History (HIST)

HIST 001 Making of the Modern World

How did the world we now live in come to be? Is globalization a recent development or does it have a history of its own? At what point can we say that a world economy emerged and what sort of relations of production and distribution linked it together? When did people start thinking and acting as citizens of nations rather than as subjects of rulers or members of religious or ethnic communities, and what were the consequences? How should we conceptualize the great revolutions (French, American, Russian, Chinese) that would determine the landscapes of modern global politics? This course is designed to help us think about the "making of the modern," not by means of an exhaustive survey but by exploring a range of topics from unusual perspectives: piracy, patriotism, prophecy; global struggles for political and human rights,drivers of war and peace, capitalism, nationalism, socialism, fascism, fundamentalism; communication and culture.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Cassanelli/Dickinson

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

HIST 011 Deciphering America

This course examines American history from the first contacts of the indigenous peoples of North America with European settlers to our own times by focusing on a few telling moments in this history. The course treats twelve of these moments. Each unit begins with a specific primary document, historical figure, image, location, year, or cultural artifact to commence the delving into the American past. Some of these icons are familiar, but the ensuing deciphering will render them as more complicated; some are unfamiliar, but they will emerge as absolutely telling. The course meets each week for two 50-minute team-taught lectures and once recitation session. Course requirements include: in-class midterm and final exams; three short paper assignments; and punctual attendance and participation in recitations.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Brown/Licht

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

HIST 023 Intro to Middle East

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Also Offered As: NELC 102

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 024 Introduction to the Ancient Near East

See primary department (NELC) for a complete course description.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Frame

Two terms. student may enter either term.

Also Offered As: ANCH 025, NELC 101

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 030 The Emergence of Modern Europe

This course traces the formation of European society, politics and culture from its earliest days through the era of the Reformation, ca. 1000-1600 CE. Major themes will include: politics and power; law and the state; economics and trade; religion; learning and the rise of universities; social organization; everyday life. The reading and analysis of primary sources from each era will be important in understanding Europe's key features and development.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Moyer

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

HIST 031 Making and Breaking European Hegemony

HIST 031 will trace the dramatic rise and fall of Europe's global hegemony during the period roughly from 1450 to 1950. Among the major themes we will examine are: states and power, borders and resistance, race and genocide, economies and oppression, ideas and revolution, the building and change of hierarchies of gender and power. Truly, a dramatic story. The objectives of the course are: 1) To serve as an introduction to the study of history for majors and non-majors alike, and to teach the critical analysis of historical sources; 2) to teach substantive knowledge of European history; 3) to provide a foundation for further study of the European past. No previous background in European or World history is required.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Holquist/Nathans/Safley

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 040 Early Modern Europe, 1450-1750

This course examines those European developments which contributed to the world we understand as modern. Special emphasis will be placed on the transformation of Europe through the advent of new technologies, the creation of a global economy, the consolidation of territorial states, the rise of effective, central governments, the dissolution of religious unity, and the dialect between modern and traditional world views.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Safley

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 048 The Rise and Fall of the Russian Empire, 1552-1917

How and why did Russia become the center of the world's largest empire, a single state encompassing eleven time zones and over a hundred ethnic groups? To answer this question, we will explore the rise of a distinct political culture beginning in medieval Muscovy, its transformation under the impact of a prolonged encounter with European civilization, and the various attempts to re-form Russia from above and below prior to the Revolution of 1917. Main themes include the facade vs. the reality of central authority, the intersection of foreign and domestic issues, the development of a radical intelligentsia, and the tension between empire and nation.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Nathans/Holquist

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: RUSS 048

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 049 The Soviet Century, 1917-1991

Out of an obscure, backward empire, the Soviet Union emerged to become the great political laboratory of the twentieth century. This course will trace the roots of the world's first socialist society and its attempts to recast human relations and human nature itself. Topics include the origins of the Revolution of 1917, the role of ideology in state policy and everyday life, the Soviet Union as the center of world communism, the challenge of ethnic diversity, and the reasons for the USSR's sudden implosion at the end of the century.Focusing on politics, society, culture, and their interaction, we will examine the rulers (from Lenin to Gorbachev) as well as the ruled (peasants, workers, and intellectuals; Russians and non-Russians). The course will feature discussions of selected texts, including primary sources in translation.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Nathans/Holquist

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: RUSS 049

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

HIST 050 England and the British Isles to 1707

The subject of this course is the history of the British Isles from the Roman Conquest in 43AD to the creation of the United Kingdom in 1707. Between these two dates the various societies and cultures in the British Isles were brought into the orbit of the Roman Empire, converted to latin Christianity, and developed distinctive cultures and strong ties with the Continent. From the twelfth century on, the kingdom of England began to exert its power over Wales, Ireland, and Scotland, although English power waxed and waned in these areas between the twelfth and the seventeenth centuries. The Anglo-Norman continental empire of the Plantagenet dynasty also played a large part in shaping the English monarchy, as did the playing out of the Hundred Years War, the internal divisions in fifteenth-century English society, and the rise of the Tudor-Stuart dynasty.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Todd

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 051 Modern Britain, 1783-2000: Empire, Expansion and Democracy

This course surveys British history from the eighteenth century to the present. In two centuries, Britain built an empire that ruled over a quarter of the globe and became the world's leading economy. In 2015, the Empire is gone, but coincident with its loss, Britain gained a welfare state and retained the a role as a powerhouse of culture and finance. Themes emphasized in the course include national identity, class, political reform, war, and imperial interaction. How did Britain come to dominate the world economy and what did this dominance look like? How should we understand its role in the world today? Do the Beatles, the Royal Family, and Amy Winehouse add up to a "Cool Britannia" that has somehow "made up" for the loss of the Empire? Using written and visual primary sources, we'll look at all of these questions as we study the birth and development of modern Britain.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Chase-Levenson

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 054 Books that Made History

It is often said that books reflect the society in which they were written. Yet many books--and their authors--shaped society, and changed how people understood the world around them. In this course we will focus on a variety of texts from the world of Rome to 1600, the era in which European society took form. In each case, we will seek not only to understand the work itself, but also how it affected the lives and the thought of its readers. Works will range from Cicero and the Biblical New Testament to Luther and Machiavelli.

Taught by: Moyer

Also Offered As: COML 052

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 055 Reading the Classics

In this course we will study the early roots of Western culture--the Biblical, Greek and Roman traditions--as well as how sixteenth- and seventeenth-century European authors reproduced, rethought and reshaped these early traditions. Instead of reading and discussing the required texts according to the date when they were written (first the early traditions and ending with the Renaissance views), we will focus our attention on a few themes that were central concerns to those living in Classic and Renaissance times, and that continue to influence modern ways of thinking and acting in Western societies: conceptions of God and the place of religion in society; nature of power and authority, and individuals' rights and duties; good, evil, and ethical philosophy; views on women, their nature and roles in society; ethnography and the perception of other cultures and societies. In addition to reading and discussing several of the biblical books--Genesis, Exodus, the Book on Revelation--we will study other seminal classical works--Sophocles' Antigone, Aristotle's Politics and Ethics, Herodotus' The Histories; Plato's Apology-- and works by Michel de Montaigne, Maria de Zayas y Sotomayor, Marie de Gournay, Christopher Marlowe, William Shakespeare, and several others. We will also work with books published in the last decades, analyzing the classics and and their reception in various periods of history, but also books that analyze what the classics tell us today--Dreyfus and Kelly's All things shining, Reading the Western Classics to find meaning in a secular Age; Anthony Grafton's Bring Out Your Dead: the Past as Revelation; James Miller, Examined Lives, from Socrates to Nietzsche; and Sarah Bakewell, How to Live: Or a Life of Montaigne in One Question and Twenty Attempts at an Answer.

Taught by: Feros

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 070 Colonial Latin America

This course provides an introduction to the broad literature on Latin America's rich colonial history. We will begin by tracing some of the early origins of - and points of contact between - the Indian, Iberian, and African men and women who formed the basis of colonial society. As the course progresses, we will explore the variety of ways in which colonial subjects lived, worked, ate, worshipped, and socialized. Lectures and reading assignments will draw upon a variety of sources, including court cases, artistic renderings, city maps and street plans, travel accounts of visits to the regions, and the material, cultural, and intellectual products made possible by the wealth and dynamism of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The course will conclude with an analysis of the Age of Revolutions, a period of dramatic upheaval that remains at the center of lively scholarly debates. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage the key questions driving these debates, the most important of which, perhaps, is: what is Latin America's colonial legacy?

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Farnsworth-Alvear

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 070, LALS 070

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Fulfills History Tradition Distribution Requirement

HIST 071 Latin American Survey 1782-Present

Surveys Latin American and Caribbean history from the Tupac Amaru Revolt to the present. We will examine the legacy of Spanish colonialism and slavery, movements for national and cultural independence, twentieth-century radicalism, and the politics of race in contemporary Latin America. Readings include fictional as well as analytical representations, and a film series will accompany the course.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Farnsworth-Alvear

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: LALS 071

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 072 Introduction to Latin American and Latino Studies

Designed to introduce students to the interdisciplinary field of Latin American and Latino Studies, this is a seminar oriented toward first and second year students. Readings will range widely, from scholarly work on the colonial world that followed from and pushed back against the "conquest"; to literary and artistic explorations of Latin American identities; to social scientists' explorations of how Latinos are changing the United States in the current generation.

