Education (EDUC)

EDUC 202 Urban Education

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: URBS 202

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 235 Psychology of Women

Critical analyses of the psychological theories of female development, and introduction to feminist scholarship on gender development and sexuality.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: GSWS 235

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 240 Education in American Culture

This course explores the relationships between forms of cultural production and transmission (schooling, family and community socialization, peer group subcultures and media representations) and relations of inequality in American society. Working with a broad definition of "education" as varied forms of social learning, we will concentrate particularly on the cultural processes that produce as well as potentially transform class, race, ethnic and gender differences and identities. From this vantage point, we will then consider the role that schools can and/or should play in challenging inequalities in America.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 241 Educational Psychology

Current issues and research, applying psychological theory to educational practice. As such, this course will explore the fundamental themes in behavioral, developmental, and cognitive areas of psychology as they relate to education. Topics include: learning, motivation, growth and development, cognitive processes, intelligence tests, measurements, evaluations, etc.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 250 Learning from Children

This course is about looking at elementary school classrooms and understanding children's experiences of school from a variety of perspectives, and from a variety of theoretical and methodological lenses from which the student can interpret children's educational experiences. This course is about developing the skills of observation, reflection, and analysis and to begin to examine some implications for curriculum, teaching and schooling. This course requires you to spend time in an elementary school classroom.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 323 Tutoring School: Theory and Practice

This course represents an opportunity for students to participate in academically-based community service involving tutoring in a West Phila. public school. This course will serve a need for those students who are already tutoring through the West Phila.Tutoring Project or other campus tutoring. It will also be available to individuals who are interested in tutoring for the first time.

Taught by: Kasher, Jackie

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: URBS 323

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 326 Tutoring in Urban Public Elementary Schools: A Child Development Perspective

The course provides an opportunity for undergraduate students to participate in academically based community service learning. Student will be studying early childhood development and learning while providing direct, one-to-one tutoring services to young students in Philadelphia public elementary schools. The course will cover foundational dimensions of the cognitive and social development of preschool and elementary school students from a multicultural perspective. The course will place a special emphasis on the multiple contexts that influence children's development and learning and how aspects of classroom environment (i.e., curriculum and classroom management strategies) can impact children's achievement. Also, student will consider a range of larger issues impacting urban education embedded in American society. The course structure has three major components: (1) lecture related directly to readings on early childhood development and key observation and listening skills necessary for effective tutoring, (2) weekly contact with a preschool or elementary school student as a volunteer tutor and active consideration of how to enhance the student learning, and (3) discussion and reflection of personal and societal issues related to being a volunteer tutor in a large urban public school.

Taught by: Fantuzzo

Also Offered As: URBS 326

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 345 Psychology of Personal Growth

Intellectual, emotional and behavioral development in the college years. Illustrative topics: developing intellectual and social competence; developing personal and career goals; managing interpersonal relationships; values and behavior. Recommended for submatriculation in Psychological Services Master's Degree program.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: GSWS 344

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 360 Human Development in Global Perspective

A life-span (infancy to adulthood) approach to development. Topics include: biological, physical, social and cognitive basis of development. Films and guest speakers are often included.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 414 Children's Literature

Theoretical and practical aspects of the study of literature for children. Students develop both wide familiarity with children's books, and understanding of how children's literature fits into the elementary school curriculum.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 417 Reading/Language Arts in the Elementary School

Second of a two-part course (see EDUC 317). The course focuses on the reading process, using literature in the reading curriculum, language and cultural difference in the classroom, and evaluating reading/language arts programs and progress. Students design and carry out reading lessons and units, conduct informal reading assessments, and participate in in-class seminars.

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: EDUC 316, 317

Corequisites: EDUC 419, 420

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: This course is open only to students officially admitted to the program for preparation of elementary school teachers.

EDUC 418 Teaching and Learning Mathematics in Elementary Schools

Students participating in this course will explore definitions of mathematics, theories of children's mathematical learning, and issues of reform in mathematics education through consideration of relevant content areas such as numeration, rational number operations, geometry, and probability and statistics.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 421 Science in Elementary and Middle Schools

An intensive approach to current methods, curricula, and trends in teaching science as basic learning, K-8. "Hands-on" activities based on cogent, current philosophical and psychological theories including: S/T/S and gender issues. Focus on skill development in critical thinking. Content areas: living things, the physical universe, and interacting ecosystems.

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: ENVS 421

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 501 Economics of Education in Developing Countries

This is a course on economics of education, a field within the subject of economics that draws upon many areas of economic specialization. The course focuses on developing countries and includes papers and case-studies covering themes such as returns to investment in education, production, costs and financing of education, teacher labor markets, economic growth, education markets, and equity issues.

Taught by: Thapa

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 502 Citizen Sociolinguistics

In this course we will draw on the Internet and daily news (internet circulated, usually) to find "Citizen Sociolinguists" who speak with authority, while juxtaposing these media with the usual scholarly sources.

Taught by: Rymes

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 503 Global Citizenship

This course examines the possibilities and limitations of conceiving of and realizing citizenship on a global scale. Readings, guest lecturers, and discussions will focus on dilemmas associated with addressing issues that transcend national boundaries. In particular, the course compares global/local dynamics that emerge across different types of improvement efforts focusing on distinctive institutions and social domains, including: educational development; human rights; humanitarian aid; free trade; micro-finance initiatives; and the global environmental movement. The course has two objectives: to explore research and theoretical work related to global citizenship, social engagement, and international development; and to discuss ethical and practical issues that emerge in the local contexts where development initiatives are implemented.

Taught by: Hall

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: ANTH 546, URBS 546

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 504 Contemporary Issues in Higher Education

An introduction to the central issues and management problems in contemporary American higher education.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 505 Globalization & the University

The aim of this course is to help students understand the basic concept of globalization, how it impacts higher education in general, and how it shapes the global market for human capital and fosters private sector and for profit provision and diversifies modes of delivery of higher education. The seminars cover the nature of globalization and the way it affects the movement of people between economies to gain and apply skills and knowledge, the creation of branch campuses, the growth of transnational education and the importance of brands and information in the global higher education market.

Taught by: Ruby

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 506 Global Perspectives on Inequalities in Education

This course provides a conceptual framework for understanding various dimensions of inequality. Through country case studies, the course takes a global perspective to explore how conceptions of equality, equity, quality, and opportunity intersect with issues around race, class, and gender, and inform debates around educational policy and practice.

Taught by: Ghaffar-Kucher

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 507 Sociology of Language

This course examines the intersection of language and society, asking how language ideologies might be implicated in the construction and maintenance of such constructs as national identity, 'standard' language variety, race, and ethnicity. Through theoretical readings and case studies, participants will question how particular linguistic situations give rise to certain institutional practices and probe how these practices might foster inequitable relations of power.

Taught by: Pomerantz

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 510 Democratizing Higher Education Participation

The aim of this course is to examine how public policy has shaped and been shaped by higher education in different political and economic settings. Seminars will examine themes such as access and equity in higher education participation, the role of higher education in economic development and nation building, and how higher education can promote democracy and an enlightened citizenry.

Taught by: Ruby,A

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 511 Equality

'All men (or all humans) are created equal': What does this statement mean? What are we all equal in? What should we be equal in? Do we have equal potential, equal dignity, equal worth? Must we have equal resources, equal opportunities, equal status? In this class we will consider philosophical and political approaches to the idea of equality. The education system's ability and commitment to respond to claims of equality will be discussed. Must we treat all children the same? Or each child differently? And if the latter, how does that constitute equality? Moreover, must we treat individuals or groups equally? Educational and philosophical answers to these questions will be the focus of this seminar.

Taught by: Ben-Porath

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 512 University-Community Partnerships

Ranging from civic engagement to economic development, institutions of higher education in the United States have long been involved in a variety of relationships with their local communities; in recent years, there has been increasing attention paid to the opportunities and challenges implicit in those relationships. In this Academically Based Community Service (ABCS) course, students will study and discuss the history, rationales, and manifestations of the partnerships that have developed. Through readings, faculty-and student-led discussions, guest lecturers, and policy-oriented projects, students will develop better understandings of the many topics surrounding university-community partnership activities. Among other themes we will consider institutional roles and relationships, service learning, community perspectives, policy issues, and evaluation.

Taught by: Grossman

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 513 Development of the Young Child

This course will blend an explanatory and descriptive account of behavioral evolution over the yearly years of life. After a review of "grand" developmental theory and the major themes of child change (from images to representation; from dependence to independence; from instinctual to social beings), this course will survey the child's passage from infancy through the early school years. While the emphasis will be on the nature of the child--what she/he sees, feels, thinks, fantasizes, wants and loves--these realities will be understood in terms of developmental theory. At each stage, the course will review the development of cognition, personal identity, socialization, and morality in pluralistic contexts.

Taught by: Goodman

Two terms. student may enter either term.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 514 Education in Developing Countries

In recent years the construct of "global development" has come under increasing scrutiny, leading some scholars and practitioners to wonder whether development remains a useful concept. In this course, we will actively engage in this debate through a survey of the development literature in the field of education. We will examine theoretical frameworks and historical perspectives that will allow us to develop a better understanding of what is meant by "development" as well as recognize how these concepts relate to basic educational planning and practce in various international contexts. The course will work from primary and secondary materials on theories,research, and applications used to promote global develoment and basic education. Some programs are carried out by multinational/bilateral agencies such as World Bank, Unicef, UNESCO, and USAID, while others are undertaken by intermediary organizations (such as NGOs and universities) and local organizations or individual specialists. Issues include a range of social, economic and political obstacles to the provision of quality education. The goal of this course is to improve your understanding of how different theories of education and development influence educational policy, priorities, and programs of international, national, and local institutions.

Taught by: Wagner/Ghaffer-Kucher

Prerequisites: Prior graduate work in related areas recommended.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 515 Field Seminar (Elementary & Secondary Education)

This seminar is designed to integrate student teaching fieldwork and university course work through reading, discussion, and reflection. Central to this course will be teacher research, an inquiry stance toward learning how to teach, and a social justice approach to education. Throughout the semester, we will be examining a range of issues through theoretical and practice-oriented lenses that will deepen our understanding of teaching and learning. Offered within the Teacher Education Program.

Activity: Lecture

3 Course Units

EDUC 516 Teaching Writing in Multilingual Contexts

This course introduces participants to a range of theoretical and practical issues related to second language literacy development, with a particular emphasis on writing instruction. An intensive service-learning project offers course participants the opportunity to work with developing writers in a bilingual community organization. The dual emphasis on theory and pedagogy is intended to create space for critical reflection on the characteristics, production, teaching, and assessment of written texts in bi/multilingual educational settings.

Taught by: Pomerantz

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 517 Classroom Discourse and Interaction

In this course students will read research that investigates the role of classroom interaction in learning and human development. Students will also learn how to "do" discourse analysis using real classroom data. Students will practice and critique methods for analyzing classroom discourse data as teachers, with an aim of developing a critical awareness of our own language use and role in society.

Taught by: Rymes

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 518 Authority, Freedom, and Disciplinary Policies

The course concentrates on the nature and justification of discipline. In particular, we focus on how discipline becomes the expression of twin but conflicting premises of education: that children should be encouraged to develop their critical intellectual capacities and autonomous decision-making -- read freedom; that these ends cannot be achieved without the direction and control of teachers -- read authority. Students read classical works on freedom and authority (John Stuart Mill, Isaiah Berlin, Emile Durkheim, John Dewey, C.S.Lewis) as well as more contemporary ones. In class we look at video clips of different practices and discuss readings. Every student selects one type of disciplinary approach to study in detail, inclusive of on-site visits. The seminar paper covers the source and nature of the school's commitments, its theory of authority and freedom (implicit and explicit), illustrations of how commitments are expressed (including discipline practices), and the student's reflections.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 519 The Evolution of Assessment: Classroom and Policy Uses

This course explores the evolution and diverse uses of assessment in four major areas: the historical roots of testing and the development of the acheivement testing industry; the rising interest and exploration of alternative forms of assessment; how teachers employ a variety of assessments in their classrooms; and how policymakers use assessment for decision-making and accountability purposes.

Taught by: Supovitz

Prerequisites: Permission needed from department.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 520 Literacy in Elementary/Middle Schools

In this course, the interconnections of language, literacy and culture are explored in order to build a knowledge base and understanding of how children learn to read and write. Emphasis will be on how to teach and develop literacy curriculum in the elementary grades, and on how close listening and observation of children in their classroom contexts, combined with a critical reading of research and theory, can inform teaching practices. A central tenet of this course is that the best teachers of reading and writing are themselves active and engaged readers and writers. An important goal is to combine an inquiry approach to teaching and learning with an inquiry approach to thinking about how we teach. Offered within the Teacher Education Program.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 521 Science in Elementary/Middle Schools

The goal of this course is to prepare teachers to facilitate science learning in the elementary and middle school. Special emphasis is placed on striving for a balance between curricular goals; individual needs and interests; and the nature of science. Offered within the Teacher Education Program.

