Historic Preservation (HSPV)

HSPV 521 American Architecture

This course is a survey of architecture in the United States. The organization, while broadly chronological, emphasizes themes around which important scholarship has gathered. The central purpose is to acquaint you with major cultural, economic, technological, and environmental forces that have shaped buildings and settlements in North America for the last 400 years. To that end, we will study a mix of "high-style" and "vernacular" architectures while encouraging you to think critically about these categories. Throughout the semester, you will be asked to grapple with both the content of assigned readings (the subject) and the manner in which authors present their arguments (the method). Louis Sullivan, for instance, gives us the tall office building "artistically considered" while Carol Willis presents it as a financial and legal artifact. What do you make of the difference? Finally, you will learn how to describe buildings. While mastery of architectural vocabulary is a necessary part of that endeavor, it is only a starting point. Rich or "thick" description is more than accurate prose. It is integral to understanding the built environment - indeed, to seeing it at all.

Taught by: Wunsch

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HSPV 528 American Vernacular Architecture

This course explores the form and development of America's built landscape-its houses, farm buildings, churches, factories, and fields--as a source of information on folk history, vernacular culture, and architectural practice.

Taught by: St. George

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: HIST 528

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HSPV 530 American Domestic Interiors Before 1850

The American domestic interior from the early British and French settlements in North America until 1850. Emphasis will be on the social, economic, and technological forces as well as the European influences that determined household decoration ranging from the decorative arts to floor, wall, and window treatments.

Taught by: Winkler

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HSPV 531 American Domestic Interiors

This course will examine the American domestic interior from the seventeenth century through the twentieth century with emphasis on the cultural, economic, and technological forces that determined the decoration and furnishing of the American home. Topics to be covered include the decorative arts; floor, wall and window treatments; and developments in lighting, heating, plumbing, food preparation and service, and communication technologies. In addition to the identification of period forms and materials, the course will give special emphasis to historical finishes. The final project will involve re-creation of an historic interior based on in-depth household inventory analysis and study. Several class periods will be devoted to off-site field trips.

Taught by: Stutman

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HSPV 538 Cultural Landscapes and Landscape Preservation

The course introduces the history and understanding of common American landscapes and surveys the field of cultural landscape studies. Methods of Methods of landscape preservation are also surveyed. The cultural-landscape perspective is a unique lens for understanding the evolution of the built environment, the experience of landscapes, and the abstract economic, political and social processes that shape the places where most Americans spend most of their time. The course will focus on the forces and patterns (natural and cultural) behind the shaping of recognizably "American" landscapes, whether urban, suburban, or rural. Methods for documenting and preserving cultural landscapes will be surveyed. Class discussions, readings, and projects will draw on several disciplines--cultural geography, vernacular architecture, environmental history, historic preservation, ecology, art, and more.

Taught by: Mason

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HSPV 540 American Building Technology I

Much architectural writing--from Vitruvius to Le Corbusier--has drawn analogous comparisons between buildings and the human body. Like the skeleton, skin, and internal metabolic systems of the human corpus, buildings are comprised of a structure, infrastructure, and outer surface which are all connected and through which liquids, gases and solids pass. Traditionally, form depended in large part on systems of construction and the selection and manipulation of individual materials. Understanding architecture's materiality in terms of form and fabric, structure and skin, and mechanical systems is essential in understanding not only what a building is, but how it evolves over time. American Building Technology will be divided into two discreet six week modules conceived in succession and taught during the second half of the first semester and first half of the second semester respectively. Module 1: Building Anatomy will examine traditional construction methods through a typological analysis of construction systems. Module 2: Building Archaeology will address the morphological evolution of a structure and its its physical setting, sometimes known as "above ground archaeology." Since thephysical fabric and its evidences of cultural alteration present one primary mode of inquiry, archaeological theory and method provide an excellent means to recover, read, and interpret material evidence, especially in association with documentary and archival sources. The course is intended to introduce students in Historic Preservation to the physical realities of built form and its analysis through careful observation and description. Note: This course continues in the first half of the spring semester for another 0.5 CU.

Taught by: Matero

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

0.5 Course Units

HSPV 541 American Building Technology II: Building Archaeology

Built works- be they barns or bridges, gardens or corn fields, palaces or pit houses - all embody something of their makers and users, and the prevailing social and cultural norms of the day. As a form of material culture, things- buildings and landscapes- are made and modified consciously and unconsciously, reflecting individual and societal forces at play. Since the physical fabric and its alteration present one primary mode of evidence, their investigation provides a critical form of research, especially in association (and often in contest) with archival documentary sources and oral histories. This course will examine the theories and techniques used to investigate the morphological evolution of built works, sometimes known as "above ground archaeology". Students will learn and apply methods relevant to the reading of architectural fabric. Methods of investigation will include absolute and relative dating techniques such as dendrochronology, finishes stratigraphy, mortar analysis, and various typological - seriation studies including framing, molding, fastener (nails and screws), and hardware analyses. Students are expected to use this knowledge in combination with the recording skills of HSPV 601 to record their assigned sites.

Taught by: Matero

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

0.5 Course Units

HSPV 545 Mechanical Systems of Historic Buildings

Mechanical systems will be examined topically from the late 17th through the early 20th centuries, including lighting, water systems, drainage, heating, ventilation, kitchens, and security systems. The course equally divides between understanding historic systems and problems of introducing modern mechanical systems into historic buildings.

Taught by: Moss

Course offered spring; odd-numbered years

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HSPV 551 Building Pathology

This course addresses the subject of deterioration of buildings, their materials, assemblies and systems, with the emphasis on the technical aspects of the mechanisms of deterioration and their enabling factors, material durability and longevity of assemblies. Details of construction and assemblies are analyzed relative to functional and performance characteristics. Lectures cover: concepts in durability; climate; psychrometric, soils & hydrologic; conditions; physics of moisture in buildings; enclosure, wall and roof systems; structural systems; and building services systems with attention to performance, deterioration, and approaches to evaluation of remedial interventions.

Taught by: Henry

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: HSPV 555 or one technical course in architecture.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HSPV 552 Building Diagnostics and Monitoring

Building diagnostics pertain to the determination of the nature of a building's condition or performance and the identification of the corresponding causative pathologies by a careful observation and investigation of its history, context and use, resulting in a formal opinion by the professional. Monitoring, a building diagnostic tool, is the consistent observation and recordation of a selected condition or attribute, by qualitative and/or quantitative measures over a period of time in order to generate useful information or data for analysis and presentation. Building diagnostics and monitoring allow the building professional to identify the causes and enabling factors of past or potential pathologies in a building and building systems, thus informing the development appropriate interventions or corrective measures. In the case of heritage buildings, the process informs the selection of interventions that satisfy the stewardship goals for the cultural resource. In the case of recently constructed buildings, the process informs the identification of envelope and systems interventions for improved performance and energy efficiency.

Taught by: Henry

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HSPV 555 Conservation Science

This course provides an introduction to architectural conservation and the technical study of traditional building materials. Lectures and accompanying laboratory sessions introduce the nature and composition of these materials, their properties, and mechanisms of deterioration, and the general laboratory skills necessary for field and laboratory characterization. Knowledge of basic college level chemistry is required.

Taught by: Matero

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: $30 Lab Fee

HSPV 556 Documentation and Conservation of the Historic Landscape

"Landscape conservation" is a growing concern in contemporary preservation circles. It is a multi-faceted issue, drawing on the fields of landscape architecture, horticulture, architectural history, regional planning, and archaeology. This course aims to provide a comprehensive overview, a look at the state-of-the-art, including philosophical issues, attempts at international and national guidelines, evaluative/survey systems, technical investigation techniques, and selected case studies. Students will be asked to analyze and develop a preliminary conservation plan for a selected site in the Philadelphia area.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HSPV 572 Preservation Through Public Policy

This course explores the intersection between historic preservation, design and public policy, as it exists and as it is evolving. That exploration is based on the recognition that a network of law and policy at the federal, state and local level has direct and profound impact on the ability to manage cultural resources, and that the pieces of that network, while interconnected, are not necessarily mutually supportive. The fundamental assumption of the course is that the preservation professional must understand the capabilities, deficiencies, and ongoing evolution of this network in order to be effective. The course will look at a range of relevant and exemplary laws and policies existing at all levels of government, examining them through case studies and in-depth analyses of pertinent programs and agencies at the local, state and federal level.

Taught by: Hollenberg

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HSPV 600 Documentation, Research, Recording 1

The goal of this course is to help students learn to contextualize the history of buildings and sites. In order to gain first-hand exposure to the actual materials of building histories, we will visit a half-dozen key archival repositories. Students will work directly with historical evidence, including maps, deeds, the census, city directories, insurance surveys, photographs, and many other kinds of archival materials. After discussing each type of document in terms of its nature and the motives for its creation, students will complete a series of projects that develop their facility for putting these materials to effective use. Philadelphia is more our laboratory than a primary focus in terms of content, as the city is rich in institutions that hold over three centuries of such materials; students will find here both an exposure to primary documents of most of the types they might find elsewhere, as well as a sense of the culture of such institutions and of the kinds of research strategies that can be most effective. The final project is the completion of an historic register nomination.

Taught by: Ammon/Wunsch

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HSPV 601 Documentation, Research, Recording II

Documentation, Research, Recording II. This course provides an introduction to the survey and recording of historic buildings and sites. Techniques of recording include traditional as well as digitally-based methods including field survey, measured drawings, photography and rectified photography. Emphasis is placed on the use of appropriate recording tools in the context of a thorough understanding of the historical significance, form and function of sites. Required for first-year MSHP students; others by permission.

Taught by: Matero/Mason/Faculty

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Studio

1 Course Unit

HSPV 606 Historic Site Management

The course focuses on management, planning, and decision-making for all types of heritage sites from individual buildings to historic sites to whole landscapes. Course material will draw on model approaches to management, as well as a series of domestic and international case studies, with the goal of understanding the practicalities of site management. Particular topics to be examined in greater detail might include conservation policy, interpretation, tourism, or economic development strategies.

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HSPV 620 Seminar in American Architecture: PARIS & PHILADELPHIA: LANDSCAPE & LITERATURE of the 19th Century.

This course explores the literal and literary landscapes of 19th-century Paris and Philadelphia, with particular attention to the ways in which the built environment is shaped by and shapes shifting ideologies in the modern age. Although today the luxury and excesses of the "City of Light" may seem worlds apart from the Quaker simplicity of the "City of Brotherly Love", Paris and Philadelphia saw themselves as partners and mutual referents during the 1800s in many areas, from urban planning to politics, prisons to paleontology. This interdisciplinary seminar will include readings from the realms of literature, historical geography, architectural history, and cultural studies as well as site visits to Philadelphia landmarks, with a view to uncovering overlaps and and resonances among different ways of reading the City. We will facilitate indepth research by students on topics relating to both French and American architectural history, literature, and cultural thought.

Taught by: Goulet/Wunsch

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: COML 625, FREN 620

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HSPV 621 Social Justice Seminar

How do historic preservation and other design professionals contribute to more equitable and just societies? How can our work be organized to result in greater equity, access and social justice? This seminar will explore connections between historic preservation (and related design, planning and artistic practices) and the pursuit of social justice. Our investigations will focus on both conceptual and theoretical constructions (how we think about social justice) and practical examples of advancing social outcomes through preservation and design. We'll draw on work by: geographers, anthropologists and other social scientists and theorists; historians; design practitioners; heritage organizations; artists; and more. Subjects will include public interest design, creative placemaking, public art, memorialization, and methods of practice and institutional organization. The course will progress through a series of weekly topics, often including guest practitioners and scholars. Students will bear significant responsibility for helping flesh out the topics and cases we study; final projects (individual and and group) will be envisioned as a statement (in the form of a book or exhibit) of how social justice concerns have reshaped practice and how they could reshape our fields in the future.

Taught by: Mason

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HSPV 624 Digital Media for Historic Preservation

A required praxis course designed to introduce students to the techniques and application of digital media for visual and textual communication. Techniques will be discussed for preservation use including survey, documentation, relational databases, and digital imaging and modeling.

Taught by: Hinchman

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HSPV 625 Preservation Economics

The primary objective is to prepare the student, as a practicing preservationist, to understand the language of the development community, to make the case through feasibility analysis why a preservation project should be undertaken, and to be able to quantify the need for public/non-profit intervention in the development process. A second objective is to acquaint the student with the measurements of the economic impact of historic preservation and to critically evaluate "economic hardship" claims made to regulatory bodies by private owners.

Taught by: Rypkema

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HSPV 637 Landscape Preservation Seminar

The seminar on the Common American Landscape concentrates on a selected topic which illuminates a typical land/or significant aspect of the American landscape in a particular time and place.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HSPV 638 Topics in Historic Preservation

Spring 2016: This seminar will examine the role of sound in shaping modern urban spaces and life. While music plays a large part in the sounds of the city, we will focus on soundscapes more broadly. From the late 19th century through the present, and in geographies spanning from Paris to Philadelphia, we will explore the making, meaning, and experience of sound for varied populations; the politics of sound as an instrument of power; and the policies of noise regulation. As an interdisciplinary seminar supported by the Mellon Humanities+Urbanism+Design Initiative, the course will bring together students and faculty from diverse fields to probe the subject of urban sound through the lenses of both theory and practice. We will read across a wide variety of disciplines, including urban and environmental history, sound studies, urban geography, the history of sensation, musicology, anthropology and critical theory. We will engage with sound archives, installations, films, and photographs, and also have an opportunity to make field recordings of our own. The format of the final project is flexible and could include a research paper, theoretical essay, visualizations, GIS mapping, sonic compositions, short film, or other types of media. Instructors: Francesca Ammon and Naomi Waltham-Smith.

Taught by: HSPV Faculty

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HSPV 640 Contemporary Design in Historic Settings

Thoughtful contemporary design can add value and meaning to historic settings of any scale. Rigorous dialogue with history and context enriches contemporary design. This seminar immerses students in the rewarding yet challenging realm of design with landmarks and existing structures. It will encourage participants to create their own models for design and preservation planning through discussion of source materials that illustrate the political, cultural and aesthetic environments that have shaped regulation and design with heritage throughout the past century. Sketch problems set in Philadelphia and analysis of case studies from around the world will enable students to critique and communicate a range of responses to landmarks and historic contexts, and to explore the roles of significance, physical and intangible conditions in shaping appropriate responses.

Taught by: Hawkes

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HSPV 650 European Conservation

A three to four week summer course offered in different locations in Europe to teach international theories and methodologies of conservation as practiced there. Lectures,documentation, field work, and field trips will be involved. Past course locations included Italy, England and Turkey. Travel and residence fees may be extra. Offered every year.

Taught by: Mason

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HSPV 656 Advanced Conservation Science

A methodological approach to the examination and analysis of historic building materials is introduced. Experimental design for conducting conservation research plus statistical analysis and modeling of research data will further complete the discussion. Practical analytical techniques appropriate for conservation practice including: classical and advanced instrumental techniques for qualitative and quantitative analysis of organic and inorganic materials will be discussed. Theoretical and practical applications of advanced surface techniques for both elemental and molecular/composition analysis as well as applications of nanotechnology and nanomaterials in conservation will be covered. Students will also learn about deterioration processes and long term effects of conservation treatments through accelerated aging techniques. Course materials will be taught through lectures, invited speakers, lab visits and laboratory sessions by practicing learned techniques and procedures on related masonry samples, along with provided course readings and literature.

Taught by: Vatankhah

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: HSPV 555, Conservation Science or Permission of the Instructor

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HSPV 660 Theories of Historic Preservation

Theories of historic preservation serve as models for practice, integrating the humanistic, artistic, design, scientific and political understandings of the field. This course examines the historical evolution of historic preservation, reviews theoretical frameworks and issues, and explores current modes of practice. Emphasis is placed on literacy in the standard preservation works and critical assessment of common preservation concepts. In addition to readings and lectures, case studies from contemporary practice will form the basis for short assignments. Professional ethics are reviewed and debated. The instructor's permission is required for any student not registered in the Graduate Program in Historic Preservation. Note that the course is organized in two parts; the first half, on the basics of preservation theory, is taught in the fall semester while the second half takes place in the spring semester and engages advanced topics. Note: this course continues in the second half of the spring semester for another 0.5 CU.

Taught by: Mason

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: Instructor's permission required for any student not registered in the Graduate Program in Historic Preservation.

Activity: Lecture

0.5 Course Units

HSPV 661 Theories of Historic Preservation II

Theories of historic preservation serve as models for practice, integrating thehumanistic, artistic, design, scientific and political understandings of the field. HSPV 661 builds on HSPV 660, which examines the historical evolution of historic preservation, reviews theoretical frameworks and issues, and explores current modes of practice. HSPV 661 engages advanced topics such as cultural landscape theory, economics of preservation, sustainability and environmental conservation, social justice, and urban design. In addition to readings and lectures, case studies from contemporary practice will be used to examine theories in practice. The principal assignment will be a term research paper. The instructor's permission is required for any student not registered in the Graduate Program in Historic Preservation. (Note that the course is the second of two parts; the first half, on the basics of preservation theory is taught inthe fall semester while the second half takes place in the spring semester.)

Taught by: Mason

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

0.5 Course Units

HSPV 671 Historic Preservation Law

Introduction to the legal framework of urban planning and historic preservation, with special emphasis on key constitutional issues, zoning, historic districts, growth management, and state and local laws for conserving historic buildings.

Taught by: Michael

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HSPV 701 Historic Preservation Studio

The studio is a practical course in planning architectural, urban and regional conservation interventions, bringing to bear the wide range of skills and ideas at play in the field of historic preservation. Recognizing that historical areas are complex entities where cultural and socio-economic realities, land use, building types, and the legal and institutional setting are all closely interrelated, the main focus of the studio is understanding the cultural significance of the built environment, and the relation of this significance to other economic, social, political and aesthetic values. Through the documentation and analysis of a selected study area, studio teams undertake planning exercises for an historical area, consult with communities and other stakeholders, carry out documentation and historical research, and create policies and projects. The studio seeks to demonstrate how, through careful evaluation of problems and potentials, preservation planning can respond to common conflicts between the conservation of cultural and architectural values and the pressure of social forces, economic interest,and politics. The studio focuses on a specific site in need of comprehensive preservation effort, most often in Philadelphia proper. Students work in teams as well as on individual projects. Consultation with local preservation and planning groups, community representatives, and faculty advisors informs research and analyze the study area, helping to define major preservation planning problems and opportunities, formulate policies, and propose preservation plans and actions.

Taught by: Mason/Wang/Hawkes

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Studio

2 Course Units

HSPV 703 Pienza Studio/Seminar

This hybrid seminar-studio course will explore advanced topics in urban conservation and landscape preservation through application to the challenges Italian case studies, principally Pienza. This Tuscan town possesses several highly significant layers of urban history, a rich set of connections to the regional landscape, and significant challenges from tourism. Planning, design and preservation interventions in this context will be a practical focus of the studio aspects of the course. (Other case studies in Italy will also be presented, including Rome's Centro and the archaeological site of Cosa.) The seminar components of the course will delve into the literature on urban conservation in Italy and elsewhere. The course will run in parallel to-and collaboration with - a Landscape Architecture studio led by Laurie Olin. Travel to Italy during March's spring break is planned. Permission of department required to enroll. Please email Program Coordinator Amanda Bloomfield: amab@design.upenn.edu.

Taught by: Mason

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: Permission of department required to enroll.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HSPV 710 Thesis I

Students are admitted to thesis after completion of two semesters or their equivalent in the graduate program. Theses should be based on original research and relate to each student's elected concentration in history, theory, technology, planning or design. Thesis proposals are required at the time of fall enrollment, and during the fall semester thesis students are required to defend their topics before preservation faculty and students. Thesis guidelines, available in the Historic Preservation office, describe other details.

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

HSPV 711 Thesis II

Students are admitted to thesis after completion of three semesters or their equivalent in the graduate program. Theses should be based on original research and relate to each student's elected concentration in history, theory, technology, planning, or design. Thesis proposals are required at the time of fall enrollment, and during the fall semester thesis students are required to defend their topics before preservation faculty and students. Thesis guidelines, available in the Historic Preservation office, describe other details.

Taught by: Faculty

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

HSPV 713 TOPICAL STUDIO/SEMINAR: PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE & ARCHITECTURAL CONSERVATION

This course is intended to introduce students to the professional practice of architectural conservation and illustrate how the technical knowledge gained through their academic studies is applied in the real world. It will include a discussion of the role of the architectural conservator within the larger preservation and restoration fields, as well as the concept of professional leadership. A significant portion of the course will be dedicated to project management--from writing a proposal to developing and implementing a work plan for a conservation project. The project management portion of the course will also review the typical progression of a project through design and construction phases, highlighting the role that the conservator plays in both. The course will include: lectures; site visits to current or recently completed conservation projects; in-class discussions and assignments related to typical tasks and challenges faced by architectural conservators in their daily professional life; and guest lecturers discussing the importance of inter-disciplinary collaboration. Permission of department required to enroll. Please email Program Coordinator Amanda Bloomfield: amab@design.upenn.edu

Taught by: Krotzer

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: Permission of the department is required to enroll.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HSPV 739 Conservation Seminar: Masonry/Wood

Module 1: Masonry - Roy Ingraffia. This seminar will offer an in-depth study of the conservation of masonry buildings and monuments with a particular focus on American building stone. Technical and aesthetic issues will be discussed as they pertain to the understanding required for conservation practice. Part 1 will address a broad range of building stone, masonry construction technologies, and deterioration phenomenon; Part 2 will concentrate on conservation methodology as well as past and current approaches for the treatment of stone masonry structures. The subject will be examined through published literature and case studies. Students will gain practical experience through lab and field exercises and demonstrations. The subject matter is relevant to interested students of conservation and preservation, architecture, landscape architecture, architectural history, and archaeology. Module 2: Wood - Andrew Fearon. Prior to the twentieth century, most structures found in the built environment relied upon wood as a primary material for both structural members and decorative features. An understanding of the physical properties as well as the historic application application of this organic material provides the basis for formulating solutions for a wide spectrum of conservation issues. As the scope of preserving wooden structures and wooden architectural elements is continually broadened, new methods and technology available to the conservator together allow for an evolving program - one that is dependent upon both consistent review of treatments and more in depth study of craft traditions. This course seeks to illustrate and address material problems typically encountered by stewards of wooden cultural heritage -among them structural assessment, bio-deterioration, stabilization and replication techniques. Through a series of lectures and hands-on workshops given by representative professionals from the fields of wood science, conservation, entomology, engineering, and archeology, theoretical and practical approaches to retaining wooden materials will be examined with the goal to inform the decision making process of future practicing professionals.

Taught by: Ingraffia/Fearon

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: Pre-requisite: HSPV 555 Conservation Science and permission needed from department.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HSPV 740 Conservation Seminar: Wood/Masonry

Module 1: Masonry - Roy Ingraffia This seminar will offer an in-depth study of the conservation of masonry buildings and monuments with a particular focus on American building stone. Technical and aesthetic issues will be discussed as they pertain to the understanding required for conservation practice. Part 1 will address a broad range of building stone, masonry construction technologies and deterioration phenomenon; Part 2 will concentrate on conservation methodology as well as past and current approaches for the treatment of stone masonry structures. The subject will be examined through published literature and case studies. Students will gain practical experience through lab and field exercises and demonstrations. The subject matter is relevant to interested students of conservation and preservation, architecture, landscape architecture, architectural history, and archaeology. Module 2: Wood - Andrew Fearon. Prior to the twentieth century, most structures found in the built environment relied upon wood as a primary material for both structural members and decorative features. An understanding of the physical properties as well as the historic application of this organic material provides the basis for formulating solutions for a wide spectrum of conservation issues. As the scope of preserving wooden structures and wooden architectural elements is continually broadened, new methods and technology available to the conservator together allow for an evolving program - one that is dependent upon both consistent review of of treatments and more in depth study of craft traditions. This course seeks to illustrate and address material problems typically encountered by stewards of wooden cultural heritage - among them structural assessment, bio-deterioration, stabilization and replication techniques. Through a series of lectures and hands-on workshops given by representative professionals from the fields of wood science, conservation, entomology, engineering, and archeology, theoretical and practical approaches to retaining wooden materials will be examined with the goal to inform the decision making process of future practicing professionals.

Taught by: Fearon/Ingraffia

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: HSPV 555 Conservation Science

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HSPV 741 Special Topics: Feats of Clay- Brick and Terra Cotta

Fall 2017- Of the major construction materials and systems employed since the earliest known traditions of architectural building, few display the temporal and geographical extent or the metaphysical alchemy of transforming loose unconsolidated sediment into a hard fused solid as fired brick and terra cotta.Born of clay, water, and fire, brick and its kin-terra cotta and structural, roof, and ornamental tile-have long been employed to construct, protect, and ornament buildings in an unbroken tradition stretching from the towers of the Old Testament to the contemporary rain screens of today's high rise buildings. Given this unique context, our focus will be a cross- disciplinary study of structural clay products-namely brick and terra cotta. We will consider these building materials and their use in terms of process (manufacturing and plant evolution), product (typology), and structural assemblage (buildings, engineering works and large artworks) and these considerations will allow an exploration of (1)historical technology and design, (2)material characterization and analysis, (3)performance and construction and (4)conservation issues. The class will conduct individual research on a range of topics and present that research generally every other week. Topical lectures will complement each presentation/discussion week. Brick and structural clay tile will be the medium by which which we, as a class, will study nothing less than American architecture, craft and labor, applied science, economics, and preservation.

Taught by: MATERO

Two terms. student may enter either term.

Prerequisite: HSPV 555

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HSPV 743 Conservation Studio/Seminar

Pit and Quarry: The Cement and Slate Industries of Lehigh Valley 2013 marked the 50th anniversary of Kenneth Hudson's groundbreaking book and manifesto on "industrial archaeology," the "mongrel" field he first named as the bastard offspring of industry and archaeology. Today the remains of industry past dominate the global landscape. Urban and rural America are littered with the evidence of the last two centuries of the country's former industrial prowess and many of these places, now abandoned, hold latent value for their transformation and reuse. Despite the recent popularity of industrialchic, critics now question whether this form of "adhocism"-that is, the improvisation of new, unrelated uses devoid of meaning and interpretation-has led to , at best, a polite taming of industrial heritage,and, at worst, its disfigurement in the name of gentrification and short-sighted corporate marketing. A shift in thinking is now required for more sustainable preservation: thematic approaches that examine the problems and potential based on the original industrial processes; consideration and interventions at the landscape scale, ecological as well as architectural thinking, and finally,human connections through past and current associations. Slate World: The Pennsylvania "Slate Belt," an area of only 22 square miles, lies approximately 50 miles to the northwest of Philadelphia and just south of Blue (Kittanning) Mountain between the Delaware and Lehigh Rivers. The first quarries opened in the 1830s, but significant growth followed in the first decade of the twentieth century when Lehigh Valley accounted for approximately half the slate produced in the United States, eventually becoming the greatest slate producing region in the world. Cement Age: Reinforced concrete would prove to be the modern material of the new century and in the United States, the creation of the first Portland cement plants in the Lehigh Valley in 1871 at Coplay, would give rise to an industry that would forever change the face of America and the world. By 1901 the Atlas Portland Cement Co. in Northampton, PA was the largest cement company in the United States - more than twice the size and probably five to ten times the size of most firms in the industry. Today the valley is still thecountry's center of cement production but automation has rendered the old plants nearly vacant, their historic mills and kilns, though still impressive, largely abandoned.

Taught by: Matero

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: HSVPV 555 Conservation Science

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HSPV 744 Architectural Archaeology: Building Lives

Time, like space, is all around us. Its evidence is visible in the natural world as physical change. In our own fabricated material works, time exerts its presence through the tell-tale signs of stylistic and technological anachronism and material degradation. It is through these indicators that we confront time indirectly and attempt to position a thing or place in relation to the present. How buildings and landscapes are received by each generation depends on the specific conditions of time and place. Built works, be they barns or bridges, gardens or corn fields, palaces or pit houses, all reflect something of their maker and user as well as the prevailing social and cultural norms. Such trajectories are dependent on many diverse factors; however once consciously examined, all creative works under consideration for their ability to communicate to us; to have relevance in ways consistent or new to their original authorship and to contemporary society. In our efforts to relate to buildings and places from the past, we use time as the primary measure from the present and historical narrative to describe what we know. As a form of material culture, buildings and landscapes are made and modified both consciously and unconsciously, directly and indirectly, thus reflecting individual and societal forces at play. Since the physical fabric and its evidences of alteration present one primary mode of inquiry, archaeological theory and methodology provide an excellent means to recover, read, and interpret that evidence in association with documentary and archival sources.

Taught by: Matero

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HSPV 746 Conservation & Mgmt

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HSPV 747 Conservation of Archaeological Sites and Landscapes

Archaeological sites and landscapes have long been considered places of historical and cultural significance and symbols of national and ethnic identity. More recently they have offered new opportunities for economic and touristic development in both urban and rural settings. With a unique set of of physical conditions including fragmentation, illegibility, extreme environmental exposure and material deterioration, as well as contested ownership and control, their conservation, management, and interpretation as heritage places require special knowledge and methodologies for both heritage specialists and archaeologists.This seminar will address the history, theories,principles, and practices of the preservation and interpretation of archaeological sites and landscapes. The course will draw from a wide range of published material and experiences representing both national and internationalcontexts. Topics will include site and landscape documentation and recording; site formation and degradation; intervention strategies including interpretation and display, legislation, policy, and contemporary issues of descendent community ownership. The course will be organized as a seminar incorporating readings, lectures and discussions on major themes defining the subject of ruins and archaeological site conservation. Readings have been selected to provide exposure to seminal works in the development of theory and method as well as current expressions of contemporary practice. This will set the background for the selected case study site which will provide students the opportunity to work with primary and secondary materials related to archaeological and ruin sites: excavation reports, stabilization work, conservation and interpretation plans, etc. Depending on the site, students will study specific issues leading toward the critique or development of a conservation and management program in accordance with guidelines established by ICOMOS/ ICAHM and other official agencies (e.g., national legislation such as NPS-28).

Taught by: Erickson/Matero

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ANTH 508

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HSPV 748 Preservation Case Studies: Advanced Theory

Preservation Case Studies will bring cutting-edge theoretical debates, current issues and the latest work of faculty and guests into the HSPV curriculum. Coordinated by the Chair, but populated with a number of other faculty, practitioners and guest scholars, the course will sample and explore current theoretical, conceptual, political and practical issues facing the historic preservation field. The course will serve two main purposes: First, to present critical and cutting-edge cases and issues in preservation in to the preservation curriculum and the discourse of PennDesign; second, present an opportunity for second-year master's and PhD to devote an elective CU to the advanced study of preservation theory. It will revolve around a series of curated, public talks - scheduled at an hourenabling the entire HSPV Program to attend the talks - as well as course-centerroundtable discussions. The course will be offered for credit as an "Advanced Theory" seminar for second-years or PhD students; attendance by all Program students will be expected at the public talks. The schedule of topics and talks will be finalized in August, and will likely include: recent social-scientific studies of historic preservation impacts; new architectural works incorporating preservation; systems research and its implications for historic preservation theory; and the politics of preservation advocacy.

Taught by: Mason

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HSPV 750 Architectural Conservation Praxis: Traditional Buildings / Traditional Practice

Summer 2017: Grand Teton National Park Travel dates: June 19, 2017 - July 8, 2017 Architectural Conservation Praxis is an intensive 3-week summer course designed for students pursuing studies in architectural conservation and builds on Penn Preservation's core curriculum and the first-year conservation courses. The syllabus is organized around project fieldwork supplemented by lectures, demonstrations, exercises, and site visits that will allow students to experience firsthand the design and construction of vernacular buildings and the application of traditional craft- based methods to preserve them. Through a partnership with the National Park Service and the Vanishing Treasures Program, students will engage in the recording, survey, and treatment of timber and masonry structures under the supervision of Penn, NPS, and guest faculty. For Summer 2017, the course will again be based at Bar BC Dude Ranch in Grand Teton National Park. Students will work with instructors on traditional construction methods including log, timber, and stone masonry. The course will also examine preservation issues related to the rich vernacular landscape and National Park heritage with visits to other sites in the area. This year participants will be able to attend the NPS "Guiding Principles for Historic Resources" workshop offered by the Western Center for Historic Preservation at White Grass Training Center within the park. Accommodation will be shared rooms at 4 Lazy F, a restored early 20th century family dude ranch with a full kitchen, bathrooms, and laundry facility. Students are requested to bring laptops, cameras, sleeping bags and all personal items. More information is available at http://www.conlab.org/acl/edtr/Praxis/edtr praxis.html. Course enrollment is by permit only. Please contact Amanda Bloomfield (HSPV Dept.) at amab@design.upenn.edu.

Taught by: Matero & Guest Faculty

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisites: HSPV 540, 541 and 555.

Activity: Studio

1 Course Unit

Notes: Travel Dates: 6/19/17 to 7/8/17

HSPV 760 Preservation Planning Praxis

This course is designed to meet two broad learning outcomes: first, solidify student's knowledge of basic city and regional planning concepts, systems and methods as applied to historic cities; second, and more extensively, apply this knowledge in a practical situation relevant to contemporary preservation planning practice. The course will be conducted over three weeks in the early summer and will have two distinct components: a short, first part of the course will be held in Philadelphia over three days in late May. It will focus on readings, lectures, and workshops about preservation planning in general; Randy Mason will lead this part of the course. The second, international part of the course will take place in Galway, Ireland. Most if not all travel and lodging will be paid by the course budget - details to come. This two-to- three-week praxis course is designed to give students an intense and concentrated "hands-on" experience in preservation planning methods, practice, research, communication and collaboration; these experiences are heightened by pursuing heritage conservation planning in a non-US setting. This year's class will be from June 4 through June 16 and will include up to 10 students. Professor Rypkema will lead the field portion of the course, aided by a Teaching Assistant. The focus of the class will be identifying and recommending ways that a municipality can implement the commitments in the New Urban Agenda (https://habitat3.org/the-new-urban-agenda) that include cultural heritage references. In October 2016 190 nations meeting in Quito, Ecuador, committed to the implementation of the New Urban Agenda. The reality is, however, that the real implementation will be at the city level - and this will vary given the resources, governance, markets and professional capacity of each municipality. The first week on- site will be primarily lectures, including importantly from lectures from local officials and experts, tours, and formal and informal discussions with local heritage advocates, public officials, and other stakeholders. The second week will be spent identifying and documenting policy areas currently in operation that could be modified to include the NUA comments and in developing and recommending new policies that might be adopted. These findings will be prepared in both written and oral reports, and on Thursday giving a public presentation of the findings. It is anticipated that the students and other participants will be divided into six teams, each addressing one of the germane NUA commitments. Each team would be composed of Penn students and local and/or regional participants. Course

Taught by: Rypkema/Mason

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisites: HSPV 540, 541, 600, 601, 660, 661; HSPV 572 or 625 or other planning-centered coursework.

Activity: Studio

1 Course Unit

Notes: Travel Dates: 5/30/17 to 6/16/17

HSPV 770 Site Management, Interpretation and Conservation Praxis

This course is designed to meet two broad learning outcomes: first, solidify graduate students' basic knowledge of site management and interpretation issues and process; second, document and interpret complex sites using historical research, landscape reading and architectural archaeology methods. The course will be conducted over three weeks in the early summer focused on the site of Powderham in Devon, England -- in partnership with Prof Daniel Maudlin, University of Plymouth, and the Earl of Devon. While the course will deal with the whole of the Powderham Estate, student projects will focus on several particular features requiring investigation and interpretation. Overall, the course will focus on a site management framework for the estate, a complex of several historic buildings and landscapes. Extensive background documentation will be available for analysis. Students will also work in smaller groups to pursue specific on-site projects and investigations; these will relate to architectural archaeology of the Great Hall and Library, investigation and interpretation of a derelict American Garden, and other elements of the estate to be determined. Accommodations will be provided in a restored stable on the grounds. Course enrollment is by permit only. Please contact Amanda Bloomfield (HSPV Dept.) at amab@design.upenn.edu.

Taught by: Hawkes, Keim, Mason and guest faculty

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisites: HSPV 540, 541, 660 and 601; 606 preferred; 551 and 555 for conservation-focused students.

Activity: Studio

1 Course Unit

Notes: Travel Dates: 5/20/17 to 6/12/17

HSPV 780 Architectural Conservation Advanced Praxis

Offering training beyond the classroom, this advanced praxis in architectural conservation focuses on the integration of theory and practice. a written project proposal must be submitted for consideration and approval by faculty, and a written defense of the work must be presented after the completion of the project. Students must have completed the conservation emphasis within the Master of Science program in Historic Preservation at the University of Pennsylvania.

Taught by: Matero

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

2 Course Units

HSPV 790 HSPV Summer Institute: First-year Historic Preservation Workshop

The Workshop is an orientation course designed to prepare incoming, first-year graduate students for the intense coursework of their first semester. Generally, the Workshop orients students to the issues and methods of the core MSHP curriculum, begins familiarizing students to the resources of Philadelphia, and begins skill-building exercises. The workshop employs lectures, exercises, and fieldtrips to introduce some of the important skills, questions, and issues that will be at the center of first year's work in the Program. Documentation, descriptive analysis of buildings and places, and critical historiography are particular emphases. The Workshop also constitutes an extended introduction to the Program's faculty and the students in first-year and second-year cohorts. Course enrollment is by permit only. Please contact Amanda Bloomfield (HSPV Dept.) at amab@design.upenn.edu.

Taught by: Mason

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Lecture

0 Course Units

HSPV 999 Independent Study

An opportunity for a student to work on a special project under the guidance of a faculty member.

Taught by: Faculty

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

2 Course Units