Taught by: Farnsworth-Alvear

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: LALS 072

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 075 Africa Before 1800

Survey of major themes and issues in African history before 1800. Topics include: early civilizations, African kingdoms and empires, population movements, the spread of Islam,and the slave trade. Also, emphasis on how historians use archaeology, linguistics, and oral traditions to reconstruct Africa's early history.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Babou

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AFRC 075, AFST 075

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

HIST 076 Africa Since 1800

Survey of major themes, events, and personalities in African history from the early nineteenth century through the 1960s. Topics include abolition of the slave trade, European imperialism, impact of colonial rule, African resistance, religious and cultural movements, rise of naturalism and pan-Africanism, issues of ethnicity and "tribalism" in modern Africa.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Cassanelli

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 076, AFST 076

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

HIST 081 History of the Middle East Since 1800

A survey of the modern Middle East with special emphasis on the experiences of ordinary men and women as articulated in biographies, novels, and regional case studies. Issues covered include the collapse of empires and the rise of a new state system following WWI, and the roots and consequences of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, the Iranian revolution and the U.S.-Iraq War. Themes include: the colonial encounter with Europe and the emergence of nationalist movements, the relationship between state and society, economic development and international relations, and religion and cultural identity.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Kashani-Sabet/Troutt-Powell

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: NELC 031

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

HIST 084 Topics in 20th C. Middle East

If "the clash of civilizations" is the first image that jumps to mind when thinking about the modern Middle East, then this is the course for you. From the familiar narratives about the creation of modern nation-states to the oft-neglected accounts of cultural life, this course surveys the multi-faceted societies of the twentieth-century Middle East. Although inclusive of the military battles and conflicts that have affected the region, this course will move beyond the cliches of war and conflict in the Middle East to show the range of issues and ideas with which intellectuals and governments grappled throughout the century. The cultural politics and economic value of oil as well as the formation of a vibrant literary life will be among the topics covered in the course. By considering illustrative cultural moments that shed light on the political history of the period, this course will adopt a nuanced framework to approach the Arab/Israeli conflict, the history of the Gulf States, the Iran-Iraq War, and U.S. involvement in the region.

Taught by: Kashani-Sabet

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: NELC 032

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 087 East&West: A Hitchhiker's Guide to the Cultural History of the Modern World

Sugar and Spices. Tea and Coffee. Opium and Cocaine. Hop aboard the Indian Ocean dhows, Chinese junks, Dutch schooners, and British and American clipper ships that made possible the rise of global capitalism, new colonial relationships, and the intensified forms of cultural change. How have the desires to possess and consume particular commodities shaped cultures and the course of modern history? This class introduces students to the cultural history of the modern world through an interdisciplinary analysis of connections between East and West, South and North. Following the circulation of commodities and the development of modern capitalism, the course examines the impact of global exchange on interactions and relationships between regions, nations, cultures, and peoples and the influences on cultural practices and meanings. The role of slavery and labor migrations, colonial and imperial relations, and struggles for economic and political independence are also considered.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: Mitchell

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ANTH 063, SAST 063

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 091 Modern Japanese History

This course will survey the major political, economic, social and intellectual trends in the making of modern Japan. Special emphasis will be given to the turbulent relationship between state and society from 1800 to the present.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Dickinson

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: EALC 071

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 093 Performing History

From medieval processions to the Mummers Parade, from military reenactments to Mardi Gras, communities do more than "write" or "read" history in order to feel its power and shape their futures. Drawing upon traditions in theater, spectacle, religion, and marketing, they also perform their history--by replaying particular characters, restaging pivotal events and sometimes even changing their outcomes--in order to test its relevance to contemporary life and to both mark and contest ritual points in the annual cycle. This course will explore diverse ways of "performing history" in different cultures, including royal passages, civic parades, historical reenactments, community festivals, and film.

Taught by: St.George

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: COML 103, FOLK 103, THAR 103

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 096 Late Imperial China

This lecture course -- the first of a two-part sequence -- examines the history of late imperial China through the early 19th century. We begin with the Song dynasty transformation: the rise of gentry society and imperial absolutism, the institution of Confucian orthodoxy, the shift of the population and the economic center of gravity to the south, the commercialization of the economy, and change in the relative status of women and men. We then trace China's subsequent political and social history, including the following themes: inner vs. outer court politics; law, government, and society; intellectuals and political dissent; gender, family, and kinship practices; patterns of peasant life and rebellion; traditional foreign relations and first contacts with the West; internal sources of the decline of imperial order.

Taught by: Fei

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: EALC 041

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 097 History of Modern China

From an empire to a republic, from communism to socialist-style capitalism, few countries have ever witnessed so much change in a hundred year period as China during the twentieth century. How are we to make sense out of this seeming chaos? This course will offer an overview of the upheavals that China has experienced from the late Qing to the Post-Mao era, interspersed with personal perspectives revealed in primary source readings such as memoirs, novels, and oral accounts. We will start with an analysis of the painful transition from the last empire, the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911), to a modern nation state, followed by exploration of a century-long tale of incessant reform and revolution. The survey will focus on three main themes: 1) the repositioning of China in the new East Asian and world orders; 2) the emergence of a modern Chinese state and nationalistic identity shaped and reshaped by a series of cultural crises; and finally, 3) the development and transformation of Chinese modernity. Major historical developments include: the Opium War and drug trade in the age of imperialism, reform and revolution, the Nationalist regime, Mao's China, the Cultural Revolution, and the ongoing efforts of post-Mao China to move beyond Communism. We will conclude with a critical review of the concept of "Greater China" that takes into account Taiwan, Hong Kong, and the Chinese diaspora in order to attain a more comprehensive understanding of modern China, however defined, at the end of the last century.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Fei

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: EALC 047

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 098 Introduction to Korean Civilization

This gateway course surveys the history of Korea from early times to the present. We will study the establishment of various sociopolitical orders and their characteristics alongside major cultural developments. Covered topics include: state formation and dissolution; the role of ideology and how it changes; religious beliefs and values; agriculture, commerce, and industry; changing family relations; responses to Western imperialism; and Korea's increasing presence in the modern world as well as its future prospects. Students will also be introduced to various interpretive approaches in the historiography. No prior knowledge of Korea or Korean language is presumed.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Park

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: EALC 003

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

HIST 101 Freshman Seminar: Europe before 1800

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: JWST 103

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 102 Freshman Seminar: Europe after 1800

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 103 Freshman Seminar: America before 1800

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 104 Freshman Seminar: America after 1800

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 015, ASAM 013

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 105 Freshman Seminar: The World before 1800

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ANCH 190, CLST 190, EALC 073

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 106 Freshman Seminar: The World After 1800

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: LALS 107

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 107 Comparative Capitalist Systems

The course follows the evolution of industrial capitalism since the beginning of the English industrial revolution in the late 18th century. It ranges from the problems of the industrial revolution in England to problems of building a market economy in eastern Europe today. In particular, it examines industrialization and explores the sources of sustained economic growth from a comparative perspective. Most of the world, especially in so-called emerging economies, is still confronted with the challenge, and often pain, of creating a modern industrial capitalist society. The course attempts to build a conceptual apparatus for understanding models of industrialization and is built around issues such as law, anti-trust, corporate forms, banking institutions, industrial relations, etc. By definition, the course tends to concentrate on successful industrializers around the world, but questions regarding continuing underdevelopment will be addressed.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: Drew

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 108 American Origins

The United States was not inevitable. With that assumption as its starting point, this course surveys North American history from about 1500 to about 1850, with the continent's many peoples and cultures in view. The unpredictable emergence of the U.S. as a nation is a focus, but always in the context of wider developments: global struggles among European empires; conflicts between indigenous peoples and settler-colonists; exploitation of enslaved African labor; evolution of distinctive colonial societies; and, finally, independence movements inspired by a transatlantic revolutionary age.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Richter

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

HIST 111 Europe before 1800: Benjamin Franklin Seminar

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 112 Europe after 1800: Benjamin Franklin Seminar

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 113 America before 1800: Benjamin Franklin Seminar

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 114 America after 1800: Benjamin Franklin Seminar

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 115 The World before 1800: Benjamin Franklin Seminar

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 116 The World after 1800: Benjamin Franklin Seminar

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 118 Witchcraft and Possession

This course explores world witchcraft and possession from the persecutions of the early seventeenth century through the rise of Wicca in the twentieth century. The mere mention of these terms, or of such close cousins as demonology, sorcery, exorcism, magic, and the witches Sabbath, raises clear ethnographic and historical challenges. How can the analysis of witchcraft-- including beliefs, patterns of accusation, the general social position of victims, the intensity and timing of witch hunts, and its relation to religious practice, law, language, gender, social marginalization, and property--lead us to a more humane understanding of belief and action? Films such as The Exorcist, The Blair Witch Project, The Crucible, and Three Sovereigns for Sarah will focus discussion.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: St.George

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ANTH 118, GSWS 119, RELS 109

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 119 History of the Modern Business Corporation

Over the last two centuries, the modern corporation has emerged as the dominant form of doing business throughout the world. As such, it not only effects people's daily lives, but also influences government policies and larger trends in society. This course looks at the history of the international corporation from the industrial revolution to the present, to consider how corporations have evolved and the varying ways in which they have influenced the history of our times. We will consider the fundamental debates surrounding the responsibility between shareholders, managers, workers, customers, and most importantly, society as a whole. Much of the course will involve an examination of case studies of individual companies, industries or issues, to understand how corporations have functioned in specific instances.

Taught by: Drew

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 123 Economic History of Europe I

This course concentrates on the economy of Europe in the Early Modern Period, 1450-1750. It was a time of great transition. Europe developed from an agriculturally-based to an industrially-based economy, with attendant changes in society and culture. From subsistence-level productivity, the European economy expanded to create great surfeits of goods, with attendant changes in consumption and expectation. Europe grew from a regional economic system to become part--some would say the heart--of a global economy, with attendant changes in worldview and identity. Economic intensification, expansion, globalization, and industrialization are our topics, therefore. Beginning with economic organizations and practices, we will consider how these changed over time and influenced society and culture. The course takes as its point of departure the experience of individual, working men and women: peasants and artisans, merchants and landlords, entrepeneurs and financiers. Yet, it argues outward: from the particular to the general, from the individual to the social, from the local to the global. It will suggest ways in which the economy influenced developments or changes that were not in themselves economic, shaped, and deflected economic life and practice.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: Safley

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 124 Economic History, 1600 to present

Economic affairs dominate much of our daily lives and an appreciation of how our economic world evolved is essential for an intelligent understanding of today's society. This course will survey the world's economic history from 1600 to the present. It will consider the evolution of government policies, the growth of trade, business and industry, the economic inter-relationship between regions, governments and business, and, of course, their effect on ordinary people's economic lives.