Taught by: Bergey

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 522 Psychology of the African-American

Using an Afro-centric philosophical understanding of the world, this course will focus on psychological issues related to African Americans, including the history of African American psychology, its application across the life span, and contemporary community issues.

Taught by: Stevenson

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AFRC 522

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 523 Social Studies in the Elementary and Middle Schools

This course will focus on teaching and learning in the content area of social studies. Curricular and pedagogical theories and practices will be examined for their educational significance, meaningful integration of content areas, respect for students' cultures (past and present), and contribution to social justice issues. Offered within the Teacher Education Program

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 524 Philosophical Aspects of Education Policy

This course, which is unofficially titled 'Justice goes to School' explores the philosophical or normative foundations of educational policy decisions. School choice, standards-based reform, civic education, children's and parents' rights, school finance reform - how do different arguments for these policies view the role of schools in society? What are their concept of the person, and their view of the educated person? We will consider arguments for and against a variety of contemporary educational policies. Students are encouraged, if they are interested, to bring to class educational policy decision that perplex or intrigue them.

Taught by: Ben-Porath

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 525 Fieldwork in Language in Education

Supervised fieldwork for individuals preparing to work with reading specialist/teachers in school settings.

Taught by: Waff

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 527 Approaches to Teaching English and Other Modern Languages

This course provides students with an introduction to theory and practice in second and foreign language teaching. Students will (a) develop an understanding of the history of language teaching practice and how such a perspective informs current day approaches, (b) explore the relationship between the context in which the language is learned and taught and classroom practice, and (c) develop an awareness of teaching principles central to a personal pedagogical approach and teaching philosophy. Students should have a field site where they can observe, participate, and collecct classroom data.

Taught by: Flores/Wagner,S/Hondo

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 528 TESOL Practice Teaching

Fieldwork course for TESOL students. This course focuses on reflective teaching practice, providing a space for students to combine theory and practice as they apply the theoretical constructs of TESOL coursework to their own language teaching. Students will become accurate and systematic observers of and thinkers about their own teaching methodology, in order to continue to develop into increasingly effective language teachers. The theme of a student-centered language classroom will be explored through scholarly literature, pedagogical techniques, and students' own classroom teaching. To participate in this course, a student must be teaching a language class for the majority of the semester.

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: EDUC 527 & EDUC 537

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Permission needed from the department

EDUC 529 Organizational Learning and Education

This course is an exploration of the theory, research, and practice of how individuals learn within organizational contexts and how organizations themselves may learn, as well as the social, cultural, and organizational forces that influence this process.

Taught by: Supovitz

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 530 Community Based Mathematics

This course engages future teachers in identifying and leveraging mathematics learning oportunities that exist within communities. First, participants apply mathematics to authentic community-based problems. After exploring literature about the use of real-world contexts in mathematics instruction, participants apply what they learn to design curriculum. Offered within the Teacher Education Program.

Taught by: Remillard & Staff

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisite: Admission to Secondary Education Math or Science

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 531 Mathematics in the Elementary and Middle Schools

Learning to teach mathematics in ways that foster mathematical understanding and enjoyment for every student requires that teachers draw on different kinds of knowledge, skills, and dispositions. In addition to developing an understanding of central mathematical ideas, learning to teach math involves learning about learners, the understandings and conceptions they hold, and the processes through which they learn. It also involves developing skill in constructing tasks that engage students in mathematical exploration, creating an environment that facilitates reasoning, and finding ways to analyze and learn from one's own teaching. Offered within the Teacher Education Program.

Taught by: Remillard

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 533 Forming and Reforming the Elementary Reading/Writing/Literacy Curriculum

Students explore the theory and practice of constructivist approaches to teaching reading/writing/talking across the curriculum. They read widely and discuss issues that are informed by theory and research in many fields of inquiry including children's and adolescent literature, educational linguistics, cognitive psychology, curriculum, and anthropology and assessment. They write and share integrative journals; develop, teach and reflect upon holistic lessons; and complete an individual or group project of their own choosing.

Taught by: Campano

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 534 School-Community Counseling & Mental Health Partnerships

This course is designed to give students a theoretical framework for developing school-community partnerships for the delivery of mental health prevention and intervention services to children. The course will include examination of several practice programs developed from the theoretical framework to provide services to parents, children, and school staff, including pairs therapy for the development of relationship skills and understandings; a whole-class prevention program to build social-emotional and academic skills in elementary children; and a preventive intervention to build capacity in Head Start to engage parents facing adversities such as degression.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 535 Literature for Children and Adolescents

Theoretical and practical aspects of the study of literature for children and adolescents. Students develop both wide familiarity with children's/adolescents' books and understanding of how literature can be used in elementary/middle/secondary school curricula. Students complete course projects that focus on literature in specific classroom, research, home, or professional contexts.

Taught by: Thomas

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 536 Indigenous Education and Language Revitalization

The course examines Indigenous education and language revitalization from an international perspective, considering questions like: What policies, ideologies, and discourses shape the history of Indigenous education? What roles do pan-Indigenous and international organizations play? What does decolonizing and Indigenizing schooling look like? How do Indigenous epistemologies, ways of knowing, being and relating influence education? What does culturally relevant schooling mean in Indigenous contexts? What are the roles of Indigenous communities in language revitalization and educational processes?

Taught by: Hornberger,N

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 537 Educational Linguistics

For students with little or no linguistics background. An introduction to the basic levels of language (phonetics and phonology, morphology and semantics, syntax, pragmatics) with special emphasis on the relevance of linguistic concepts to education. Other topics may include bi/multilingualism, language variation, and language acquisition.

Taught by: Butler/Moore/Hondo/Paninos

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 539 Teaching Performance Art for Cross-Cultural Education

This class examines issues related to cultural communities and the arts, specifically performance, writing and storytelling as an educational tool for generating cross cultural and intercultural understanding, dialogue and exchange. Assignments will focus on, cross-cultural research and dialogue, and skill building in teaching, writing and performance. Students will also develop an understanding of how performance can be used to enhance classroom activities in elementary/middle/secondary/post secondary classroom curricula.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 540 Teaching Diverse Learners

This course engages student teachers working with diverse learners, presenting factual information about specific areas of need situated within a socio-cultural framework. It addresses content related to both special education and English language learners in four areas: (1) Introduction to Special Education; (2) Learning Categories; (3) Issues in Special Education; and (4) Working with English Language Learners. Offered within the Teacher Education Program

Taught by: Watts, Bialka, Kinney Grossman

Two terms. student may enter either term.

Prerequisites: Permission needed from department.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 541 Access & Choice in American Higher Education

College enrollment is a complex process that is shaped by the economic, social and policy context, higher education institutions, K-12 schools, families, and students. The course will examine the theoretical perspectives that are used to understand college access and choice processes. The implications of various policies and practices for college access and choice will also be explored, with particular attention to the effects of these policies for underrepresented groups. As an Academically Based Community Service (ABCS) course, this course is also designed to generate tangible recommendations that program administrators and institutional leaders may be used to improve college access and choice.

Taught by: Perna

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 542 Management in Higher Education

This course is an introduction to management issues and practices in higher education. It is designed to provide students with working understanding of both the role of administration within the culture of higher education and the contemporary issues related to management of fiscal, personnel, facilities, and information resources. The interface between administrative and academic decision-making will be explored within these contexts and case studies will be used to highlight the concepts.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 543 UNDERSTANDING MINORITY SERVING INSTITUTIONS

Students taking this course will learn about the historical context of HBCUs in educating African Americans, and how their role has changed since the mid- 1800's. Specific contemporary challenges and successes related to HBCUs will be covered and relate to control, and enrollment, accreditation, funding, degree completionk, and outreach/retention programming. Students will become familiar with MBCUs in their own right, as well as in comparison to other postsecondary institutions.

Taught by: Gasman

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 545

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 544 School and Society in America

This course reviews the major empirical and theoretical research from the social history, and social theory on the development, organization and governance of American education, and the relationship between schooling and the principal institutions and social structures of American society.

Taught by: Puckett/Staff

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 546 Sociolinguistics in Education

The educational consequences of linguistic and cultural diversity. A broad overview of sociolinguistics, introducing both early foundational work and current issues in the field. Topics include language contact and language prestige, multilingualism and language ecology, regional and stylistic variation, verbal repertoire and communicative competence, language and social identity, codeswitching and diglossia, language socialization and language ideology, as they relate to educational policy and practice in the United States and around the world.

Taught by: Hornberger/Flores/Moore

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 547 Anthropology and Education

An introduction to the intent, approach, and contribution of anthropology to the study of socialization and schooling in cross-cultural perspective. Education is examined in traditional, colonial, and complex industrial societies.

Taught by: Hall or Posecznick

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ANTH 547, URBS 547

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 548 American Education Reform: History, Policy, Practice

An examination of major trends, central tendencies, and turning points in American education reform, giving particular attention to contemporary developments such as accountability laws and school choice. This historical development of the federal role in American schooling is also considered, as is the history of school desegregation. What is the purpose of "school"? How have schools evolved across time, and how have Americans tried to change them? And what can we learn from this long history of reform?

Taught by: Zimmerman

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 549 Writing and Culture

In this class we will look at writing as an expressive and instrumental part of culture and society. We see writing as cultural artifact and cultural behavior, shaped by and shaping the context of its use. This approach to writing is the foundation for the new literacy studies, which understands writing as several variable, multiple, diverse and changing practices contingent upon specific cultural and social contexts. Readings for the course are drawn primarily from the New Literacy Studies, but also from philosophy, anthropology, folklore, literary theory, literature and linguistics. We will consider ways these approaches to understanding and describing writing can inform classroom practice.

Taught by: Camitta

Course usually offered summer term only

Also Offered As: FOLK 552

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 550 Educational and Social Entrepreneurship

This course provides an understanding of the nature of entrepreneurship related to public/private/for profit and non-profit educational and social organizations. The course focuses on issues of management, strategies and financing of early stage entrepreneurial ventures, and on entrepreneurship in established educational organizations.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 551 Outside the School Box: History, Policy and Alternatives

This course explores historical and contemporary challenges involved in the policy and practice of non-school education agencies and factors that work in service to local school/community settings. Students will explore several historical case studies, conceptual frames, and current policy challenges, culminating in a community-based research project.

Taught by: Johanek

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 552 Video Games and Virtual Worlds as Sites for Learning

Drawing on work from the education, psychology, communication, and the growing field of games studies, we will examine the history of video games, research on game play and players, review how researchers from different disciplines have conceptualized and investigated learning in playing and designing games, and what we know about possible outcomes. We will also address issues of gender, race and violence that have been prominent in discussions about the impact of games.

Taught by: Kafai

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 553 Foundations of Education for Diverse Learners

An introduction to Special Education including the history, the legal regulation of Special Education, and an examination of critical issues.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 554 Teaching & Learning in Urban Contexts

This course marks the beginnings of your year-long inquiry as preservice teachers, and hopefully your career-long inquiry as committed educational professionals, into the challenges of and opportunities for teaching and learning in urban settings. The theories and practices explored in this course are offered as foundations for instructional approaches that are intentional, reflective, inquiry-based,and learner-centered. As we investigate multiple dimensions of teaching and learning (curriculum design, learning theories, instructional techniques, etc.), you will have opportunities to both clarify and challenge the assumptions, beliefs, hopes, fears, and goals that you bring to your preapration to teach in urban secondary schools. Offered within the Teacher Education Program.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 555 Advanced Field Seminar (Elementary & Secondary Education)

This course focuses on praxis--the mutually supporting roles of theory and practice that bring rigor and relevance to the work of educational professionals. This course is designed to give student teachers opportunities to develop pedagogical orientations, to learn from "problems of practice" at placement sites, and to enrich student teachers' theoretical and practical knowledge. All of these experiences will inform the master's portfolio and will prepare teachers to continue to see themselves and their practice as continuing sites for research. Offered within the Teacher Education Program.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 556 Higher Education Finance

Designed for non-financial managers, this course provides students with an introduction to basic concepts related to the finance of higher education. It examines the forces that influence the financing of higher education at both the state and federal levels. It addresses both the macro-economic and micro-economic issues related to higher education finance. In addition, students will be introduced to issues related to institutional finance.

Taught by: Finney

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 557 Developmental Theories: Applications with Adolescents

Focuses on theories of adolescent development and the nature of transactions among adolescents, peers, teachers, specialists, and significant others. Also covers methods of intervening to promote psychological growth.

Taught by: Nakkula

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 558 Developmental Theories: Applications with Young Adults

This course is designed as a collaborative inquiry toward constructing and elaborating upon theories of young adult development and interactions with young adults as counselors, teachers, family members, and higher education administrators. Using a seminar or working group format, participants explore the relationships among developmental theory, sociocultural contexts of young adults, practice (e.g., interventions, relationships), and research. Using literature from empirical and popular, mainstream sources, participants will engage in learning of how young adults navigate the transition from adolescence to adulthood. Specific topics to be addressed include, "the quarterlife crisis," financial needs of young adults, relationships, family, and career exploration and crystallization.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 559 Sociology of Education

This course provides an overview of key theoretical perspectives and topics in the sociology of education, including expansion of formal educational systems; the extent to which educational systems contribute to or inhibit social mobility; inequality of educational inputs and outcomes by race, social class, and gender; and the social organization of educational institutions, including sources of authority, community, and alienation. The course includes both K-12 and higher education topics.

Taught by: Ingersoll

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 560 Human Development

Provides an introduction to physical, social, cognitive, emotional and linguistic development from infancy to adulthood. Major theories related to human development will be discussed along with methods of intervention for individuals in various life stages.

Taught by: Fegley/Frye

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 561 Adolescent Development

An interdisciplinary view will be used to frame biological, psychological, and social development among adolescents. Special emphasis will be placed on how contextual factors influence developmental outcomes. Theories of adolescent development and methods of intervention will also be discussed.

Taught by: Fegley

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 562 Personality & Social Development

The effects of social processes on human development in the interlocking contexts of parents, family, peers, school, communities and culture are considered during the major developmental periods of infancy, childhood, adolescence and adulthood. The course examines what is unique about social developments, how social relationships can be defined, and what are the social precursors and consequences of specific developmental changes.

Taught by: Chen

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 563 TESOL Seminar

A weekly seminar that seeks to consolidate, broaden, and deepen knowledge of the main themes, trends, issues, and practices in the field of TESOL. Students will demonstrate their ability to observe, analyze, and reflect upon their teaching as they make connections between theory and practice, all critical skills for ongoing professional development which relate to the students' final project, a reflective-analytical or action research paper. The project is based on a thirty-hour teaching internship completed during the semester in which the students are enrolled in EDUC 563. The project is individually designed and subject to the instructor's approval. All students in the M.S.Ed./TESOL and Language & Literacy must submit a proposal for the internship in the semester before they take the Seminar.

Taught by: Wagner,S/Paninos

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: EDUC 528

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Permission needed from the department

EDUC 564 Moral Values and the Schools

This course explores whether, and if so, how "values" should be taught in the schools by addressing the following questions: What is unique about the domain of values? Is there, or should there be, a corpus of shared personal and social values? What are the sources of values and how are they transmitted across generations? If schools teach values, how do they address the problems associated with specific codes? The problems of the absence of codes? The tensions between fidelity to personal beliefs and to values of compromise, tolerance and cultural pluralism?

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 565 Contemporary Issues in Community Psychology

This course focuses on three related issues. The history and evolution of community psychology within the political, economic and scientific contexts is the first issue. Second, students examine the discipline's distinction between community mental health and community psychology. Third, students examine the implications of disease prevention and health promotion for the discipline's current status and future development.

Course not offered every year

Prerequisite: EDUC 686

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 566 Cross Cultural Awareness

This course provides students experiential and cognitive awareness through affective exercises and readings. It explores issues of living in a diverse society through a variety of educational strategies including workshops, small group process, guest lectures, etc. It represents the seminar portion of P.A.C.E. (Programs for Awareness in Cultural Education): An "Educating the Peer Educator" Program.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 567 Internship: ICC

All students in the MS/ICC program must complete a supervised internship of at least 160 hours prior to enrolling in this course. The supervised internship is individually designed and is subject to approval; students must submit a Prospectus describing the internship in the Fall or Spring semester prior to beginning the internship. This course offers guidance as students complete the portfolio or reflective paper, which is based on the experience and data collected during the internship. Through this course, students in the M.S.Ed./ICC program will discuss ways to conceptualize the internship experience, situate it meaningfully within the field of intercultural communication, locate and analyze relevant research literature, and prepare the portfolio or reflective paper, with an overall goal of developing the ability to communicate clearly and effectively for an academic and/or professional audience.

Taught by: Moore/Pomerantz

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Eight or more courses toward M.S.Ed. degree in Intercultural Communication. Permission needed from department.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 568 Cognitive Development

This course examines the cognitive development of the child from infancy to adolescence with an emphasis on cultural context. Topics include: origins of thinking, Piaget, Vygotsky, intelligence, development of learning and memory, language development, and moral development.

Taught by: Frye

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: EDUC 560 or equivalent

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 569 Administration of Student Life

This course covers a variety of issues in the management of student services on campus. After examining the historical context of student affairs and the theoretical frameworks of student development, students explore ways to most effectively administer the numerous activities that comprise student affairs programs.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 570 Education and the American Metropolis

Education and the American City centers on major trends and factors that have shaped cities and their preK-16 school systems since the Second World War, including racial discrimination, migration and immigration, suburbanization, deindustrialization, U.S. housing policy, social welfare policy, and urban renewal.

Taught by: Puckett

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 571 History of the English Language

A survey of the major historical trends in the development of the English language.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 572 Language and Gender

This course traces the development of research on language and gender, introducing key theoretical issues and methodological concerns in this area. Participants will consider how gender ideologies shape and are shaped by language use, with particular attention to how research findings can be applied to educational and other professional settings.

Taught by: Pomerantz

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: GSWS 572

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 573 Higher Education Policy : What Can We Learn from Other Countries?

This course examines the proposition that policy makers, educational leaders and practitioners can learn from what has worked and failed in higher education policy and practice in other nations.

Taught by: Ruby/Eynon

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 574 Race/Ethnicity in Human Development

This interdisciplinary course will employ a critical perspective on minority youth development, analyze the existing literature, and propose alternative explanations for observed phenomena. It will consider pertinent issues and theories of middle childhood, adolescent and young adult development.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 575 TPE: Qualitative Studies of Developmental Interventions

This course is designed to introduce students to innovative approaches to the psychology of education, especially with regard to populations from at-risk contexts, sociocultural dimensions of education, and social-emotional learning.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 575

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 576 The Social & Political Philosophy of Education

Is the purpose of education to allow individuals to better themselves by pursuing personal tastes and interests, or should education be primarily aimed at creating good citizens or good members of a group? Is there a way of reconciling these two aims? Assuming that adult relations with children are inherently paternalistic, is it possible for children to be educated for future autonomy to pursue major life goals free from such paternalistic control; and if so, how? How much, if any control over education can be allocated to the state, even when this conflicts with the educational goals parents have for their children? Such questions are especially relevant in multicultural or pluralistic societies in which some groups within a liberal state are non-liberal. Should a liberal democratic state intervene in education to ensure the development of children's personal autonomy, or must toleration of non-liberal groups prevail even at the expense of children's autonomy?

Taught by: Detlefsen, K.

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: GSWS 249, PHIL 249

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 577 Selected Topics in Educational Linguistics

The focus for each semester will vary to reflect those issues most relevant to current concerns in educational linguistics.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 578 Teaching Reading and Study in Colleges and Universities

This course is designed for both pre-service and experienced instructors and administrators who are interested in teaching and/or researching the concept ofacademic literacies and the array of academic skills in postsecondary settings,and/or directing programs in reading, writing and study strategies at the postsecondary level. The course presents theoretical frameworks relevant to theteaching of study strategies, theories of cognitive development, and practical instructional methods. Emphasis is placed on the process and content of such instruction, materials and methods for teaching, and ways to organize postsecondary literacy programs.

Taught by: Cohen, M

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 579 Intercultural Communication and Miscommunication

An introduction to basic issues in intercultural communication, reviewing various perspectives on the nature of culture, communication, "miscommunication" and inter-cultural relations. The course criticizes two commonly held assumptions: 1) that "cultures" are unitary and unchanging and 2) that inter-cultural contact and communication is inherently more troublesome then intra-cultural communication. The course considers ways in which intercultural communication has important consequences in education, medicine, social services, business settings, and international contact situations.

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 580 Developmental Theories & Applications with Children

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an opportunity to consider mandates, models, and methods related to enhancing the learning and development of preschool and early elementary school children. This course emphasizes the application of developmental psychology and multicultural perspectives to the design of effective classroom-based strategies. Students will consider a "whole-child" approach to understanding children's classroom behavior in context. Major assignments will involve gathering and synthesizing information about children in routine classroom situations. This information will be used to better understand children's needs and strengths and how they are manifested in transaction with classroom contexts. Students will focus on one or more students to conduct a comprehensive child study of the child in context. This contact must include opportunities to observe children in a natural setting and interact with them on a regular basis throughtout the semester. The placement needs to be approved by the professor. If students do not have a regular classroom contact, one will be arranged.

Taught by: Fantuzzo

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 581 Advanced Psychology of Women: Counseling Issues for Women

The course is intended for those who already have a foundation in the study of the psychology of women and want to expand their understanding of the provision of psychological services to include a contextual, feminist, and relational perspective. Theoretical and applied practices regarding women's mental health, issues of diversity, sexuality and relationships for women will be addressed

Also Offered As: GSWS 581

Prerequisites: Introduction to Psychology and an undergraduate course in the Psychology of Women or approval by professor.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 582 Theories and Pedagogies of Teaching Writing

This seminar examines various theories and pedagogies of teaching writing in multilingual, multimodal contexts. It explores the historical and ideological underpinnings of contemporary theories of writing and attends to how writing, and the teaching of writing, is shifting in a mobile, networked, and global age.

Taught by: Stornaiuolo

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 583 Content-Based Instruction

This course offers students opportunities to investigate, observe, design practice, and critically evaluate the integration of content and language teaching - Content Based Instruction. The settings investigated include thematic English Language teaching; co-teaching and peer coaching by ESL and content teacher teams; and sheltered content instruction, among others. Standards, integrations of tasks, and special language requirements in various content areas are reviewed.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 584 Basic Counseling Skills

This course will teach basic counseling skills to students not seeking a license in professional counseling as a way to help them connect with and work well with others. It will predominantly be oriented towards skill building. We will review/discuss a selection of basic counseling skills and use in-class demonstrations to practice these skills. This course is required for the Counseling and Human Development Skills Concentration.

Taught by: Schultz,Kyle

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 585 Advanced Group and Family Counseling

This course focuses on the basics of systems intervention with a specific focus on families and groups. The purpose is to develop more advanced knowledge of practical therapeutic problem-solving skills at the graduate student level using ecological, systemic, and cultural perspectives. Students will be exposed to advanced group therapy strategies with children, youth, and adults, with family interventions across various mental health diagnostic populations, and how to intervene within groups and families in which cultural differences and styles are key themes. Students will also be challenged to develop a preliminary rationale for a systemic theory of behavior change. Given the diversity of clients that counselors see professionally, some advanced and demonstrated knowledge of how cultural differences will be addressed in the counseling session and in the relationships of larger societal institutions will be expected. This course will satisfy the Group work II requirement of the MPE program in Professional Counseling and Psychology. The course also fits within the APHD theme of Applied Psychology: Intervention and Certification.

Taught by: Lappin

Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in the M.Phil.Ed. in Professional Counseling Program.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 586 ETHNOGRAPHIC FILMMAKING

This ethnographic methodology course considers filmmaking/videography as a tool in conducting ethnographic research as well as a medium for presenting academic research to scholarly and non-scholarly audiences. The course engages the methodological and theoretical implications of capturing data and crafting social scientific accounts/narratives in images and sounds. Students are required to put theory into practice by conducting ethnographic research and producing an ethnographic film as their final project. In service to that goal, students will read about ethnography (as a social scientific method and representational genre), learn and utilize ethnographic methods in fieldwork, watch non-fiction films (to be analyzed for formal properties and implicit assumptions about culture/sociality), and acquire rigorous training in the skills and craft of digital video production. This is an ABCS course, and students will produce short ethnographic films with students in Philadelphia high schools as part of a partnership project with the School District of Philadelphia. Due to the time needed for ethnographic film production, this is a year-long course, which will meet periodically in both the fall and spring semesters.

Taught by: Hall,Kathleen & Das,Amit

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: ANTH 583

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 587 Human Sexuality

All persons have moments that elicit reflection on issues related to myriad aspects of sexuality. When working with people in clincial or school settings, these issues are ubiquitous. This course will provide a broad understanding of sexuality and specific ways to address sexuality problems.

Taught by: Schultz,Kyle

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 588 Digital Literacies in a Networked World

This graduate seminar is designed to explore how literacy and learning are changing as people participate with digital technologies across intersecting local and global networks. Participants will collaboratively investigate how young people's digital literacies-their culturally and socially situated meaning making practices mediated by digital tools-emerge in relation to constantly shifting technologies of communication and are constructed, reconstructed, negotiated, and embodied in multiple semiotic systems across everyday contexts. This course highlights how digital literacies are situated, and how these socio-cultural understandings illuminate issues of power and privilege.

Taught by: Stornaiuolo, A

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 589 Teaching and Learning in the Global Era

We are living in an era in which economic, social, cultural, environmental and technological transformations are connecting people across the globe in new and unprecedented ways. Given that our world is increasingly interconnected, it is no longer adequate to prepare students to succeed simply as citizens of a particular nation. Students also must acquire the knowledge, skills, dispositions, understanding and aptitude to engage with people from different regions in the world who may hold varying or conflicting perspectives, forms of knowledge, and ways of knowing that are culturally and historically specific and informed. This course will focus on issues related to teaching and learning in the 21st century, and to preparing young people for global citizenship. We will consider what it means to be a global citizen as well as the various approaches to educating for global citizenship that have emerged in the U.S. and around the world. We will also explore instructional and curricular innovations that aim to enrich how young people learn about world regions and cultural traditions, engage with global issues and come to respect contrasting perspectives.

Taught by: Hall

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 590 Gender & Education

This course is designed to provide an overview of the major discussions and debates in the area of gender and education. While the intersections of gender, race, class, ethnicity, and sexuality are emphasized throughout this course, the focus of the research we will read is on gender and education in English-speaking countries. We will examine theoretical frameworks of gender and use these to read popular literature, examine teaching practices and teachers with respect to gender, using case studies to investigate the topics.

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: GSWS 590

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 591 Applied Research Methods to Inform Policy and Practice

The class is designed to provide students with the knowledge and tools to define relevant research questions to guide program design and operations, as well as to guide policy development; to map questions to appropriate methods of reserarch; to judge the quality of research evidence; and to design strong analysis and evaluation strategies for various purposes. The primary, but not exclusive, focus of the course is on education policy concerns.

Taught by: Maynard

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Permission needed from department.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 592 Professional Development in Higher Education

To prepare for a career in higher education, students are engaged in a 20-hour a week assistantship in the field. This course complements and enhances the graduate assistantship. Emphasizing practical application of theory and skill development, the course does the following: provides students with tools to embark on a successful job search; offers networking opportunities with administrators in higher education; and introduces students to relevant and timely literature and resources in higher education professional development.

Taught by: Aikins

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 593 Experiential Learning Design for Intercultural Communication

Provides new and experienced educators the opportunity to learn and practice training design and facilitation using the principles of experiential and adult learning.

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: EDUC676 or permission from the instructor

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 594 Diversity in Higher Education

This course explores issues of diversity as they pertain to higher education, including race, ethnicity, gender, class, religion, sexual orientation, ideology, etc. Rather than focusing on specific populations of people, the course will tackle issues of diversity within the context of concrete higher education functions and problems.

Taught by: Tiao/Staff

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 595 POLITICS AND EDUCATION

How is education a form of political action? In this course we look at the governance of schools, the trust in them and their relations to socio-economic conditions in society, among other topics, using research in education, political science, and political theory.

Taught by: BEN-PORATH

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: PSCI 545

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 596 International Early Childhood Policies and Programs

This course focuses on early childhood development research, policies, and practices in low and middle-income countries. The first part of the course reviews the evidence for investing in young children from economic, health, and education perspectives. The second part of the course discusses current issues related to designing, implementing, and evaluating quality, contextually-appropriate early childhood interventions.

Taught by: Neuman

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 597 Policy Planning in International Educational Development: Theory and Practice

This course focuses on education npolivy in low and middle-income countries. The first part examines global policy frameworks and international institutions/actors that shape education reform efforts. The second part covers the contexts, processes, and tools for national education policy planning. The third part analyzes a series of current cross-national education policy issues.

Taught by: Neuman

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 598 Interfaith Dialogue in Action

This ABCS course explores religious pluralism and interfaith dialogue and action on college campuses. It brings together students with diverse faith commitments (including atheism) to engage with and learn from one another in academic study, dialogue, and service.

Taught by: Hall/Kocher

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 599 History of American Education

This course will examine the growth and development of American schools, from the birth of the republic into the present. By 1850, the United States sent a greater fraction of its children to school than any other nation on earth. Why? What did young people learn there? And, most of all, how did these institutions both refelct and shape our evolving conceptions of "America" itself? In an irreducibly diverse society, the answers were never simple. Americans have always defined their nation in a myriad of contrasting and often contradictory ways. So they have also clashed vehemently over their schools, which remain our central public vehicle for deliberating and disseminating the values that we wish to transmit to our young. Our course will pay close attention to these education-related debates, especially in the realms of race, class, and religion. When immigrants came here from other shores, would they have to relinquish their old cultures and languages? When African-Americans won their freedom from bondage, what status would they assume? And as different religious denominations fanned out across the country, how would they balance the uncompromising demands of faith with the pluralistic imperatives of democracy? All of these questions came into relief at school, where the answers changed dramatically over time. Early American teachers blithely assumed that newcomers woudl abandon their old-world habits and tongues; today, "multicultural education" seeks to preserve or even to celebrate these distinctive patterns. Post-emancipation white philanthropists designed vocational curricula for freed African-Americans, imagining blacks as loyal serfs; but blacks themselves demanded a more academic education, which

Taught by: Zimmerman

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: HIST 463

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 601 Economic Aspects of Educational Policy

This course has two main goals. One is to teach students to apply economic principals to analyze a wide range of educational policy issues. The other is to provide students with a foundation in contemporary education policy issues. The course is designed to address analytic issues relevant to a wide range of educational professionals, including managers, policy makers, and evaluators. The course will be divided into five units: (1) principles of economic analysis in the context of education policy; (2) the economics of early care and education; (3) cost-effectiveness analysis; (4) human capital investment; and (5) education finance.

Taught by: Maynard

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 602 Youth Cultural Formations

This course explores anthropological perspectives on peer-based youth cultures. It explores how educational institutions, media (fashion, music, magazines), and states shape youth cultures in cross-cultural contexts through social processes such as capitalism, nationalism, and increasing globalization. The course emphasizes ethnographies and histories which explore the relationship of these wider social processes to the lived realities of young people, situated in class, gender, national and race-specific contexts.

Taught by: Strong

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 603 Wellness and Addictions Counseling

This course will provide an overview of addictions and addiction counseling from research, theory, and applied perspectives. It will also explore contemporary conceptions of "wellness" and wellness-promotion strategies, particularly for people struggling with addictions. Applied skills for addressing wellness and addiction will be framed within current evidence-based research.

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in the M.Phil.Ed. in Professional Counseling Program.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 604 Ethics and Leadership in Higher Education

This course looks critically at the various theories of leadership with a special emphasis on the ethical dimensions of leadership. Initial classes are devoted to common ethical frameworks from Plato and moving through Kant, Hume and into the present practical application of ethics to leadership. Leadership theory and practice reveal that there is no one approach that is best or that works in all situations. Aspiring leaders must have a variety of lenses through which they can analyze and understand the elements involved in ethical leadership. At the end of the course students will be able to apply essential concepts of ethical decision making and leadership - the role of trust and the ability to build trust, the uses of power, the importance of good decision-making, the conflicting priorities that arise from living out your core values in the workplace.

Taught by: Armacost

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 605 Sustainability in Schools

This course looks at the issue of sustainability across three dimensions: financial,environmental and programmatic. 1. The issue of financial sustainability focuses on the need of schools to carefully manage funding sources and expenditures and raise supplemental dollars to underwrite aspects of the mission of the school. Included in this focus will be the topics of marketing, communications, and development. 2. Environmental sustainability is increasingly emphasized by schools as an educational goal and an operating principal. This topic will include incorporating sustainability practices into school wide decision making to build campuses which are increasingly green and less wasteful. 3. The third and final focus of the course, programmatic sustainability, brings together many of the themes of the entire leadership program as it reviews the ways schools must think about new models of educating children including the implications of such issues as emerging research on learning, environmental sustainability, globalization, and equity and access. The course utilizes the conceptual framework for sustainability developed by the National Association of Independent Schools. Offered within the School Leadership Program.

Taught by: Ball

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: Admission to School Leadership Program.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 606 Development in Higher Education

This course is designed for current aspiring professions in the area of fundraising and institutional advancement. Topics will include: a history and overview of philanthropy, motivations for giving, ethics, fundraising courses, leadership, annual giving, public relations, and volunteer management. Special emphasis will be placed on fundraising in communities of color.

Taught by: Gasman

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 607 Faculty and Academic Governance

Introduction to selected issues pertaining to faculty and academic governance, such as: Who governs American colleges and universities? What are the respective roles of the president, the board of trustees, the faculty, and students in institutional decision making? The course will also explore key contemporary governance issues.

Taught by: Hartley/Garland

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 608 Organizational Change in Higher Education

Colleges and universities today face tremendous challenges--calls by external constituents for greater accountability, scarcity of resources, greater competition, and pedagogical innovations. The need for change, and for change agents, in our institutions of higher learning has never been greater. This course examines organizational change both theoretically and practically in college and university settings. Students will be introduced to many of the most current, influential, and promising theories about how change occurs at the departmental, institutional and system level. Using case studies, we will apply these frameworks in order to diagnose and develop constructive strategies for meaningful change.

Taught by: Hartley

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 609 Counseling for Educators

The purpose of this course is to help professional educators develop an understanding of the major issues involved in trying to help others. To accomplish this, it examines various counseling theories and explores their relevance for working with students and parents as they confront normal issues of learning and development. Through observation, skill building, and practice in natural settings, students will have the opportunity to develop their own grounded theory of helping.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 610 Cultural Perspectives on Human Development

This course focuses on children's and adolescents' development from cultural and cross-cultural perspectives. Topics include traditional and recent theories of cultural influence on development, research strategies, socialization values and practices, and socioemotional and cognitive functions such as aggression and conflict, shyness, and academic acheivement in cultural context. Issues involving ethnicity and social and cultural changes are also discussed.

Taught by: Chen

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 611 Education, Development, and Globalization

This course will explore contemporary issues in international education. The emphasis will be on exploring an emergent body of literature on contemporary processes of globalization in the field of education. The course has a double goal: 1) to provide theoretical frameworks and historical perspectives in order to develop an adequate understanding of 'globalization', and 2) to explore the relevance and impact of globalization as a framework for understanding educational processes in comparative and international contexts.

Taught by: Ghaffar-Kucher

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 612 LGBT Counseling & Development

In the past quarter century, the awareness of the unique issues facing lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals has expanded and become essential knowledge in our work as educators, providers of psychological services, and other service provision fields. This course provides a contextual and applied understanding the interactional processes facing LGBT individuals.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: GSWS 612

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 613 Group Counseling

Through didactic and experimental learning activities, students will explore various theoretical approaches to groups, learn and apply principles of group dynamics, develop familiarity with ethical, legal and professional standards relative to group leadership, learn member roles and functions in group, examine group counseling in a multicultural context, and relate these issues to the leader's interpersonal style and behavior. Applications to specific developmental stages and contexts will be explored.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 614 Child Development and Social Policy

The purpose of this course is to focus on major US social policies impacting our most vulnerable subpopulations of children living in poverty. The class will explore how developmental science can provide a broad conceptual framework to inform the construction of social policies for children and evaluate their effectiveness. Since much of the social policy issues for children in the US public square are currently hotly debated, the class format will incorporate debate and require students to actively research and defend positions on existing policies. Class size will be set at a level to maximize interaction and involvement.

Taught by: Fantuzzo

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 615 Parenting and Children's Educational Development

Theory and research on family influences on achievement development, models of the home-learning environment; parental involvement in schools.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 616 Master's Foundations of Teaching and Learning

The course explores theoretical and empirical perspectives on the questions: What is knowledge and knowing? What is learning? What is teaching? How do contexts influence teaching, knowing, and learning? A central goal of the course is to encourage students to consider these questions and their interconnections for themselves, to examine ways scholars and practitioners have answered them, and to develop an analytical framework to use in examining contemporary practices in settings that include formal and informal, urban and international.

Taught by: Kafai/Yoon/Staff

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: Permission needed from department.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 617 Counseling for School to Career Transitions

This psychology course will focus on the developmental and emotional changes that coincide with adolescents' conceptions of work and work-related activities. As a course in career psychology, students will be exposed to readings from multiple disciplinary perspectives and will be expected to learn how to work with youth as they struggle through decisions on career and moving beyond the safety of childhood and adolescence. In addition, students will learn about the family-youth and school-student relational dynamics and that occur simultaneous to the adolescent's development of a work ethic.

Taught by: Nakkula

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 618 Leadership in Educational Institutions

In this course class members will simultaneously engage in an academic study of educational leadership focusing on Pre-K-12 schools and school districts, and in a continuing leadership development laboratory experience designed to increase one's personal efficacy as leader. A basic assumption for the course is that leadership is a central component of schooling; teaching is considered as foremost a leadership activity, whether with five year olds or high school seniors, and successful schools and districts are assumed to have capable leaders. The course will give particular attention to the recent shift in role expectations for school leaders - from competent manager to accountable instructional leader - and what this shift means in relation to the day-to-day work of educational leaders.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 620 Enrollment Management

Enrollment management is an organizational concept of strategies for achieving institutional goals. The course provides an overview of multiple enrollment management models, the evolution and maturation of these models, the related implications of these organizational structures and strategies, and the benefits and drawbacks on institutions and their markets. This course is designed primarily for masters-level students.

Taught by: Kaplan

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 621 Proseminar in Professional Education

An integrative seminar that will provide an opportunity to reflect, orally and in writing, on the issues of quality, stability, and change in teaching, curriculum and school organization, toward the aim of fundamental reform in educational practice.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 622 International Educational Development Program (IEDP) International Field Experience/Internship

Conceptual background on the role and utility of non-profit organizations in international educational development, combined with 6-8 weeks of field experience working in a developing country, or with an international organization that has programs in developing countries. The pre-fieldwork phase of the coruse seeks to aquaint students with the stages of a project cycle and will introduce students to tools and techniques employed by a variety of international development organizations. Students will work in small groups on a technical proposal throughout the semester. For the fieldwork phase, students are required to write multiple reports from the field.

Taught by: Ghaffer-Kucher

Two terms. student must enter first term.

Prerequisites: Required of (and limited to) IEDP students in order to complete their Master's Degree.

Activity: Full Time Internship

1 Course Unit

EDUC 623 Childhood Interventions

The course addresses the following key questions: what is early childhood intervention? What was it, and what has it become? What are its historical roots in child development research, early childhood education, special education, and maternal and child health? However, while addressing earlier conceptual issues, this survey course also links these conceptualizations to contemporary developments in the field that are of special significance to educators.

Course not offered every year

Prerequisite: EDUC 560 Human Development

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 624 Gender in College

Examined in this course are theories and interdisciplinary perspectives pertaining to gender on college and university campuses. Emphasis is placed on the social construction of gender, gendered institutional norms and practices, gender disparities on college campuses, and the unique experiential realities of women, men, and transgender persons in a variety of roles and postsecondary educational contexts.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 625 Data Processing and Analysis

Use of Statistical Software including Statistical Analysis (SAS) to effectively build a wide variety of datasets for use to address a range of empirical research questions. Evaluate conventional methods for dealing with missing data and apply contemporary methods using SAS.

Taught by: Turner

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: Educ 667 or equivalent

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 626 The Discourses of Teaching Reading

This course draws on varying pedagogical and personal perspectives to explore conceptions of reading comprehension and how it can be taught to children and adolescents. Focus will be given to how certain ways of structuring dialogue about a text profoundly change how readers think about and do reading.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 627 Teaching in the Middle and Secondary Schools

Content-specific sections of this course (math, social studies, science) will examine approaches in planning, implementing and evaluating methods for teaching science, mathematics and social studies in middle and secondary schools. This course is grounded in the belief that teaching and learning require educators to question our teaching purposes and practices through a process of sel-reflection, collegial and student-teacher interactions as well as personal and professional growth. Using a variety of learning theories and perspectives as the foundation for interactive teaching strategies, the stories, questions and contradictions of each content area are examined from a variety of perspectives. Offered within the Teacher Education Program.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 628 Education Finance Policy

This course examines the legal, political and economic issues surrounding how public schools are funded, including equity, productivity and the interaction of finance and school reform. Through readings, discussion and written assignments, students will develop and apply policy analysis skills to the area of education finance.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 629 Teaching English/Language and Literacy in Middle and Secondary Schools

This course is a collaborative inquiry into the dynamic concept of adolescent literacy and its potential as an organizing construct for improving teaching and learning. It provides opportunities to investigate a variety of resources including our own histories as well as a range of print, digital and visual texts and to conduct fieldwork in various middle and secondary school classrooms where youth are being positioned (and positioning themselves) as literacy learners and literacy is being defined, performed, practiced, interrogated, and interpreted, within and beyond the school curricula. By engaging with youth, in various texts and contexts and for a range of purposes, participants will try to make sense of how adolescents negotiate their worlds, in school and out. The approach to literacy is interdisciplinary, drawing from the domains of literature, composition, linquistics, curriculum theory, anthropology and psychology and from theory, research and practice of both university-based and school-based teachers, writers and researchers. The intent is to pose and refine questions about what it means to teach literacy in ways that take seriously what youth bring to school as their own knowledge and passions, cultural and linguistic resources.

Taught by: Stornaiuolo

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 631 Research Topics

This seminar offers students a collaborative setting in which to explore a topical area, craft a literature review and refine their research questions. The course will be of special interest to doctoral candidates who are draqwn to an area of inquiry (e.g., presidential leadership, diversity, access, organizational change) but now wish to elicit from it a discrete "researchable" question.

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: Permission needed from department.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 632 Leadership in Independent, Public and Parochial Schools

The challenges of leadership in both independent and parochial schools are important to consider as part of the broader discussion of educational leadership in elementary and secondary education. The course will identify themes that have implications for both private and public schools and will seek to establish interconnections. This course will examine the history and social foundations of independent and parochial education, and will consider issues of leadership that involve working with the various constituencies within schools including board members, faculty, parents, alumni and students. This course will conclude with a consideration of the relationship of independent and parochial schools to public purpose and the overall goals of education within the contemporary society. Offered within the School Leadership Program.

Taught by: Ball, E

Prerequisites: Admission to School Leadership Program.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 633 Selected Topics in Reading/Writing

Examines a topic of current interest to theory, research, and practice in writing.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 634 Language Assessment

This course concerns a basic theoretical and practical foundation in language assessment, with particular emphasis on assessments used in second and foreign language education. The course covers various kinds of testing (both formal testing and performance-based assessment), theoretical and technical issues associated with test development, administration, the social influences of testing, and future directions in language assessment.

Taught by: Butler

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 635 Assessing Language and Learning Differences

This course exposes students to a wide variety of assessments used to look closely at growth in reading/writing/literacy. Students critique both formal and informal approaches to assessment as well as complete structured observations of learners within diverse instructional contents. Emphases include contextual and affective components of reading/language difficulties, innovative assessment procedures, observational strategies and collaborative inquiry.

Taught by: Gadsden/Campano

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: EDUC 533

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Auditors not permitted

EDUC 636 Young Adult Literature, Media & Culture

This course acquaints students with the ever-expanding body of literature written for young adults, considering the theoretical and pedagogical issues it raises. Readings include many young adult novels; empirical research on adolescent response to literature; and literary theory.

Taught by: Thomas

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 637 Advanced Methods in TESOL

Students employ action research techniques and case studies to investigate challenges in teaching second languages in a variety of classroom settings. Fieldwork in teaching ESL forms the basis for a course paper. Based on student self-evaluation, class members also review and deepen knowledge of such L2 teaching issues as form focus within task-based and content-based instruction, learning strategies in second language teaching, and materials adaptation. Readings on research and theory in second language pedagogy lead to a critical consideration of the construct of "methodology" within the diverse sociocultural contexts in which they plan to teach.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 639 Design of Learning Environments

This course examines different theoretical frames and strategies related to the study and design of learning environments in school, community and online contexts. Physical, social and cognitive aspects of learning situations are considered as students evaluate current research and applications in a variety of existing educational learning environments.

Taught by: Yoon/Staff

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 640 History of American Higher Education

This interactive course focuses on the history of American higher education from the Colonial period through the current day. An emphasis is placed on underrepresented institutions and individuals. Students will have the opportunity to make connections between historical trends and movements and current issues.

Taught by: Gasman

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 641 Language and the Professions

This course takes a micro-analytical perspective on interaction and language use in various institutional domains. Topics include doctor-patient interaction in diagnosis and treatment; trial examination and jury deliberations, as well as informal modes of conflict resolution; and news and political communications. Attention is focused on the interrelationships between interactional practices, institutional tasks and social identities. Students will be given opportunities to mutually engage in hands-on data analysis during the class.

Taught by: Wagner,S.

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 642 Higher Education in American Society

Our nation's colleges and universities are affected by social, economic, and political forces. Societal forces impose a variety of demand on higher education institutions, as reflected by calls for greater accountability, improved access, cost containment, and incorporation of new technologies. This course considers the ways that colleges and universities are challenged to respond to demands for increased accountability while maintaining their commitment to such core values as academic freedom and institutional autonomy.

Taught by: Perna

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 644 Technology-Mediated Teaching & Learning

Students in this course will critically evaluate the role of technology in education. Through a range of inquiry projects, research analysis and hands-on experience, students will examine the potential risks and benefits, as well as strategies of use for technology-mediated teaching and learning. Technologies considered will include: skill-building software, microworld software, visualization and modeling tools, internet search tools, media production tools, and collaboration technologies.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 645 Issues in Education and Health: Disparities and Prevention in Schools and Communities

Drawing upon research and scholarship in health and education, this course aims to deepen our knowledge, understanding, and ability to effect positive change in the health and health practices of students and families in urban settings, using schools and community agencies as sites of engagement.

Taught by: Gadsden

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 646 Contextualizing the School to Prison Pipeline: Implications of History, Policy, and Race

The term school-to-prison pipeline typically refers to a disturbing trend in which punitive policies have led to children being funneled out of schools and into the criminal justice system at an alarming rate. This course: 1. Examines the historical context and policies that have contributed to the school-to-prison pipeline.

Taught by: Harper

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 650 Communication and Culture in Context

This course brings together scholarship in pragmatics, interactional sociolinguistics, and critical discourse analysis to help language teachers and intercultural educators foster pedagogies that respond to the complexities of living in a multilingual/multicultural society. Through a series of readings, small research projects, and activities, participants will develop a collection of educational practices that focus on 1) raising metalinguistic awareness, 2) developing resources and strategies for communicating across perceived social and cultural boundaries, and 3) assessing intercultural interactional competence.

Taught by: Pomerantz/Paninos

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 652 Developing Instructional Leadership in Practice

This course emphasizes how to connect organizational systems with the school's instructional mission. Students investigate how distributive leadership is a key factor in consistent implementation of the instructional mission. The significance of building a community of learners for both adults and children is explored. Participants study the importance of aligning, managing, and evaluating curriculum, instruction, assessment, professional development and instructional support systems with a focus on K-12 student achievement in mathematics and science. Inquiry into effective uses of technology, begun in the fall term, is intensified in this term. Coursework includes interactive case studies, debates, inquiry projects and field investigations. Offered within the School Leadership Program.

Taught by: Ball, Brody, Dawson, and Mata

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: Admission to School Leadership Program.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 653 Field Internship Seminar: Inquiring into Organizational and Legal Dimensions to Principal Leadership

The course emphasizes that effective schools commit to the ongoing learning of children and adults. Systems thinking provides the lens through which students inquire into how the principal's organizational leadership can support continuous school improvement through attention to school climate, program coherence, and effectiveness of instruction. Students deepen their understanding of law and policy, affecting three significant areas: special education, teacher evaluation, and students' rights. Three focused observations provide opportunities to visit schools engaged in continuous school improvement in mathematics, science and the arts. A University-assigned mentor supervises the work of each student, as the 360 hour on-site internship continues. Offered within the School Leadership Program.

Taught by: Ball, Brody, Dawson, and Mata

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: Admission to School Leadership Program.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 654 Aligning Fiscal, Human and Community Resources in Support of the School's Instructional Mission

This course focuses on the effective utilization of resources to serve the mission of improving student achievement. Connecting the daily decision-making of the school, including managing budgets and funding streams, utilization of space, use of time, and scheduling and assignments of staff and students in accordance with the school's mission are emphasized. Students purse an understanding of how a school leader has a public role as an advocate, catalyst, and broker, in spanning the boundaries between schools and the communities they serve. Students develop inquiry projects to further their knowledge of community resources, budgeting, legal principles, school law and school district policies. The Cumulative Portfolio is presented at the end of this course. Offered within the School Leadership Program.

Taught by: Brody, Dawson and Mata

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisites: Admission to School Leadership Program.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 656 College and University Teaching

In this class, students will learn how to systematically plan for a university course, develop a teaching philosophy, create a course syllabus relevant to their discipline and expertise, design and implement evaluation instruments to assess teaching and learning, experiment with a range of technologies to advance teaching, and participate in a teaching simulation. This course also incorporates issues of diversity with regard to teaching.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 657 Advanced Methods in Middle & Secondary Education

Formal teaching and learning are on-going processes that require an examination of our practice and purpose through self-reflection, self-evaluation, collegial and student/teacher interaction, and personal and professional growth. This course is the second half of a content-specific secondary methods sequence that is geared toward teaching middle and high school English, math, science and social studies in an urban setting. Special focus will be on content, pedagogical strategies as well as specific skills and Pennsylvania and national standards. We will work together as teacher-researchers to combine theory with practice to increase our understanding and utilization of an inquiry based, multiple perspective, constructivist approach to teaching. Offered within the Teacher Education Program.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 658 Diagnosis and Psychopatholgy

In this course, students will explore the etiology, course, and prevalence of pscyhological disorders of childhood and adolescence. Particular focus is on the role of these issues in the developing person within the context of family, school, and culture. Major clinical and empirical classification systems (DSMIV and the new DSM5) are examined, as well as some of the diagnostic and assessment strategies used to aid the conceptualization and treatment of these disorders.

Taught by: Richardson

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 661 Language Diversity and Education

Exploration of issues affecting educational policy and classroom practice in multilingual, multicultural settings, with an emphasis on ethnographic research. Selected U.S. and international cases illustrate concerns relating to learners' bilingual/bicultural/biliterate development in formal educational settings. Topics include policy contexts, program structures, teaching and learning in the multilingual classroom, discourses and identities in multilingual education policy and practice, and the role of teachers, researchers, and communities in implementing change in schools.

Taught by: Hornberger

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: LALS 661

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Permission needed from the department

EDUC 662 Picturebooks and the Practice of Literacy

This course examines the formal properties of picturebooks and their use in enabling literacy development. The course uses aesthetic theory, theories of text-picture relationships, theories of literacy and theories of literary understanding, and also exposes students to empirical research on children's responses to this literary form.

Taught by: Thomas

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 663 Sociocultural Foundations in Counseling

The course provides an understanding of sociocultural concepts essential to the work of counselors and providers of psychological services. This course provides a contextual and applied understanding of working with socioculturally diverse clients. The purpose of this course is to expand one's understanding of the impact of sociocultural and contextual factors, social-psychological influences, the role of values, and the interaction of identities in counseling and psychological services. Both intervention and prevention strategies will be addressed. The student will be required to demonstrate a working knowledge of key concepts in sociocultural psychology and the topical areas addressed in the course.

Taught by: Warren/Staff

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 664 Participatory Educational Research in Global Perspective: Theory and Practice

This course examines participatory models and frameworks in relation to international applied educational development research. Through a critical examination of approaches to international applied development research, the course examines real-world models of development research in order to examine questions regarding the nature of knowledge, post-colonial histories, researcher positionalities, and the relationships between concepts, theory, methodology, community, and identity. Course focuses on participatory methodologies as cross-sector strategy frameworks for sustainable, equitable, locally driven educational development efforts.

Taught by: Ravitch

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 665 Research on Teaching

This course is designed to explore the research literature on classroom teaching processes as well as the contrasting conceptual and methodological approaches upon which this literature is based. The course introduces students to the major substantive areas in the field, develops a critical perspective on contrasting paradigms, and raises questions about the implication of research on teaching for curriculum, instruction, evaluation, and teacher education.

Taught by: Remillard

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 667 Introductory Statistics for Educational Research

Scales of measurement; indices of central tendency and variability; product-movement correlation; introduction to the chi-squared; Z, T, and F distributions.

Taught by: Boe

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 668 Master's Paper Seminar

This seminar explores key foundational questions for graduate-level work: How is academic knowledge formed and reproduced? How do we engage with and interrogate the scholarly research? And, how do we participate in the academic conversation around a topic? The Master's Paper Seminar introduces students to academic discourse, disciplinary writing conventions, and research practices. As part of this course, students are guided through preparing a literature review of a topic of their choice. This review, in turn, forms the foundation of their 30-40 page Master's Paper that is required for the completion of the M.S.Ed degree.

Taught by: Aplenc

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

0.5 Course Units

EDUC 669 Seminar in Practitioner Inquiry

This course is designed as a collaborative investigation into practitioner inquiry and the work of inquiry communities in K-16 and graduate/professional school settings, professional networks and community-based organizations. The focus is on conceptual and methodological frameworks and methods of practitioner inquiry and the contexts, purposes and practices of differently situated inquiry communities. Participants will explore a range of practitioner inquiry traditions and texts that go by terms such as action, collaborative, critical, community-based, participatory, autobiographical, emancipatory, narrative and pedagogical. They will also conduct an inquiry based on their particular interests and contexts. The course will emphasize practitioner inquiry that intentionally engages issues of equity, access and culture in educational settings.

Taught by: Campano and Hartley

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 670 Second Language Development

This course provides an introduction to theory and research on second language acquisition. Linguistic, cognitive, social and pedagogical perspectives are considered through readings, lectures, activities, and assignments. Students gain an understanding of research design, methodology, and documentation through guided analysis of published studies and an opportunity to deign and implement research projects.

Taught by: Butler/Larsen-Freeman/Hondo

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 671 Adult Literacy

Teaching reading/writing/literacy to adults for whom English is a first or second language. Topics include contrasting conceptions of literacy and learning; participatory literacy programs; instruction and curriculum for adults with diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds and nationalities; alternative/performance-based assessment; and practitioner research in adult literacy education.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 673 Curriculum & Pedagogy in International Contexts

This course explores the problems, issues, and approaches to teacher preparation and the development of curricula and instructional materials, particularly (though not exclusively) in developing country contexts through a seminar styled class and a hands-on semester long project.

Taught by: Ghaffar-Kucher, Ameena

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 674 Curriculum and Materials Development for English Language Teaching

This course is designed for those who are ready to develop skills in curriculum, course and materials design. The objectives of the course include learning how (a) to become able to analytically respond to readings on curriculum, course and materials development; (b) to analyze the sociocultural, economic, linguistic and occupational contexts of language teaching programs; (c) to design an original semester-long ESL/EFL course; (d) to design original pedagogical tasks and supplementary materials; and (e) to design in a group. EDUC 527 & EDUC 537 provide essential background for this advanced course.

Taught by: Hondo

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: EDUC 527 & EDUC 537 or permission from instructor

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 675 Structure of English

The goal of this course is to increase students' explicit knowledge of selected isolatable parts of the English language and to identify their pedagogical applications with respect to the needs of learners of English as a foreign/second language. This goal is realized through an investigation of: 1)frequently occurring linguistic forms and the rules and principles that govern the way that these forms can be combined and ordered; 2) the meanings that can attach to these forms; and 3) the social functions associated with these forms.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 676 Discursive Approaches in Intercultural Communication

This course offers a discourse-based approach and hands-on introduction to the field of intercultural communication, from the micro-level of interpersonal interaction to the macro-level of institutional practice. Through a series of readings and service learning projects in multicultural settings, students will hone their observational and analytic abilities, while gaining an appreciation of and facility for participating in the communicative diversity around them. Topics will include a repertoire approach to examining language in use, interpretation and metacommentary, and the possibility of intervention to facilitate new communicative patterns.

Taught by: Rymes/Moore

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 677 Information and Communications Technologies for Education and Development in Global Perspective

The importance of the relationshp between education, technology, and social-economic development is increasing in the U.S. and around the world. What are new information and communications technologies (ICTs), how are they being deployed, and for what reasons? Are new ICTs a means for delivering skill-based or distance education information, and in what ways are they becoming a part of societies today? What constitute, then, ICTs for Development (ICT4D), and what role do they play in societies that are 'industrialized' and 'developing'.

Taught by: Wagner

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 678 Gender and Sexuality in Education

This seminar gives an overview of the intersections and interplay among gender, sexuality, and education through theory, practice, current discussions, and analysis of varied contexts in English speaking countries (e.g. the United States, Canada, Great Britain, and Australia). After examining the theoretical foundations of genders and sexualities, we will look at their histories and effects in K-12 schools and colleges and universities as well as explore special topics.

Taught by: Cross E

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 679 Reading, Writing, and Critical Thinking for Applied Linguistics

This course offers international students a hands-on introduction to the practices that constitute academic language use in the fields of TESOL/ICC through a variety of scholarly readings that also serve as an introduction to multilingual writing research. Participants will focus on developing skills and strategies that will strengthen their existing expertise in the following areas: locating, reading, and critiquing academic articles; producing graduate-level written work across a variety of genres; and participating in oral activities.

Taught by: Pomerantz/Paninos

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 680 Evaluation of Policies, Programs and Projects

Basic evaluation policy and methods for determining nature and severity of problems, implementation of programs relative effects and cost-effectiveness of interventions to reduce problems, design and conduct of evaluation studies in education, social services, crime and delinquency, in the U.S. and other countries.

Taught by: Boruch

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: EDUC 667 or equivalent

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 681 Literacy and Illustrated Texts: Picturebooks, Comics and Graphic Novels

Students develop familiarity with illustrated materials - including picturebooks, comics, and graphic novels - while cultivatng understanding of how illustrated texts like these can be used in 21st century elementary/middle/secondary literacy curricula. Students complete individualized and group course projects that focus on illustrated texts in specific classroom, research, critical, theoretical, home, community, and/or professional contexts.

Taught by: Thomas

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 682 Qualitative Modes of Inquiry

This course surveys the field of qualitative research and focuses on foundational philosophies of and approaches to qualitative research. The course focuses on the stages of qualitative research including the development of researchable questions, research designs, conceptual frameworks, methodological stances, data collection and analysis and instrument design and implementation.

Taught by: Ravitch/Strong/Staff

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 683 Survey Methods & Design

This course covers the methods and design of field surveys in the U.S. and other countries in education, the social sciences, criminal justice research, and other areas. It covers methods of eliciting information through household, mail, telephone surveys, methods of assuring privacy, enhancing cooperation rates and related matters. Finally, the fundamentals of statistical sampling and sample design are handled. Much of the course is based on contemporary surveys sponsored by the National Center for Education Statistics and other federal, state and local agencies.

Taught by: Boruch

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: STAT 502

Prerequisites: Educ 667 or equivalent. Undergraduate statistics or tests and measurement.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 684 Measurement & Assessment

Analysis of primary assessment concepts including basic theoretical principles, types and purposes of assessment devices, levels of measurement, standardization and norming, and methods to support reliability and validity; special focus on appropriate test interpretation, fairness, measurement of change, and incremental validity; application of standards for test development, usage, and critique in education, health care, public policy, and scientific inquiry.

Taught by: McDermott

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 685 Career Counseling and Development

Career development is studied as an aspect of general development theories of educational and vocational choice and adjustment; psychological aspects of occupations.

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisites: Permission needed from instructor.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 686 Counseling Interventions

This course will provide an overview of the approaches to various psychological interventions with a focus on theory, key concepts, and therapeutic processes.The purpose of this course is to develop a knowledge base of the underlying principles and approaches of psychological interventions. Students will be required to demonstrate a working knowledge of the key concepts of the psychotherapeutic approaches presented, distinguish between different approaches, and make a preliminary rationale for the use of a particular approach. Students also are expected to develop a critical perspective and demonstrate the ability to analyze theories and interventions.

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: Admission to Counseling and Mental Health Services.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 687 Counseling Ethics & Professional Principles

This course will provide the student with an opportunity to learn and incorporate the multifaceted roles of the professional counselor and assist the student in developing a sense of their professional identity. In this process, the course will focus on the professional role of the counselor; ethics and their application across situations and professional settings; and gaining strong professional communication abilities. The primary goals of the course are to develop the student's awareness of their roles and responsibilities as a professional, incorporating ethical standards as a counselor, increasing professional communication skills, and understanding the roles of counselor across professional settings.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 688 Counseling Practicum

Seminar and lab to accompany supervised practicum or apprenticeship experiencesin schools, colleges, or community agencies. Placement to be arranged by instructor.

Two terms. student must enter first term.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 689 Contemporary Issues in Mathematics Curriculum

Educational leaders and policy makers in the U.S. have long used curriculum reform to drive change in K-12 teaching and schooling practices. This course examines the assumptions underlying this approach and examines the related research evidence.

Taught by: Remillard

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 691 Contemporary Issues in Science and Technology Education Research

This course focuses on topics that represent some of the most salient and contemporary issues in science education research today. The syllabus moves through four sections that address: 1) Curriculum and Content (What and Why); 2) Learning Processes (How); 3) Contexts (When and Where); 4) Teaching and Teacher Education (Who).

Taught by: Yoon, Susan

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 692 Education Policy Issues

This course is an introduction to the process of conducting educational research. Its purpose is to help students learn to approach problems like researchers by examining and critiquing existing research and developing coherent "researchable" questions. Students will carry out a substantial independent project where they will develop elements of a research proposal.

Taught by: Maynard

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 693 Student Development in College Environments

An overview of college student development theory is offered in this course. Specifically, three families of theory are explored: 1) Psychosocial and identity, 2) cognitive-structural, and 3) environmental. The theories are discussed in terms of their foundations, constructs, and applicability to work in various functional areas of higher education.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 694 Organization and Administration of Intercollegiate Athletics

Athletics play a critical role at colleges and universities. This course examines the role of intercollegiate athletics, how they are structured, what educational purposes they serve and how such programs influence the social and academic development of students.

Taught by: Weaver/Staff

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 695 Proseminar in International Educational Development

The IEDP Proseminar covers the broad arena of international educational development. The course is designed to provide an analytical perspective on applied research and policy as undertaken by UN, donor and non-profit agencies, with a focus on developing countries. Several invited specialists will participate in the course. This Proseminar is a required course for IEDP Masters students.

Taught by: Wagner

Two terms. student must enter first term.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 696 In/formal Learning Experience Internship

The In/formal Learning Experiences Internship is a two-semester course that meets throughout the academic year to cover theory, research, and practice of informal learning. The internship is undertaken from October to March each academic year in one of our partnership institutions and includes about 120 hours field work. The course is designed to provide background readings, a discussion forum of central issues in informal learning, and a place to share and exchange internship experiences. This course will be required for all LST MSEd and TLL MSEd students as part of the required Internship Program.

Two terms. student must enter first term.

Activity: Lecture

0.5 Course Units

EDUC 697 Post-Master's Internship in School Counseling

Seminar to accompany post-master's internship. Meets requirements for certification in school counseling and special education. Instructor must approve placement.

Course not offered every year

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the master's program in Psychological Services.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 698 Politics of School Reform

In this seminar we'll explore the political causes and consequences of school reform in the post-Brown era. Coverage will be eclectic so as to give participants a broad, interdisciplinary background in the field. We'll draw primarily from the politics of education literature, but we'll reach beyond and examine work from political science, sociology and history. Rather than the standard categories organizing this scholarship-by level (local, state, federal), decision-making body (school board, legislature, judiciary), or issue area (standards, decentralization, funding)- we'll structure our exploration by considering fundamental conclusions about the politics of school reform: (1) School reform as contained politics, (2) School reform as transgressive politics, (3) School reform as collaborative politics, and (4) Institutions, ideas, & interests as constraints on the politics of school reform.

Taught by: Quinn

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 700 Craft of Ethnography

This course is designed to follow after Ethnographic Research Methods (EDUC 721). In the introductory course, students learned how to use qualitative methods in conducting a brief field study. This advanced level course focuses on research design and specifically the craft of ethnographic research. Students will apply what they learn in the course in writing a proposal for a dissertation research project.

Taught by: Hall

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: ANTH 707

Prerequisites: Must have completed EDUC 721 or equivalent introductory qualitative methods course.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 702 Conceptual Models of School Leadership & Organization

This graduate seminar has three components. One, we will explore contemporary theories of organization as frameworks for understanding how classrooms, schools, and districts function. Two, we will employ a case method approach on several real-world cases developed by Harvard Business School and the Public Education Leadership Project at Harvard University. Three, we will learn from and interact directly with local education leaders and their communities through a series of school leadership study tours.

Taught by: Quinn

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 703 Advanced Qualitative and Case Study Research

This course explores epistemological and methodological choices and stances in qualitative research as well as advanced research methods including qualitative research design and concept mapping, sampling/participant selection, interviewing, coding and data analysis, instrument development and triangulation techniques.

Taught by: Ravitch

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: EDUC 682 Qualitative Modes of Inquiry

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 704 Economics of Higher Education

Covers selected topics in the economics of higher education, including investment and consumption theories, cost functions, university investment practices and principles, and academic labor markets.

Taught by: Presley

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 705 Proseminar in Research & Analysis

This course is designed to provide students with the skills, information, and resources that are necessary to develop a research proposal. This course will also examine strategies for completing proposals and dissertations. A variety of research designs and approaches to educational research will be explored. Through this course, students will become both informed consumers of research and effective designers of research.

Taught by: Perna/Hartley

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: Permission needed from department.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 706 Culture/Power/Subjectivities

This doctoral level course will introduce students to a conceptual language and theoretical tools for analyzing and explaining the complex intersection of racialized, ethnic, gendered, sexual, and classed differences and asymmetrical social relations. The students will examine critically the interrelationships between culture, power, and subjectivity through a close reading of classical and contemporary social theory. Emphasis will be given to assessing the power of various theories for conceptualizing and explaining mechanisms of social stratification as well as the basis of social order and processes of social change.

Taught by: Hall

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: ANTH 704, FOLK 706, URBS 706

Prerequisite: EDUC 547

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 707 Improving Schools: What Works, What Doesn't, and Why

Designed to increase knowledge of what works to improve public schools, what doesn't, and why. Topics include accountability, turnaround and charter schools, Common Core Standards, and other organizational, curricular, teacher and leader reforms. Focuses on how reforms are translated to the classroom, and effects on districts, principals, teachers, and students.

Taught by: Desimone

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 708 Schools as Organizations

Schools are places of learning - but they are also workplaces, teachers are employees and teaching is a job. This in-depth doctoral-level course focuses on theory and research concerned with the organizational and occupational side to schools and teaching. It draws from multiple fields and perspectives, including: organizational theory; the sociology of organizations, occupations and work; educational administration; and school leadership. The objective is to have students udnerstand and evaluate a series of different perspectives from theory, research and policy concerned with the character of the teaching occupation and the organization of schools.

Taught by: Ingersoll

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 709 Peer Relationships in Childhood and Adolescence.

This course focuses on various aspects of children's peer relationships, especially with regard to their significance for human development. The roles of family, community, and socio-cultural contexts in the development of interpersonal competence and relationships are discussed. The course explores possible intervention strategies to help children with peer relationship difficulties.

Taught by: Chen

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 710 Methods of Discourse Analysis

This course introduces several methodological approaches that have been developed to do discourse analysis. The course intends primarily to provide students with various methodological tools for studying naturally-occurring speech. Assignments include both reading and weekly data analysis exercises.

Taught by: Rymes

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisites: This course is designed to follow after Qualitative Modes of Inquiry (EDUC 682) and as such it is suggested that students have some background in qualitive methods before enrolling.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 712 Comprehensive School Reform: From 'No Child Left Behind' through 'Race to the Top' to 'Every Student Succeeds Act'

This course examines how K-12 education policy is designed and implemented in the United States. It uses a systems analysis as the framework for looking at who makes what kinds of demands on the education policy system, how these demands are placed on the policy agenda, the decision making process, and resulting education policies and policy outcomes. The course pays particular attention to the roles of federal, state and local governments in education policy, and the impact of our intergovernmental system on the design and implementation of policy. Students will also examine major education policies and debate key education policy issues that arise at each level of government.

Taught by: Hershberg

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 712, SWRK 716

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 713 Responding to Literature: An Interdisciplinary Perspective

This course deals with the ways in which readers respond to and transact with literary texts, and aims at helping students understand the nature of the variety of ways in which literature interfaces with our lives. Three different types of discourse are read: literary criticism; empirical research on response to literature; and literary texts themselves. Various types of literary criticism are considered, including (but certainly not limited to ) what is commonly called "reader response criticism"; text-based criticism; and criticism that contextualizes literature socially and historically. The empirical research on response deals with ways in which readers of various ages interact with literature, mostly in school settings; some attention is given to instructional design and critique of methodology. The literary texts range from picturebooks to literature for young adults.

Taught by: Thomas

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 714 Law and Higher Education

An examination of the most important state and federal laws governing U.S. colleges and universities, with an emphasis on current legal problems.

Taught by: Roth

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 715 Case Studies in Higher Education Administration

This course is designed to enhance understanding of decision making in higher education administration. Based on case studies, students will analyze, propose policies, generate action plans and implementation procedures, and assess the potential consequences of their administrative decisions.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 716 Public Policy Issues in Higher Education

A study of the most influential federal and state policies, legislation and practices affecting colleges and universities.

Taught by: Finney

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 717 Professional Internship in Counseling I

The course will consist of experiential and small group learning, with a focus on practicing and refining skills related to advanced work in psychological services, including the application of various techniques of counseling, ethical considerations, and critiques of live and simulated counseling sessions through role-playing, audio and visual taping.

Taught by: Watts

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: Formal admission into Professional Counseling and Psychology M.Phil.Program.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 718 Professional Internship in Counseling II

Lab seminar group with a seminar group leader leader is the second component of the Professional Counseling Internship course. Lab will provide students with exposure to others' experiences in different types of internships, working with a variety of different client populations. A primary goal of this course is to help each student refine his/her evolving knowledge of self as a provider of psychological services to others. Students will also evaluate contexts of practice and the professional skills, ethics and practices inherent in effective provision of counseling and psychological services. This course consists of two components: CLASS MEETINGS, during which the full group will meet to address issues related to work in various internships, as well as discuss the development of advanced counseling skills and issues; and, LAB SEMINAR GROUP, which consists of 7-8 masters students with a seminar group lab leader.

Taught by: Watts

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in the M.Phil.Ed. in Professional Counseling Program.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 719 Research on Teacher Education and Learning to Teach

This course focuses on issues of research, practice, and policy related to teacher education at the preservice, induction, and continuing education levels in the United States and internationally. The course is designed as a seminar to engage participants in the study of teacher education through interaction with researchers and policy-makers, through in-depth study of critical issues in the field, and through engagement with teacher education programs. It is anticipated that each course participant will develop a literature review focusing on one or more topics related to critical issues in teacher education.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 720 Teachers and Teaching Policy

Explores research, policies, and practices that promote a high-quality teacher workforce, and effective instruction. Topics include recruitment, retention, mentoring, induction, professional development, certification, value-added, merit pay, etc. Appropriate for students from different programs, including education, social/public policy, psychology, political science, sociology, business, and current and future teachers and school leaders.

Taught by: Desimone

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 721 Ethnographic Research Methods

A course in ethnographic participant observational research; its substantive orientation, literature, and methods. Emphasis is on the interpretive study of social organization and culture in educational settings, formal and informal. Methods of data collection and analysis, critical review of examples of ethnographic research reports, and research design and proposal preparation are among the topics and activities included in this course.

Taught by: Hall/Strong

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: FOLK 672, URBS 672

Prerequisites: This course is designed to follow after Qualitative Modes of Inquiry (EDUC 682) and as such it is suggested that students have some background in qualitative methods before enrolling.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 723 Multicultural Issues in Education

This course examines critical issues, problems, and perspectives in multicultural education. Intended to focus on access to literacy and educational opportunity, the course will engage class members in discussions around a variety of topics in educational practice, research, and policy. Specifically, the course will (1) review theoretical frameworks in multicultural education, (2) analyze the issues of race, racism, and culture in historical and contemporary perspective, and (3) identify obstacles to participation in the educational process by diverse cultural and ethnic groups. Students will be required to complete field experiences and classroom activities that enable them to reflect on their own belief systems, practices, and educational experiences.

Taught by: Gadsden

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 723

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 724 Literacy: Social and Historical Perspectives

A review of the cross-cultural and historical literature on writing and reading with emphasis on the identification of norms and practices which affect the teaching and learning of reading and literacy today. Special attention to the social functions of literacy in work, home, and school settings and to myths regarding the consequences of literacy for cognition, socio-economic mobility, and predictability, and the predictability of citizen behaviors.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 725 Advanced Professional Development & Ethics in Counseling

The purpose of this course is to expand the student's awareness of the multifaceted responsibilities and roles of school counselors in primary and secondary school settings. Through readings, class discussions and guest lectures, it is intended that students will acquire additional competencies and a broader appreciation for professional issues confronted by school counselors and varied responsibilities they have in helping students focus on academic, personal, social and career development in an effort to achieve success in school and lead fulfilling lives. An important emphasis of this course will be on school counseling from an ecological and multicultural perspective.

Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in the M.Phil.Ed. in Professional Counseling Program.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 726 Doctoral Foundations of Teaching and Learning

The course explores theoretical and empirical perspectives on the questions: What is knowledge and knowing? What is learning? What is teaching? How do contexts influence teaching, knowing and learning? A central goal of the course is to encourage students to consider these questions and their interconnections for themselves, to examine ways scholars and practitioners have answered them, and to develop an analytical framework to use in examining contemporary practices in settings that include formal and informal, urban and international.

Taught by: Kafai/Remillard/Yoon/Reisman/Staff

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 727 Education, Culture and Society

This course surveys basic issues in the philosophical and social foundations of education, addressing basic questions about the purpose of education, mostly through reading primary texts. Intended for incoming doctoral students.

Taught by: Ben-Porath

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 729 International Educational Development Doctoral Proseminar

The IEDP Doctoral Proseminar covers the broad arena of international educational development. Drawing on the research experiences of the faculty and of the enrolled doctoral students, the course allows for the analysis of intellectual and technical challenges of working in international education and development, especially around issues of social and public policy.

Taught by: Ghaffar-Kucher,Ameena & Wagner,Dan

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 731 Risk, Resilience, and Prevention Science

Examines the definition and measurement of risk and resilience from the perspectives of developmental psychology and ecological theories of development; introduces students to the conceptual and practical integration of intervention and prevention sciences to address social, emotional, educational, and health problems across childhood.

Taught by: Wolf

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 735 Tutorial Work in Reading/Writing/Literacy

Tutorial in Reading Writing and Literacy, is designed for participants to gain knowledge and insight into the major challenges facing learners in their quest for proficiency in literacy. The course participants investigate and develop instructional plans for the literacy needs of learners in pre-K to 12th grade settings. Course participants will investigate the roles and responsibilities of the literacy specialist as related to identifying the needsof learners and planning appropriate instruction to meet those needs.

Taught by: Gross

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: Permission needed from instructor.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 737 Research in Teaching Writing

This doctoral seminar explores theories and research on writing, investigating current and traditional areas of inquiry in the field of writing studies. As class participants review and analyze theoretical and empirical literature on writing and teaching writing, the seminar will offer students opportunities to compose texts and reflect on their roles as writers in the academy through collaborative inquiry. Participants will think together about the the purposes, functions, and consequences of writing in diverse communities and across school and out-of-school settings. The course will pay particular attention to how writing is shifting in a mobile, networked, global age, and how multimodality, interactivity, and hybridity characterize our composing lives.

Taught by: Stornaiuolo, A

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 747 Biological Psychology

The biological bases of behavior, including genetics, physiology, endocrinology and bioethology.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 751 Introduction to Applied Quantitative Methods for Education Research: Pre-K to 20

An introduction to the interpretation and use of data about education policy issues through the use of computer-assisted methods of statistical analysis. Emphasis is on the implications for educational policy and research design.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 764 Cognitive Processes

Basic concepts, theory, and research in cognitive science, problem-solving, psycholinguistics, memory, perception and social cognition. Special topics may include reading, bilingualism, computer modeling, and cognitive theory applied to education and non-education settings.

Taught by: Frye

Prerequisite: EDUC 568 or equivalent

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 765 Developmental Deviations

Theoretical orientations toward handicapping conditions in children; controversial issues in description and categorization; the relationship of disabilities to developmental (cognitive, social, emotional) processes.

Course not offered every year

Prerequisite: EDUC 560 or equivalent

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 766 Advanced Professional Counseling Interventions

This course will focus on advanced issues in the clinical practice of professional psychology with children, adolescents and adults where students will practice clinical skills in role-played therapeutic situations. Students will be using this class as preparation for the formal clinical examination required by all Master of Philosophy in Education students prior to graduation from the Professional Psychology and Counseling program.

Taught by: Morris/Stevenson

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: Admission into Professional Counseling M.Phil.Ed. Program

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 767 Regression and Analysis of Variance

This course covers design of controlled randomized experiments, analysis of survey data and controlled field experiments, including statistical models, regression, hypothesis testing, relevant data analysis and reporting.

Taught by: Boruch

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: EDUC 667 or equivalent

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 768 Measurement Theory and Test Construction

Design of ability, achievement, and performance measures such as those applied for high-stakes decision making in large-scale assessment and for diagnosis and classification of individuals; advanced true-score and item response theory; item formatting, analysis, selection, calibration, linking, and scaling; analysis of reliability for continuous, ordinal, nominal, and composite scales; analysis of differential item functioning; unidimensionality, and local independence; model contrasting, test equating, and scaling for longitudinal assessment; standards and cut-point setting.

Taught by: McDermott

Course not offered every year

Prerequisite: EDUC 684 or equivalent

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 770 New Models for Postsecondary Education

Taught by: Pritchett

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 771 Factor Analysis and Scale Development

Advanced measurement theory; exploratory and confirmatory item factoring and clustering for self-report, observational, rating, performance, and personality instruments;factoring of dichotomous and ordered categorical data, full-information factoring; scaling procedures, hierarchical structure, full-information bifactor structure, invariance, generality, reliability, validity, interpretation, and scientific reporting.

Taught by: McDermott

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: EDUC 684 or equivalent.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 777 Structural Equations Modeling

Theory and application of means modeling and longitudinal analysis through structural equations, including observed variable regression with multiple equations simultaneously estimated, confirmatory factor analysis measurement models using multiple observed indicators to define sets of latent variables, and regression relationships among multiple latent variables; advanced applications for repeated measures and multilevel growth modeling in educational and social science research.

Taught by: Rovine/McDermott

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: Introductory Statistics

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 782 Assessment for Counselors I

A critical analysis of tests and clinical methods in assessment as related to theories of intelligence, and includes: 1) factors influencing assessments; 2) assessment theory; 3) assessment practices; 4) interpretations of assessments.

Prerequisites: Admission to Professional Counseling M.Phil.Program

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 783 Assessment for Counselors II

Review and administration of assessment instruments in the areas of adaptive behavior, perceptual abilities, neurological functioning, diagnostic and achievement measures, vocational interests, and objective personality measures. Integration and interpretation of results and intervention.

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: Admission to Counseling and Mental Health Services or Professional Counseling M.Phil.Program

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 784 Psychological Consultation

Study of theories of consultation and their applications at the professional level. Methods and procedures in applied behavior analysis are introduced as skills for successful consultation.

Course not offered every year

Prerequisites: Admission to Counseling & Mental Health Services or Professional Counseling M. Phil. Program

Activity: Lecture

0.5 Course Units

EDUC 785 Selected Topics in Professional Psychology

Consideration of research and theory, on selected advanced topics.

Course not offered every year

Prerequisites: Admission to Counseling & Mental Health Services or Professional Counseling M. Phil. Program

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 806 Narrating the Self

This seminar explores, in some linguistic detail, how narrators can partly construct their selves while telling autobiographical stories. The seminar addresses three questions: What is the structure of narrative discourse? How might we construct ourselves by telling stories about ourselves? If narrative is central to self-constructions, what is "the self"?

Taught by: Rymes

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 829 Policy Research Seminar

Study of the roles of scientific inquiry in development and assessment of contemporary educational and social policy. Analysis and application of foundational research, statistical and psychometric methods to inform a variety of policy topics and related issues and problems encountered in policy formation and evaluation.

Taught by: Boe

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: EDUC 667 or equivalent.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 834 Theories of Reading

This course is designed as a collaborative inquiry toward constructing and elaborating theories of practice as teachers and/or researchers of reading. Using a seminar or working group format, participants explore the relationships among theory, reading, practice, pedagogy and research. The course's conceptualization is informed primarily by (1) frameworks from critical, feminist and culturally-centered literatures which foreground issues of equity, representation, and ethics; and (2) current conversations in the field of literacy where the definitions, purposes, and practices of reading have been made problematic. It also invites participants to engage the notion that knowledge for teaching and research comes from inquiry into the questions, issues, and contradictions that arise from everyday life. The course provides historical lenses for comparative analyses of theoretical frameworks and research paradigms as well as opportunities to investigate participants' individual histories as well as teaching and research interests.

Taught by: Campano

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 835 Seminar in Reading and Writing

Participants in the course examine landmark studies in the field of reading, writing, and literacy; explore different approaches to composing critical reviews of the literature for academic journals, dissertations and other research projects; and select, search, and review the theoretical and empirical literature related to a topic of their own interest in the domains of reading, writing and literacy.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 836 Issues in Instructional Leadership in Reading and Writing

Participants will consider current critical issues in Reading, Writing, and Literacy, such as: improving accountability and assessment; approaches to professional development and curriculum development; and the use of scientifically "valid" research to advance literacy learning.

Taught by: Waff

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 838 Applied Research & Reporting

Hands-on experience conducting applied research. Students will be guided through a research project of relevance to education or social policy chosen by the student, with assistance from the instructor. The research entails analysis of one or more public or quasi-public use data sets, such as the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth; the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Child Supplement; The Teenage Parent Demonstration Data Base; the National Profile of Child Care Settings Data Base; or the National Post Secondary Student Aid Survey. The students will prepare journal-length papers based on their research and respond to the reviews of classmates and the instructor.

Taught by: Maynard

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: Competence in basic statistics and computer literacy.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 845 Seminar in Microethnography

This course provides an introduction to theory and method in the unified analysis of verbal and nonverbal behavior as it is culturally patterned, socially organized, and socially organizing in face-to-face interaction, in an approach that integrates participant observation with the detailed analysis of audiovisual records. Students read relevant literature in linguistic anthropology, interactional sociolinguistics, conversation analysis, and embodiment in social interaction. Class requirements include in-class reading presentations, a small microethnographic research project, and several short data analysis reports drawing on differing levels of analysis and differing theortical orientations. Students review and apply methods of audiovisual data collection, transcription, processing, archiving, and presentation.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 860 ISHD Proseminar: Exploring Self in Developmental Context

This course gives students the opportunity to better understand their own psychological development and how this interacts with their scholarship and professional development. Required course for ISHD students.

Taught by: Stevenson

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 871 Randomized Trials and Experiments

This course will cover three alternatives to conventional modeling in the social sciences: (1) design and execution of field trials in education and other social sectors including criminology, (2) quasi-experiments especially contemporary research comparing results of randomized and non-randomized trials, and (3) analysis for descriptive and exploratory purposes. The course themes include causal inference, vulnerability of models applied to observational data, recent developments computer-intensive inductive approaches to data, and related matters. Although some methodological background papers will be discussed, the seminar is case study oriented with readings from contemporary research on the topics from peer reviewed journals and well-vetted reports issued by governmental and nongovernment agencies. Cases will include work supported by IES on effects of Odyssey Math, for example, and work in the crime and justice arena. We will study the work of scholars affiliated with Penn who are actively involved in randomized and non-randomized trials, for instance, and the work of colleagues at other universities (Berkeley, Northwestern, Wisconsin, Princeton, others) and colleagues in non-profit and for profit research organizations such as Analytica, AIR, Mathematica and others that contribute tolearning in this arena.

Taught by: Boruch

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: CRIM 871

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 880 Complex, Multilevel, and Longitudinal Research Models

Design construction, sampling, internal and external validity principles; univariate and multivariate statistical treatment of experimental and quasi-experimental data; computer processing, interpretation, and reporting for simple and complex factorial,repeated measures, time series, growth trajectory, unbalanced, and multiple consistent and inconsistent covariates designs; error covariance structure modeling, hierarchical linear (and nonlinear) modeling, and multilevel individual growth-curve modeling.

Taught by: McDermott

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: EDUC 767 or equivalent

EDUC 881 Applied Multivariate Statistics

Multivariate strategies for hypothesis testing, prediction, and classification including multiple regression, multivariate multiple regression, canonical regression, multiple logistic regression, multiple discriminant functions, factor analysis of scaled variables, hierarchical cluster analysis, and multivariate classification analysis; computer processing, interpretation, and reporting.

Taught by: McDermott

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: EDUC 767 or equivalent and permission of instructor.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 900 Research Seminar in Applied Research Synthesis Methods

Issues in research design, development of a literature review, and dissertation proposal.

Taught by: Maynard

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 911 Issues in Second Language Acquisition

This course is designed for students to be able to analyze, synthesize and discuss second language acquisition theory and research on the basis of intensive reading of work that reflects perennial and current issues in the field. Comparisons and connections are drawn from theoretical and empirical literature on second language acquisition processes, constraints, and interventions. Relevant research methods are also addressed. Topics, issues, and readings are updated each time the course is offered.

Taught by: Butler

Course not offered every year

Prerequisite: EDUC 670

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Permission needed from instructor

EDUC 917 Research Seminar: Language and Power

The course examines the relationship between language, meaning and power in their social context. The course is organised around a number of core themes; Language studies rooted in Critical Discourse analysis; The application of Bourdieu's concepts to this field; multi modality; the growing concern with 'Superdiversity' that links Local/ Global; academic literacies, with particularreference to the writing required in students' own contexts; and methodologicalissues in researching language and power; and we then bring all of this to bear on our own context under the heading 'language in education'.

Taught by: Street

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 920 Research Seminar in Reading and Writing

For doctoral candidates and others engaged in research and advanced professional study in the field of literacy.

Taught by: Campano

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

EDUC 927 Research Seminar: Language Policy and Education

Seminar participants are introduced to concepts, theories, and methods in the field of language planning and policy, which they then apply in developing their own library-based research on specific language planning cases from around the world. Cases may include: official language decisions, instructional medium choices, literacy initiatives, gender-neutral language reforms, foreign/heritage/second language pedagogy and policy, indigenous language revitalization efforts, or other language-related decisions and policies at international, national or local levels.

Taught by: Hornberger

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Permission needed from instructor

EDUC 960 Advanced Research in Human Learning and Development

Selected topics from human learning, human development, cognitive processes, social psychology, and personality.

Taught by: Frye

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

EDUC 980 Research Seminar in Counseling

This course is designed to position students to acquire a more sophisticated understanding of research methods in order to conduct and critically evaluate empirical research in applied and clinical settings.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit