's work as the capstone is written. A course professor may also be the student's primary advisor or a reader. For details about the capstone course, including delivery dates, please see the DYNM Canvas community site.

Taught by: Barstow and Russo

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: Capstone.

DYNM 720 Foundations of Organizational Consulting and Executive Coaching

This 5.5 day intensive course is the first in a six-course cohort program in Organizational Consulting and Executive Coaching. During this course students will experience the formation of a group (their cohort) and learn the dynamics that commonly affect groups. Students will be taught a variety of theoretical constructs which influence the helping professional role and also start to practice as helping professionals through live coaching and case studies. This course is a residential course. This course will have an additional course fee to cover lodging and other program logistics. Registration permits will be issued upon a signed Travel Agreement being returned to the Organizational Dynamics program office.

Taught by: Bergey/Pennington/Russo

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: This course is for OCEC Cohort members only.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: F; DYNM Concentration: OCEC. Course Schedule: TBA

DYNM 722 Making Meaning from Organizational Experience and Establishing Frameworks for Consulting and Coaching

This course is designed to immediately follow the five-day DYNM 720 intensive in order to build on cohort member experiences by introducing a broad range of coaching and consulting theories. Using newly introduced theories and your own experiences and observations, you will begin applying them to assess, interpret, and make meaning of behavior at three levels: individual, group, and organizational. Using your knowledge and research, you will begin narrowing and deepening theories you are drawn toward to begin laying a foundation for your further work in DYNM 723 and 724. DYNM 722 culminates with each cohort member researching and executing a high-level presentation based on one theoretical approach. You will continue your cohort-based learning with your deeper appreciation of one approach, as well as benefiting from each of your cohort member's presentations.

Taught by: Bergey

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: This course is for OCEC Cohort members only.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: F; DYNM Concentration: OCEC. Course Schedule: TBA

DYNM 723 Consulting and Coaching Process: Knowing Yourself

Participants learn to be coaches by being coaches to one another. Over a two-month period,cohort members expand their repertoire of skills and tools, share their experiences, and together scrutinze the client/coach relationship.

Taught by: Pennington

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: This course is for OCEC cohort members only.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: A; DYNM Concentration: OCEC. Course Schedule: 4/8-9; 5/6-7; 6/3-4

DYNM 724 Building Consulting/Coaching Tools and Techniques

This course will offer a conceptual comprehension of the tools and techniques used in effective internal and external organizational consulting engagements. By contrasting the theory and practice of alternative coaching models, we will build tools and techniques for effective coaching as a leadership competency. Through an analysis of the coaching relationships in your organization, you will learn to develop a personalized approach to coaching and expand upon within organizational settings. Participants learn the "how and why" as well consulting frameworks. Additionally, the relevant and often symbiotic connection between consulting and coaching will be studied. What process toolsare most useful to today's executive coach in a consultative environment? How do approaches to consulting and coaching differ? How are they similar? How can a confluence of coaching and consulting lead to more effective decision making and wide-scale organizational performance? DYNM 724 will be presented over five class meetings. The class sessions will be taught utilizing lectureslectures, case studies, structured small group discussions, individual, and team presentations, faculty and participant experiences, and guest speakers.

Taught by: Russo

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: This course is for OCEC cohort members only. DYNM 614, which teaches the same ccontent, is open to all DYNM students.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: DE; DYNM Concentration: OCEC. Course Schedule: 1/7 8; 2/11 12; 3/11 12

DYNM 725 Interpretation & Problem-Solving & Managing Conflict

Participants explore sources of problems and conflicts, identify the range of choices for resolution, and spend time in the field identifying and resolving conflicts at the personal and team levels.

Taught by: Napier

One-term course offered either term

Corequisite: DYNM726

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For additional information, please see our website at: http://www.organizationaldynamics.upenn.edu

DYNM 726 Expanding Coaching/Consulting Tools and Skills

Competencies are expanded into more complex aspects of team and organizational change. Having experienced the art of design at a micro level, they now examine it as a means of enhancing larger system change. The cohort explores the nature of system change and how it relates to changing teams and individuals.

Taught by: Russo/Napier/Orenstein

Corequisite: DYNM725

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For additional information, please see our website at: http://www.organizationaldynamics.upenn.edu

DYNM 727 Practicum Experience in Consulting and Coaching

Participants integrate everything they have learned by contracting with a client to provide consulting/coaching services. Individual supervision is provided on a weekly basis by a core faculty member and peer supervision is provided in two clinics, where cohort members share their experiences and learning with one another and, at the conclusion of the second clinic, bid the cohort farewell as members are now ready for their internship experiences. This course is open to OCEC students only. This course fills the following Organizational Dynamics requirements: Categories: A Concentrations: OCEC

Taught by: Russo/Napier/Orenstein

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For additional information, please see our website at: http://www.organizationaldynamics.upenn.edu

DYNM 729 Executive Coaching Internship

In this course, each participant is exposed to a variety of executive coaching opportunities designed to enable them to utilize their skills in multiple situations and contexts. Access to an advisor/coach during this period ensures that each participant's advanced learning will be provided in a timely and individualized manner.

Taught by: Bergey/Pennington/Russo

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: A; DYNM Concentration: OCEC

DYNM 730 Capstone Portfolio Preparation and Proposal

In this course, students demonstrate their consulting and coaching mastery and scholarship by creating their capstone/thesis summary proposal. Throughout the program, participants will have systematically codified their learning experiences through the delivery and accumulation of various papers, project results, and other measures of performance. These will be contained in a Personal Portfolio which includes a record of understanding the assigned literature and classroom-based theory and experiences. In addition, each individual's personal coaching philosophy is framed in a theoretical and model developed over the course of the program. Personal reflections and insights are an essential aspect of the ongoing record of learning. Using all of these as source material, the participant writes and assembles a full case history drawn from the Practicum (DYNM 727) and the Internships (DYNM 728 and DYNM 729).

Taught by: Russo/Napier/Orenstein

One-term course offered either term

Corequisite: DYNM729

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For additional information, please see our website at: http://www.organizationaldynamics.upenn.edu

DYNM 753 China in Transition: The Context and Consequences of Economic Reform and Opening to the Outside World

The course will focus on the reforms and international openness that have transformed China during the last quarter century, and their political, social and legal contexts and consequences. Several specific topics will receive detailed attention, including reforms to China's economy (including the creation of a market economy, and changes in enterprise ownership and management and financial institutions), the role of foreign trade and investment and other channels of external influence, rising affluence and inequality, political reform and liveralization, and the development of the legal system. Students will experience contemporary urban China firsthand and see important cultural and historical sites and artifacts, providing a basis for assessing the influence of Chinese traditions and legacies in the People's Republic today. In China, we will meet with foreign and Chinese business people, government officials, academics and others.

Taught by: deLisle

Course usually offered summer term only

Corequisite: DYNM 754

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For additional information, please see our website at: http://www.organizationaldynamics.upenn.edu

DYNM 754 China in Transition: The Context and Consequences of Economic Reform and Opening to the Outside World

The course will focus on the reforms and international openness that have transformed China during the last quarter century, and their political, social and legal contexts and consequences. Several specific topics will receive detailed attention, including reforms to China's economy (including the creation of a market economy, and changes in enterprise ownership and management and financial institutions), the role of foreign trade and investments and other channels of external influence, rising affluence and inequality, political reform and liberalization, and the development of the legal system. Students will experience contemporary urban China firsthand and see important cultural and historical sites and artifacts, providing a basis for assessing the influence of Chinese traditions and legacies in the People's Republic today. In China, we will meet with foreign and Chinese business people, government officials, academics, and others.

Taught by: deLisle

Course usually offered summer term only

Corequisite: DYNM 753

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For additional information, please see our website at: http://www.organizationaldynamics.upenn.edu

DYNM 758 Sweden: Strategies for Thriving in the 21st Century

Neutral during WWII, and claiming a "Middle Way" between east and west in the post-war twentieth century, Sweden - its people, institutions, and culture - has left its mark on our global society. In today's world, the influence of Swedish ideas and innovations can be seen in government structures, health and social policies, business organizations, working life, education, science, art, literature, and, of course, the design and style of many products and services which enjoy high demand. These are impressive impacts from a nation-state of only eight million people. What lessons are there for Americans and our institutions as we enter the twenty-first century where our leadership position, ability to determine the rules and control the agenda of world economic and political affairs are diminished? In this course, we focus on "the people philosophy" of Sweden, its government, businesses and organizations. We cover healthcare issues and policy, sustainable development, the European Community and the human relations issues in organizations. This course will include meetings with academics and leaders from industry, government, health care, science, media, arts and culture. Students will meet with and learn from these representatives in order to explore Swedish organizational dynamics, both in terms of its economic prosperity and the problems Swedish society faces today.

Taught by: Barstow

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For additional information, please see our website at: http://www.organizationaldynamics.upenn.edu

DYNM 766 Global Collaboration for Sustainability: The Food-Water-Energy Nexis in Italy

Environmentalist Paul Hawken challenged a class of 2009 college graduates that they would have to "figure out what it means to be a human being on earth at a time when every living system is declining and at the rate of decline is accelerating." That theme is at the heart of this course. While we have seen the notion of sustainability gaining traction in recent years, our quality of life in the near future very likely hinges on the development and implementation of sustainable solutions to enormously complex environmental and social problems--particularly around food, water, and energy. This course is designed to foster the thinking and the collaborative spirt thatis needed to address those enormous problems. It involves focusing on a critical global sustainability problem with vast social, cultural, and environmental dimensions--in this case, the need to balance global food, water, and energy needs in a manner that allows the world to feed 9.6 billion citizens by 2050 while preserving the environment for future generations. It also involves collaboration and the exchange of ideas between multi-disciplinary leaders from multiple countries and perspectives on how to manage diverse views and sustainability iniviatives that are extremely relevant to the success of today's organizations (i.e., how to lead "big change" for competitive advantage).

Taught by: Finn

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisites: Permits to register for this course will be issued upon receipt of a signed travel agreement.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: This course departs the US 4/28 and returns 5/6.

DYNM 770 Process Excellence in South America: Chile on Its Journey to Productivity and Performance

This course will travel to Chile July 21st through 29th. The class will meet on campus before and after departure on dates to be determined. This course will have an additional course fee to cover lodging and other program logistics. Registration permits will be issued upon a signed Travel Agreement being returned to the Organizational Dynamics program office. Chile is a long and narrow strip of land along the pacific coast of South America. It is the longest country in the world, 2,700 miles in length, which is about the distance from San Francisco to New York. In 1973 the military imposed a dictatorship, led by Augusto Pinochet, who ruled the country until 1990. The Chilean strategy to be part of the world economy has been based on open markets and the development of Free Trade Agreements. A report by The Economist Intelligence Unit shows Chile has the best environment in the region for business and is among the top 20 countries worldwide. Chile stands out for the effectiveness of its policies, labor, and infrastructure. The strength and stability of its banking and financial systems have generated high credibility indexes inforeign markets, which has meant that big companies want to invest in the country, improving access to goods and services. Chilean companies have started improving the way they organize themselves. Business Process Management and Digitalization have become important topics in many organizations. The Universidad de Chile offers numerous courses and certificates in that field. Chile is making good progress on it journey to productivity and performance. Students will meet with academics and business leaders and observe the organizational dynamics of

Taught by: Kirchmer and Olivos

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: A; DYNM Concentrations: LMC, GL, SD. Travel Dates: 7/21-29. Pre-departure class is 7/5 from 1-4 pm.

DYNM 771 Micro-Finance in India: The Past, Present and Future

This 2CU course includes travel and study in Bangalore, Mangalore and Mumbai, India, a country acknowledged as the world's larget democracy with a population of over 1 billion. India has a thriving microfinance industry that has come under scrutiny in the past year. While micro finance has been touted by many as the panacea in helping raise people out of poverty, empower women and aid in development from the grassroots level, it has come with some serious attendant costs. This course will discuss a variety of different models of micro finance and review the new trends of financial inclusion for the poor. We will start in Bangalore and continue to Mangalore, where we will visit local development projects, microfinance women's groups, and meet organizational leaders. We will see firsthand how and if micro finance and financial inclusion "work effectively" to achieve the goals of alleviating poverty. While in Mangalore, students will attend and participate in a conference: Micro Finance in India: The Past, Present and Future, being held at Nitte University. We will hear experts speak on current issues and how new legislation in India may change the face of micro finance. We will end the program in Mumbai, one of the most populous urban regions in the world and the richest city in India with the highest GDP of any city in South, West or Central Asia.

Taught by: Handy

Activity: Lecture

2 Course Units

Notes: For additional information, please see our website at: http://www.organizationaldynamics.upenn.edu

DYNM 786 Multi-Organizational Project Management

In the interconnected world of global corporations, studying Project Management from the standpoint of U.S. firms is not enough. Broadening perspectives is the goal of the seminar in Paris, France. Dr. Jean-Marc Choukroun will lead Organizational Dynamics students in a study of European approaches to the challenges of large project management, particularly those involved in public-private and other multi-group projects. Dr. Choukroun notes that "In today's global economy, managing multi-national, multi-cultural teams, devising innovative financing arrangements and securing public-private cooperation are increasingly becoming standard requirements for complex projects. European integration has made dealing with these issues a priority with many European organizations. Students will be exposed to new ideas, and new ways of applying time-tested methods and techniques that European organizations in general, and more specifically French organizations, have developed to address these issues. Properly adapted, some of these ideas should prove to be readily applicable in the US context. In addition, students will discover how French managers in the public and private sectors frame issues, approach problems and implement solutions."

Taught by: Choukroun

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: DYNM Category: A; DYNM Concentrations: LMC, GL. Travel Course Dates: 5/21 to 5/29.

DYNM 899 MPhil Capstone Course

This course requires the student to study a topic of their own choice, to discuss their progress with the class (in regulare meetings) and to deliver a final paper that meets the following criteria: 1) Makes an argument, describes, or summarizes a position that is unique, original or which directly applies to the student; 2) Uses primary sources or applies to a primary organization as much as possible; 3) Conforms to the style and format of good academic writing and the MPhil Capstone Project presentation standards; 4) Allows a student to demonstrate competencies gained from the courses completed in the Organizational Dynamics program. The role of the MPhil Capstone course professor is to coordinate the development of each student's capstone committee, to offer facilitation during peer-review discussion of student work as the capstone is written, and to post the final grade. The course professor may also be a student's primary advisor or a reader. For details about the MPhil capstone course, including delivery dates, see the MPhil capstone course page.

Taught by: Starr

Activity: Masters Thesis

1 Course Unit

Notes: For additional information, please see our website at: http://www.organizationaldynamics.upenn.edu