Taught by: Drew

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 126 Modern Europe, 1789-1919

It's old, it's new. It's unfamiliar, it's recognizable. This course investigates the collapse of the "old regime" and the birth of something like the Europe we recognize. The long nineteenth century witnessed the development of political, economic, and cultural phenomena we often see as characteristic of modern society. Topics considered include political revolution, industrialization, liberalism, imperialism, and new ideologies of gender, race, and class. Our focus will be consistently transnational. Where did Europe begin and end? How did borders and boundaries operate at the edge of nations, but also within societies? We will investigate these questions as we follow European history from the violence and optimism of the French Revolution to the chaos of the First World War.

Taught by: Chase-Levenson

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 127 The Material Past in a Digital World

The material remains of the human past-objects and spaces-provide tangible evidence of past people's lives. Today's information technologies improve our ability to document, study, and present these materials. But what does it mean to deal with material evidence in virtual context? In this class, students will learn basic digital methods for studying the past while working with the collections of the Penn Museum. As we learn about acquiring and managing data, we will gain valuable experience in the evaluation and use of digital tools. The digital humanities are a platform both for learning the basical digital literacy students need to succeed in today's world and for discussing the human consequences of these new technologies and data. We will disuss information technology's impact on the study and presentation of the past, including topics such as public participation in archaeological projects, educational technologies in museum galleries, and the issues raised by digitizing and disseminating historic texts and objects. Finally, we will touch on technology's role in the preservation of the past in today's turbulent world. No prior technical experience is required, but we hope students will share an enthusiasm for the past.

Taught by: Peter Cobb

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ANTH 127, ARTH 127, CLST 127, NELC 187

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 128 From Complete Destruction to Superpower: Europe 1945-2013

This course offers a survey of European history, including both eastern and western Europe since World War II until the present. The course examines how Europe in all its complexity and cultures lived under the shadow of the Cold War. It examines the origins and nature of the cold War, not just in its diplomatic and political dimensions, but also its effects on the culture and people of Europe. It explores the reasons for the phenomenon of anti-Americanism and the series of revolts exploding throughout eastern Europe until the fall of the Berlin Wall. Finally, the course examines a number of thematic areas about European political culture, immigration, decolonization, the 1960s revolts and the 1970s terrorism, the resurgence of nationalism, but also the growth of the European community. The course explores the question: what does it mean to be European?

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 130 History of Globalization

Globalization seems the essence of modernity, but it is not a new phenomena. The world has already witnessed several eras of globalization, each of which transformed and changed the world in often similar but sometime unique fashions. This course will look at continuing trends towards globalization and consider its rich history and the contentious arguments that it has always provoked. Although the focus of the course will be on globalization during the 19th and 20th centuries, we will also consider earlier episodes of globalization, to fully appreciate its evolution and importance.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: Drew

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 131 Financial Meltdown, Past and Present

Economic history is increasingly recognized as a crucial source of policy advice and is invoked with growing frequency in public debates. In particular, the subprime crisis in 2008 and after has generated a demand for "historical perspective" that would improve the understanding of the causes of financial turmoil and facilitate the prevention of comparable catastrophes. This course begins with a review of the principal features of the subprime crisis of 2008 and asks, so to speak, "how did we get there?" It answers by providing historical insights that shed light on crucial aspects of financial disasters. This is a history course, engaging with topics pertaining to economics, law and politics (national and international). Students with diverse backgrounds are expected to benefit from this course through acquiring a concrete knowledge of the historical evolution of fundamental institutions of financial capitalism. Ultimately, students enrolling in this course are expected to achieve proficiency in historically informed discussion of the mechanisms that were played out in the subprime crisis and beyond.

Taught by: Flandreau

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ECON 028

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 133 Free Speech and Censorship

This course will explore the idea of free speech - its justification, its relationship to various forms of censorship, and its proper limits - as a historical, philosophical, legal, and ultimately, political question. In the first half of the course, we will explore the long history across the West of the regulation of various kinds of ideas and their expression, from malicious gossip to heresies, and read classic arguments for and against censorship, copyright protections, and standards of taste and decency and of truth. In the second part of the seminar, after looking at how the idea of freedom of speech came to seem an existential prerequisite for democracy as well as individual liberty, we will take up the historical and philosophical questions posed by such recent dilemmas as whether or not hate speech deserves the protection of the First Amendment, the distinction between art and pornography from the perspective of freedom of expression, speech during wartime, and the transformative effects of the internet on the circulation and regulation of ideas. We will end the semester by thinking about the globalization of the idea of free speech as a human right and its implications, both positive and negative. Readings will range from Robert Darnton's The Forbidden Best-Sellers of Pre-Revolutionary France, to D. H. Lawrence's Lady Chatterley's Lover, to documents concerning the cartoons of Charlie Hebdo and law review articles about Citizens United v. FEC. We will also make considerable use of local resources, from museums to the library.

Taught by: Rosenfeld

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 135 Cold War: Global History

The cold War was more than simply a military confrontation between the United States and the Soviet Union; it was the frame within which the entire world developed (for better or worse) for nearly five decades. This course will examine the cold War as a global phenomenon, covering not only the military and diplomatic history of the period, but also examining the social and cultural impact of the superpower confrontation. We will cover the origins of the conflict, the interplay between periods of tension and detente, the relative significance of disagreements within the opposing blocs, and the relationship between the "center" of the conflict in the North Atlantic/European area and the global "periphery".

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: Nathans

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: EEUR 135, RUSS 135

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

HIST 137 International Society in the Twentieth Century

Is the world evolving toward a global civil society, and perhaps toward global government? The course explores this question across the 20th century, focusing on the origins and evolution of transnational organizations and movements. We will analyze a variety of actors above and below the level of the nation-state, from the League of Nations to Amnesty International. At the same time we will pay careful attention to the many countervailing forces that have resisted the process of globalization: various forms of nationalism, local ethnic and religious movements in places as far-flung as Central Africa and Northern Ireland, and struggles over territories and border control from Arizona to Kashmir. We will look at the long history of contention between these opposing trajectories, exploring such topics as Wilsonianism and its reception in Europe and beyond, transnational human rights norms, the environmentalist movement, institutions designed to deal with global threats such as the World Health Organization or the International Atomic Energy Agency, European integration, political Islam, and the War on Terror.

Taught by: Ogle

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 139 Jews and Judaism in Antiquity

A broad introduction to the history of Jewish civilization from its Biblical beginnings to the Middle Ages, with the main focus on the formative period of classical rabbinic Judaism and on the symbiotic relationship between Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Dohrmann

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: JWST 156, NELC 051, NELC 451, RELS 120

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 140 Medieval and Early Modern Jewry

Exploration of intellectual, social, and cultural developments in Jewish civilization from the rise of Islam in the seventh century to the assault on established conceptions of faith and religious authority in 17th century Europe, that is, from the age of Mohammed to that of Spinoza. Particular attention will be paid to the interaction of Jewish culture with those of Christianity and Islam.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Ruderman

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: JWST 157, NELC 052, RELS 121

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 141 Jews in the Modern World

This course offers an intensive survey of the major currents in Jewish culture and society from the late middle ages to the present. Focusing upon the different societies in which Jews have lived, the course explores Jewish responses to the political, socio-economic, and cultural challenges of modernity.Topics to be covered include the political emancipation of Jews, the creation of new religious movements within Judaism, Jewish socialism, Zionism, the Holocaust, and the emergence of new Jewish communities in Israel and the United States. No prior background in Jewish history is expected.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Wenger

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: JWST 158, NELC 053, RELS 122

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 143 Foundations of European Thought: from Rome to the Renaissance

This course offers an introduction to the world of thought and learning at the heart of European culture, from the Romans through the Renaissance. We begin with the ancient Mediterranean and the formation of Christianity and trace its transformation into European society. Along the way we will examine the rise of universities and institutions for learning, and follow the humanist movement in rediscovering and redefining the ancients in the modern world.

Taught by: Moyer

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: COML 143

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 146 Comparative Medicine

See primary department (HSOC) for a complete course description.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Mukharji

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HSOC 145, STSC 145

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 150 American Jewish Experience

This course offers a comprehensive survey of American Jewish history from the colonial period to the present. It will cover the different waves of Jewish immigration to the United States and examine the construction of Jewish political, cultural, and religious life in America. Topics will include: American Judaism, the Jewish labor movement, Jewish politics and popular culture, and the responses of American Jews to the Holocaust and the State of Israel.

Taught by: Wenger

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: JWST 130, RELS 124

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 153 Transformation of Urban America: From the Mid-Twentieth Century to the Present

The course traces the economic, social, and political history of American cities after World War II. It focuses on how the economic problems of the industrial city were compounded by the racial conflicts of the 1950s and 1960s and the fiscal crises of the 1970s. The last part of the course examines the forces that have led to the revitalization of cities in recent years.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Fairbanks

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: URBS 104

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 155 Introduction to Asian American History

This course will provide an introduction to the history of Asian Pacific Americans, focusing on the wide diversity of migrant experiences, as well as the continuing legacies of Orientalism on American-born APA's. Issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality will also be examined.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Azuma

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ASAM 003

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 159 Technology, Policy & War

Comparative and interdisciplinary examination of successful and failed uses of force in international relations, from ancient to modern times, using case studies. Readings will include Clausowitz, Sun Tzu, and a variety of primary and secondary sources for the wars considered each year. Issues of war's fundamental origins, and its many impacts on society, will also be considered.

Taught by: Waldron

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

HIST 160 Strategy, Policy and War

Analysis of the political use of force, both in theory and in practice, through analytical readings and study of selected wars. Readings include Sun Zi, Kautilya, Machiavelli, Clauseqitz and other strategists. Case studies vary but may include the Peloponnesian War, the Mongol conquests, the Crusades, the Crimean War, Russo-Japanese War, World War II, Korea, or the Falklands, among others, with focus on initiation, strategic alternatives, decision and termination. Some discussion of the law of war and international attempts to limit it.

Taught by: Waldron

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 161 American Capitalism

A broad overview of American economic history will be provided by focusing on the following topics: colonial trade patterns, the growth of the market economy, the political economy of slavery, industrial expansion, segmentation in the labor force and changes in work, technological and organizational innovations, business cycles, the rise of the corporate welfare state, the growth of monopoly capitalism, and current economic problems in historical perspective.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Licht

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ECON 014

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

HIST 162 The American West

This course explores the social and cultural history and current views of the many Wests we think we know, In 1872, President Grant established Yellowstone National Park, only the first of many national and state nature reserves in the west. Even while the Parks were widely celebrated, in 1876 Grant allowed miners and land speculators into the Black Hills, or Paha Sapa, land long considered sacred by the Lakota peoples and 'protected' for them as recently as 1868 Treaty of Laramie. From this pairing of events in the 1870s spring the many overlapping themes this course will address: Native peoples, their beliefs and material cultures, pressured by the arrival of scattered industries (gold rushes, silver and copper mining); irregular sources of industrial and banking capital from England, New York, Chicago, and elsewhere; the arrival of the US Army in 1851, then a break removing troops for the Civil War, then their renewed and constant appearance from 1866 on and the making and breaking of other treaties; the irregular scattering of land speculators and dirt farmers, even while the US government insisted the Sioux and Cheyennes, among other peoples, not disturb the passage of planters on the Oregon Trail, even as their hunting grounds were enclosed by the Union Pacific and North Pacific railroads by 1870. Naturalists, hikers, and artists arrived by rail to the western parks: Yellowstone, Yosemite (1890), and the Grand Canyon (1919). By 1900, American tourists went west to see wild West Indian Shows and wonder at the new parks. They ate at restaurants serving western food, wore western ware and cowboy boots, and listened to western music that finally reached its high point when folklorist Hal Cannon founded the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering in Elko, Nevada, in 1984, still active today with offshoots in Durango, Montana, and Texas.

Taught by: St. George

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 163 Modern American Culture

Through the twentieth century, American culture took on new forms and meanings, spurred by technological innovation, commerce, and institutions, and shaped by an ever-changing population. In the process, American culture became self-consciously 'modern'-embraced, contested, repudiated, and continually redefined. This course explores the history of American culture from the 1890s to the 1990s, with a focus on the following questions: Why did culture become such an important part of American economic, social, and political life in the twentieth century? How has culture been created, understood, and mobilized by different groups in American society at different times? What have been the politics of culture over the twentieth century? Topics include the rise of 'culture industries' and mass entertainment, including amusement parks, film, radio, and television; the growth of consumer culture; the impact of gender in such arenas as sports and fashion; the role of working-class peoples, African Americans, and immigrants in American culture; the cultural response to the Depression and World War II; and popular activism. The course emphasizes the study of primary documents-journalism, fiction, letters and diaries, music, photographs, and film-as a means of understanding the past.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Peiss

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

HIST 164 Recent American History

This course examines major developments in United States history since the Great Depression, a tumultuous period that gave birth to many of our contemporary debates about the responsibilities of government, the possiblity of radical social change, and the meaning of citizenship. Reading primary documents alongside historical accounts, we will address the building of the New Deal state; the emergence of the United States as a superpower; the domestic and international repercussions of the Cold War; the impact of mass consumption, suburbanization, and new technologies; the civil rights movement and other drives for social change; the cultural and political fallout of the Vietnam War; transformations in gender roles and the family; and the end of the "American century."

Taught by: Licht

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 166 Arabic/Israeli Conflict in Literature and Film

This course will explore the origins, the history and, most importantly, the literary and cinematic art of the struggle that has endured for a century over the region that some call the Holy Land, some call Eretz Israel and others call Palestine. We will also consider religious motivations and interpretations that have inspired many involved in this conflict as well as the political consequences of world wars that contributed so greatly to the reconfiguration of the Middle East after the fall of the Ottoman Empire, and after the revelations of the Holocaust in Western Europe. While we will rely on a textbook for historical grounding. the most significant material we will use to learn this history will be films, novels, and short stories. Can the arts lead us to a different understanding of the lives lived through what seems like unending crisis?

Taught by: Troutt-Powell

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: CIMS 166, NELC 137

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

HIST 167 The New African Diaspora

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 167, AFST 167, URBS 167

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 168 History of American Law to 1877

The course surveys the development of law in the U.S. to 1877, including such subjects as: the evolution of the legal profession, the transformation of English law during the American Revolution, the making and implementation of the Constitution, and issues concerning business and economic development, the law of slavery, the status of women, and civil rights.

Taught by: Berry

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 168

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 169 History of American Law Since 1877

This course covers the development of legal rules and principles concerning individual and group conduct in the United States since 1877. Such subjects as regulation and deregulation, legal education and the legal profession, and the legal status of women and minorities will be discussed.

Taught by: Berry

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AFRC 169

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 170 The American South

Southern culture and history from 1607-1860, from Jamestown to seccession. Traces the rise of slavery and plantation society, the growth of Southern sectionalism and its explosion into Civil War.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Two terms. student may enter either term.

Also Offered As: AFRC 172

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

HIST 171 The American South 1860-Present

This course will trace the history of the American South from the end of the Civil War to the present. It will investigate Reconstruction, the New South, Populism, racial disfranchisement and the rise of Jim Crow, the politics of the One-Party South, the South in the Progressive era and its role in the New Deal and World War II, the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 1960s, and the rise of the Republican South. While following the narrative of politics and economic development,we will pay particular attention to race relations and will be more than casually interested in gender roles. In addition, we will take frequent peeks at the evolving Southern identity as reflected in popular culture and literature as well as in other corners of the public sphere.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Two terms. student may enter either term.

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

HIST 172 Native People of Eastern North America

This course surveys Native American life east of the Mississippi River from earliest times to the present. The diverse histories of Native peoples will be examined both on their own terms and as continuing elements of the continent's broader story. Topics to be addressed include 16th- and 17th-century demographic, economic, and social consequences of contact with European peoples, 18th century strategies of resistance and accommodation to colonial powers, 19th-century impacts of U.S. government removal and cultural assimilation policies, and 20th-century cultural and political developments among the region's surviving Native American communities.

Taught by: Richter

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 174 Reform and Revolution in the Americas

The United States and Latin America produced a remarkable series of revolutions and reforms during the postwar period. This course examines efforts in the United States, Guatemala, Cuba, and Brazil to define and address problems around land, labor, and property; nation, empire, and autonomy; and racism, democracy, and citizenship. In studying the US and Latin America together, the class invites students to explore central themes of both regions' histories as parts of global processes. We will explore exchanges between social movements in the US, Cuba and Africa, for instance, ask how ideas about poverty traversed national borders, and examine the global rise of human rights consciousness. The class, in other words, not only compares national histories but analyzes the relationships between national upheavals and the global significance of events in the hemisphere.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Offner

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: LALS 174

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 175 Society and Culture in Brazil

With its booming economy, the recent inauguration of its first female president, and its selection as host to the 2012 World Cup and Olympic games, Brazil is growing in global prestige. But amid all these exciting developments are devastating socioeconomic inequalities. Access to safe living conditions, livable wages, higher education, and overall social mobility remain painfully out of reach to many Brazilians, the majority of whom are the descendants of slaves. Why do these problems persist in a country that has had such an enduring and widespread reputation as a "racial democracy"? What are the possibilities of closing the equality gap in Brazil? To answer these and other questions, our course takes a long and expansive view of Brazilian history. We begin with an exploration of Brazil's early formation as a Portuguese colony in the sixteenth century before moving on to tracing its development as one of the largest and longest-lasting slaveholding societies in the world. From there we will examine the gradual process of abolition in the region, the transition to an independent republic in the nineteenth century, as well as the nation-building projects and political crises of the twentieth century. We will conclude with an analysis of the major issues shaping modern Brazilian soicety and culture.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 175, LALS 175

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 176 Afro-American History 1550-1876

This course will study the history of Afro-Americans from their first encounter with Europeans in the 16th century to emancipation during the Civil War. The course will concentrate on the variety of black responses to capture, enslavement, and forced acculturation in the New World. The difference in the slave experience of various New World countries, and the methods of black resistance and rebellion to varied slave systems will be investigated. The nature and role of the free black communities in antebellum America will also be studied.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Two terms. student may enter either term.

Also Offered As: AFRC 176

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 177 Afro-American History 1876 to Present

A study of the major events, issues, and personalities in Afro-American history from Reconstruction to the present. It will also examine the different slave experiences and the methods of black resistance and rebellion in the various slave systems.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Savage

Two terms. student may enter either term.

Also Offered As: AFRC 177

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 178 The Foundations of the Early Modern Atlantic World 1450-1800

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a solid knowledge of Atlantic history during the early modern period (XV-XVIII centuries). Through readings of primary and secondary texts we will discuss the cultural, religious, intellectual, and economic developments of Europe, Africa, and the Americas, as well as the connections, struggles, and mutual influences between the peoples of these three continents. Throughout the semester we will study several important topics: medieval precedents of early modern expansion; theories of empire; ideologies and systems of conquest and colonialization; the relevance of race and slavery to the understanding of the early modern Atlantic world; how different peoples perceived others and themselves; how European imperialism and colonialization affected the internal development of Africa and America; the role played by religion in the Atlantic world; persistence and continuity of Native cultures and beliefs during an age of expansion; the creation of new identities; the role played by African nations in the creation of the Atlantic world; and the creation of an Atlantic economy.

Taught by: Feros

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: LALS 178

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 179 The Rise and Fall of the Spanish Empire 1450-1700

This course will provide students with a solid knowledge of the history of early modern Spain (1450-1700). Through readings of primary and secondary texts that offer a complex vision of the cultural, religious, intellectual, and economic contexts and processes, students will be able to appreciate the intricacies of Spain's historical evolution. The course focuses on the rise and decline of the Spanish monarchy: the conditions that enabled Spain to become the most powerful monarchy in early modern times, and the conditions that led to its decline. This course also touches upon other important aspects critical to understanding early modern Spain: relationships among Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Iberian Peninsula; the conquest and colonization of the New World; and early modern debates about Spain's rights to occupy America and the so-called "destruction of the Indies."

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Feros

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: LALS 179, ROML 250

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 188 Civilizations at odds? The United States and the Middle East

Foe or friend, Satan or saint - America has often been depicted in the Middle East either as a benevolent superpower or an ill-meaning enemy. In America, too, stereotypes of the Middle East abound as the home of terrorists, falafels, and fanatics. This undergraduate lecture course will explore the relationship between the United States and the Middle East by moving beyond such facile stereotypes. Our goal is to understand why a century of interaction has done little to foster greater understanding between these two societies. By reading novels, memoirs, and historical accounts, we will examine the origins of this cultural and diplomatic encounter in the twentieth century. The readings wills hed light on America's political and economic involvement in the Middle East after the Second World War. We will consider the impact of oil diplomacy on U.S.-Middle East relations, as well as the role of ideology and religion, in our effort to comprehend the current challenges that face these societies.

Taught by: Kashani-Sabet

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: NELC 188

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 189 Modern Egypt

This course will seek to explore how Egyptian culture has dealt with its many pasts by investigating early modern and modern Egyptian history.With an emphasis on the 18th century to the present we will explore the culture of Egypt under the Ottoman Empire, slavery in Egypt, the unsuccessful French attempt to colonize Egypt and the successful British occupation of the country.

Taught by: Troutt-Powell

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 201 Major Seminar in History: Europe Before 1800

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 202 Major Seminar in History: Europe After 1800

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 203 Major Seminar in History: America Before 1800

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 204 Major Seminar in History: America After 1800

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: GSWS 204, JWST 204, LALS 204

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 205 Major Seminar in History: The World before 1800

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: LALS 205, NELC 235

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 206 Major Seminar of the World after 1800

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 209 Industrial Metropolis

Although we no longer think of most U.S. cities as industrial cities, metropolitan areas today are all products of industrial economies, technologies, and social systems. This course explores the industrialization and deindustrialization of American cities within their evolving global context from the era of European colonization to the present. It includes weekly readings and discussion, regular response papers and walking tours, in- class exercises, and a research paper using primary sources. Themes include energy and ecology, labor and production, inner city and suburban development, globalization, and economic restructuring. Ultimately, the class aims to give students a broad knowledge of 1) the history of industrial capitalism, 2) its effects on cities and regions over the past three centuries, and 3) analytical tools for understanding the past, present, and future of metropolitan economies, geography, and society.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Vitiello

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: URBS 103

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 211 Europe before 1800: Advanced Benjamin Franklin Seminar

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: FREN 360, JWST 201

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 212 Europe after 1800: Advanced Benjamin Franklin Seminar

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ITAL 200

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 213 America before 1800: Advanced Benjamin Franklin Seminar

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 214 America after 1800: Advanced Benjamin Franklin Seminar

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 215, JWST 214

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 215 The World before 1800: Advanced Benjamin Franklin Seminar

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 216 The World after 1800: Advanced Benjamin Franklin Seminar

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 215, NELC 286

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 219 Medieval Russia: Origins of Russian Cultural Identity

This course offers an overview of the cultural history of Rus from its origins to the eighteenth century, a period which laid the foundation for the Russian Empire. The course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the evolution of the main cultural paradigms of Russian Orthodoxy viewed in a broader European context. Although this course is historical in content, it is also about modern Russia. The legacy of Medieval Rus is still referenced, often allegorically, in contemporary social and cultural discourse as the Russian, Ukrainian and Belarusian societies attempt to reconstruct and reinterpret their histories. In this course, students learn that the study of the medieval cultural and political history explains many aspects of modern Russian society, its culture and mentality.

Taught by: Verkholantsev

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 235, RUSS 234, SLAV 517

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 220 Russia and the West

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 220, RUSS 220

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 227 Topics in S. Asian Hist

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 230 Topics in European History

Topics vary

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: CLST 230, COML 248, GRMN 232, ITAL 230, JWST 230

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 231 Topics in US History

Topics in US History

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 229, ASAM 203, ENGL 253, JWST 215, RELS 209

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 232 World History: Africa or the Middle East

Topics vary

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 233, AFST 232, CIMS 233, GSWS 232, NELC 282

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 233 World History: East Asia or Latin America

Topics Vary

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 234, ARTH 369, EALC 141, GSWS 233, LALS 233

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 234 Topics in Transnational History

Topics vary

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: URBS 234

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 274 African American Life and Culture in Slavery

This course will examine the lives of enslaved African Americans in the United States, both in the North and the South. We will engage historiographical debates, and tackle questions that have long concerned historians. For example, if slaves were wrenched from families and traded, could they sustain family relationships? If slaves worked from sun-up until sun-down, how could they create music? We will engage with primary and secondary sources to expand our understanding of values, cultural practices, and daily life among enslaved people. Topics will include: literacy, family, labor, food, music and dance, hair and clothing, religion, material culture, resistance, and memories of slavery. Several disciplines including History, Archaeology, Literature, and Music, will help us in our explorations. Written, oral, and artistic texts for the course will provide us with rich sources for exploring the nuances of slave life, and students will have opportunities to delve deeply into topics that are of particular interest to them.

Also Offered As: AFRC 276

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 275 Islam and Society in Africa

This course is designed to provide the students with a broad understanding of the history of Islam in Africa. The focus will be mostly on West Africa, but we will also look at developments in other regions of the continent. We will examine the process of islamization in Africa and the interplay between Islam and the African traditional religions and customs. Topics include conversion, Islamic education and literacy, the status of women, Muslim response to European colonial domination, Islamic mysticism, and the contemporary development of Sunni movements.

Taught by: Babou

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 274, AFST 274

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 276 Japan: The Age of the Samuri

This course deals with the samurai in Japanese history and culture and will focus on the period of samurai political dominance from 1185 to 1868, but it will in fact range over the whole of Japanese history from the development of early forms of warfare to the disappearance of the samurai after the Meiji Restoration of the 19th century. The course will conclude with a discussion of the legacy of the samurai in modern Japanese culture and the image of the samurai in foreign perceptions of Japan.

Taught by: Hurst

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: EALC 176

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 277 Tpcs in Premod Jap History

Also Offered As: EALC 270

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 308 Renaissance Europe

This course will examine the cultural and intellectual movement known as the Renaissance, from its origins in fourteenth-century Italy to its diffusion into the rest of Europe in the sixteenth century. We will trace the great changes in the world of learning and letters, the visual arts, and music,along with those taking place in politics, economics, and social organization. We will be reading primary sources as well as modern works.

Taught by: Moyer

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 309 Age of Reformation

The Protestant Reformation of the 16th century was a watershed in European history. It marked the culmination of centuries of religious, political and social change and had profound institutional and intellectual consequences. We will examine the central teachings and activities of the Protestant reformers against this broad background. Topics will include: medieval traditions of religious protest and reform; social and political changes in the period of the Reformation; the changing role of the Papacy; and the impact of the new technology of printing. Readings will be both primary texts and secondary sources and discussions will be an integral part of the class.

Taught by: Safley

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 310 Europe in the Age of Baroque

The baroque earns its name from a style of art and architecture, developed in Europe between 1550 and 1700 and typified by elaborate ornamentation and color.The term can be applied well to the history of the period, which was characterized by conflict and complexity.

Taught by: Safley

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 311 The Tudors

This course examines the history of England from the accession of Henry (VII) Tudor in 1485 to the death of Elizabeth I in 1603, with emphases on the political and personal history of this colorful dynasty, the religious revolution known as the protestant Reformation, the arts and literature known as the English Renaissance, imperial and trade ventures overseas, and aspects of popular culture including the witch craze. Unlike most English histories of the period, we will also look closely at the other realms of the British Isles, Scotland, Wales, and Ireland. Readings consist of a textbook with a British scope, and an array of primary sources, some in book form and others (marked with an asterisk on the syllabus) attached to Blackboard or distributed in class. Books are available at the Penn Book Center, except for biographies associated with film critiques. Most of the films noted in the syllabus will be available on PVN; otherwise, they can be viewed at the library or through Netflix. Assignments in square brackets are optional.

Taught by: Todd

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 312 Britain's Century of Revolution

England, Ireland, Wales and Scotland experienced revolutions in the first half of the seventeenth century that abolished monarchy and hereditary aristocracy, and carried out the first judicial execution of a monarch in European history. England was re-constructed as a republic, then with Scotland became the United Commonwealth of Great Britain, then declined into a military dictatorship, and finally invited the king back. In 1688, however, the Glorious Revolution deposed that king and declared Britain a strictly constitutional monarchy. This course will explore what motivated ordinarily obedient British subjects to take up arms against their rulers. The works of Milton and Marvell, Cromwell, Hobbes and Locke, and many lesser-known writers of diaries, autobiographies, sermons, statutes, and letters will illuminate the issues. The focus will be on how law, politics and religion interacted in the onset of war and defining of settlement, but with an eye to the larger social and cultural setting in which revolutions happened: this is also an era of both witchcraze and scientific revolution, puritanism and the slave trade, the near-destruction of London by fire and plague and its re-birth as the capital of a commercial empire.

Taught by: Todd

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 314 Victorian Britain: Spaces, Places, and Pests

In this course, we will examine the nooks and crannies of Victorian society. It was a period of squalor, but also innovation, devastating diseases, and crucial advances in public health and medical science. Its cities featured depressing slums and lurid crimes, but also new kinds of spectacles, entertainments, and commodities. It was, in many ways, as one of its greatest authors wrote, "the best of times, and the worst of times." Units under study will include "The Docks," "The Germs," "The Empire," "The Church," and "the Museum." We'll investigate killer diseases like cholera and typhus, dazzling buildings like the Crystal Palace, imperial wars and crises, and new scientific movements like Darwinism and mesmerism. Along the way, we will encounter proper and eminent Victorians as well as scandalous and marginalized ones. The aim will be to understand Victorian mentalities and ideas by looking at a diverse array of institutions and inventions. Readings will include novels, stories, pamphlets, essays, and cartoons as well as secondary literature. Classes will be a mixture of lecture and discussion, and no previous experience in British history is necessary.

Taught by: Chase-Levenson

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 318 Italian History from Napoleon to Berlusconi

The seminar looks at the evolution of modern Italy from the Napoleonic Era through the unification of the Kingdom in 1861, through its crisis in the First World War and the subsequent struggle for control of the new mass society. It looks at the emergence of the first fascist regime and the first modern dictatorship under Benito Mussolini; the rise and consolidation of that dictatorship, its descent into anti-Semitism, defeat in war and the civil war of 1943-45.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ITAL 318

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 320 Nature's Nation: Americans and their Environment

Environmental history studies the interactions between humans and the natural world. In this kind of study, mosquitoes and rain are actors in history as well as humans and their impact. This course explores these interactions through case studies and topics nationally and globally, such as energy, disease, human migration and settlement, animals, technological changes, urban and suburban development, conservation and politics. This course is geared toward students who want to think about how history happens, in different placaes and over time.

Taught by: Greene

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HSOC 279, STSC 279

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 323 Material Life in America, 1600-1800

This course will explore the history of America's use and fascination with material goods between 1600 and 1860. We will examine such issues as the transferal of European traditions of material culture to the New World, the creation of American creolized forms, the impact of reformers in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, and the development of regional landscapes. Thematic issues will include consumerism, objects as symbolic communication and metaphor, and the complementary issues of archaeology and history of art in material culture study.

Taught by: St. George

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: FOLK 323

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 331 American Diplomatic History Since 1776

Survey course tracing the origins and evolution of the great traditions of U.S. foreign policy, including Exceptionalism, Unilateralism, Manifest Destiny, Wilsonianism, etc., by which Americans have tried to define their place in the world. Three hours of lecture per week, extensive reading, no recitations.

Taught by: McDougall

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 333 Napoleonic Era & Tolstoy

In this course we will read what many consider to be the greatest book in world literature. This work, Tolstoys War and Peace, is devoted to one of the most momentous periods in world history, the Napoleonic Era (1789-1815). We will study both the novel and the era of the Napoleonic Wars: the military campaigns of Napoleon and his opponents, the grand strategies of the age, political intrigues and diplomatic betrayals, the ideologies and human dramas, the relationship between art and history. How does literature help us to understand this era? How does history help us to understand this great novel? This semester marks the 200th anniversary of Napoleons attempt to conquer Russia and achieve world domination, the campaign of 1812. Come celebrate this Bicentennial with us! Because we will read War and Peace over the course of the entire semester, readings will be manageable and very enjoyable.

Taught by: Holquist/Vinitsky

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: COML 236, RUSS 240

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 342 European Intellectual History, 1300-1600

This course will examine the formation of European traditions of scholarship and letters, including medieval, Renaissance and early modern writings. Topics will include court literature and romance; scholastic thought and university scholarship; political thought; the humanist tradition. It will consider the rise of printing, the formation of the "republic of letters," and the development of popular literature.

Taught by: Moyer

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: COML 342

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 343 Nineteenth Century European Intellectual History

Starting with the dual challenges of Enlightenment and Revolution at the close of the eighteenth century, this course examines the emergence of modern European thought and culture in the century from Kant to Nietzsche. Themes to be considered include Romanticism, Utopian Socialism, early Feminism, Marxism, Liberalism, and Aestheticism. Readings include Kant, Hegel, Burke, Marx, Mill, Wollstonecraft, Darwin, Schopenhauer, and Nietzsche.

Taught by: Breckman

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: COML 343

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 344 Twentieth Century European Intellectual History

European intellectual and cultural history from 1870 to 1950. Themes to be considered include aesthetic modernism and the avant-garde, the rebellion against rationalism and positivism, Social Darwinism, Second International Socialism, the impact of World War One on European intellectuals, psychoanalysis, existentialism, and the ideological origins of fascism. Figures to be studied include Nietzsche, Freud, Woolf, Sartre, Camus, and Heidegger.

Taught by: Breckman

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: COML 344

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 345 Sinners, Sex and Slaves: Race and Sex in Early America

This course explores the lost worlds of sinners, witches, sexual offenders, rebellious slaves, and Native American prophets from the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries. Using the life stories of unusual individuals from the past, we try to make sense of their contentious relationships with their societies. By following the careers of the trouble-makers, the criminals, and the rebels, we also learn about the foundations of social order and the impulse to reform that rocked American society during the nineteenth century.

Taught by: Brown

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 345, GSWS 345

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

HIST 346 Gender in Modern American History

This course explores how immigration, industrialization, racial segregation, and the growing authority of science transformed the fundamental conditions of women's lives in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Building on previous effforts by female reformers to perfect society, women at the turn of the century organized large social movements dedicated to improving the lives of women and children and gaining public access to political power. We will examine the fruits of this activism as well as the consequences of subsequent events for the rise of several important social movements in the latter half of the century -- including civil rights, women's liberation, and gay rights -- in which women played a vital role. The course concludes with an assessment of feminism in the present day, with special emphasis on the responses of younger women to its legacy.

Taught by: Brown

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AFRC 346, GSWS 346

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

HIST 349 History of Sexuality in the U.S.

This course introduces students to a relatively new field of inquiry, the history of sexuality in the U.S. It explores the past to consider why sexuality has been so central to American identities, culture, and politics. Primary documents and other readings focus on the history of sexual ideology and regulation; popular culture and changing sexual practices; the emergence of distinct sexual identities and communities; the politics of sexuality; and the relationship between sexual and and other forms of social difference, such as gender, race, ethnicity, age, and class. Topics include many with continuing relevance to contemporary public debate: among them, sexual representation and censorship, sexual violence, adolescent sexuality, the politics of reproduction, gay and lesbian sexualities and sexually transmitted diseases.

Taught by: Peiss

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: GSWS 349

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

HIST 354 American Expansion in the Pacific

This class will focus on America's expansion into the Pacific around the turn of the century with the acquisition of Hawaii and the Phillipines. It can deal with various issues, including the meaning of "frontier," colonialism, development of capitalist economies in the region, diplomacy, racism, migration, an American brand of Orientalism in encountering the "natives" and "heathens,"and histories of the West and the Pacific Islands in general.

Taught by: Azuma

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ASAM 354

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 362 Law in American Life

Taught by: Gordon

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 367 Philadelphia, 1700-2000

Using Philadelphia as a lens, this course will examine the transformation of American cities from the colonial period to the present. Through readings, lectures, and tours, we will consider urbanization and suburbanization, race, class, and ethnicity, economic development, poverty and inequality, housing and neighborhood change, urban institutions, and politics and public policy.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: URBS 367

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 370 North Africa: History, Culture, Society

This interdisciplinary seminar aims to introduce students to the countries of North Africa, with a focus on the Maghreb and Libya (1830-present). It does so while examining the region's close economic and cultural connections to sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, and the Middle East. Readings will include histories, political analyses, anthropological studies, and novels, and will cover a wide range of topics such as colonial and postcolonial experiences, developments in Islamic thought and practice, and labor migration. This class is intended for juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

Taught by: Sharkey

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AFST 332, AFST 533, NELC 332, NELC 632

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 371 Africa and the Mid-East

This seminar will explore the historical relationship between these two regions from the early modern age to the present. We will examine the history of trade, particularly the slave trade, and its cultural and political legacy. We will compare the experiences of European imperalism--how the scramble for Africa dovetailed with the last decades of the Ottoman Empire--with an eye to how this shaped nationalist movements in both regions. The course will also explore the decades of independence with a special eye towards pan-Africanism and pan-Arabism. We will also study the ramifications of the Arab-Israeli conflict on the relationship between African and Middle-Eastern countries, from Uganda to Ethiopia, from OPEC to Darfur. The course will pay close attention to migrations through the regions, whether forced or economic or religious. Whenever possible we will explore, through film and literature, how people in Africa and the Middle East see their connections, and their differences.

Taught by: Troutt-Powell

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 372, AFST 373, NELC 334

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 372 The History of Foreign Aid to Africa

This course examines the history, politics, and significance of foreign aid to Africa since the late 19th century. While we do not typically think about the European colonial period in Africa in terms of 'foreign aid,' that era introduced ideas and institutions which formed the foundations for modern aid policies and practices. So we start there and move forward into more contemporary times. In addition to examining the objectives behind foreign assistance and the intentions of donors and recipients, we will look at some of the consequences (intended or unintended) of various forms of foreign aid to Africa over the past century. While not designed to be a comprehensive history of development theory, of African economics, or of international aid organizations, the course will touch on all of these topics. Previous course work on Africa is strongly advised.

Taught by: Cassanelli

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFST 372, HIST 542

Prerequisites: AFST/HIST 076, AFST 190, or AFST 256

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 373 America in the 1960s

This course examines the political, cultural, and intellectual history of America between 1954 and 1974. It considers the civil rights movement, the New Frontier and Great Society, the Supreme Court and right politics, the rise of the New Right, the debate over Vietnam, student radicalism, sexual liberation movements, black power, the counterculture, the urban crisis, and white backlash. The course emphasizes the transformation of liberalism and the revitalization of conservatism, and the tensions between integration and separatism, between libertarianism and communitarianism that shaped the social movements of the sixties.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

HIST 380 Modern Jewish Intellectual and Cultural History

An overview of Jewish intellectual and cultural history from the late 18th century until the present. The course considers the Jewish enlightenment Reform, Conservative and Neo-Orthodox Judaism, Zionist and Jewish Socialist thought, and Jewish thought in the 20th century, particularly in the context of the Holocaust. Readings of primary sources including Mendelsohn, Geiger, Hirsch, Herzl, Achad-ha-Am, Baeck, Buber, Kaplan, and others. No previous background is required.

Taught by: Ruderman

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: JWST 380, RELS 320

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 390 China & USSR Compared

A comprehensive and multi-faceted survey of China and Russia, mostly in the twentieth century, through examining preludes and postludes, but focusing above all on their time as Communist states and sometimes quarreling Cold War allies. Of course we will cover the history, the geography, the economics, the leaders (Stalin, Mao), and the great events - not least the Second World War in each - always comparing, contrasting, and drawing linkages. We will also examine, however, daily life and work for ordinary people, developments in society, and not least their common attemps at revolution, at somehow creating new and unprecedented polities, having populations of radically transformed new people. This informative, fascinating quest will take us from folklore to literature and the arts to dissent and religion and ecology, among other topics. As far as possible we will let their people speak for themselves, by assigning mostly translations of original sources including novels and memoirs, even poetry. A comprehensive assessment of the strategically critical Asian heartland - which at over 14 million square miles is larger than Canada, the United States, and Western Europe combined. Lectures, readings, midterm, short paper, and in-class final.

Taught by: Waldron

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: RUSS 390

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 391 The Vietnam War

A THOROUGH HISTORICAL, MILITARY, AND SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE VIETNAM WAR, WHICH LASTED IN ONE FORM OR ANOTHER FROM THE END OF WWII IN 1945 TO 1975, IN WHICH OCCURRED THE LONGEST AND MOST HUMILIATING DEFEAT IN OUR HISTORY. SINCE THAT TIME THE VIETNAMESE HAVE PUBLISHED HUNDREDS OF DOCUMENTS, SOME IN ENGLISH, THAT PROVIDE AN ENTIRELY NEW PERSPECTIVE ON WHAT WE BELIEVED DURING THE WAR. THESE, SUPPLEMENTED BY OTHER PRIMARY AND SECONDARY MATERIALS, AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE WRITTEN BY VIETNAMESE OR BY AMERICANS HAVING FIRST-HAND KNOWLEDGE, WILL FORM THE BACKBONE OF THE COURSE. THE VARIOUS AMERICAN AND VIETNAMESE STRATEGIES WILL BE SCRUTINIZED CAREFULLY, AND A GOOD DEAL SAID ABOUT THE HOME FRONT IN AMERICA. THE ACTUAL FIGHTING, THAT DETERMINED THE OUTCOME, WILL NOT BE SLIGHTED. WE EXPECT AT LEAST SOME GUEST SPEAKERS HAVING LONG DIPLOMATIC OR MILIARY EXPERIENCE IN VIETNAM. THE PRESENT WILL BE OUR CONCLUSION. LECTURES TTH 12-1:30; MIDTERM IN CLASS, SHORT PAPER, AND REGULAR FINAL. IF YOU WANT TO UNDERSTAND THE WORLD YOU NOW LIVE IN, THIS COURSE IS A GOOD PLACE TO START.

Taught by: Waldron

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: EALC 196

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 394 China and the World: Modern Times

History 394 is a comprehensive introduction to the last hundred years of China's relations with the world, with emphasis on American-Chinese relations, but within the necessary context of China's relations with other countries from Asia to Europe to Africa and elsewhere (as well as Washington's changing relations with Beijing). China's role in the world can be understood only when the full background and international context is made clear. This course has no prerequisites: freshmen and others lacking background will find it manageable and interesting. Students who have successfully completed this course will be well positioned to understand some of the most important of current events, and if they like, pursue the topics as careers (there will be no shortage, I assure you). Although much will be said about diplomacy, and Chinese diplomatic strategy in particular, the mile-posts of the course will be a series of wars: World War I and its effects on China; the heroic Chinese war of resistance against Japan (1937-1945) in which, effectively without allies, the Chinese avoided defeat; the bitter Civil War that followed almost immediately (1946-1949) and brought Mao Zedong and his Communists to power while the predecessor Nationalist government fled to the island of Taiwan; then the Korean War (1950-1953) and the close Chinese-Soviet alliance that followed; The Taiwan Straits Crises (1954-1955, 1958, 1996); the Chinese-Indian war (1962) the origin of a situation now heating up; the Sino-Soviet border conflicts (1969); the Vietnam War (1955-1975) which changed the United States profoundly while reorientating China internationally; the (at the time) little noticed Chinese invasion of Vietnam (1979) - and finally the increasingly tense situation today, between Chine and India, and China and her maritime neighbors from Japan to Indonesia, many U.S. allies.

Taught by: Waldron

Also Offered As: EALC 044

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 395 East Asian Diplomacy

This course will survey the history of relations among the great powers in East Asia from 1600 to the present. Special emphasis will be played upon the peculiarities of cross-national exchange in Asia (as compared to Europe), particularly the difficulties of relations among states possessing fundamentally different cultural traditions. We will explore the many informal, as well as formal, means of diplomacy in Asia over the past 400 years.

Taught by: Dickinson

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: EALC 105, EALC 505

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

HIST 398 Junior Honors in History

Open to junior honors candidates in history. Introduction to the study and analysis of historical phenomena. Emphasis on theoretical approaches to historical knowledge, problems of methodology, and introduction to research design and strategy. Objective of this seminar is the development of honors thesis proposal.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 400 Senior Honors in History I

Open to senior honors candidates in history who will begin writing their honors thesis during this seminar.

Two terms. student must enter first term.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 411 Introduction to Written Culture, 14th - 18th Centuries

Taught by: Chartier/Stallybrass

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: COML 411, ENGL 234

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 412 Topics in World History

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 372, EALC 442, INTR 290, NELC 334

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 414 Human Rights and History

The idea of universal, inalienable rights--once dismissed by the philosopher Jeremy Bentham as "nonsense upon stilts"--has become the dominant moral language of our time, the self-evident truth par excellence of our age. Human rights have become a source of inspiration to oppressed individuals and groups across the world, the rallying cry for a global civil society, and not least, a controversial source of legitimation for American foreign policy. This seminar asks: how did all this come to be? We will investigate human rights not only as theories embodied in texts, but as practices embedded in specific historical contexts. Are human rights the product of a peculiarly European heritage, of the Enlightenment and protestantism? How did Americans reconcile inalienable rights with the reality of slavery? Did human rights serve as a "civilizing" mask for colonialism? Can universal rights be reconciled with genuine cultural diversity? Through case studies and close readings, the seminar will work toward a genealogy of human rights.

Taught by: Nathans

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 415 European Intellectual History of the Seventeenth Century

A survey based soley on primary sources of the main currents of seventeenth-century European thought: the criticism of inherited systems and of the authority of the past; skepticism, rationalism; empiricism; and the rise of the new natural philosophy. We will study deep conceptual change as an historical phenomenon, examining works that were both profoundly influential in the seventeenth-century and that are of enduring historical significance. There are no prerequisites, and one of the goals of the course is to make seventeenth-century thought accessible in its context to the twenty-first century student.

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: COML 419

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 416 European Intellectual History in the 18th Century

A survey based soley on primary sources of the main currents of eighteenth-century European thought: the "Enlightenment;" deism; natural religion; skepticism; evangelical revival; political reform; utilitarianism; naturalism; and materialism. The course will focus on works widely-read in the eighteenth century and of enduring historical significance. There are no prerequisites, and one of the goals of the course is to make eighteenth-century thought accessible in its context to the twenty-first century.

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: COML 416

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 418 European Intellectual History since 1945

This course concentrates on French intellectual history after 1945, with some excursions into Germany. We will explore changing conceptions of the intellectual, from Sartre's concenpt of the 'engagement' to Foucault's idea of the 'specific intellectual'; the rise and fall of existentialism; structuralism and poststructuralism; and the debate over 'postmodernity.'

Taught by: Breckman

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: COML 418

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 420 European International Relations from the Age of Enlightenment to the Great War

This course will examine the international politics of Europe in the 18th and 19th centuries, up to the outbreak of World War I. During these centuries, the European great powers experienced significant internal transformations and also a revolution in their relations, both of which reinforced and accelerated each other. In the process, Europe asserted a dominant position in world politics, but also sowed the seed for the terrible castrophes of the 20th Century. The course will address this transformation of European diplomacy with special attention to the rivalries between the great powers, the impact of nationalism and emerging mass politics, the interplay between military and economic power, and the relationship between the European powers and the rest of the world.

Taught by: McDougall

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 421 Europe and the World since 1914

This course looks at Europe's interactions with other world regions throughout the twentieth century. Over the course of roughly a hundred years, Europeans have shaped the fates of peoples living beyond the western world, for instance through the impact of two world wars, European colonialism, and the global Cold War. At the same time, European societies 'at home' were not left unaffected by these interactions. Even today, Europeans are facing the legacies of some of these histories in immigration and the politics of religion and secularism for example. The past century also saw a dramatic shift in Europe's position in the world - from dominance to a loss of influence in the shadow of the United States and more recently, China. The course spends significant time covering the histories of world regions other than Europe. It furthermore considers some interactions and exchanges between world regions from a social and cultural point of view. Because the class spans roughtly a century, the content has to remain introductory and general, although a very basic familiarity with 20th-century international history is helpful.

Taught by: Ogle

Two terms. student may enter either term.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 425 World War I

This survey course examines the outbreak, conduct, and aftermath of the First World War. The First World War put an end to the world of the 19th century and laid the foundations of the 20th century, the age of destruction and devastation. This course will examine the war in three components: the long-term and immediate causes of the First World War; the war's catastrophic conduct, on the battlefield and on the home front; and the war's devastating aftermath. While we will discuss military operations and certain battles, this course is not a military history of the war; it covers the social, economic, political and diplomatic aspects that contributed to the war's outbreak and made possible its execution over four devastating years. No preliminary knowledge or coursework is required.

Taught by: Holquist

Two terms. student may enter either term.

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

HIST 430 Rise and Fall of the Third Reich

The meteoric rise of Hitler's NSDAP in Germany, the nature of Nazi rule, and the final collapse of the Third Reich. The first half of the semester analyzes the appeal of the NSDAP- who joined the party, who voted for it, and why. Nazi mobilization tactics, campaign strategy, and grass-roots techniques, the content of the party's social appeals. The second half of the course concentrates on the Nazis in power, their use of terror and propaganda, their ideological objective, everyday life in the Third Reich, the possibilities of resistance to the regime. Special attention will be devoted to Nazi Jewish policy and the step that led to the "Final Solution" and the Holocaust.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

HIST 431 A World at War: World War II in Europe and Asia

This course will examine the diplomatic origins, military course and domestic implications of World War II.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

HIST 440 Perspectives on Urban Poverty

This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to 20th century urban poverty, and 20th century urban poverty knowledge. In addition to providing an historical overview of American poverty, the course is primarily concerned with the ways in which historical, cultural, political, racial, social, spatial/geographical, and economic forces have either shaped or been left out of contemporary debates on urban poverty. Of great importance, the course will evaluate competing analytic trends in the social sciences and their respective implications in terms of the question of what can be known about urban poverty in the contexts of social policy and practice, academic research, and the broader social imaginary. We will critically analyze a wide body of literature that theorizes and explains urban poverty. Course readings span the disciplines of sociology, anthropology, urban studies, history, and social welfare. Primacy will be granted to critical analysis and deconstruction of course texts, particularly with regard to the ways in which poverty knowledge creates, sustains, and constricts meaningful channels of action in urban poverty policy and practice interventions.

Taught by: Fairbanks

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: URBS 420

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 441 North American Colonial History

A survey of the development of American colonial society, 1607-1750, with emphasis on the regional differences between life in early New England, the Mid-Atlantic, and the South, as well as the relationships between British colonists, Native Americans, and African Americans.

Taught by: Brown

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 442 America in the Era of the Revolution, 1763-1800

As a number of historians have observed, the American Revolution now may seem to have been the inevitable culmination of political, economic, and cultural changes underway in the eighteenth century. But for many whose lives were altered by its disruptive contours, it was more improbable than inevitable. How, then, are we to make sense of the Revolution? What were its causes? Its progress? Its extended "settlement," or period of resolution and questions during the course of the semester, we will need to keep our eyes open to changes afoot in many social fields: the ascendancy or democratic and egalitarian thought; the widespread development of consumerism and market capitalism; the linked forms processes of rebellion and nation-building; and the economic and strategic progress of the conflict itself.

Taught by: St. George

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 449 God and Nature: Readings on the Encounter between Jewish Thought and Science

God and Nature examines the place of the natural world, medicine, and science in Jewish thought from antiquity to the modern era. It looks especially at a body of primary sources in Hebrew written during the age of the so-called "scientific revolution" and during its aftermath. The course is a seminar open to undergraduate and graduate students with a reading knowledge of classical Hebrew. Students without Hebrew with special interest in the subject might enroll with special permission from the instructor.

Taught by: Ruderman

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: JWST 449, RELS 422

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 451 The U.S. and the World since 1898

This class examines the emergence of the U.S. as a world power since 1898, and considers both the international and domestic consequences of U.S. foreign relations. In one respect, the twentieth century was a strange time to become a global empire: it was the period when colonial systems centered in Europe, Russia, Japan, and Turkey collapsed, and new nations emerged throughout Africa and Asia. This class explores the changing strategies of military, economic, and political intervention that the U.S. pursued as colonization lost legitimacy. Within that framework, the class invites students to think about several questions: How did the idea and practice of empire change over the twentieth century? How did the United States relate to new visions of independence emerging in Africa, Asia, and Latin America? How did global interactions both inform and reflect racial ideology in the United States? Finally, how did international affairs transform U.S. politics and social movements?

Taught by: Offner

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 452 Topics in International Relations

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: INTR 290

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 455 Topics in American History

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: SOCI 450

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 463 History of American Education

This course will examine the growth and development of American schools, from the birth of the republic into the present. By 1850, the United States sent a greater fraction of its children to school than any other nation on earth. Why? What did young people learn there? And, most of all, how did these institutions both reflect and shape our evolving conceptions of "America" itself? In an irreducibly diverse society, the answers were never simple. Americans have always defined their nation in a myriad of contrasting and often contradictory ways. So they have also clashed vehemently over their schools, which remain our central public vehicle for deliberating and disseminating the values that we wish to transmit to our young. Our course will pay close attention to these education-related debates, especially in the realms of race, class, and religion. When immigrants came here from other shores, would they have to relinquish their old cultures and languages? When African-Americans won their freedom from bondage, what status would they assume? And as different religious denominations fanned out across the country, how would they balance the uncompromising demands of faith with the pluralistic imperatives of democracy? All of these questions came into relief at school, where the answers changed dramatically over time. Early American teachers blithely assumed that newcomers would abandon their old-world habits and tongues; today, "multicultural education" seeks to preserve or even to celebrate these distinctive patterns. Post-emancipation white philanthropists designed vocational curricula for freed African-Americans, imagining blacks as loyal serfs; but blacks themselves demanded a more academic education, which

Taught by: Zimmerman

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: EDUC 599

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HIST 489 Africans Abroad: Emigrants, Refugees, and Citizens in the New African Diaspora

This seminar will examine the experiences of recent emigrants and refugees from Africa, including many now living in the city of Philadelphia and the surrounding region. In addition to reading some of the historical and comparative literature on migration, ethnic diasporas, and transnationalism, students will have the opportunity to conduct research on specific African communities in Philadelphia or elsewhere in North America, Europe, or the Middle East. African emigres' relations with both their home and host societies will be explored and compared with the experience of other immigrant groups over the past century. Topics include reasons for leaving Africa, patterns of economic and educational adaptation abroad, changes in gender and generational roles, issues of cultural and political identity, and the impact of national immigration policies.

Taught by: Cassanelli

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 488

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 490 Topics in Jewish History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in Jewish history.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: GRMN 581, JWST 490, RELS 429

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 501 The Nature of Sex

What is natural about sex, gender, sexuality and reproduction? This course examines a range of social science, feminist, and historical theories that try to make sense of some of the most intimate and seemingly timeless features of the human experience: the difference between the sexes, the relationship between gender and anatomical sex, and the emotional and social dynamics of reproduction. Among the topics we will consider are the relationship between public and private life; the historic connections between patriarchy and capitalism; reproduction as a social and cultural as well a biological phenomenon; class, race, ethnicity, and religion as alternative sites of identity; citizenship, legal personhood and contract; the dynamics of empire and conquest; feminism; sexuality; the history of the body; visual culture; postmodernist, poststructuralist, and postfeminist ways of thinking about sex and gender; the current debates about the meaning of marriage; and the challenge presented by transgender lives. The course is designed for graduate students but open to undergraduates with the permission of the instructor.

Taught by: Brown

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 528 Amer Vernacular Architec

Also Offered As: HSPV 528

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 530 20th Century Afro-American Historiography

This course will study major historical works on African American history for the post-1890 period. Emphasis on intellectual, political, and cultural history, and special attention to current debates about the relevance of this history and race generally to studies and students of United States history.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 533 Topics in Ancient and Medieval Christianity

Topics vary.

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: RELS 533

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 550 Topics in Jewish History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in Jewish history.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 590 Tpcs in Lang and Lit

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: COML 502, ENGL 501, GRMN 510

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 608 Urban Studies Proseminar

Open to PhD students, this scholar-oriented seminar explores how academic researchers from different disciplines define researchable questions, craft research designs, and contribute to knowledge through an examination of important and/or recently published books and monographs with an urban focus. Required of all doctoral students enrolled in the Urban Studies Graduate Certificate Program. Enrollment is limited to 15 students. Other doctoral students may enroll on a space available basis. Course requirements include completion of a major research paper on a topic selected in consultation with the instructor.

Taught by: Stern

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: CPLN 800, SOCI 608, URBS 608

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 610 Topics in American History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in American history.

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 610, GSWS 610, URBS 610

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 620 Topics in European History

Reading and Discussion course on selected topics in European History.

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: COML 621, GRMN 630, JWST 620, RUSS 618, SLAV 623

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 630 Topics in Asian History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in Asian History.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: EALC 541, EALC 726, EALC 774, SAST 512

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 640 Topics in Middle Eastern History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in Middle Eastern history.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: NELC 686

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 645 History and Culture

The aim of this course is to explore and test ways of (re)constructing past cultural practices. The exploration bgins with some basic concepts of culture and cultural change and their relationship to social dynamics. Next we try to identify and apply the most appropriate sources and methods for analyzing cultural "languages" (myth or narrative, symbol, and ritual) and their "text." We will look especially at tools and insights that can be adapted from literary criticism and sociolinguistics, as well as from ethnography -- always within the "discipline of historical context" (E.P. Thompson). Emphasis will be on documentary sources, published and unpublished, but visual imagery and the material record in general, as well as oral traditions, will be included. The principal interpretive questions will resolve around two clusters of issues. One cluster involves evidence and standards of verification; the other involves the ethics and rhetoric of cultural translation/representation.

Taught by: Farriss

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 645

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 650 Topics in African History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in African history

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 650, AFST 650

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 660 Topics in Latin American and Caribbean History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in Latin American and Caribbean history

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 527

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 668 Colloquium in the History of Law and Social Policy

This is a course in the history of law and policy-making with respect to selected social problems. Discussion of assigned readings and papers will elaborate the role law, lawyers, judges, other public official and policy advocates have played in proposing solutions to specific problems. The course will permit theevaluation of the importance of historical perspective and legal expertise in policy debates.

Taught by: Berry

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 668

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 670 Topics in Trans Regional History

Reading and discussion course on selected topics in Transregional History

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 670, GSWS 670

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 700 Proseminar in History

Weekly readings, discussions, and writing assignments to develop a global perspective within which to study human events in various regional/cultural milieus, c. 1400 to the present.

Two terms. student must enter first term.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 710 Research seminar in American history.

Research seminar on selected topics in American history.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 710, LAW 969

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 720 Research in European History

Research seminar on selected topics in European history.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: RELS 738

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 730 Research Seminar in Asian History

Research seminar on selected topics in Asian history.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 740 Research Seminar in Middle Eastern History

Research seminar on selected topics in Middle Eastern history.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 740, AFST 740, GSWS 740

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 750 Research Seminar in African History

Research seminar on selected topics in African history.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 710

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 760 Research Seminar in latin American and Caribbean History

Research seminar on selected topics in Latin American and Caribbean history.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HIST 770 Res Sem: Transregional

Research seminar on selected topics in Transregional history.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: LALS 771

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit