Government Administration (GAFL)

GAFL 500 Half-Term Electives

Descriptions for each section can be found by clicking the provided link. Section 011 Influencing Public Policy. Section 012 Organizatioinal Leadership and Communication. Section 021 Designing Thinking for Social Entrepreneurs. Section 022 Project Management in the Public Sector. Section 023 Campaign Management: How to Run and Win. Please direct any issues or inquiries to felsinstitute@sas.upenn.edu.

One-term course offered either term

Corequisites: Must be taken with corresponding GAFL 500 section in opposing session. E.g. GAFL 500 011 and 023. This completes the 1 CU.

Activity: Seminar

0.5 Course Units

Notes: This is a "hybrid" course, with synchronous, online meetings and once-monthly, on-campus meetings in Philadelphia, PA. On-campus meetings vary by term. Please read the description for dates and times. Also, please note there is an additional $150 online course fee. Half-term electives enable students to engage with a greater number of topics over the span of a semester. Each elective covers different material. These courses are 0.5 CU each. Students will need to take one in session 1 and one in session 2 to receive a full CU. Fall 2017 on-campus meetings will be held on the following Fridays and Saturdays from 2-5:30pm: First session: September 8 9, October 13 14 Second session: November 10 11, December 1 2

GAFL 502 Public Communications

Successful leaders must be able to convey their integrity and their ideas, their vision and their values clearly and convincingly in public settings. By analyzing great political speeches and affording students the opportunity to prepare and deliver different types of speeches, this course teaches the fundamentals of persuasive public speaking while encouraging students to develop their own voice. This is a performance course. Students will gain skill and confidence in their speech writing and public speaking skills through practice, peer feedback, and extensive professional coaching. Class lectures and discussions will focus on persuasive stragegies and techniques for handling community meetings, Q and A sessions, and interactions with the media.

Taught by: Benedict (Fall & Spring); Besnoff (Summer)

Course offered summer, fall and spring terms

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: This course has seats reserved for Fels' students and gives priority to grad students. Post-bacc students, contact Joshua Power (joshuarp@sas.upenn.edu) Undergraduate students, contact Joshua Power 2 weeks before the start of the pertinent term to request a seat. Seats are not guaranteed to post-bacc or undergraduate students.

GAFL 506 The Problem of Jobs: The Philadelphia Story

Once the "workshop of the world" with a diverse manufacturing economy, the City of Philadelphia has lost a huge proportion of its historical economic base in the past 60 years. Today, Philadelphia struggles to find its competitive advantage. Yet, it has tremendous assets that can be leveraged. This course will explore the rise and fall of Philadelphia's manufacturing economy, efforts to forestall its decline in the 1960s and 70s, the racial and gender dynamics of its employment ecosystem, and contemporary strategies to create a sustainable local economy. We will focus on the emerging national recognition of place-based economic development strategies, including the revival of downtown residential living, tourism, and hospitality, and the role of institutions, such as universities and hospitals, in the revitalization of urban America. The course will combine readings in economic and social history and urban economics with case study analyses of local policies aimed at stimulating growth.

Taught by: Hornstein

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GAFL 511 Reinventing Nonprofits

Course offered summer, fall and spring terms

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GAFL 515 Public Finance Leadership in the New Fiscal Reality

Several factors are intersecting upon U.S. local governments including: muted economic growth, demographics, technological change, ineffective monetary & fiscal policy, and political shenanigans. These are having a profound impact on local government financial health. Many local governments are struggling to structurally balance their budgets, even now several years into one of the longest U.S. post-WWII economic recoveries. Expenditure demand, especially because of rising employee pension and OPEB benefits, is rising faster than expected. Revenues are not rising as quickly as they have historically. This New Fiscal Reality is redefining the concept of municipal distress. Further, the options local governments have to respond to distress may be changing. It might be necessary for local governments to move away from typical solutions like distressed municipality programs and other state level aid. If the current financial trajectory continues, some local governments will not be able to deliver the same service-level they have in the past. New solutions are required. This class will 1) define the New Fiscal Reality; 2) review essential public finance concepts and relationships; 3) study past and recent examples of financial distress and prescribed solutions; 4) survey the current local government financial landscape; and 5) identify solutions public finance leaders can institute for the future. Several local government finance, political and policy experts will speak during the semester. A heavy amount of student engagement is expected to be completed in the form of research, group work, writing, and the critiquing of other students/ work.

Taught by: Kozlik

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GAFL 517 Quantitative Tools for Consulting

The purpose of the course is to study the theory and application of certain, key quantitative methods utilized in financial and fiscal decision-making in state and local governments: defining and measuring efficiency and equity; statistical analysis, multivariate analysis, linear and multipole regression; inter-temporal decision-making; and cost-benefit analysis. Primary emphasis will be on understanding the context and quantitative basics of these methods to prepare students for effective careers in state and local governments. Each student should have a basic understanding of market economics, the roles of government in our market economy, accounting/budgeting basics, and the Philadelphia metro area economy and government.

Taught by: Lee Young Huang

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GAFL 520 Marketing & Fundraising for Non-Profit Organizations

Fundraising and marketing are complementary tools for building revenue streams and fulfilling the program objectives of nearly every nonprofit organization. This course develops students' ability to market a nonprofit to mission recipients and prospective donors and to solicit funds from individuals and organizations. Through lectures, readings, discussions, and assignments, students are actively engaged in learning how to help an organization achieve its mission and objectives. This includes but is not limited to the assessing an organization's marketing and fundraising capabilities; identifying, segmenting,and creating relationships with target markets and donors; building infrastructure to properly seek and steward gifts; using technology to fulfill marketing and fundraising objectives; and focusing on fundraising and marketing methods such as social media, direct response, events, major gifts, planned giving, and others.

Taught by: Hugg

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Hybrid Course

1 Course Unit

Notes: This is a "hybrid" course, with synchronous, online meetings and once-monthly, on-campus meetings at the Fels Institute of Government in Philadelphia, PA. On-campus meetings vary by term. Please read the description for dates and times. Also, please note there is an additional $150 online course fee.

GAFL 521 Advanced Public Management

TBA

Taught by: Lim

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Hybrid Course

1 Course Unit

GAFL 526 Municipal Bonds

The course provides a comprehensive overview of the $3.7 trillion municipal bond market, with a focus on public finance investment banking; capital project financing for state and local governments including water, sewer, mass transit and road projects, and non-profit financing for educational and healthcare institutions; the legal and regulatory framework governing the municipal bonds market; rating agency analysis; quantitative modeling; and investor perspectives.

Taught by: Steven Genyk

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GAFL 527 Community Development and Qualitative Methods

Urban planning and community development involve attempting to understand (and then propose methods for solving) complex problems arising from our shared experience of living together in communities. These wicked problems (Rittel & Weber, 1973) often arise from multiple co-occurring influences; economic, socio-cultural, political, geographic/geological, psychological, etc. The fluid and multi-dimensional nature of these problems, therefore, calls for a fluid and multi-dimensional approach to understanding them. Nonetheless, for the better part of the last half a century the majority of efforts to approach such dilemmas has relied largely on quantitative research methods. While quantitative approaches to understanding community dynamics certainly have a demonstrated value, an over-reliance on such methods can come at the expense of the more nuanced understanding available through qualitative research approaches. Quantitative methods are useful in exploring questions such as where, when, who and how many. They are less effective, however, in answering questions of why and how. For answers to these sorts of questions we must turn to qualitative research methods.

Taught by: Terence Milstead

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GAFL 528 Critical Issues in Public Finance

The Course, Critical Issues in Public Finance will consider contemporary issuesaffecting the fiscal state of local governments. Covered will be issues that have distressed municipalities; the policies/initiatives that seek to rectify such including privatization/public private partnerships; reformation of municipal pensions; sustainable education funding alternatives; and tax policies aimed at promoting economic growth. Students will be assigned to a team, which will identify and provide a solution for an issue or issues plaguing a fictional government. Each team will prepare a written report and make a presentation all of which will constitute the final project. Assignments will serve as the building blocks for the final written work product and presentation developed by each team. The class is divided into four modules. The first module will take a historical look at events behind fiscal distress in municipalities and then explore current day drivers that are causing the same today. Modules two, three and four will examine some of the tools that have been used successfully or otherwise to remediate the drivers of fiscal distress. In each module case studies will be used to further analyze the particular fiscal challenge of a municipality. Written assignments will be based on case studies. Summer 2017 On-Campus Meetings are 9:30am-1:00pm on Fridays--May 19, June 23, and July 21 and Saturdays--May 20, June 24, and July 22

Taught by: Olanipekun-Lewis

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Hybrid Course

1 Course Unit

Notes: This is a "hybrid" course, with synchronous, online meetings and once-monthly, on-campus meetings in Philadelphia, PA. On-campus meetings vary by term. Please read the description for dates and times. Also, please note there is an additional $150 online course fee.

GAFL 529 Nonprofit Financial Management

The course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the primary financial management issues and decisions that confront senior management in nonprofits and government. Students will examine financial analysis techniques from both a practical and strategic perspective as they examine operating and capital decisions. The objective of the course is to allow the student to understand how managers integrate the various discrete financial decisions within a broader framework that allows them to analyze, develop and execute a coherent overall financial strategy.

Taught by: Rosenzweig, Janet

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GAFL 530 Evidence Based Policies of Economic and Political Development

This class provides a "hands-on" introduction to the promises and limitations of using Randomized Control Trials (RCTs) to inform policy makers, practitioners, and academics of the conditions under which policies likely would have a positive effect on economic and political outcomes, in the context of international development. This course has three parts: the first is devoted to understanding the "nuts and bolts" of running field experiments / RCTs in developing countries. In part, we will be reading Glennester and Takavarasha's Running Randomized Evaluations: A Practical Guide. In addition, we will discuss core behavioral concepts from both behavioral economics and social psychology (prospect theory). The second part of the course will be devoted to demonstrating how schools have used RCTs to inform core policy debates (e.g. What are some effective ways to reduce corruption? How can we improve the performance of frontline service providers? How can politicians be more responsive to their constituents?) In the third part, students will be presenting their own research proposals, explicitly designed to address either a core policy question in the developing world or--for those interested--in the USA. Here students will have an opportunity to partner with the Social and Behavioral Sciences Team (https://sbst.gov), which is under the National Science and Technology Council.

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: PSCI 413

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GAFL 531 Data Science for Public Policy

Taught by: Nelson Lim

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GAFL 532 Urban Government in Action

This class explores how city administrators and legislatures have addressed the critical issues facing urban America today, including fighting urban blight and transforming neighborhoods, public school funding, public financing of sports stadiums, reducing the tax burden, public health issues like smoking bans, legislative redistricting, crime and safety issues, campaign finance finance reform, economic development issues like tax increment financing, race relations, welfare reform, public transportation, and how to reverse job and population losses. The goal is to place in context the various ways that elected officials approach complex issues, towards a more realistic understanding of how to influence a proposal as it works its way through the process towards implementation.

Taught by: Kenney

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: CRIM 402, CRIM 602

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GAFL 534 Infrastructure Investment and Economic Growth: Why, How, and When

Infrastructure is widely acknowledged to be critical for economic success, and infrastructure investments are promoted as leading to economic growth, either at the local or national level. Yet, investments in telecommunications, transportation, energy, or other infrastructure do not always yield the hoped public benefit. This course will help answer the question: Under what circumstances does infrastructure investment contribute to economic growth, and how do we know? Because government resources are limited, advocates often must be creative to find sufficient funding to get desirable projects completed. This course will also help answer the question: How do we pay for the infrastructure projects we want to build? The course will illustrate approaches to answering these questions using case studies of past and proposed investments.

Taught by: Angelides

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GAFL 538 Hum Rights, Justice, Pol

Course offered summer, fall and spring terms

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GAFL 542 Downtown Development

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: CPLN 642

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GAFL 546 Social Enterprise Models and Social Impact Locally and Globally

If you believe in finding innovative ways to make a difference and solve social issues locally and globally, you will benefit from the Social Enterprise and Impact Locally and Globally Course (Social Enterprise). Social Enterprise is designed for those who have a practitioner's interest in the development, leadership, and management of the evolving nonprofit sector and their intersection with the socially conscious private sector and government. The course takes the student through the process of developing a mock social enterprise including idea exploration, testing and plan execution and provides the student with essential strategies and tools to conduct in-depth analysis of a social enterprise leading to their application to a regional social enterprise. This course fulfills an elective for the MPA and the Certificate in Nonprofit Administration.

Taught by: Hansen-Turton, Tine; Torres, Nicholas

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GAFL 548 Grant Writing

This course will provide students with the role of the foundation in philanthropy, what it does, how it does it, and what you need to know to be both an effective foundation manager and foundation grant seeker. From the foundation side, the course will include strategic planning, assessment of project resultes, and the responsibilities of the foundation grant program officer. From the grant seeker side, it will include identifying the appropriate foundations, making the connection to the foundation, grant writing, and relationship management. Summer 2016 On-Campus Meetings: 9:30am-1:00pm Fridays and Saturdays May 20-1, June 24-5, and July 22-3

Taught by: Colleen Terrell

Activity: Hybrid Course

1 Course Unit

Notes: In Summer 2016 ONLY This is a "hybrid" course, with synchronous, online meetings and once-monthly, on-campus meetings at the Fels Institute of Government in Philadelphia, PA. On-campus meetings vary by term. Please read the description for dates and times. Also, please note there is an additional $150 online course fee.

GAFL 549 Leading Nonprofits

Leading Nonprofit Organizations is designed for those interested in leading and managing a nonprofit organization. It takes a practitioners perspective on strategic realities of modern practice. Each section will seek to rapidly orient a new manager to the complexities, strategic issues, & politics. The course is taught through a combination of theory and practice using selected readings, lectures, guest presentations, group activities (Mock senior staff discussions) and field assignments (pairing with area nonprofit leader and attendance at one of the organizations board meetings.)

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: The Summer 2017 offering of this course is a hybrid course with an additional $150 online course fee. The course meets online weekly on Mondays from 7:45-8:45pm and on-campus on the following Fridays from 9:30am-1pm May 19, June 23, and July 21 and on the following Saturdays from 9:30-1pm May 20, June 24, and July 22.

GAFL 550 Organizational Diagnosis

This course will help participants learn the skills involved in conducting a systemic, organizational diagnosis. Applying organizational diagnosis skills can help organizations make more effective, evidence-based decisions; increase an organization's ability to learn and to apply these learnings; increase organizational effectiveness; and, often, save organizations from flawed and detrimental actions. The course places an emphasis on systems thinking, psychodynamic organizational theory, and appreciative inquiry as ways into understanding organizational issues and problems. Frequently, when organizations find themselves in trouble, e.g. problems in the system about such things as lack of leadership, poor communication, diminished productivity, low morale, etc., there is a tendency to frame the problem(s) simplistically and/or locate blame on a few difficult individuals or groups. However, upon closer examination, problematic issues are often found to be symptomatic and/or symbolic of multiple issues within the organization. This course will help participants to understand how problems, which appear, at one level of the system, (e.g. at the personal or interpersonal level) often represent problems at other levels of the system (e.g. at the group and/or institutional level), or signify a range of inter-related issues. Emphasis will be placed on the diagnostic skills needed to examine government agencies, non-profits, and bureaucracies. It will provide participants with the theoretical constructs and application skills necessary for identifying and framing problem areas, collecting data, and organizing feedback to client systems. Real-time examples will inform our discussions as we consider the relationship between diagnosis, organizational reflection, and appropriate action.

Activity: Hybrid Course

1 Course Unit

Notes: This is a "hybrid" course, with synchronous, online meetings and once-monthly, on-campus meetings at the Fels Institute of Government in Philadelphia, PA. Weekends vary by term. There is a $150 online course fee.

GAFL 551 Lobbying

In a system of representative government, organizations and individuals with interests at stake often seek the support of a governement relations professional. This course addresses government relations from the varying perspectives of the current or aspiring professional, the client, and the government official. It is designed to provide the students with an introduction to government affairs and lobbying at the local, state, and federal levels of governement and to illustrate how lobbying and the lobbyists shape and affect public policy. The course is not designed as a how-to in lobbying, but, rather, it is designed to expose students to lobbying and, more importantly, the lobbying process. To that end, students will draw on many disciplines, such as psychology, law, history, political science, urban affairs, economics, foreign policy, domestic policy, and others, to understand the complex mosaic of the lobbying and legislative processes.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GAFL 555 Using the Political Process to Effect Organizational Change

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: DYNM 655

Prerequisites: Course permits must be requested at https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/dynamics/course-permit

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For additional information, please see our website at: http://www.organizationaldynamics.upenn.edu

GAFL 561 Media Relations

This course is designed to help you better understand the role and practice of media relations and messaging in corporate, non-profit, and government organizations in this new media era. You will learn how to research media and reporters, devleop messages, build strategic media plans, generate media coverage, serve as spokespeople, handle crisis situations, and use new media strategies. You will hear from public relations professionals on such topics as working with reporters, developing PR campaigns, and creating effective web outreach programs. Class discussions, reading assignments, research and writing projects, group projects, and case studies offer an engaging and interactive learning environment to expand and apply your knowledge of media relations and messaging. Summer 2017 On-Campus Meetings are 9:30am-1:00pm on Fridays--May 19, June 23, and July 21 and Saturdays--May 20, June 24, and July 22

Taught by: Frank Igwe

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Hybrid Course

1 Course Unit

Notes: This is a "hybrid" course, with synchronous, online meetings and once-monthly, on-campus meetings in Philadelphia, PA. On-campus meetings vary by term. Please read the description for dates and times. Also, please note there is an additional $150 online course fee.

GAFL 569 The Politics of Housing and Urban Development

This course offers an exploration of how legislative action, government policymaking, and citizen advocacy influence plans for the investment of public capital in distressed urban neighborhoods. Course topics this semester will include an evaluation of the results of City of Philadelphia development policies under the administration of former Mayor Michael A. Nutter, as well as onsideration of plans being undertaken by the administration of Mayor James F. Kenney, who took office in January. The course will also include an assessment of a large-scale property acquisition and development strategy being implemented by the Philadelphia Housing Authority in North Philadelphia and a review of recent and current reinvestment proposals for Camden's waterfront and downtown-area neighborhoods.

Taught by: Kromer

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: CPLN 625, URBS 451

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GAFL 599 Independent Study

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

GAFL 612 Quantitative Methods for Policy Analysis

This course will help students learn how to make evidence-based decisions in a public sector context. The course will introduce important data analysis skills and help students evaluate the quality of studies undertaken to measure the impact of public policies and programs. This course will meet on-campus on the following Fridays from 9:30am-1pm and on the following Saturdays from 2-5:30pm: Fridays September 8, October 13, November 10, and December 1; Saturdays September 9, October 14, November 11, and December 2. This course will meet online on Mondays 6:45-7:45pm.

Taught by: Robertson-Kraft, Claire

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Hybrid Course

1 Course Unit

Notes: This is a "hybrid" course, with synchronous, online meetings and once-monthly, on-campus meetings at the Fels Institute of Government in Philadelphia, PA. Weekends vary by term. Please read the course description for further information.

GAFL 621 Public Economics

This course provides students with the knowledge required to understand government operations in relation to the market economy. In theory of supply and demand, students explore the pricing mechanism, price elasticity, and the effects of price controls on markets. Efficiency is examined in connection with competition and again in connection with equity, and market failure is considered as a reason for government intervention. Cost-benefit analysis is examined in the context of selecting among public investment alternatives. The course also assists students in addressing issues connected with local public goods and economic development.

Taught by: Sieg, Holger Wolfgang

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GAFL 623 Leading People

Leading People focuses on Strategic Human Resource Management (SHRM), the combination of human resource management (HRM) and the strategic direction of the organization, whether public or non-profit. This course will examine the theory and principles of SHRM as they relate to job analysis, recruitment and selection, compensation, benefits, training and career development, performance management, and labor-management relations. Learning to deal with the daily SHRM challenges makes leaders and managers more effective and more valuable to the organization. Summer 2017 On-Campus Meetings are 9:30am-1:00pm on Fridays--May 19, June 23, and July 21 and Saturdays--May 20, June 24, and July 22

Taught by: Jones

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Hybrid Course

1 Course Unit

Notes: This is a "hybrid" course, with synchronous, online meetings and once-monthly, on-campus meetings in Philadelphia, PA. On-campus meetings vary by term. Please read the description for dates and times. Also, please note there is an additional $150 online course fee.

GAFL 631 Policy Making & Public Institutions

This course introduces students to the theories and practice of the policy- making process. There are four primary learning objectives. First, understanding how the structure of political institutions matter for the policies that they produce. Second, recognizing the constraints that policy makers face when making decisions on behalf of the public. Third, identifying the strategies that can be used to overcome these constraints. Fourth, knowing the toolbox that is available to participants in the policy-making process to help get their preferred strategies implemented. While our focus will primarily be on American political institutions, many of the idas and topics discussed in the class apply broadly to other democratic systems of goverment. The class will be a mix of lecture and cases. Cases are on a diverse set of policy topics, with a goal of illustrating braod themes about the policy-making process rather than the specifics of certain policy areas.

Taught by: Meredith, Marc

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: This course is a core requirement for the full-time MPA program at the Fels Institute of Goverment. Permits will not be issued to non-Fels students.

GAFL 640 Program Evaluations and Data Analysis

One of the trademarks of the 21st century public management is the usage of data and analysis in the decision-making process. A successful public leader will use emperical evidence to guide her decisions. She knows what types of data and analysis she should ask her analysts to collect and conduct, how to consume the results they generate, and how to transform the analytical results into effective communication with stakeholders. This class will help you become that 21st century public leader. My goal for this class is to teach you fundamental ideas of performance management, program evaluation, and data analysis. At the end of this course, you will understand key principals of performance measures and program evaluation; be able to process, manage, and analyze quantitative data using Excel; and learn to write basic programming tasks using R. I picked Excel because it is a standard software that most organizations already have. It is not an ideal software to conduct sophisticated statistical analysis, but being a power-user of Excel will make you a valued employee. I will teach you how to use it to conduct reproducible analysis using R. It is the future of quantitative analysis. Most importantly, it is free. Knowing how to use R is an attractive skill for your employer. In addition, I will teach you how to transform analytical results into effective communication.

Taught by: Lim, Nelson

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: This course is a requirement for MPA full-time students who started in Fall 2015 or later. It is an elective for MPA full-time students who started Fall 2014 or earlier.

GAFL 641 Program Evaluations & Data Analysis--Hybrid Format

This course introduces program evaluation in the context of research methods. Students learn about design and the application of data collection skills to all phases of program/service delivery from needs assessment to analysis of findings to implementation of changes based on results. Students learn to appreciate how these skills can be used as practical tools for identifying problems to developing and implementing programs. This applied course provides students with practical experiences to apply guidelines of evaluation and research methods in actual program evaluation projects in the Philadelphia region. Summer 2017 On-Campus Meetings are 2:00pm-5:30pm on Fridays--May 19, June 23, and July 21 and Saturdays--May 20, June 24, and July 22

Taught by: Claire Robertson-Kraft

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisites: GAFL 612 Quantitative Methods for Policy Analysis with grade of B or higher. First-Year Exec MPA Students ONLY

Activity: Hybrid Course

1 Course Unit

Notes: This is a "hybrid" course, with synchronous, online meetings and once-monthly, on-campus meetings at the Fels Institute of Government in Philadelphia, PA. On-campus meetings vary by term. Please read the description for dates and times. Also, please note there is an additional $150 online course fee.

GAFL 651 Public Financial Management

This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of accounting and budgeting for government and nonprofit organizations. The course is designed for students with little or no background in financial reporting, budgeting, and financial management. "Accounting and budgeting must be recognized as separate systems that must interact in a complementary manner if managers are to exercise control of the financial resources of their organizations" (Garner, 1991).

Taught by: Levine, Carolyn

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: This course satisfies a core requirement in the Master of Public Administration and the Certificate of Public Finance.

GAFL 652 Financial Management of Public and Nonprofit Organizations

This course provides an introduction to financial management principles for public and nonprofit organizations. The primary objective of this course is to demystify financial information and improve students ability to effectively engage in financial discussions, regardless of their role in the organization. This course will be focused on the vocabulary and tools necessary to interpret, analyze, and properly communicate financial information in order to develop and execute an appropriate financial strategy. On-campus meetings for Spring 2017 will be on Fridays from 2pm-5:30pm on Jan. 13, Feb. 17, Mar. 17, and Apr. 21 and on Saturdays from 9:30am-1pm Jan 14, Feb. 18, Mar. 18, and Apr. 22. The class will meet online weekly on Mondays 7:15-8:15pm.

Taught by: Dingley, Julie

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Hybrid Course

1 Course Unit

Notes: This is a "hybrid" course, with synchronous, online meetings and once-monthly, on-campus meetings at the Fels Institute of Government in Philadelphia, PA. On-campus meetings vary by term. Please read the description for dates and times. Also, please note there is an additional $150 online course fee.

GAFL 710 Negotiations

This course will meet in-person from 9:30am-1:00pm on the following Fridays and Saturdays: September 8-9, October 13-14, November 10-11, December 1-2.This course will meet virtually Mondays 7:00-8:00pm.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Hybrid Course

1 Course Unit

Notes: This is a "hybrid" course, with synchronous, online meetings and once-monthly, on-campus meetings at the Fels Institute of Government in Philadelphia, PA. Weekends vary by term. There is a $150 online course fee.

GAFL 716 Campaign Management: How to Run and Win

This is a practical course designed to impart the elements of a successful political campaign for public office to the student. Study will focus on the local campaign and how it is planned, organized, executed and funded. Local practitioners will augment course sessions to provide interaction between the student and those who have successfully run campaigns, raised funds, and been elected.

Taught by: Smith

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GAFL 719 Advanced Budgeting

The course will build on the fundamentals taught in the introductory budgeting unit to help build students' competence in budgetary analysis. Using detailed data from a major city as a course-long case study, and incorporating excel skill-building exercises, students will develop hands-on understanding of budgets by working through such factors as economic drivers of fiscal performance, revenue analysis and forecasting, including tax policy considerations; expenditure analysis and projection, with an emphasis on workforce costs; and capital budgeting and financing. Students will also be introduced to key fiscal policies, budget monitoring and performance measurement, and the development of effective budget communications for various audiences.

Taught by: Nadol and Westerman

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GAFL 732 Public Management

This core MPA course is intended to help each student to learn more than he or she already knows about public management both as a profession and as a field of academic study and to enjoy the company of supportive peers, instructors, and special guests as he or she contemplates a post-MPA career in governance. This course satisfies a core requirement in the Master of Public Administration full-time program.

Taught by: DiIulio/Mulhern

Two terms. student may enter either term.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GAFL 733 Public Management (MPA Executive Section)

Overview--Public managers must have technical expertise in planning, staffing, and budgeting; however, technical skills alone are not sufficient to become an effective public manager. You must understand the socio-political context of your organization and your success will be dependent on your ability to analyze policy options and persuade stakeholders and supervisors, through effective communications, to pursue the policy options you recommend. Public managers in the 21st century must also understand the ever increasing diversity of their constituents and stakeholders. Economic globalization and international migration continue to increase the the racial and ethnic diversity of our workforce. Diversity begets complexity and tension. Effective public managers must learn to lead inclusive organizations that leverage diversity and defuse tensions among heterogeneous constituents and stakeholders. Learning objectives The goal for this class is to expand your knowledge about public management, both as a profession and as a field of study. At the end of this course, you will understand key competencies of an effective public manager, demonstrate your understanding through class discussions, weekly reading notes, a group case study analysis and presentation, and a policy memo that analyzes management dilemmas and proposes responses. To accomplish this goal, we will go beyond passive learning from classroom lectures. We will have a few guest speakers whose expertise will complement readings. We expect you to be prepared and to participate in classroom discussions, engage practicing public administrators and accomplished researchers in seminars/workshops, and learn to draft policy briefs and policy memos completing scenario-based assignments.

Taught by: Jones, Darrell D.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Hybrid Course

1 Course Unit

Notes: This is a "hybrid" course, with synchronous, online meetings and once-monthly, on-campus meetings in Philadelphia, PA. On-campus meetings vary by term. Please read the description for dates and times. Also, please note there is an additional $150 online course fee.

GAFL 735 The Performance Imperative

The course will explore the critical role of performance measurement in improving management, particularly for public sector entities. This will include the examination of fundamental principles of performance measurement, the identification and application of different performance measurement techniques and strategies, and the evaluation of best practices within the field. Topics to be covered will include the evolution and adaptation of "Stat-ing" (e.g., CompStat, CitiStat, StateStat), the relationship between performance measurement and financial management, and how performance measurement can be used to inform different analytic techniques. On-campus meetings for Spring 2017 will be on Fridays from 9:30am-1pm on Jan. 13, Feb. 17, Mar. 17, and Apr. 21 and on Saturdays from 2-5:30pm on Jan 14, Feb. 18, Mar. 18, and Apr. 22. The class will meet online weekly on Mondays 8:45 to 9:45pm.

Taught by: Gallagher & Blauer

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Hybrid Course

1 Course Unit

Notes: This is a "hybrid" course, with synchronous, online meetings and once-monthly, on-campus meetings at the Fels Institute of Government in Philadelphia, PA. Weekends vary by term. Please read the course description for further information.

GAFL 797 Capstone Fieldwork

Activity: Masters Thesis

0 Course Units

GAFL 799 MPA Capstone

The completion of a capstone projects is one of the academic requirements for the Master of Public Administration (MPA) at the University of Pennsylvania's Fels Institute of Government. The capstone project represents a way for graduate students to apply their multi-disciplinary learning from the program to a specific public administration challenge(s) or issue(s). To succesfully complete a capstone project, a student must receive a passing grade for his or her capstone paper and associated briefing. The student's capstone paper resembles a policy memo that an administrative staff writes to decision makers and stakeholders. The paper integrates and deepens the student's learning from the program. More importantly, the capstone paper provides a way for a student to bring her/his learning and knoweldge from the program back into her/his chosen career. The research focus should be one that is of great interest to the student as well as one from which a potential organization will benefit.

Taught by: Nelson Lim--MPA Full-Time Format; Claire Robertson-Kraft--MPA Exec Format

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

0 Course Units

Notes: In Summer ONLY, This is a "hybrid" course, with synchronous, online meetings and once-monthly, on-campus meetings in Philadelphia, PA. On-campus meetings vary by year. Please read the description for dates and times. Also, please note there is an additional $150 online course fee for hybrid offerings.