East Asian Languages & Civilization (EALC)

EALC 001 Introduction to Chinese Civilization

Survey of the civilization of China from prehistoric times to 1912.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Goldin, Atwood, Smith, Cheng

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 002 Introduction to Japanese Civilization

Survey of the civilization of Japan from prehistoric times to the present.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Fulfills Cross-Cultural Analysis

EALC 003 Introduction to Korean Civilization

This gateway course surveys the history of Korea from early times to the present. We will study the establishment of various sociopolitical orders and their characteristics alongside major cultural developments. Covered topics include: state formation and dissolution; the role of ideology and how it changes; religious beliefs and values; agriculture, commerce, and industry; changing family relations; responses to Western imperialism; and Korea's increasing presence in the modern world as well as its future prospects. Students will also be introduced to various interpretive approaches in the historiography.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Park

Also Offered As: HIST 098

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 007 East Asia: Past and Present

This course surveys the history of East Asia from early times to the present. We will study the establishment of various sociopolitical orders and their characteristics alongside major cultural developments. Covered topics include: state formation and dissolution; the role of ideology and how it changes; religious beliefs and values; agriculture, commerce, and industry; changing family relations; responses to imperialism; and East Asia's growing stature in the modern world as well as future prospect. Although a main focus will be on understanding how the regions we now know as China, Japan, and Korea emerged with their respective identities, the course will also give attention to various groups that are rarely noticed in the contemporary world but nonetheless historically important, such as the Tibetans, Khitans, Jurchens, Mongols, and Manchus.

Taught by: Park

Also Offered As: HIST 005

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 008 East Asian Religions

This course introduces religious traditions in China, Japan, and Taiwan from ancient to contemporary times, with emphases on their sociopolitical contexts, visual and material dimensions, and entanglement with gender, sexuality, and the body. We will examine the history of Confucianism, Daoism, Buddhism, Shinto, as well as the practices, thoughts, and institutions that do not fall squarely into those categories. We will pay attention to the relationship between textual and oral traditions, and that between canons, rituals, and popular practices from both historical and anthropological perspectives.

Taught by: Cheng H

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: RELS 172

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 013 Art and Civilization in East Asia

Survey of the major artistic traditions of East Asia from Neolithic times through the 18th century. Will serve as an introduction to upper level lecture courses that deal with the arts and civilizations of China, Korea, and Japan. Students study and handle objects during weekly session in the Museum.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Taught by: Davis,Steinhardt

Two terms. student may enter either term.

Also Offered As: ARTH 103, VLST 233

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 015 Introduction to Buddhism

This course seeks to introduce students to the diversity of doctrines held and practices performed by Buddhists in Asia. By focusing on how specific beliefs and practices are tied to particular locations and particular times, we will be able to explore in detail the religious institutions, artistic, architectural, and musical traditions, textual production and legal and doctrinal developments of Buddhism over time and within its socio-historical context. Religion is never divorced from its place and its time. Furthermore, by geographically and historically grounding the study of these religions we will be able to examine how their individual ethic, cosmological and soteriological systems effect local history, economics, politics, and material culture. We will concentrate first on the person of the Buddha, his many biographies and how he has been followed and worshipped in a variety of ways from Lhasa, Tibet to Phrae, Thailand. From there we touch on the foundational teachings of the Buddha with an eye to how they have evolved and transformed over time. Finally, we focus on the practice of Buddhist ritual, magic and ethics in monasteries and among aly communities in Asia and even in the West. This section will confront the way Buddhists have thought of issues such as "Just-War," Women's Rights and Abortion. While no one quarter course could provide a detailed presentation of the beliefs and practices of Buddhism, my hope is that we will be able to look closely at certain aspects of these religions by focusing on how they are practiced in places like Nara, Japan or Vietnam, Laos.

Taught by: McDaniel

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: RELS 173, SAST 142

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 034 What is Taoism?

In this course, we will attempt to answer the question, "What is Daoism?" The bulk of the readings will consist of English translations of primary texts that have at one time or another been labeled as "Daoist," in order to sort out the different senses of the term, and consider what common features, if any, are shared by these influential texts. The course begins with the Laozi, the one text affirmed by virtually all "Daoist" traditions as foundational. The readings include several other "Daoist" texts, covering a period of roughly one thousand years, and will conclude with a survey of meditation and longevity techniques, practices which sometimes have no textual basis whatsoever. Drawing on various kinds of "Daoist" sources, we hope to answer the question that serves as the title of this course. No knowledge of Chinese is presumed. Graduate students may not enroll in this course.

Taught by: Goldin

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 041 Late Imperial China

From an Eurasian empire ruled by Mongols to an ethnically defined Han Chinese Ming dynasty, then again to a multi-ethnic empire ruled by a minority group of Manchus, the disruptions and transformations in the very idea of "China" in the past seven centuries defies our modern notion of China as a unitary nation with the world's longest continuous cultural tradition. How to understand the continuities and discontinuities of the last three imperial dynasties of China will be the central focus of our survey. How did these different ethnic groups adjust to each other's way of life? Did complicated cultural interaction prompt different visions of empires? How did the meaning of "Chinese change over this time period? How did international politics shape the fate of Chinese empires? With no assumption of prior knowledge, lectures open with an overview of Chinese society before the eve of the Mongolian invasion, and then trace the changing visions of ethnic and social orders in the subsequent regimes ruled by three different ethnic groups (Mongolian, Han Chinese, and Manchurian). We will examine and compare bureaucratic operations, cultural ideals, domestic and international policies from above as well as the daily life experiences from below. The course will conclude with an analysis of the collapse of the imperial order at the beginning of the twentieth century, after it was severely challenged by a semi-Christian Utopian movement from within and global drug trade imperialist attacks from without.

Taught by: Fei

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HIST 096

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 055 Monsters of Japan

Godzilla! Mothra! Rodan! Totoro! Pikachu! If you know who they are, join us to discover the deeper meanings of monstrosity in Japan. If you don't know who they are, learn the literal, metaphorical, and cinematic implications of these giant (and not so giant) beasts. Watch Tokyo go down in flames, and discuss what that means for New York and Philadelphia! Explore the history, literature, and films of Japanese monsters in this undergraduate seminar.

Taught by: Chance, F

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: CIMS 055

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 064 Sushi & Ramen: Making Japanese Food Global

Who defines Japanese food? Is it the chef at a top establishment in Tokyo, a home cook in Osaka, a tea master in Kyoto, the ancient capital? Or is it the midwestern American who thinks sushi means raw fish? Is it the person who scarfs cup noodles, or the devotee of artisan ramen stock? Perhaps it is the Japanese government, which in 2006 sent undercover agents abroad to guard against inferior Japanese food outlets. In this class we will consider how Japanese food came to be defined in distinction to Western and Chinese foods beginning in the nineteenth century, and how Japanese food became a global cuisine. Among our questions: What makes a dish Japanese? How did Portuguese or Spanish frying habits (tempura) and Chinese lamian (ramen) become hallmarks? How traditional is the diet of rice and fish, and in what ways does it interact with the environment? How did Buddhist vegetarians justify sukiyaki? What relationship does food have to the longevity of Japanese today? How does gender affect Japanese food cultures? What are the origins of Iron Chef and bento? We will survey the Philadelphia Japanese food scene and learn to make our own sushi. Some controversies we will discuss include the consumption of whale meat in Japan. We will also investigate Japanese government controls of food to combat obesity and to make food safe. after the Fukushima nuclear catastrophe. Materials include essays, films, novellas, menus, and cookbooks.

Taught by: Chance, L.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Freshmen Seminar

EALC 069 Japanese Popular Culture

Today, Japanese manga, anime, J-pop, and film have a global audience. But these exports can only be truly understood in light of longstanding domestic anxieties about sex, violence, gender, and "the kids these days." More recent concerns about the country's declining birthrate, weakening geopolitical position, and vulnerability to natural and anthropogenic disaster also deeply influence Japanese media products. This course explores some of these anxieties through critical examinations of manga, anime, video games, television, music, and fashion in Japan. Film screenings include work by directors Kon Satoshi, Otomo Katsuhiro, Takahata Isao, Miyazaki Hayao; Itami Juzo, and Takita Yojiro; manga excerpts include work by Tezuka Osamu, Urasawa Naoki, and Yazawa Ai. Secondary readings include scholarship in anthropology, history, sociology, literature, film studies and religious studies.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 071 Modern Japanese History

This course will survey the major political, economic, social and intellectual trends in the making of modern Japan. Special emphasis will be given to the turbulent relationship between state and society from 1800 to the present.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Dickinson

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: HIST 091

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 086 KOREAN POPULAR CULTURE

"Korean Wave" (Hallyu) is currently raging throughout non-Western parts of the world, especially Asia, and may be making its way to the West. From South Korean tele-dramas and K-pop music to their respective celebrity icons, these popular cultural forms from Korea are increasingly becoming part of the everyday landscape and vocabulary. We will attempt to understand and evaluate this cultural phenomenon-its promises and limitations as well as its popularity and backlash against it. More specifically, this course explores the ways in which television, music, manhwa (comic books), and the internet participate in the transnational production and circulation of culture, modernity, tradition, ideology, and politics. Some of the more specific topics covered may include: Korean emotions and melodramas; imitation versus innovation in K-pop; fictions of history in period dramas; the marketing of new masculinity; revival of folk culture; preservation of traditional values in postmodern times; repatriation of Korean American pop stars to Korea; and youth culture. Requires outside viewing and listening.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 104 Introduction to Inner Asian Civilizations

This course examines the interplay between politics and economics in East Asia. A major course objective is to reconcile the regions past success with the difficulties experience in many of these countries more recently. Another primary objective is to consider in what ways and to what degree the growth experiences of the high-performing economies in East Asia shed light on the prospects for long-term success of reforms currently underway in China.

Taught by: Atwood

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 504

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 105 East Asian Diplomacy

This course will survey the history of relations among the great powers in East Asia from the sixteenth century to the present. Special emphasis will be given to regional and global developments from the perspective of the three principal East Asian states-China, Japan, and Korea. We will explore the many informal, as well as formal, means of diplomacy in East Asia over the past 400 plus years.

Taught by: Dickinson

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: EALC 505, HIST 395

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

EALC 108 Sports in East Asia

This course will examine sports in East Asia from the nineteenth century to the present. Recently, East Asia plays an important role in transforming the global geopolitics of sport. The post-war East Asian Olympic Games-1964 Tokyo Olympics, 1972 Sapporo Winter Olympics, 1988 Seoul Olympics, 1998 Nagano Winter Olympics, and 2008 Beijing Olympics-and the 2002 FIFA World Cup Korea/Japan illustrate the fact that a new global sports order led by East Asia has emerged. East Asia nations will play hosts to other major sporting events, including the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympics, 2020 Tokyo Olympics, and 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics. Chinese, Japanese, and Korean athletes have been highly active in MLB, NBA, English Premier League, and LPGA. The popularity of the various martial arts proves that East Asian sports seem to be everywhere these days. This class will focus on helping students understand how sports have affected and transformed East Asia exploring various issues: imperialism, colonialism, race, class, gender, foreign policy, nationalism, religion, economics, industrialization, tourism, and urbanization. Course contents include lecture, discussions, secondary readings, primary source readings, documentaries, and films.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 508

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 115 Buddhist Arts of East Asia: Sources, Iconography and Styles

Survey of art and architecture created for Buddhist religious purposes in China, Japan, and to a lesser extent Korea, Tibet, and Central Asia. The course will include a brief overview of Buddhist monuments in South Asia, study of the iconography of Buddhist images in graphic and sculptural media, and analysis of a variety of Buddhist styles in painting, sculpture, and architecture.

Taught by: Chance, F

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 515, RELS 175

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 116 East Asian Gardens

Explore the beauty of gardens (and associated buildings) in Japan, China, and Korea from ancient times to the present. Lectures will be illustrated by photographs from dozens of sites in East Asia, and by a field trip to the Japanese House and Garden in Fairmount Park. The main body of the course will be a historical survey of the evolution of East Asian garden art forms from the sixth century to the present. Discussion will touch on geographic and climatic parameters, spiritual and aesthetic principles, practical limitations and creative innovations of East Asian gardens. There will be an additional fee for the Japanese House visit, and possibly for other field trips.

Taught by: Chance, F

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 516

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 118 Gender and Sexuality in Asia

This introductory course will deal with issues such as stereotypes of Asian women and men, cultural construction of femininity and masculinity, international and sexual division of labor, traffic in women in the sex industries, representation of gender and sexuality in academic scholarship as well as literary texts and popular culture, local and global activism for the rights of women and sexual minorities.

Taught by: Kano

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 518

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 119 East Asian Ceramics

History of ceramic forms, techniques, and aesthetic principles in China, Korea, and Japan from neolithic times to the present century, illustrated by slides and examples, augmented by readings, field trips, and student presentations. Aimed at students with general interest in Japan and/or ceramics history; particularly but not exclusively those majoring in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, East Asian Area Studies or History of Art; also art majors interested in ceramics.

Taught by: Chance, F

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 519

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 121 Chinese Poetry & Prose: In translation

A wide variety of poetic & prose genres from the earliest times to the 19th century is introduced through English translation. A few selections will also be studied in Chinese characters with romanized transcriptions. There are no prerequisites for this course.

Taught by: Mair

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: EALC 521

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 122 Chinese Fiction and Drama in Translation

This course explores Romance of Three Kingdoms the most popular classical novel in East Asia and an important source for understanding Chinese culture, politics, history, and military strategy. We propose to read this work not only as a textbook of Chinese literature but also as a guidebook for career development and risk assessment. Why didn t Pangtong have a career as successful as Zhuge Liang? Why did Ma Su volunteer in a project that he is not good at? If Cao Cao, Liu Bei, Sun Quan run for presidency in the U.S., who would you vote for and why? In addition to Romance of Three Kingdoms, this course introduces other classical Chinese fictions such as Dream of the Red Chamber and Strange Tales from a Chinese Studio, as well as literary criticism such as On the Standard of Literature (Dian lun), Essays on Literature (Wen lun), and The Literary Mind and the Carving of Dragons.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Taught by: Mair

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: EALC 522

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 125 Cultural Chinas: 20th Century Chinese Literature and Film

This course serves as a thematic introduction to modern Chinese literature and cinema in mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and transnational Chinese communities in the twentieth century. By discussing a wide range of key literary and filmic texts, this class looks into major issues and discourses in China's century of modernization: enlightenment and revolution, politics and aesthetics, sentimental education and nationalism, historical trauma and violence, gender and sexuality, social hygiene and body politics, diaspora and displacement, youth sub-culture and urban imagination.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: CIMS 220, EALC 525

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 127 The Arts of China

A broad survey of Chinese architecture, sculpture, and painting from the Neolithic age through the nineteenth century. Topics include excavated material from China's Bronze Age, Chinese funerary arts, Buddhist caves and sculpture (including works in the University Museum), the Chinese city, the Chinese garden, and major masterpieces of Chinese painting.

Taught by: Steinhardt

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ARTH 214, ARTH 614, EALC 527

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Graduate students may take this course as EALC 527 and should see the instructor to discuss additional requirements for graduate credit.

EALC 129 Critical Theory China

Also Offered As: EALC 529

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 131 Introduction to Classical Chinese Thought

This course is intended as an introduction to the foundational thinkers of Chinese civilization, who flourished from the fifth to the second centuries B.C. No knowledge of Chinese is presumed, and there are no prerequisites, although EALC 001 (Introduction to Chinese Civilization) is recommended. Graduate students may take this course as EALC 531 and should see the instructor to discuss requirements for graduate credit. (Undergraduates must enroll in the courses as EALC 131.)

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Goldin

Course offered spring; odd-numbered years

Also Offered As: EALC 531

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 139 Religion in Modern China

This course focuses on the history and role of religion in the Chinese cultural sphere (Mainland China, Taiwan, and the Diaspora) from the mid-19th century to the present day, focusing on the relationship between religious institutions and the state during the imperial, republican, and communist regimes. We will learn about the impact of religious ideas, practices, and organizations on social, political and economic processes and inspect the role of religion in the consolidation of individual, communal, and national identity. Adopting a comparative and interdisciplinary approach, we will attempt to ascertain the impact of the various Chinese religious traditions: Confucianism, Daoism, Buddhism, and popular sects, as well as global religions such as Islam and Christianity, on the internal sociopolitical structure of the Chinese state and their role in shaping power relations on a transregional, national, and local level. Special emphasis will be given to the role and use of the grand narratives of secularism and modernity in the shaping of the Chinese nation-state, as well as the value of using these frameworks in the study of modern China. The class is discussion based, supplemented by lectures, student presentations, and documentary films. No knowledge of Chinese is presumed. All readings will be in English.

Taught by: Tavor

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 539, RELS 139

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 151 Contemporary Fiction & Film in Japan

This course will explore fiction and film in contemporary Japan, from 1945 to the present. Topics will include literary and cinematic representation of Japan s war experience and post-war reconstruction, negotiation with Japanese classics, confrontation with the state, and changing ideas of gender and sexuality. We will explore these and other questions by analyzing texts of various genres, including film and film scripts, novels, short stories, manga, and academic essays. Class sessions will combine lectures, discussion, audio-visual materials, and creative as well as analytical writing exercises. The course is taught in English, although Japanese materials will be made available upon request. No prior coursework in Japanese literature, culture, or film is required or expected; additional secondary materials will be available for students taking the course at the 600 level. Writers and film directors examined may include: Kawabata Yasunari, Hayashi Fumiko, Abe Kobo, Mishima Yukio, Oe Kenzaburo, Yoshimoto Banana, Ozu Yasujiro, Naruse Mikio, Kurosawa Akira, Imamura Shohei, Koreeda Hirokazu, and Beat Takeshi.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Taught by: Kano

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CIMS 151, COML 256, EALC 551, GSWS 257

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Fulfills Cross-Cultural Analysis

EALC 152 Love and Loss in Japanese Literary Traditions: In Translation

How do people make sense of the multiple experiences that the simple words "love" and "loss" imply? How do they express their thoughts and feelings to one another? In this course, we will explore some means Japanese culture has found to grapple with these events and sensations. We will also see how these culturally sanctioned frameworks have shaped the ways Japanese view love and loss. Our materials will sample the literary tradition of Japan from earliest times to the early modern and even modern periods. Close readings of a diverse group of texts, including poetry, narrative, theater, and the related arts of calligraphy, painting, and music will structure our inquiry. The class will take an expedition to nearby Woodlands Cemetery to experience poetry in nature. By the end of the course, you should be able to appreciate texts that differ slightly in their value systems, linguistic expressions, and aesthetic sensibilities from those that you may already know. Among the available project work that you may select, if you have basic Japanese, is learning to read a literary manga. All shared class material is in English translation.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Taught by: Chance

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: EALC 552

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 153 Loyal Warriors in Japanese Literature

From the earliest literature to the latest think piece on Japanese society, the roles of the "warrior" and of "loyalty" in Japanese culture have fascinated those both inside and outside of Japan. In this course we will trace the development of paragons of loyalty and warrior prowess from the earliest literary works, through the epic Tales of the Heike, and on to the "Treasury of Loyal Retainers," theater, and film. We will read in the philosophy of fidelity and samurai codes to track the growing dedication to ideals of loyalty, exploring evidence of behavior less than loyal as we seek the real influence of these notions. Related topics include the extremes of vengeance and fanaticism.

Taught by: Chance

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 553

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 155 Modern Japanese Literature

This course surveys Japanese literature (novels, short stories, poetry, drama, essays) from 1868 to World War II. The purpose is not only to read some of the most important and interesting literary texts of this period, but also to reflect on the ways we read and study literature, and how we draw connections between literature, self, and society. The reading material will be entirely in English.

Taught by: Kano

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 555

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 157 Arts of Japan

This course introduces the major artistic traditions of Japan, from the Neolithic period to the present, and teaches the fundamental methods of the discipline of art history. Special attention will be given to the places of Shinto, the impact of Buddhism, and their related architectures and sculptures; the principles of narrative illustration; the changing roles of aristocratic, monastic, shogunal and merchant patronage; the formation of the concept of the artist over time; and the transformation of tradition in the modern age.

Taught by: Davis

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 213, ARTH 613, EALC 557

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Graduate students may take this course as EALC 557 and should see the instructor to discuss additional requirements for graduate credit.

EALC 160 Introduction to Japanese Thought

This class integrates the Japanese archaeological artifacts (ca, 240 items) and drawings (ca. 16 sheets) that were given to the Penn Museum at the World's Columbian Exposition of 1893 as a gift from the Tokyo National Museum/Meiji Government. In this course, as students learn the basic knowledge on Japanese archaeology, they participate in the basic background research on the exposition objects. Students are then to choose his/her research topic based on this collection, and their projects and resulting research papers will be presented possibly on a newly-established website. Through their individual research projects using this collection, students will learn how to handle the archaeological artifacts, investigate the relevant data in the Penn Museum archives, and acquire the basic curatorial knowledge and skills for dating, classifying, specifying the provenience of the objects.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: EALC 560

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 162 CITY & CITIZENSHIP/JAPAN

Taught by: Spafford

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: EALC 562

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 166 Gender and Sexuality in Japan

This seminar deals with issues such as the cultural and historical constructions of femininity and masculinity; gendered division of education and labor; representation of gender and sexuality in literature, theater, and popular culture; and forms of activism for the rights of women and sexual minorities. This course will use films, videos, and manga, as well as readings from anthropological, historical, literary, and theoretical texts. All readings will be in English, but Japanese materials will be available to those interested.

Taught by: Kano

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 566, GSWS 186, GSWS 586

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 170 Japanese Archaeology in the Penn Museum

Taught by: Nishimura

Also Offered As: ANTH 170, ANTH 570, EALC 570

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 173 Family Feuds

Taught by: Spafford

Also Offered As: EALC 573

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 176 Japan: The Age of the Samurai

Who (or what) where the samurai? What does it mean to say that Japan had an "Age of the Samurai"? In popular imagination, pre-modern Japan has long been associated with its hereditary warrior class. Countless movies have explored the character and martial prowess of these men. Yet warriors constituted but a tiny portion of the societies they inhabited and ruled, and historians researching medieval Japan have turned their attentions to a great range of subjects and to other classes (elite and commoner alike). This class is designed to acquaint students with the complex and diverse centuries that have been called the "Age of the Samurai"-roughly, the years between ca. 1110 and 1850. In the course of the semester, we will explore the central themes in the historiography of warrior society, while introducing some of the defining texts that have shaped our imagination of this age (from laws to epic poems, from codes of conduct to autobiographies).

Taught by: Spafford

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HIST 276

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 183 Readings in Korean History

Topic varies year to year for this seminar.

Also Offered As: EALC 583

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 184 Two Koreas: The Politics of Division

In today's world, the inter-Korean border or DMZ (demilitarized zone) is widely regarded as one of the most impermeable and conflictual frontiers. The purpose of this course is to explore the dynamics of its formation between, and impact within, the two Koreas. The course therefore proposes to analyze how the division of the Korean peninsula not only came into being but also how it has shaped the socio-political trajectories of both the North and the South since 1945. The course also aims at introducing students to conceptual frameworks and comparative debates relevant to understanding the Korean case(s) from a social science perspective.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: EALC 584

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 192 Arts of Korea

The goal of this course is understanding the development of visual, performing, and literary arts in Korea and the historical, religious, and social contexts in which they flourished. It serves as an introduction to the arts of Korea, with emphasis on painting, sculpture, ceramics, and architecture and additional consideration of dance, drama, poetry, and culinary arts. Covers the whole history of Korea, from prehistoric times to the twenty-first century.

Taught by: Chance, F

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: EALC 592

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 206 Gender and Sexuality in East Asia

The course will be a collaborative investigation of some of the most important issues concerning gender and sexuality in East Asia. The region has in common the legacies of Buddhism and Confucianism, as well as a process of rapid modernization and industrialization in the last couple of centuries. They are also bound to each other through cultural ties, colonial experiences, and international trade. The course assumes that when talking about gender and sexuality, confining our perspective to one nation-state often makes little sense. Many issues must be considered within the contexts of historical, cultural, political, and economic exchange. We must also take account of our own location in a classroom in the United States, and question the ways in which our knowledge about the lives of women and men in East Asia is constructed, enabled and constrained. To this end, the course will encourage us to be critical readers of various sources of information: historical materials, scholarly essays, contemporary journalism, fiction, and film.

Taught by: Kano

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 606, GSWS 207, GSWS 607

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 211 Life and Death in Han China

Using maps, city-panning, architecture, wall painting, sculpture, and minor arts as evidence, the course will examine the attitudes toward life and death in Han (206 BCE-AD 220) China.

Taught by: Steinhardt

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: EALC 611

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 216 Chinese Art Under the Mongols

The Yuan Dynasty (1257-1368), the period of Mongolilan rule, was the only time in Chinese history when China was part of a larger empire that spanned the Asian continent. Using architecture, sculpture, painting, and excavated evidence, this course examines the unique results of an international Asian world centered in China.

Taught by: Steinhardt

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 616

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 221 First Year Classical Chinese

Introduction to the classical written language, beginning with Shadick, First Course in Literary Chinese. Students with a background in Japanese, Korean, Cantonese, Taiwanese, and other East Asian languages are welcome; it is not necessary to know Mandarin. The course begins from scratch, and swiftly but rigorously develops the ability to read a wide variety of classical and semi-classical styles. Original texts from the 6th century BC to the 20th century AD are studied. This course is taught in English and there are no prerequisites.

Taught by: Mair

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: CHIN 491, EALC 621

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 222 1st Year Classical Chin II

Continuation of CHIN491 EALC221/621, which is the only prerequisite for this course. Upon completion of Shadick, readings in a wide selection of texts with Chinese commentaries may be taken up. These readings are in part chosen to reflect student interest. This is the second half of a year-long course. Those who enroll must take both semesters.

Taught by: Mair

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: CHIN 492, EALC 622

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 223 Language, Script and Society in China

The Chinese writing system is the only major surviving script in the world that is partially picto-ideographic, Egyptian hieroglyphic and Sumero-Akkadian cuneiform having passed out of use about two millennia ago. Partly because it is so unique, a tremendous number of myths have grown up around the Chinese script. In an attempt to understand how they really function, this seminar will examine the nature of the sinographs and their relationship to spoken Sinitic languages, as well as their implications for society and culture. We will also discuss the artistic and technological aspects of the Chinese characters and the ongoing efforts to reform and simplify them. The use of sinographs in other East Asian countries than China will be taken into account. There are no prerequisites for this class.

Taught by: Mair

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 623

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 225 Topics in Chinese Cinema

This course is an introduction to Chinese cinema in mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong, with emphasis on the way it represents or negotiates notions of China and Chineseness, as well as national and cultural identity. We will examine Chinese cinematic traditions in light of significant topics such as: the foundation of Chinese cinema and the rise of nationalism; film's relationship to literary and popular cultural discourses; the pursuit of modernization; aesthetic responses to political and historical upheavals and transformations; the aesthetics of revolution, diaspora and transnationalism; visualized sexualities, violence, and youth subculture; collective desires to imagine and reinvent the cultural past; the politics of memory, mourning and amnesia, among others.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: CIMS 205, EALC 625

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 226 East Asian Funerary Arts

Study of tombs and tomb decoration of emperors and officials in China, Korea, and Japan from the pre-Buddhist era through the 19th century.

Taught by: Steinhardt

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: EALC 626

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 227 Chinese Painting

Study of Chinese painting and practice from the earliest pictorial representation through the late twentieth century. Painting styles are analyzed, but themes such as landscape and narrative are considered with regard to larger social, cultural, and historical issues. The class will pay particular attention to the construction of the concepts of the "artist" and "art criticism" and their impact on the field into the present. Visits to study paintings at the University of Pennsylvania Museum and Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Taught by: Steinhardt

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ARTH 217, EALC 627

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 228 Chinese Wall Painting

Survey of mural painting in temples and tombs from the earliest examples in the last BCE centuries through the Ming dynasty. The course examines paintings that have been uncovered in the last few years, as well as famous examples in China and in North American museums.

Taught by: Steinhardt

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 628

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 229 Chinese Architecture

Survey of Chinese buildings and building technology from the formative period in the second millennium B.C. through the twentieth century. The course will deal with well-known monuments such as the Buddhist monasteries of Wutai, imperial palaces in Chang'an and Beijing, the Ming tombs and the Temple of Heaven, and less frequently studied buildings. Also covered will be the theory and principles of Chinese construction.

Taught by: Steinhardt

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ARCH 716, EALC 629

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Graduate-level option requires a 20-page paper and permission of the instructor

EALC 230 Gender and Religion in China

This course examines gender in Chinese religious culture from ancient to contemporary times. We will explore topics including the Buddhist accommodation of Chinese family system, Chinese transformation of the bodhisattva Guanyin, female deities in Daoist and popular religious pantheons, writings about religious women, female ghosts and fox spirits in literary imagination and folk tales, and the significance of yin force in Chinese medicine and Daoist alchemy. Through the case of China, we will look at how gender plays critical and constitutive roles in religious traditions, and how religion can be used both to reinforce and to challenge gender norms.

Taught by: Cheng, H

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 630, GSWS 234, GSWS 630, RELS 237, RELS 630

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 232 Cultural Memory in Contemporary China

How is memory constructed and represented? What does society remember and/or forget? How and under what circumstances? How is it possible and/or impossible to bear witness? This course will examine notions of individual and collective memories, trauma, catastrophe, historical violence, post-socialist nostalgia, and amnesia, and explore the possibilities and impossibilities of remembering and forgetting in various forms of representation and cultural production in contemporary Chinese-speaking communities.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 632

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 233 CHINESE AESTHETICS

Mummies of the Silk Road. This course takes advantage of, and is premised upon, the unique opportunity afforded by the extraordinary exhibition entitled "Secrets of the Silk Road," which is being shown at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology from February 5-June 5, 2010. The exhibition is comprised of more than a hundred objects, including two mummies (roughly 1800 BC and 800 BC) and the magnificent trappings of a third (early 5th century AD). Among the artifacts are attractive foodstuffs, splendid textiles, finely made shoes, unusual headgear, beautiful jewelry, evocative statues and figurines, mysterious mortuary accessories, manuscripts in a variety of languages and scripts, Sasanian coins, fine paintings, and much else besides, all of these materials come from the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (XUAR) of the People's Republic of China, which geographically may be referred to as Eastern Central Asia (ECA) and ethnically as Uyghurstan or East Turkestan. We will study each of the items for the exhibition in depth and will also reference other related mummies (actually naturally desiccated corpses) and materials from the museums and archaeological institutes of the XUAR. In the process of doing so, we will familiarize ourselves with the inhabitants, languages, places, and history of the region. Moreover, it is the aim of the course to situate ECA within the context of the whole of Eurasia. Our discussions will touch upon ancient and modern DNA, blood types, physical anthropology, bronze technology, the spread of agriculture and oasis technology, the utilization of the horse and other domesticated animals, wheeled vehicles, textiles, climate, geography, and all other aspects of the region that are relevant to life there during the Bronze Age, Iron Age, and medieval period.

Taught by: Goldin

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 633

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 234 Daoist Traditions

This course examines the history of various intellectual and religious traditions that came to be known as Daoist (or Taoist in the Wade-Giles Romanization). We will begin with a critical review of the twentieth-century reinvention of Daoism and the new classification of religious versus philosophical Daoism, before tracing chronologically the textual, institutional, and social history of Daoist traditions from the fourth century B.C.E. While familiarizing students with the key concepts, practices, and organizations developed in the history of Daoism, this class emphasizes the specific socio-political context of each of them. Throughout the course, we will think critically about the labeling of Daoist (as well as Confucian and Buddhist) in Chinese history and in modern scholarship. We will also question modern demarcations between philosophy, religion, and science, as well as that between the spiritual and the physical.

Taught by: Cheng

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 634, RELS 233, RELS 634

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 239 Sex and Society in Ancient China

Ancient Chinese writers considered sexual activity to be an essential component of humanity, and the study of human sexuality to be essential to the study of human history. Sexuality constituted a fundamental source of imagery and categories that informed the classical Chinese conception of social, political, and military relationships. This course will survey the major sources dealing with sex and society in ancient China. There are no prerequisites, and no knowledge of Chinese is presumed.

Taught by: Goldin

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 639

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 240 Early Chinese History

This seminar covers the span of Chinese history from the Bronze Age to the end of the Han dynasty in A.D. 220. No knowledge of Chinese is presumed, but EALC 001 (Introduction to Chinese Civilization) is a prerequisite. Graduate students who wish to enroll should meet with the instructor to discuss additional requirements for graduate credit.

Taught by: Goldin

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: EALC 640

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 241 Law in Pre-Modern China

This course, intended for graduate students and advanced undergraduates, offers a survey of the sources and research problems of pre-modern Chinese law. For reasons to be examined in the course, traditional Sinological education has neglected law as a legitimate field of inquiry; consequently, the secondary literature is surprisingly meager. Our readings will take us from the Warring States Period to the Qing dynasty--an interval of over two millennia--and will cover several varieties of legal documents, including statutes, handbooks, court records, and theoretical treatises. All the readings will be in English, and no knowledge of Chinese is presumed. Graduate students should see the instructor to discuss requirement for graduate credit.

Taught by: Goldin

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 641

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 242 Medicine and Healing in China

This course explores Chinese medicine and healing culture, its diversity, and its change over time. We will discuss topics including the establishment of canonical medicine, Daoist approaches to healing and longevity, diverse views of the body and disease, the emergence of treatments for women, medical construction of sex difference and imagination of female sexuality, the thriving and decline of female healers, the identity of scholar physicians, the transmission of medical knowledge, domestic and cross-regional drug market, healer-patient relations, and new visions of traditional Chinese medicine in modern China.

Taught by: Cheng,H

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 642

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 243 PASTORALISM & MOBILITY

Taught by: Atwood

Also Offered As: EALC 643

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 251 Readings in Classical Japanese I

Readings in classical texts drawn from the Heian, Kamakura, Muromachi, and Edo periods. Introduction to the different styles of classical Japanese, and to classical Japanese as a whole.

For BA Students: Advanced Language Course

Taught by: Chance

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: EALC 651, JPAN 491

Prerequisite: JPAN 212 or equivalent

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 252 Readings in Classical Japanese II

Readings in classical texts drawn from the Heian, Kamakura, Muromachi, and Edo periods. Introduction to the different styles of classical Japanese, and to classical Japanese as a whole.

Taught by: Chance, L

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: EALC 652, JPAN 492

Prerequisite: JPAN 212

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 253 The Politics of Shinto

Shinto-derived images and ideas frequently appear in Japanese anime and film, and journalists and academics frequently mobilize the term Shinto as a way of explaining Japan s past or envisioning its future. The environmentalist left champions a green Shinto while Shinto-derived ideas serve as red meat for politicians pandering to Japan s nationalist right. While the influential position Shinto occupies in Japanese sociopolitical life is therefore clear, the term Shinto itself is actually not. Depending on who one asks, Shinto is either the venerable indigenous religion of the Japanese archipelago, the irreducible core of Japanese culture, a tiny subset of Japanese Buddhism, an oppressive political ideology linked to the emperor system, an environmentalist ethic, or some combination of these. This course investigates the multifarious types of Shinto envisioned by these competing interest groups.

Taught by: Thomas,J

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 653

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 254 War and Literature in Japan: Tales of the Heike

Our subject is Tale of the Heike, a multifaceted narrative of the twelfth-century battles that brought the Taira clan down and led to the establishment of Japan's first military government. We will read the Heike tales with an eye toward how they fictionalize history and idealize certain types, most notably loyal women and warriors; the development of the warrior tale genre; central aspects of the Japanese ethos; and later works of literature based on episodes and characters from the Tale of the Heike. All material is in English translation. (Students of Japanese language may learn to read a famous section in the original.) There are no pre-requisites.

Taught by: Chance, L

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: EALC 654

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 255 Japanese Theater

Japan has one of the richest and most varied theatrical traditions in the world. In this course, we will examine Japanese theater in historical and comparative contexts. The readings and discussions will cover all areas of the theatrical experience (script, acting, stage design, costumes, music, and audience). Audio-visual material will be used whenever appropriate and possible. The class will be conducted in English, with all English materials.

Taught by: Kano

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: COML 385, EALC 655, FOLK 485, GSWS 254, THAR 485

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 256 The Tale of Genji

"Crowning masterpiece of Japanese literature," "the world's first novel," "fountainhead of Japanese literary and aesthetic culture," "a great soap opera in the vein of Jacqueline Susann." Readers over the centuries have praised the Tale of Genji, the monumental prose tale finished just after the year 1000, in a variety of ways. In this course we will read the latest English translation of Murasaki Shikibu's work. We will watch as Genji loses his mother at a tender age, is cast out of the royal family, and begins a quest to fill the void she left. Along the way, Genji's loyalty to all the women he encounters forges his reputation as the ideal lover. We will consider gender issues in the female author's portrayal of this rake, and question the changing audience, from bored court women to censorious monks, from adoring nationalists to comic book adaptors. Study of the tale requires consideration of poetry, imagery, costume, music, history, religion, theater, political and material culture, all of which will be components of the course. We will also trace the effect of the tale's many motifs, from flora and fauna to murderously jealous spirits, on later literature and conceptions of human emotions. All material is in English translation. There are no prerequisites.

Taught by: Chance, L.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: EALC 656

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 258 Japanese Architecture

An introduction to the visual, aesthetic, historical, religious, philosophical, and symbolic aspects of Japanese structures from earliest times to the mid-19th century. Through a discussion of shrines, temples, palaces, tombs, cities, and gardens the student will explore what makes Japanese architecture distinctive and how the traditions of Japanese architecture evolve over time.

Taught by: Steinhardt

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARCH 718, EALC 658

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 259 Gender and Sexuality in Japan

If you have ever wondered about the following questions, then this is the right course for you: Is Japan a hyper-feminine nation of smiling geisha and obedient wives? Is it a hyper-masculine nation of samurai and economic warriors? Is it true that Japanese wives control the household? Is it true that Japanese men suffer from over-dependence on their mothers? What do young Japanese women and young men worry about? What does the government think about the future of Japanese women and men? Assuming that expressions of gender and sexuality are deeply influenced by cultural and social factors, and that they also show profound differences regionally and historically, this course examines a variety of texts--historical, biographical, autobiographical, fictional, non-fictional, visual, cinematic, analytical, theoretical--in order to better understand the complexity of any attempts to answer the above questions.

Taught by: Kano

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 659, GSWS 259

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 260 History of the Book in East Asia

History of the Book in East Asia

Taught by: Chance L,Davis J

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 661

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 263 Topics in Japanese Thought

Course focuses on a few selected topics for close attention. Past topics have included the examination of certain current social and ethical questions-- for instance those having to do with organ transplantation, abortion, suicide, euthanasia, political corruption, and "openness" as a society. Readings will be on contemporary questions but include some pre-modern materials that influence the discussion.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 663

Prerequisite: EALC 002 is recommended

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 264 Bandits, Pirates and Peasants: Lawlessness and Violence in Pre-Modern Japan

This course will be an exploration of premodern Japanese history through the lens of violence. The centuries under consideration (roughly, the eighth thought nineteenth) were characterized by greatly varying levels of violence, both of the state-sanctioned variety (war, punishments for law-breakers and political losers) and of the non-sanctioned variety (piracy, banditry, warrior and peasant rebellions). Examining a wide variety of translated sources, from diaries to chronicles, from legal codes to fiction, we shall examine the changing social, political, economic, and cultural contexts of violence, in order to interrogate not only why certain periods were remarkably peaceful while others were not, but also why violence took different forms in relation to different circumstances. We shall consider how contempories made sense of the violence that surrounded them (or didn't) and how they divided the acceptable use of force from the wanton and society-threatening abuse of it. The course will feature presentations and severl (very short) papers.

Taught by: Spafford, D.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 664

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 269 Japanese Buddhism

An introduction to the history and cultural role of Buddhism in Japan. Emphasis is on Buddhism as a component in the religious, intellectual, and cultural life of the Japanese, especially in poetry and the visual arts. Includes a short review of prior Buddhism in India and China.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: EALC 669

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 270 Shamans to Shoguns

This course tackles about a millennium of pre-modern Japanese political, social, and cultural history (roughly, 700-1700). Instead of attempting to cover the period chronologically, as an introductory survey might, this class is structured as a series of case studies. Each of these will take a primary source as its point of departure and explore one or more facets of Japanese history and writing. In the course of each case study, lectures and discussions will branch out from the main source to examine its historical context as well as the (political, cultural, textual) traditions that informed that source s composition. In general, students will read the entire texts of the main sources (or significant portions of them), along with scholarly articles and shorter excerpts from other sources, composed at the same time or in the same vein/genre. During lectures and discussions alike, students will be asked to engage the readings, so as to grasp the specifics of Japanese history and practice the analytical skills required of historical discourse.

Taught by: Spafford, D.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 670, HIST 277

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 291 Archaeology of Central Asia

A site by site investigation of Buddhist and non-Buddhist ruins in Central Asia. Included are Nisa, Khwarezm, Pyandzhikent, Khalchayan, Ay-Khanum, Bamiyan, Miran, Tumshuk, Kizil, Kucha, Khotan, Adzhina-Tepe, Khocho, Khara-Khoto, and Bezeklik.

Taught by: Steinhardt

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: EALC 691

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 301 Major Seminar on China

This is a seminar required for all Chinese majors in the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilization. Topic varies year to year.

Taught by: Mair

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: EALC001,no language required for undergraduates.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 302 Major Seminar on Japan

This is a seminar required for all Japanese majors in the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilization. Topic varies year to year.

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: EALC 002. No language required for undergraduates

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 303 Major Seminar on Korea

This is a seminar required for all Korean majors in the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilization. Topic varies year to year.

Taught by: Park

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 371 Study Abroad

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 501 Chinese History and Civilization

This Master's level seminar focuses on the political, social and cultural history of the Chinese region from the Stone Age to the 20th century. Readings will consist of primary and secondary sources, including influential modern studies of Chinese history and civilization. All course materials are in English and no knowledge of Chinese is presumed.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 502 Japanese History and Civilization

This seminar introduces students to the graduate-level study of Japan. In addition to getting a broad overview of Japanese culture, students in the course will develop familiarity with major debates in the history of the field of Japanese studies. The course also provides basic training in using primary and secondary sources in Japanese, Japanese bibliographic conventions, and other skills necessary for pursuing advanced research or a teaching career in the field. Open to all graduate students and to undergraduates with permission from the instructor. Familiarity with Japanese language is a plus but is not required.

Taught by: Thomas J

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Undergraduates need permission from instructor.

EALC 503 Korean History & Civilization

This graduate-level seminar focuses on the political, social, and cultural history of the Korean Peninsula and the vicinity from early times to the contemporary era. Readings will consist of primary and secondary sources, including influential modern studies of Korean history and civilization. All course materials are in English and no knowledge of Korean is presumed.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 504 Introduction to Inner Asian Civilizations

This class is intended for new graduate students and upper-division undergraduates with some prerequisites who wish to get a solid grounding in the study of Inner Asia. The class will introduce Inner Asia as a coherent civilizational network, focusing on: 1) the steppe-imperial tradition; 2) the Tibetan-rite Buddhist commonwealth that developed from the Tibetan and Mongol empires; and 3) the increasing integration of these two Inner Asian civilizational patterns with that of imperial China. There will also be some consideration of the Islamic Turco-Mongolian synthesis that developed in the post-Mongol period. Regionally, the class introduce: 1) core Inner Asia (the Mongolian plateau, the Tarim Basin, the Tibetan plateau, the Manchuria) and 2) the main dynasties of China that formed in the Mongolia and Manchuria (Liao, Jin, Yuan and Qing). There will also be some consideration of historically Inner Asian populations in Hexi (Gansu-Qinghai), and the North China plains and the Shaanxi-Shanxi-Rehe uplands. Chronologically, the class will touch on prehistory and the contemporary period, but will mostly cover the period from the emergence of historical records on the Mongolian plateau and the Tarim basin to roughly 1950. Prehistory and the contemporary period will be give less detailed coverage.

Taught by: Atwood

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 104

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Graduate Seminar

EALC 505 East Asian Diplomacy

This course will survey recent scholarship on East Asian diplomacy from the sixteenth century to the present. We will engage several fundamental debates about the relationship between China, Japan, Korea and the outer world and introduce not only orthodox diplomatic analyses but also newer approaches to modern China, Japan and Korea by international and global historians.

Taught by: Dickinson

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: EALC 105, HIST 395

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 508 SPORTS IN EAST ASIA

This course will examine sports in East Asia from the nineteenth century to the present. Recently, East Asia plays an important role in transforming the global geopolitics of sport. The post-war East Asian Olympic Games-1964 Tokyo Olympics, 1972 Sapporo Winter Olympics, 1988 Seoul Olympics, 1998 Nagano Winter Olympics, and 2008 Beijing Olympics-and the 2002 FIFA World Cup Korea/Japan illustrate the fact that a new global sports order led by East Asia has emerged. East Asia nations will play hosts to other major sporting events, including the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympics, 2020 Tokyo Olympics, and 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics. Chinese, Japanese, and Korean athletes have been highly active in MLB, NBA, English Premier League, and LPGA. The popularity of the various martial arts proves that ?East Asian sports seem to be everywhere these days. This class will focus on helping students understand how sports have affected and transformed East Asia exploring various issues: imperialism, colonialism, race, class, gender, foreign policy, nationalism, religion, economics, industrialization, tourism, and urbanization. Course contents include lecture, discussions, secondary readings, primary source readings, documentaries, and films.

Also Offered As: EALC 108

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 515 Buddhist Arts of East Asia: Sources, Iconography and Styles

Survey of art and architecture created for Buddhist religious purposes in China, Japan, and to a lesser extent Korea, Tibet, and Central Asia. The course will include a brief overview of Buddhist monuments in South Asia, study of the iconography of Buddhist images in graphic and sculptural media, and analysis of a variety of Buddhist styles in painting, sculpture, and architecture.

Taught by: Chance, F

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 115, RELS 175

Prerequisites: Research in an East Asian language required for graduate credit.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 516 East Asian Gardens

Explore the beauty of gardens (and associated buildings) in Japan, China, and Korea from ancient times to the present. Lectures will be illustrated by photographs from dozens of sites in East Asia, and by a field trip to the Japanese House and Garden in Fairmount Park. The main body of the course will be a historical survey of the evolution of East Asian garden art forms from the sixth century to the present. Discussion will touch on geographic and climatic parameters, spiritual and aesthetic principles, practical limitations and creative innovations of East Asian gardens. There will be an additional fee for the Japanese House visit, and possibly for other field trips.

Taught by: Chance, F

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 116

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 518 Gender and Sexuality in Asia

This introductory course will deal with issues such as stereotypes of Asian women and men, cultural construction of femininity and masculinity, international and sexual division of labor, traffic in women in the sex industries, representation of gender and sexuality in academic scholarship as well as literary texts and popular culture, local and global activism for the rights of women and sexual minorities.

Taught by: Kano

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 118

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 519 East Asian Ceramics

History of ceramic forms, techniques, and aesthetic principles in China, Korea, and Japan from neolithic times to the present century, illustrated by slides and examples, augmented by readings, field trips, and student presentations. Aimed at students with general interest in Japan and/or ceramics history; particularly but not exclusively those majoring in East Asian Languages & Civs, East Asian Area Studies or History of Art; also art majors interested in ceramics.

Taught by: Chance, F

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 119

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 521 Chinese Poetry & Prose: In translation

A wide variety of poetic & prose genres from the earliest times to the 19th century is introduced through English translation. A few selections will also be studied in Chinese characters with romanized transcriptions. There are no prerequisites for this course.

Taught by: Mair

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: EALC 121

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 522 Chinese Fiction and Drama in Translation

This course explores Romance of Three Kingdoms the most popular classical novel in East Asia and an important source for understanding Chinese culture, politics, history, and military strategy. We propose to read this work not only as a textbook of Chinese literature but also as a guidebook for career development and risk assessment. Why didn't t Pangtong have a career as successful as Zhuge Liang? Why did Ma Su volunteer in a project that he is not good at? If Cao Cao, Liu Bei, Sun Quan run for presidency in the U.S., who would you vote for and why? In addition to Romance of Three Kingdoms, this course introduces other classical Chinese fictions such as Dream of the Red Chamber and Strange Tales from a Chinese Studio, as well as literary criticism such as On the Standard of Literature (Dian lun), Essays on Literature (Wen lun), and The Literary Mind and the Carving of Dragons.

Taught by: Mair

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: EALC 122

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 525 Cultural Chinas: 20th Century Chinese Literature and Film

This course serves as a thematic introduction to modern Chinese literature and cinema in mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and transnational Chinese communities in the twentieth century. By discussing a wide range of key literary and filmic texts, this class looks into major issues and discourses in China's century of modernization: enlightenment and revolution, politics and aesthetics, sentimental education and nationalism, historical trauma and violence, gender and sexuality, social hygiene and body politics, diaspora and displacement, youth sub-culture and urban imagination.

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: EALC 125

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 527 The Arts of China

A broad survey of Chinese architecture, sculpture, and painting from the Neolithic age through the nineteenth century. Topics include excavated material from China's Bronze Age, Chinese funerary arts, Buddhist caves and sculpture (including works in the University Museum), the Chinese city, the Chinese garden, and major masterpieces of Chinese painting.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ARTH 214, ARTH 614, EALC 127

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 529 Critical Theory China

Also Offered As: EALC 129

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 531 Introduction to Classical Chinese Thought

This course is intended as an introduction to the foundational thinkers of Chinese civilization, who flourished from the fifth to the second centuries B.C. No knowledge of Chinese is presumed, and there are no prerequisites, although EALC 001 (Introduction to Chinese Civilization) is recommended. Graduate students may take this course as EALC 531 and should see the instructor to discuss requirements for graduate credit. (Undergraduates must enroll in the course as EALC 131.)

Taught by: Goldin

Course offered spring; odd-numbered years

Also Offered As: EALC 131

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 535 Topics in Japanese Art

Topic varies. Spring 2016: In this seminar we will take a closer look at the prints, paintings, and illustrated books produced by one of ukiyo-e's most famous artists, Kitagawa Utamaro (1753?-1806), with special focus upon works to be included in an upcoming exhibition. We will begin by surveying the larger history of the pictures of the floating world (ukiyo-e) and pay close attention to Utamaro's teacher and his contemporaries. The status of the artist, the role of the publisher, networks of possible patrons, and Utamaro's legacy are among the key issues the seminar will address. Our analysis will further attend to the ways in which works by Utamaro and other ukiyo-e artists were evaluated and appreciated in late 19th-century France by such figures as Edmond de Goncourt, Hayashi Tadamashi, and Siegfried Bing, among others. Students will have the opportunity to study works in local and regional collections, including the Kislak Center, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Freer/Sackler Galleries. Undergraduate students admitted by permission only.

Taught by: Davis

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 135

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 536 Chinese Martial Arts

This course offers a thematic introduction to the history of martial arts in China. Throughout the semester, we will explore the social, political, and cultural contexts of martial arts practice, from the classical period to the 21st century. The course will take an interdisciplinary approach to situating martial arts practices in history through an examination of religious, literary, and visual sources, against the backdrop of theoretical approaches from across gender studies, anthropology, and cultural theory. The course will be divided into three units. The first unit will focus on the cultural background that led to the emergence of martial arts practices in the pre-modern period. We will examine classical discourses on the human body and its cultivation and the role of medical practices and religious institutions, such as the Shaolin Temple, in the development of martial arts regimens. In the second unit, we will discuss the spread and popularization of martial arts practices in late imperial and modern Chinese society through a close reading of literary sources, such as wuxia novels and other works of fiction. In addition, we will explore the modernization and re-invention of martial arts in the late 19th and early 20th century, when China attempts to re-establish itself as a modern nation. The third and final unit will be devoted to the global impact of Chinese martial arts in contemporary popular culture. Through a discussion and analysis of Kung Fu films, as well as video games, we will explore the role of martial arts narratives and practices in the construction of gender, cultural, and national identity and the various ways in which they are used by the current Chinese regime to assert its influence in the global arena. No knowledge of Chinese is presumed, and all readings will be available in English on the Canvas website in PDF form. Graduate students may take this course as EALC536 and should see the instructor to discuss requirements for graduate credit.

Taught by: Tavor

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 136

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 551 Contemporary Fiction & Film in Japan

Taught by: Kano

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CIMS 151, COML 256, EALC 151, GSWS 257

Prerequisites: This course will explore fiction and film in contemporary Japan, from 1945 to the present. Topics will include literary and cinematic representation of Japan s war experience and post-war reconstruction, negotiation with Japanese classics, confrontation with the state, and changing ideas of gender and sexuality. We will explore these and other questions by analyzing texts of various genres, including film and film scripts, novels, short stories, manga, and academic essays. Class sessions will combine lectures, discussion, audio-visual materials, and creative as well as analytical writing exercises. The course is taught in English, although Japanese materials will be made available upon request. No prior coursework in Japanese literature, culture, or film is required or expected; additional secondary materials will be available for students taking the course at the 600 level. Writers and film directors examined may include: Kawabata Yasunari, Hayashi Fumiko, Abe Kobo, Mishima Yukio, Oe Kenzaburo, Yoshimoto Banana, Ozu Yasujiro, Naruse Mikio, Kurosawa Akira, Imamura Shohei, Koreeda Hirokazu, and Beat Takeshi.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 552 Love and Loss in Japanese Literary Traditions: In Translation

Chinese economic and political engagements now stretch across the globe from Africa to Latin America. This state of affairs is hardly historically unique- complex interconnections have existed for centuries. Yet this course looks behind the numbers to consider whether the current moment is qualitatively different from earlier iterations of globalization. How do we understand a road built by Chinese laborers in Nigeria, a "Chinese" airport in Sudan, and a copper mine in Zambia, a gold mine in Peru, oil investments in Venezuela and Ecuador, or massively increasing trade with Brazil? Together we will explore Chinese state and firm-level interventions in Africa and Latin America as harbingers of an emergent global economic structure, largely defined by intensified and re-configured South-South linkages. Through the disciplinary methods of anthropology, political economy, management, and media studies we will consider both the historical context of intensified Chinese involvement in these regions and a wide range of more contemporary ethnographies and case studies. In the process, we will subject transnational economic studies, the statements of managers and officials, and popular culture texts alike to fine-grained readings.

Taught by: Chance

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: EALC 152

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 553 Loyal Warriors in Japanese Literature

From the earliest literature to the latest think piece on Japanese society, the roles of the "warrior" and of "loyalty" in Japanese culture have fascinated those both inside and outside of Japan. In this course we will trace the development of paragons of loyalty and warrior prowess from the earliest literary works, through the epic Tales of the Heike, and on to the "Treasury of Loyal Retainers." We will read in the philosophy of fidelity and samurai codes to track the growing dedication to ideals of loyalty, exploring evidence of behavior less than loyal as we seek the real influence of these notions. Related topics will include the extremes of vengeance and fanaticism.

Taught by: Chance

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 153

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 555 Modern Japanese Literature

This course surveys Japanese literature (novels, short stories, poetry, drama, essays) from 1868 to World War II. The purpose is not only to read some of the most important and interesting literary texts of this period, but also to reflect on the ways we read and study literature, and how we draw connections between literature, self, and society. The reading material will be entirely in English.

Taught by: Kano

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: EALC 155

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 557 Arts of Japan

This is an introductory survey course on the ancient societies and civilizations of East Asia especially in the areas known today as Japan, China, and Korea. This course will explore the general lifeways of the peoples in these regions during the prehistoric periods, specifically from the Mesolithic/Neolithic periods about 8,000 BC up to the era of political unification around 700 AD in both the Japanese archipelago and the Korean peninsula. By examining primarily the art and architecture of these prehistoric societies, this course will explore important sociocultural aspects, including subsistence, sedentism, state formation, social stratification, leadership, warfare, trade, technology, population movement, and mortuary customs. The course aims to provide a through foundation for further study in the histories and cultures of ancient Japan, China and Korea.

Taught by: Nishimura

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ARTH 213, ARTH 613, EALC 157

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 559 Topics in Japanese Art

Topic varies.

Taught by: Davis

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 515

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 560 Introduction to Japanese Thought

This course introduces the major intellectual developments and problems within Japan's history. Special attention will be given to explaining why and how Japanese thinkers only selectively absorbed Chinese thinking during Japan's first "opening" to outside influence and then later tried again to be selective when engaged with the West. Japanese thinkers' differing way of understanding and utilizing Buddhism, Confucianism, and Daoism, Christianity, and European philosophy will be considered. So too, however, will be what are usually taken to be "native" patterns of thought--viz. Shinto, The National Learning School, and what came to be called "the Code of the Warrior." Surfacing at various points in this course will be questions that could be addressed to any nation or people and their intellectual history--viz. What does it mean for anyone to claim there might be "indigenous" modes of thought and appreciation? Can thought and philosophy get free of being suspect as ways for the expression of nationalism in its various forms? What are some of the practical consequences in and for a society, especially in our "globalized" world, when its intellectual trajectory differs from that of the "West" and important contemporary thinkers within wish to retain that?

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: EALC 160

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 566 Gender and Sexuality in Japan

This seminar deals with issues such as the cultural and historical constructions of femininity and masculinity; gendered division of education and labor; representation of gender and sexuality in literature, theater, and popular culture; and forms of activism for the rights of women and sexual minorities. This course will use films, videos, and manga, as well as readings from anthropological, historical, literary, and theoretical texts. All readings will be in English, but Japanese materials will be available to those interested.

Taught by: Kano

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 166, GSWS 186, GSWS 586

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 570 Japanese Archaeology in the Penn Museum

This class integrates the Japanese archaeological artifacts (ca, 240 items) andand drawings (ca. 16 sheets) that were given to the Penn Museum at the World's Columbian Exposition of 1893 as a gift from the Tokyo National Museum/Meiji Government. In this course, as students learn the basic knowledge on Japanese archaeology, they participate in the basic background research on the exposition objects. Students are then to choose his/her research topic based on this collection, and their projects and resulting research papers will be presented possibly on a newly-established website. Through their individual research projects using this collection, students will learn how to handle the archaeological artifacts, investigate the relevant data in the Penn Museum archives, and acquire the basic curatorial knowledge and skills for dating, classifying, specifying the provenience of the objects.

Taught by: Nishimura

Also Offered As: ANTH 170, ANTH 570, EALC 170

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 573 Family Feuds

Taught by: Spafford

Also Offered As: EALC 173

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 576 Japan: Age of the Samurai

This course deals with the samurai in Japanese history and culture and will focus on the period of samurai political dominance from 1185 to 1868, but it will in fact range over the whole of Japanese history from the development of early forms of warfare to the disappearance of the samurai after the Meiji Restoration of the 19th century. The course will conclude with a discussion of the legacy of the samurai in modern Japanese culture and the image of the samurai in foreign perceptions of Japan.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: EALC 176

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 583 Readings in Korean History

Topic varies year to year for this seminar.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 183

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 584 Two Koreas: The Politics of Division

In today's world, the inter-Korean border or DMZ (demilitarized zone) is widely regarded as one of the most impermeable and conflictual frontiers. The purpose of this course is to explore the dynamics of its formation between, and impact within, the two Koreas. The course therefore proposes to analyze how the division of the Korean peninsula not only came into being but also how it has shaped the socio-political trajectories of both the North and the South since 1945. The course also aims at introducing students to conceptual frameworks and comparative debates relevant to understanding the Korean case(s) from a social science perspective.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 184

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 592 Arts of Korea

The goal of this course is understanding the development of visual, performing, and literary arts in Korea and the historical, religious, and social contexts in which they flourished. It serves as an introduction to the arts of Korea, with emphasis on painting, sculpture, ceramics, and architecture and additional consideration of dance, drama, poetry, and culinary arts. Covers the whole history of Korea, from prehistoric times to the twenty-first century. Students enrolled in this graduate number are expected to do research in an East Asian language.

Taught by: Chance, F

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: EALC 192

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 611 Life and Death in Han China

Using wall painting, sculpture, and minor arts as evidence, the course will examine the attitudes toward life and beliefs and death in Han (206 B.C.-A.D.220) China.

Taught by: Steinhardt

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: EALC 211

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 616 Chinese Arts Under the Mongols

The Yuan Dynasty (1257-1368), the period of Mongolian rule, was the only time in Chinese history when China was part of a larger empire that spanned the Asian continent. Using architecture, sculpture, painting, and excavated evidence, this course examines the unique results of an international Asian world centered in China.

Taught by: Steinhardt

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 216

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 621 First Year Classical Chinese I

Introduction to the classical written language, beginning with Shadick, First Course in Literary Chinese. Students with a background in Japanese, Korean, Cantonese, Taiwanese, and other East Asian languages are welcome; it is not necessary to know Mandarin. The course begins from scratch, and swiftly but rigorously develops the ability to read a wide variety of classical and semi-classical styles. Original texts from the 6th century BC to the 20th century AD are studied. This course is taught in English and there are no prerequisites.

Taught by: Mair

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: CHIN 491, EALC 221

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 622 1st Year Classical Chin II

Continuation of CHIN491 EALC221/621, which is the only prerequisite for this course. Upon completion of Shadick, readings in a wide selection of texts with Chinese commentaries may be taken up. These readings are in part chosen to reflect student interest. This is the second half of a year-long course. Those who enroll must take both semesters.

Taught by: Mair

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: CHIN 492, EALC 222

Prerequisite: None

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 623 Language, Script and Society in China

The Chinese writing system is the only major surviving script in the world that is partially picto-ideographic, Egyptian hieroglyphic and Sumero-Akkadian cuneiform having passed out of use about two millennia ago. Partly because it is so unique, a tremendous number of myths have grown up around the Chinese script. In an attempt to understand how they really function, this seminar will examine the nature of the sinographs and their relationship to spoken Sinitic languages, as well as their implications for society and culture. We will also discuss the artistic and technological aspects of the Chinese characters and the ongoing efforts to reform and simplify them. The use of sinographs in other East Asian countries than China will be taken into account. There are no prerequisites for this class.

Taught by: Mair

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 223

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 626 East Asian Funerary Arts

Study of tombs and tomb decoration of emperors and officials in China, Korea, and Japan from the pre-Buddhist era through the l9th century.

Taught by: Steinhardt

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: EALC 226

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 627 Chinese Painting

Study of Chinese painting and practice from the earliest pictorial representation through the late twentieth century. Painting styles are analyzed, but themes such as landscape and narrative are considered with regard to larger social, cultural, and historical issues. The class will pay particular attention to the construction of the concepts of the "artist" and "art criticism" and their impact on the field into the present. Visits to study paintings at the University of Pennsylvania Museum and Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Taught by: Steinhardt

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ARTH 217, EALC 227

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 628 Chinese Wall Painting

Survey of mural painting in temples and tombs from the earliest examples in the last BCE centuries through the Ming dynasty. The course examines paintings that have been uncovered in the last few years, as well as famous examples in China and in North American museums.

Taught by: Steinhardt

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 228

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 629 Chinese Architecture

Survey of Chinese buildings and building technology from the formative period in the second millennium B.C. through the twentieth century. The course will deal with well-known monuments such as the Buddhist monasteries of Wutai, imperial palaces in Chang'an and Beijing, the Ming tombs and the Temple of Heaven, and less frequently studied buildings. Also covered will be the theory and principles of Chinese construction.

Taught by: Steinhardt

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ARCH 716, EALC 229

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 630 Gender and Religion in China

This course examines gender in Chinese religious culture from ancient to contemporary times. We will explore topics including the Buddhist accommodation of Chinese family system, Chinese transformation of the bodhisattva Guanyin, female deities in Daoist and popular religious pantheons, writings about religious women, female ghosts and fox spirits in literary imagination and folk tales, and the significance of yin force in Chinese medicine and Daoist alchemy. Through the case of China, we will look at how gender plays critical and constitutive roles in religious traditions, and how religion can be used both to reinforce and to challenge gender norms.

Taught by: Cheng, H

Also Offered As: EALC 230, GSWS 234, GSWS 630, RELS 237, RELS 630

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 632 Cultural Memory in Contemporary China

How is memory constructed and represented? What does society remember and/or forget? How and under what circumstances? How is it possible and/or impossible to bear witness? This course will examine notions of individual and collective memories, trauma, catastrophe, historical violence, post-socialist nostalgia, and amnesia, and explore the possibilities and impossibilities of remembering and forgetting in various forms of representation and cultural production in contemporary Chinese-speaking communities.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 232

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 633 CHINESE AESTHETICS

Taught by: Goldin

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 233

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 634 Daoist Traditions

This course examines the history of various intellectual and religious traditions that came to be known as Daoist (or Taoist in the Wade-Giles Romanization). We will begin with a critical review of the twentieth-century reinvention of Daoism and the new classification of religious versus philosophical Daoism, before tracing chronologically the textual, institutional, and social history of Daoist traditions from the fourth century B.C.E. While familiarizing students with the key concepts, practices, and organizations developed in the history of Daoism, this class emphasizes the specific socio-political context of each of them. Throughout the course, we will think critically about the labeling of Daoist (as well as Confucian and Buddhist) in Chinese history and in modern scholarship. We will also question modern demarcations between philosophy, religion, and science, as well as that between the spiritual and the physical.

Taught by: Wang

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 234, RELS 233, RELS 634

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 639 Sex and Society in Ancient China

Ancient Chinese writers considered sexual activity to be an essential component of humanity, and that study of human sexuality to be essential to the study of human history. Sexuality constituted a fundamental source of imagery and categories that informed the classical Chinese conception of social, political, and military relationships. This course will survey the major sources dealing with sex and society in ancient China. There are no pre-requisites, and no knowledge of Chinese is presumed.

Taught by: Goldin

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 239

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 640 Early Chinese History

This seminar covers the span of Chinese history from the Bronze Age to the establishment of the empire in 221 B.C. No knowledge of Chinese is presumed, but EALC 001 (Introduction to Chinese Civilization) is a prerequisite. Graduate students who wish to enroll should meet with the instructor to discuss additional requirements for graduate credit.

Taught by: Goldin

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: EALC 240

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 641 Law in Pre-Modern China

This course, intended for graduate students and advanced undergraduates, offers a survey of the sources and research problems of pre-modern Chinese law. For reasons to be examined in the course, traditional Sinological education has neglected law as a legitimate field of inquiry; consequently, the secondary literature is surprisingly meager. Our readings will take us from the Warring States Period to the Qing dynasty--an interval of over two millennia--and will cover several varieties of legal documents, including statutes, handbooks, court records, and theoretical treatises. All the readings will be in English, and no knowledge of Chinese is presumed. Graduate students should see the instructor to discuss requirement for graduate credit.

Taught by: Goldin

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 241

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 642 Medicine and Healing in China

This course explores Chinese medicine and healing culture, its diversity, and its change over time. We will discuss topics including the establishment of canonical medicine, Daoist approaches to healing and longevity, diverse views of the body and disease, the emergence of treatments for women, medical construction of sex difference and imagination of female sexuality, the thriving and decline of female healers, the identity of scholar physicians, the transmission of medical knowledge, domestic and cross-regional drug market, healer-patient relations, and new visions of traditional Chinese medicine in modern China.

Taught by: Cheng,H

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 242

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 643 PASTORALISM & MOBILITY

Taught by: Atwood

Also Offered As: EALC 243

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 645 Popular Culture in Modern China

What constitutes Chinese popular culture in the modern age? How does popular culture contest and collaborate with modern Chinese literature in the formation of Chinese modernity? This course provides a comprehensive examination of modern Chinese popular culture in mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and other transnational Chinese communities in the past century. From film to literature, from opera to theatre, from music, vintage photographs, to comic books, this course will probe popular culture as it has manifested itself in the dynamic dialogue between high art and mass culture, and trace its sociopolitical, cultural, and aesthetic impact on modern China. Topics will include the sentimental education through reading popular romance as a new form of national pastime; the rise of Chinese pictorial journalism; the gender politics of cross-dressing in Beijing opera as a form of popular entertainment; neo-sensationalism and urban culture in modern Shanghai; the 1930-40s debate over popular and populist culture; the acoustic modernity of Chinese popular music; Maoist model operal and revolutionary melodrama; the cult of masculinity in Hong Kong martial arts fiction and cinema; cultural articulations in post-Maoist Chinese rock music; and the discourse of violence and body in Chinese youth subculture.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 651 Readings in Classical Japanese I

Readings in classical texts drawn from the Heian, Kamakura, Muromachi, and Edo periods. Introduction to the different styles of classical Japanese, and to classical Japanese as a whole.

For BA Students: Advanced Language Course

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: EALC 251, JPAN 491

Prerequisite: JPAN 212 or equivalent

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 652 Readings in Classical Japanese II

Readings in classical texts drawn from the Heian, Kamakura, Muromachi, and Edo periods. Introduction to the different styles of classical Japanese, and to classical Japanese as a whole.

Taught by: Chance

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: EALC 252, JPAN 492

Prerequisites: EALC 251/651/JPAN 491 or equivalent.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 653 The Politics of Shinto

Shinto-derived images and ideas frequently appear in Japanese anime and film, and journalists and academics frequently mobilize the term Shinto as a way of explaining Japan s past or envisioning its future. The environmentalist left champions a green Shinto while Shinto-derived ideas serve as red meat for politicians pandering to Japan s nationalist right. While the influential position Shinto occupies in Japanese sociopolitical life is therefore clear, the term Shinto itself is actually not. Depending on who one asks, Shinto is either the venerable indigenous religion of the Japanese archipelago, the irreducible core of Japanese culture, a tiny subset of Japanese Buddhism, an oppressive political ideology linked to the emperor system, an environmentalist ethic, or some combination of these. This course investigates the multifarious types of Shinto envisioned by these competing interest groups.

Taught by: Thomas,J.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 253

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 654 Tales of the Heike

Our subject is Tale of the Heike, a multifaceted narrative of the twelfth-century battles that brought the Taira clan down and led to the establishment of Japan's first military government. We will read the Heike tales with an eye toward how they fictionalize history and idealize certain types, most notably loyal women and warriors; the development of the warrior tale genre; central aspects of the Japanese ethos; and later works of literature based on episodes and characters from the Tale of the Heike. All material is in English translation. (Students of Japanese language may learn to read a famous section in the original.) There are no pre-requisites.

Taught by: Chance, L

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: EALC 254

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 655 Japanese Theater

Japan has one of the richest and most varied theatrical traditions in the world. In this course, we will examine Japanese theater in historical and comparative contexts. The readings and discussions will cover all areas of the theatrical experience (script, acting, stage design, costumes, music, audience). Audio-visual material will be used whenever appropriate and possible. The class will be conducted in English, with all English materials.

Taught by: Kano

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: EALC 255, GSWS 255, GSWS 654

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 656 The Tale of Genji

"Crowning masterpiece of Japanese literature," "the world's first novel," "fountainhead of Japanese literary and aesthetic culture," "a great soap opera in the vein of Jacqueline Susann." Readers over the centuries have praised the Tale of Genji, the monumental prose tale finished just after the year 1000, in a variety of ways. In this course we will read the latest English translation of Murasaki Shikibu's work. We will watch as Genji loses his mother at a tender age, is cast out of the royal family, and begins a quest to fill the void she left. Along the way, Genji's loyalty to all the women he encounters forges his reputation as the ideal lover. We will consider gender issues in the female author's portrayal of this rake, and question the changing audience, from bored court women to censorious monks, from adoring nationalists to comic book adaptors. Study of the tale requires consideration of poetry, imagery, costume, music, history, religion, theater, political and material culture, all of which will be components of the course. We will also trace the effect of the tale's many motifs, from flora and fauna to murderously jealous spirits, on later literature and conceptions of human emotions. All material is in English translation. There are no prerequisites.

Taught by: Chance, L.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: EALC 256

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 658 Japanese Architecture

An introduction to the visual, aesthetic, historical, religious, philosophical, and symbolic aspects of Japanese structures from earliest times to the mid-19th century. Through a discussion of shrines, temples, palaces, tombs, cities, and gardens the student will explore what makes Japanese architecture distinctive and how the traditions of Japanese architecture evolve over time.

Taught by: Steinhardt

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 258

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 659 Gender and Sexuality in Japan

Taught by: Kano

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 259, GSWS 259

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 661 History of the Book in East Asia

Taught by: Chance/Davis

Also Offered As: EALC 260

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 663 Topics in Japanese Thought

Course focuses on a few selected topics for close attention. Topic for 1995-96 will be examination of certain current social and ethical questions--for instance those having to do with organ transplantation, abortion, suicide, euthanasia, political corruption, and "openness" as a society. Readings will be on contemporary questions but include some pre-modern materials that influence the discussion.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 263

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 664 Bandits, Pirates and Peasants: Lawlessness and Violence in Pre-Modern Japan

This course will be an exploration of premodern Japanese history through the lens of violence. The centuries under consideration (roughly, the eighth thought nineteenth) were characterized by greatly varying levels of violence, both of the state-sanctioned variety (war, punishments for law-breakers and political losers) and of the non-sanctioned variety (piracy, banditry, warrior and peasant rebellions). Examining a wide variety of translated sources, from diaries to chronicles, from legal codes to fiction, we shall examine the changing social, political, economic, and cultural contexts of violence, in order to interrogate not only why certain periods were remarkably peaceful while others were not, but also why violence took different forms in relation to different circumstances. We shall consider how contempories made sense of the violence that surrounded them (or didn't) and how they divided the acceptable use of force from the wanton and society-threatening abuse of it. The course will feature presentations and several (very short) papers.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 264

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 669 Japanese Buddhism

An introduction to the history and cultural role of Buddhism in Japan. Emphasis is on Buddhism as a component in the religious, intellectual, and cultural life of the Japanese, especially in poetry and the visual arts. Includes a short review of prior Buddhism in India and China.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: EALC 269

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 670 Shamans To Shoguns

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: EALC 270

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 691 Archaeology of Central Asia

A site by site investigation of Buddhist and non-Buddhist ruins in Central Asia. Included are Nisa, Khwarezm, Pyandzhikent, Khalchayan, Ay-Khanum, Bamiyan, Miran, Tumshuk, Kizil, Kucha, Khotan, Adzhina-Tepe, Khocho, Khara-Khoto, and Bezeklik.

Taught by: Steinhardt

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: EALC 291

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 701 Chinese Buddhist Texts

Seminar for graduate students focusing on the medieval period.

Taught by: Mair

Course not offered every year

Prerequisites: Knowledge of Classical Chinese required.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 710 Proseminar East Asia

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 719 The East Asian Monastery

Taught by: Steinhardt

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 720 Topics in Chinese Studies

Topics vary semester to semester

Taught by: Mair

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 721 Advanced Classical Chinese I

Close reading and interpretation of texts in various styles of classical Chinese drawn from the Han, Wei, Tang, and Song periods. Focus on strengthening students' reading ability in classical Chinese. Attention to questions of style, rhetoric, and syntax.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CHIN 721

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 723 Early Vernacular Sinitic

Selected reading in mostly medieval Chinese texts.

Taught by: Mair

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 725 Topics in East Asian Art

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 727 Seminar in East Asian Architecture

Topic varies. Subjects have included The Chinese Monastery, Chinese Architecture in Shanxi Province, and Architecture in East Asian Painting.

Taught by: Steinhardt

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Reading knowledge of Chinese.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 730 Survey Chinese History

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 731 Tang-Song Religious and Medical Texts

This seminar aims at developing the skill in reading religious and medical texts of a range of different genres from the Tang-Song period, including treatises in medical theory, no sological texts, recipe compilations, material medical, macrobiotic texts, Buddhist and Daoist meditation and ritual instructions, as well as case histories in anecdotal forms. There are a variety of topics we can choose to focus on the studying those texts, and the choice will be made on the students' on research interests. Each week we will look at one type of texts, consider its edition, textual history, chapter organization and genre (sometimes with background readings), read line-by-line a sample text assigned in advance, as well as sight-read short samples that students bring to class. . At least one year Classical Chinese is required.

Taught by: Cheng, H

Course not offered every year

Prerequisites: At least one year Classical Chinese is required.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 733 Song Dynasty Texts

The goal of this course is to gain a practical ability in doing research concerning the Song dynasty by utilizing Chinese primary sources. Each session we will take a type of source, look at examples of it in the library, consider indexes and other reference aids, consider historiographical uses and limitations, and do some communal reading of a sample text distributed in advance, as well as sight-reading of short samples students bring to class, prepared to translate for the class. We will cover sources including standard histories (Song shi, Liao shi, Jin shi), narrative history (Xu zizhi tongjian changbian), biographical accounts (epitaphs, index of Song biographies), diaries, letters, inscriptions, anecdotes, regional histories/gazetteers, and government documents (Song hui yao).

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 738 Religion & Ethnicity in Inner Asia

Taught by: Atwood

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 740 Sinological Methods

This seminar is designed to acquaint graduate students with the basic methods and resources of Sino logical research. The course will begin with an overview of essential reference works and aids to study, such as dictionaries and concordances, and continue with a survey of the major primary sources for the study of traditional Chinese history. Students are required to demonstrate the use of the methods learned in the course in a research paper, to be presented to the class in the form of a brief lecture at the end of the semester. Only graduate students may enroll in this course. The prerequisites are reading knowledge of modern Chinese and two years of the classical language. Familiarity with Japanese, though not required, would prove helpful.

Taught by: Goldin

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 745 TOPICS SONG DYNASTY HIST

Taught by: Vivier

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 747 CHINESE ECONOMIC HISTORY

Taught by: Vivier

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 749 Japanese for Sinologists

An accelerated course in scholarly Japanese for Sinologists and others with a knowledge of Chinese characters.

For BA Students: Advanced Language Course

Taught by: Chance, L

Course not offered every year

Prerequisites: Completion of JPAN 112 or the equivalent. Knowledge of Chinese characters.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 750 Japanese Literature: Research Methods in the Classical Tradition

Introduction to bibliographic tools for research in pre-modern literature. Emphasis on hands-on library work, including how to use libraries in Japan. Covers history and terminology of bibliography. Students may attend lectures in EALC 152/552 simultaneously, when offered. Final project will use reference tools for substantive research in individual student's area of interest.

Taught by: Chance

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Requires Japanese Language

EALC 752 Modern Japanese Literature and Culture

This seminar will focus on selected topics in modern Japanese literature and culture (Meiji to present day) varying from year to year. For advanced graduate students. Permission of instructor required.

Taught by: Kano

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 754 No and Kyogen: Text and Context

Japan's classical theater will be closely read and investigated in terms of certain select literary, intellectual, and social issues of medieval Japan.

Course not offered every year

Prerequisite: EALC 552 or equivalent

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 755 Literary Criticism and Theory in Japanese Literature

While the focus of this seminar will shift from year to year, the aim is to enable students to gain 1) a basic understanding of various theoretical approaches to literature, 2) familiarity with the histories and conventions of criticism, literary and otherwise, in Japan; 3) a few theoretical tools to think in complex ways about some of the most interesting and controversial issues of today, such as nationalism, imperialism, colonialism, postmodernism, and feminism, with particular focus on Japan's position in the world. The course is primarily intended for graduate students but is also open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor. The course is taught in English, and all of the readings will be available in English translation. An optional discussion section may be arranged for those students who are able and willing to read and discuss materials in Japanese.

Taught by: Kano

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 685

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 756 Readings in Pre-Modern Japanese Literature

Continued reading of texts chosen to accord with student interests. Materials may include calligraphic manuscripts and Edo period woodblock texts.

Taught by: Chance

Course not offered every year

Prerequisites: EALC 252 Readings in Classical Japanese II, or equivalent

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 758 Teaching Methods in Japanese

A practicum for Teaching Fellows and others engaged in teaching Japanese language for the first time. It introduces various approaches to teaching foreign language and surveys current issues in second language acquisition, particularly with respect to the less commonly taught languages. Students write a paper based on their experiences in the classroom.

Taught by: Chance

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Requires Japanese Language

EALC 760 Japanese Religions

A broad survey of Japanese religions from ancient times to the present. Topics include kami worship, Buddhism, Shinto, Shugendo, Onmyodo,"new religions", and Japanese variants of Christianity and Islam. Students will make weekly presentations on reading material in class and will have two major written assignments. This course serves as preparation for a comprehensive exam in Japanese religions or for dissertation research on some aspect of Japanese religions.

Taught by: Thomas,J

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 761 Readings in Japanese Religion

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 762 Ethics and Aesthetics in East Asian Buddhism

Course not offered every year

Prerequisites: Knowledge of the Japanese or Chinese language.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 770 Japanese Bibliography and Problems of Research

Weekly sessions on the works of reference necessary for scholarly work in Japanese sources. Introduction to all main Japanese reference works in religion (Buddhism and Shintoism), government, literature, economics, etc. There are weekly assignments to be prepared in the library reference room. For advanced graduate students.

Course not offered every year

Prerequisite: JPAN 312 or equivalent

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 771 Current Japanology

Major trends in scholarship as reflected in important recent publications, especially formative books and periodical literatures. The trajectory within certain disciplines as well as the interaction among them will be critically evaluated in terms of gains and losses. Implications of these theses in the planning of graduate and postgraduate research.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: GSWS 771

Prerequisite: Knowledge of reading Japanese

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EALC 772 Medieval Japan: Texts and Issues

Close readings of selected texts (poetry, drama, historical and religious texts) combined with discussions of major questions in current scholarship on medieval Japan. Guest scholars.

Course not offered every year

Prerequisites: Knowledge of classical Japanese required.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 773 Proseminar: Early Modern Japan

This course will examine in detail the Tokugawa, or Edo, period (1600-1868). In weekly class sessions, equal attention will be devoted to institutional (political, economic and social) issues on the one hand, and cultural (art, literature, theater and philosophy/religion) developments on the other. A period in which Japan enjoyed protracted peace and relative isolation from the outside world, Tokugawa Japan experienced tremendous changes across all sectors of society. While the changes were unsettling to Japan's military rulers, they provided important preconditions for the subsequent modernization of Japan.

Taught by: Chance,F

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through the College of General Studies MLA Program

EALC 785 SOURCES IN KOREAN STUDIES

This course offers a critical introduction to the methodology of studying about Korea, especially its history. In the past four decades, Korean history as a field has grown tremendously in depth and breadth, thanks to an increasing body of scholarship by Korean and non-Korean researchers alike. Although still lagging behind scholarship on China and Japan in quantity and diversity, enhanced richness of historiography on Korea has increased demand for an in-depth, methodological assessment of various interpretive approaches. Recognizing the nexus between historiography and its constantly changing social context, we will consider how historiography on Korea has evolved since the 1960s. Addressing these issues by focusing on kinship, status, ideology, and economy, this seminar searches for new approaches to studying about Korea in particular and, more broadly, East Asia.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EALC 790 KOREAN STUDIES: METHODS

Topic varies year to year.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit