Folklore (FOLK)

FOLK 022 World Music and Cultures

This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Taught by: Muller

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 050, AFST 050, ANTH 022, MUSC 050

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

FOLK 025 Science, Magic, and Religion, 1500 to the present.

The Western world once had its share of witches, alchemists, astrologers and magicians. They are thin on the ground these days, only to be replaced by New Age or cult-like movements. This course examines magic as it once was, explores the rise of science in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, looks at Mesmerism and thesosophy within the framework of radical political movements culminating in the rise of Fascism, and for twentieth century America explores the nature of post-war Big Science and various anti-science movements. No prerequisites.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HIST 025, RELS 116

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

FOLK 029 Women and Religion

Introduction to the role of women in major religious traditions, focusing on the relationship between religion and culture. Attention to views of women i sacred texts, and to recent feminist responses.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: GSWS 109

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

FOLK 082 Ritual In American Life

Starting with birth and working chronologically through a series of case studies, this course invites students to examine the centrality of rituals that celebrate the human lifecycle as well as overtly competitve sporting an political rituals. We will explore rituals that unfold at the local level a well as those that most Americans experience only via the media. Rituals under examination include birthday parties, Bat Mitzvahs, Halloween, Quinceaneras, Proms, graduations, rodeos, Homecomings, weddings, Greek initiations, beauty pageants, reunions, and funerals. Students will be encouraged to critically examine their own ritual beliefs and practices and consider these and other theoretical questions: What is the status of ritual in post-industrial culture? What distinguishes popular culture from officia ritual and secular from religious ritual? How do sociological variables suc as race, class, gender, sexuality, and religion shape people's understanding of, and participation in, modern family life? How do contemporary rituals bond Americans at the local and/or national level? All students will be expected to conduct original research on a ritual of their own.

Taught by: Paxton

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Freshman Seminar

FOLK 103 Performing History

From medieval processions to the Mummer's Parade, from military reenactments to Mardi Gras, communities do more than "write" or "read" history in order to feel its power and shape their futures. Drawing upon traditions in theater, spectacle, religion, and marketing, they also perform their history--by replaying particular characters, restaging pivotal events and sometimes even changing their outcomes--in order to test its relevance to contemporary life and to both mark and contest ritual points in the annual cycle. This course will explore diverse ways of "performing history" in different cultures, including royal passages, civic parades, historical reenactments, community festivals, and film.

Taught by: St. George

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 103, HIST 093, THAR 103

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

FOLK 106 Studies in African-American Music

This course explores aspects of the origins, style development, aesthetic philosophies, historiography, and contemporary conventions of African-American musical traditions. Beginning with the African legacy, we situate the conceptual approaches of African American music within the larger African Diaspora. The course provides a foundation for the advanced study of the various strains of black musics to appear in the United States. Covering the 19th and 20th centuries, we explore the socio-political contexts and cultural imperatives of black music from a multidisciplinary perspective (musicology, ethnomusicology, linguistics, African-American literary criticism, cultural studies, history, anthropology). The range of genres, styles, idioms, and time periods include: the music of West and Central Africa, the music of colonial America, 19th century church and dance music, minstrelsy, music of the Harlem Renaissance, jazz, blues, gospel, hip-hop, and film music. Special attention is given to the ways in which black music generates "meaning" and to how the social energy circulating within black music articulates myriad issues about American identity at specific historical moments.

Taught by: Ramsey

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 147, ANTH 156, MUSC 235

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

FOLK 137 Sociology of Media and Popular Culture

This course relies on a variety of sociological approaches to media and popular, with a particular emphasis on the importance of the organization of the culture industries, the relationship between cultural consumption and status, and the social significance of leisure activities from sports to shopping. Specific course topics include the branding of Disney, Nike and Starbucks; the glovalization of popular culture; the blurring of entertainment and politics; and the rise of new media technologies in the digital age.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Grazian

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: SOCI 137

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Also fulfills General Requirement in Arts Letters for Class of 2009 and prior

FOLK 158 Musics of Latin America, the Caribbean, and Hispanics in the U.S.

This survey course considers Latin American musics within a broad cultural and historical framework. Latin American musical practices are explored by illustrating the many ways that aesthetics, ritual, communication, religion, and social structure are embodied in and contested through performance. These initial inquiries open onto an investigation of a range of theoretical concepts that become particularly pertinent in Latin American contexts^K-concepts such as post-colonialism, migration, ethnicity, and globalization. Throughout the course, we will listen to many different styles and repertories of music and then work to understand them not only in relation to the readings that frame our discussions but also in relation to our own, North American contexts of music consumption and production.

Taught by: Rommen

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 158, LALS 158

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

FOLK 201 American Folklore

This course will examine American expressive culture, including everyday speech, narrative, music, foodways, religion, public celebrations, and material culture through an exploration of the multiple and changing avenues of diversity in the United States. Folklore can be considered the unofficial culture that exists beneath and between the institutions of power that we read about in our history books, and that is what we will be studying--the 99% of American life that goes unseen and unnoticed in other college courses. Some of the topics we will examine are: campus folklore; body art and adornment; contemporary (urban) legends and beliefs; public celebrations and rituals; and the adaptation and commodification of folk culture in popular media.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ANTH 205

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

FOLK 203 Afro-American Folklore

An overview of the major forms of expressive culture developed by Afro-Americans. The course focuses on the continuous development of black cultural expression from slavery to the present, emphasizing the socio-historical context in which they are to be understood and interpreted.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 203

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

FOLK 229 Myth in Society

In this course we will explore the mythologies of selected peoples in the Ancient Near East, Africa, Asia, and Native North and South America and examine how the gods function in the life and belief of each society. The study of mythological texts will be accompanied, as much as possible, by illustrative slides that will show the images of these deities in art and ritual.

Taught by: Ben-Amos

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ANTH 226, COML 357, NELC 249

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

FOLK 231 American Popular Culture

The course will explore the history and practice of popular culture and culture studies in the United States. We will begin by challenging the concepts of "folk," "mass" and "popular" as well as "American" and "culture." Furthermore, we will interrogate various media such as television, film, music, comics and popular romances to gain insights into the conditions for the reproduction of social relations. Through an analysis of audience response to performed or viewed events we will explore how and why people actively negotiate and interpret popular materials. This class will attempt to situate popular culture within a larger social, cultural and political framework. Some areas of popular culture we may investigate include MTV, talk shows, fashion, club cultures, rap and other musics, snaps, pro-wrestling, professional sports, Hollywood movies, advertising, McDonald's and there will be room to explore other areas students may find interesting. We will end by looking into the exportation of American popular culture and its reception, interpretation, adaptation and consumption around the world.

Taught by: Lee

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

FOLK 233 African Folklore

"Despite the overwhelming reality of economic decline; despite unimaginable poverty; despite wars, malnutrition, disease and political instability, African cultural productivity grows apace: popular literatures, oral narrative and poetry, dance, drama, and visual art all thrive."-- Kwame Anthony Appiah from In My Father's House What role(s) does folklore play in the lives of Africans today? How has folklore adapted to the realities of contemporary, urban Africa? This course will investigate the continuation of traditional elements produced in diverse media and circumstances in a modern, largely urban, Africa. Although traditional African culture has been transformed and changed in the face of rapid urbanization and modernity, it continues to provide a means through which people enjoy themselves and comment on a wide range of issues affecting their lives. Issues such as identity, difference, and diversity; tradition and history; modernity and development; wealth and power; politics and political change; and gender relations.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFST 233

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

FOLK 240 Fairy Tales

This course surveys the fairy tale (M rchen) as an oral narrative genre, and in its transformations as literature, sequential art, and film. Topics include classic and contemporary collections from Europe, the United States, and beyoond;issues of "authenticity" and the ownership of tales; fairy tales as folk performance, post-modern pastiche, and material culture; and the genre's relationship to geography, gender, power, and desire. This course will serve as a scholarly introduction to the field of Fairy-Tale Studies. And it may examine works from Matthew Bright, Angela Carter, Emma Donoghue, Guillermo Del Toro, Neil Gaiman, David Kaplan, and Bill Willingham.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 240, ENGL 290

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

FOLK 241 Great Story Collections

This course is intended for those with no prior background in folklore or knowledge of various cultures. Texts range in age from the first century to the twentieth, and geographically from the Middle East to Europe to the United States. Each collection displays various techniques of collecting folk materials and making them concerete. Each in its own way also raises different issues of genre, legitimacy, canon formation, cultural values and context.

For BA Students: Arts and Letters Sector

Taught by: Azzolina

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 193, ENGL 099

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

FOLK 252 Themes in Jewish Tradition

Course topics will vary; they have included The Binding of Isaac, Responses to Catastrophes in Jewish History, Holy Men & Women (Ben-Amos); Rewriting the Bible (Dohrmann); Performing Judaism (Fishman); Jewish Political Thought (Fishman); Jewish Esotericism (Lorberbaum) Democratic culture assumes the democracy of knowledge - the accessibility of of knowledge and its transparency. Should this always be the case? What of harmful knowledge? When are secrets necessary? In traditional Jewish thought, approaching the divine has often assumed an aura of danger. Theological knowledge was thought of as restricted. This seminar will explore the "open" and "closed" in theological knowledge, as presented in central texts of the rabbinic tradition: the Mishnah, Maimonides and the Kabbalah. Primary sources will be available in both Hebrew and English.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: NELC 252

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

FOLK 270 Folklore and Sexuality

Sexuality is usually thought of as being biological or social, divided into categories of natural and unnatural. Often misssed are its creative and communicative aspects. Examining the constructed social elements of sexuality requires attention be paid to folklore in groups, between individuals and on the larger platform of popular technological media. The most interesting locations for exploration are those places where borderlands or margins, occur between genders, orientations and other cultural categories. A field-based paper will be required that must include documentary research.

Taught by: Azzolina

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: GSWS 270

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

FOLK 280 Jewish Folklore

The Jews are among the few nations and ethnic groups whose oral tradition occurs in literary and religious texts dating back more than two thousand years. This tradition changed and diversified over the years in terms of the migrations of Jews into different countries and the historical, social, and cultural changes that these countries underwent. The course attempts to capture the historical and ethnic diversity of Jewish folklore in a variety of oral literary forms. A basic book of Hasidic legends from the 18th century will serve as a key text to explore problems in Jewish folklore relating to both earlier and later periods.

Taught by: Ben-Amos

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: COML 283, JWST 260, NELC 258

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

FOLK 299 Independent Study

Directed study at the sophomore level.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

FOLK 323 Material Life in America, 1600-1800

This course will explore the history of America's use and fascination with material goods between 1600 and 1860. We will examine such issues as the transferal of European traditions of material culture to the New World, the creationof American creolized forms, the impact of reformers in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, and the development of regional landscapes. Thematic issues will include consumerism, objects as symbolic communication and metaphor, and the complementary issues of archaeology and history of art in material culture study.

Taught by: St. George

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HIST 323

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

FOLK 360 Native American Folklore

A survey of the indigenous oral literaturres of North America that will read Native American myths and other traditional narratives with the primary aim to exploring their meanings to Native people. Topics will include, among other things, moral and religious significance, performance, aesthetics, humor, and the relationship of myth to landscape and individual life experience. The course will also place the study of Native American folklore in the context of the history of scholarship, and current issues such as cultural renewal, language endangerment, cultural representation, and cultural property rights.

Taught by: J.Berman

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

FOLK 399 Independent Study

Directed study at the junior level.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

FOLK 406 Folklore and the Supernatural

Some beliefs in the supernatural have not diminished appreciably in modern cultures, in spite of many predictions that they would do so. This course will examine traditional beliefs about supernatural beings, supernatural realms, and humans who interact with these, as well as the historical development of Western ideas of "the supernatural" itself.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

FOLK 420 Culture, Communication, and Body Language

Our perception and interpretation of body language is often subliminal, but is crucial in all communication. This course will develop skills in observation and analysis of nonverbal behavior, with a particular emphasis on cross cultural communication. In contemporary society, the analysis of nonverbal communication has applications in education, psychology, business, advertising, medicine, police work, the justice system, the military, religion, sports, and politics. As video and digital cameras are increasingly being placed in public (and private!) locations, the ethical questions of why, how, and by whom body movements and images are analyzed become a topic of primary importance for society. Clothing, scents, gestures, eye contact, silence, music, dance, the built environment -- all are used to construct relationships and develop markets for the new century. Readings from a number of disciplinary perspectives will give us the opportunity to investigate these and other issues related to the body and to nonverbal communication in multicultural societies.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

FOLK 436 Urban Folklore

This course examines the emergent aesthetic and expressive traditions of urban environments. Cities are unique places with a wide range of folkloric traditions, including neighborhood stories, ethnic festivals, and folk art. We will examine the material, customary, and verbal traditions that emerge in everyday life, including contemporary legends, urban agriculture and food ways, public displays and celebrations, body art, children s play, and Philadelphia s ethnic arts. We will consider how these contemporary practices may be understood within a traditional folklore framework, as well as what these practices reveal about contemporary values, anxieties, and concerns. Course work will involve local field observations and will be of use to anyone studying human interaction, creative processes, or urban ethnography.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: URBS 436

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

FOLK 485 Japanese Theatre

Japan has one of the richest and most varied theatrical traditions in the world. In this course, we will examine Japanese theater in historical and comparative contexts. The readings and discussions will cover all areas of the theatrical experience (script, acting, stage design, costumes, music, audience). Audio-visual material will be used whenever appropriate and possible. The class will be conducted in English, with all English materials.

Taught by: Kano

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: COML 385, EALC 255, THAR 485

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

FOLK 499 Independent Study

Directed study at the senior level.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

FOLK 503 Issues in Folklore Theory

"Fieldwork" is the term folklorists and scholars in related fields use to describe the process by which they arrive at their discipline's subject matter. This includes everything from the pragmatic issues of collecting and documenting materials to the complex relations involved whken people study people. Readings, short writing assignments, and class discussions will probe this spectrum of concerns comprehensively. Brief exercises are planned to experience different aspects of fieldwork. On this background of theory and practice, students will work toward designing a fieldwork based project and draft a funding proposal.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ANTH 503

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: An introduction to folklore for graduate students, concentrating upon certain key issues in the theory and history of the discipline.

FOLK 518 American Vernacular Architecture

This course explores the form and development of America's built landscape -- its houses, farm buildings, churches, factories, and fields -- as a source of information on folk history, vernacular culture, and architectural practice.

Taught by: St. George

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HSPV 528

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

FOLK 531 Prose Narrative

The topics of discussion in the course are the following: the nature of narrative, narrative taxonomy and terminology, performance in storytelling events, the transformation of historical experience into narrative, the construction of symbolic reality, the psycho-social interpretation of folktales, the search for minimal units, the historic-geographic method in folktale studies, the folktale in history and the history of folktale research.

Taught by: Ben-Amos

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: NELC 582

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

FOLK 532 Proverb, Riddle and Speech Metaphor

Through readings and collaborative projects this working seminar will explore the place of metaphor in the genres of proverb and riddle and examine their position in oral communication in traditional and modern societies. Critical readings of former definitions and models of riddles and metaphors will enable students to obtain a comprehensive perspective of these genres that will synthesize functional, structural, metaphoric, and rhetoric theories.

Taught by: Ben-Amos

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 529

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

FOLK 541 Academic Writing and Research Design in the Arts and Sciences

Have you ever noticed that scholars in different academic disciplines seem to speak different languages? Have you wondered how scholars put together a plan for their research, explain their findings, and organize and write their papers? This class is designed to introduce MLA students and other advanced students to the research and writing conventions used by scholars in the arts and sciences. With attention to disciplines in the humanities, social sciences, and sciences, we will identify and explore some of the theories, sources, language, and qualitative and quantitative methodologies that scholars use as they conduct original research in their fields. Throughout the class, we'll also discuss writing conventions across the arts and sciences, with special attention to the structure of argument; the use of evidence; voice and style in both traditional academic writing and more innovative forms of writing; and documentation conventions. Students will develop an original research project through incremental writing assignments, and will write a formal research proposal (15-20 pages), which can be used as their Capstone proposal if they wish.

Taught by: Rabberman

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: MLA 541

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

FOLK 549 Structural Analysis

In folklore scholarship, structural analysis extends over several genres. In this course we will examine the analysis of genres from structural perspectives, the critique of structural analysis and the current constructive directions that have emerged in the field in response to criticism of structuralism.

Taught by: Ben-Amos

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANTH 545

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

FOLK 603 Food, Culture, and Society

Behind a simple proverb like "You are what you eat" lies a great deal of food for thought. Human beings have always elaborated on the biological necessity of eating, and this course will explore the myriad ways in which people work, think, and communicate with food. The course will survey the major approaches from folklore, anthropology and related fields toward the role of food, cookery, feasting and fasting in culture. Among the topics to be addressed are gender roles and differences in foodways, the significance of food in historical transformations, the transmission of foodways in writing and publishing, the relationship of foodways to ethnicity and region, the intimate relationship between food and religion, and foodways in the global market place. Short exercises and a term project will provide students with opportunities to research and write about foodways from different angles.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANTH 601

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

FOLK 605 Anthropology of Music

This seminar in ethnomusicology examines music from a cultural perspective. We investigate theoretical and methodological issues that arise when music is situated within an ethnographic context. Theories from anthropology and folklore are studied as they have been applied in ethnomusicology, including structural-functionalism, structuralism, symbolic anthropology, and performance theory. Topics include music and social structure; ritual and performance; social change and historical process; class, ethnic identity, and gender. Case studies from around the globe enrich this exploration of music in culture.

Taught by: Muller

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ANTH 605, COML 605, MUSC 605

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

FOLK 606 History of Folklore Studies

A survey of the theoretical basis and the historical development of research in international and American folkloristics.

Taught by: Ben-Amos

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

FOLK 620 Feminist Theories

This course gives students the opportunity to engage with the most significant theoretical influences upon feminist thought and historical scholarship in the last 35 years. Foucault, Bourdieu, Rubin, Butler, and Freud are just some of the theorists we will discuss. We will also incorporate recent works in feminist film theory and queer theory. Our focus is twofold: working collectively through difficult theory that is too daunting to tackle alone, and exploring possible applications of feminist theory for feminist politics and historical studies of women, gender and sexuality. Approximately half of our course reading will be devoted to work designated as "theory" and the other half to recent applications by historians.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: HIST 620

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: When the topic is "Feminist Theories," FOLK 620 will be crosslisted and the following description applies.

FOLK 629 Theories of Myth

Theories of myth are the center of modern and post-modern, structural and post-structural thought. Myth has served as a vehicle and a metaphor for the formulation of a broad range of modern theories. In this course we will examine the theoretical foundations of these approaches to myth focusing on early thinkers such as Vico, and concluding with modern twentieth century scholars in several disciplines that make myth the central idea of their studies.

Taught by: Ben-Amos

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 662, NELC 683, RELS 605

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

FOLK 639 Issues in Cultural Studies

This course tracks the different theoretical appropriations of "culture" and examines how the meanings we attach to it depend on the perspectives through which we define it. The course first addresses perspectives on culture suggested by anthropology, sociology, communication, and aesthetics, and then considers the tensions across academic disciplines that have produced what is commonly known as "cultural studies." The course is predicated on the importance of becoming cultural critics versed in alternative ways of naming cultural problems, issues, and texts. The course aims not to lend closure to competing notions of culture but to illustrate the diversity suggested by different approaches.

Taught by: Zelizer

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 639, COMM 639

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

FOLK 650 Folklore and Critical Regionalism

In tandem with global political and economic restructuring, and the related unsettling of national and local identities, scholarship on place has burgeoned. Recently, scholars from multiple disciplines have called for a shift from identity-centered approaches to the study of place and region to a more critical assessment of how the encounter of the local with "the larger than local" is articulated (Shuman, 1993). "Critical regionalism," a term hailing from architectual theory, names an effort to "frame a dialogue between localized dimensionality and the imperatives of international architecture" (Frampton, 1981). One way of framing this dailogue is to examine the imaginaries that span disjunct places "twinned" through those larger than local processes, imaginaries that regionalize from within (Herr, 1996). What are the foundations for such a project in folkloristics, and what is the role of ethnography in cultivating critical regionalism? To get at such questions, we will examine selected regional ethnographies and place-based folklore programs. Work for the course will include 1) evaluating a regional ethnography and a public program inlight of critical regionalist theory and 2) developing, with a partner or group, a proposal for a multi-site kethnography anchored partly in the mid-Atlantic region.

Taught by: Hufford, M.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

FOLK 702 Practicum

Adanced students may arrange for a practicum. The nature of the learning task and the work to be completed must be discussed both with the student's advisor and the practicum supervisor at the hosting organization or institution. Suitable practicum sites are museums, community or state arts organizations, not-for-profit organizations in the realm of cultural programming and advocacy, etc. The practicum may be taken for credit only once.

Taught by: Hufford, M.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

FOLK 706 Culture/Power/Identities

This course will introduce students to a conceptual language and the theoretical tools to analyze the complex dynamics of racial, ethnic, gender, sexual, and class differences. The students will critically examine the interrelationships between culture, power, and identities through the recent contributions in cultural studies, critical pedagogy and post-structuralist theory and will explore the usefulness of these ideas for improving their own work as researchers and as practitioners.

Taught by: Hall

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: ANTH 704, EDUC 706, URBS 706

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

FOLK 715 Seminar in Ethnomusicology

Seminar on selected topics in ethnomusicology. Freedom is a pervasive idea in the twentieth century, in the United States and elsewhere. This seminar will examine a range of texts concerned with the idea of freedom, politically, philosophically, and musically. A key part of the seminar will focus on free jazz, as it has been recorded in the twentieth century, and as it occurs in live performances on Penn campus and elsewhere in Philadelphia.

Taught by: Muller

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFST 705, ANTH 705, COML 715, GSWS 705, MUSC 705

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Open to graduate students from all departments

FOLK 725 Bodylore

Bodylore, a term coined in the late 1980s by folklorist Katharine Young, names an emerging subfield focused on the body's role in the making of social meanings. In this seminar, we'll consider the body as it is theorized by Bakhtin, Bourdieu, Douglas, Harvey, Stewart, Young, and others, and we'll turn to selected ethnographic case studies to explore problems of embodiment. How does the body enact the discourses that constitute it? How do our ways of imagining and interpreting the body bear on our ways of ordering the social and natural world? How is the body's dual status as both mode and object of knowing (Stewart) negotiated in ethnographic and scientific practice? How might a more humanistic ethnography undo and displace the dualisms of mind and body, body and self, and perhaps even return us to the body as a measure of all things (Harvey)? Work for the course will include in-class presentations, participation in electronic and face-to-face discussion about the readings, and a final paper.

Taught by: Hufford, M

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANTH 725

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

FOLK 770 Seminar in Afro-American Music

This seminar treats selected aspects of the history, aesthetics, criticism and historiography of African-American music. Topics will vary each time this course is offered.

Taught by: Ramsey

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 771, MUSC 770

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

FOLK 999 Independent Study and Research

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit