Integrated Product Design (IPD)

IPD 500 Product Eng Basics

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

IPD 501 Integrated Computer-Aided Design, Manufacturing and Analysis

The majority of today's engineered products move through an advanced computer-aided workflow which greatly speeds design and process time. This course will explore the fundamental components of this workflow through a combination of lectures, hands-on exercises, and a semester design project. General course topics include: fundamental design principles, project definition and needfinding, advanced computer-aided design, rapid prototyping techniques, computer-controlled machining, and an in-depth exploration of the modern analysis and simulation tools that have revolutionized the way in which products are designed. Enrollment is limited.

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: MEAM 101, MEAM 150, and MEAM 210, or graduate standing in the School of Engineering, Design, or Wharton with similar experience

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

IPD 503 Ipd Fundamentals

Also Offered As: ARCH 303

Activity: Studio

1 Course Unit

IPD 504 Rehab Engineering and Design

Students will learn about problems faced by disabled persons and medical rehabilitation specialists, and how engineering design can be used to solve and ameliorate those problems. The course combines lectures, multiple design projects and exercises, and field trips to clinical rehabilitation facilities. Students will have substantial interactio with clinical faculty, as well as with patients.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: BE 514

Prerequisite: Graduate students or permission of the instructor

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

IPD 509 Needfinding

Needfinding is an approach that puts people and their needs at the center of product development and business strategy creation. Over 90% of new products introduced into the marketplace fail. A good portion of these failures are due to lack of understanding of end consumers and their needs. To develop truly successful new products, it's not enough just to ask people what they need or want. Designers and engineers need tools and techniques to get beyond what people can explicitly state and determine their implicit needs. Needfinding is an approach for developing deep insights that provide strategic direction for corporations and open up new possibilities for product development. In this class students will gain a toolset from which to develop their own approaches to conducting researching for design: learning how to think about other people, about culture, and about new perspectives. They will also learn tactical skills: how to define research questions, how to conduct observations and interviews, how to interpret results, how to synthesize them into fodder for design, and how to communicate their findings in a way that is compelling and actionable for designers, marketers, and business strategists. This class is designed for graduate students and upper level undergrads with a specific interest in product design or design thinking.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

IPD 511 Creative Thinking and Design.

This is a creative & iterative problem solving course that uses a series of mechanical design challenge projects to move students into the broad realm of unpredictable often incalculable time-constrained problem solving. It explores a wide variety of problem definition, exploration and solving "tools," and a variety of surrounding "design thinking" topics, such as ethics and the design of experience. Drawing and prototyping are used in the projects for ideation, iteration, speculation and communication.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: It is recommended that undergraduates take MEAM 101 prior to this course.

IPD 514 Design for Manufacturability

This course is aimed at providing current and future product design/development engineers, manufacturing engineers, and product development managers with an applied understanding of Design for Manufacturability (DFM) concepts and methods. The course content includes materials from multiple disciplines including: engineering design, manufacturing, marketing, finance, project management, and quality systems.

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: MEAM 514

Prerequisites: MEAM 101 or equivalent, MEAM 210 or equivalent, Senior or Graduate standing in the School of Design, Engineering, or Business with completed product development and/or design engineering core coursework or related experience

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

IPD 515 Product Design.

This course provides tools and methods for creating new products. The course is intended for students with a strong career interest in new product development , entrepreneurship, and/or technology development. The course follows an overall product design methodology, including the identification of customer needs, generation of product concepts, prototyping, and design-for-manufacturing. Weekly student assignments are focused on the design of a new product and culminate in the creation of a prototype, which is launched at an end-of-semester public Design Fair. The course project is a physical good - but most of the tools and methods apply to services and software products.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: MEAM 415, OIDD 415

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

IPD 516 Advanced Mechatronic Reactive Systems

This course combines performance art and advanced mechatronics concepts that include the design and implementation of large-scale actuation, advanced sensing, actuation and control. This course pairs design school and engineering students to form interdisciplinary teams that together design and build electro-mechanical reactive spaces and scenic/architectural elements in the context of the performing arts. The two disciplinary groups will be treated separately and receive credit for different courses (ARCH746 will be taught concurrently and in some cases co-located) as they will be learning different things. Engineering students gain design sensibilities and advanced mechatronics in the form of networked embedded processing and protocols for large scale actuation and sensing. Design students learn elementary mechatronics and design reactive architectures and work with engineering students to build them. The class will culminate in a some artistic performance (typically with professional artists) such as a Shakespeare play, robotic ballet, a mechatronic opera.

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: MEAM 516

Prerequisite: MEAM 510 (Mechatronics) or equivalent

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

IPD 517 Des & Dev Web-Based Prod

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: OIDD 416

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

IPD 519 Real Time Embedded Sys

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ESE 519

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

IPD 521 Designing Smart Objects

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ARCH 721

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

IPD 525 Ergonomics/Human Factors Based Product Design

Human Factors and Ergonomics knowledge is a critical component of a product designer or design engineer's toolbox. This course teaches the direct application of existing human factors/ergonomic data to the creation of new product designs. Applying human factors knowledge to problem solving for product design happens throughout the design process. It is a useful input as initial ideas begin to ut and as a way to verify completed concepts through directly documented user testing and design iteration. The course would be a mini-lecture/studio style course in which the students will work in class on assigned projects, finding, analyzing, extrapolating and applying data to design solutions and creating mockups, modeland prototypes for user testing of their designs.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

IPD 526 Contemporary Furniture Design

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: ARCH 726

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

IPD 527 Industrial Design I.

This course provides an introduction to the ideas and techniques of Industrial Design, which operates between Engineering and Marketing as the design component of Integrated Product Development. The course is intended for students from engineering, design, or business with an interest in multi-disciplinary, needs-based product design methods. It will follow a workshop model, combining weekly lectures on design manufacturing, with a progressive set of design exercises.

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: ARCH 727

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

IPD 528 Design of Contemporary Products

This course was designed to explore intersections of functionality and performance using an experimental platform to uncover opportunities within the built environment to create domestic products. Provides practical insights into the material manipulation and aesthetic experimentation that are essential for the design and fabrication of products. Lectures and case studies help students to learn from examples and develop their own designs. Through a series of exercises, students design and fabricate a prototype using actual materials. The course addresses problems unique to product design, such as scale, weight, cost and production.

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: ARCH 728

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

IPD 530 Building Product Workshop: Transwall

As Craig Vogel notes in The Design of Things to Come, "we are in a new economic age that is in need of a new renaissance in product development, on that leverages multiple minds working in concert," With this mindset, this interdisciplinary workshop guides students through the product design process from design brief to concept generation in one semester, working firsthand with Transwall, a leading manufacturer of demountable wall systems, to focus on a specific product need. The design opportunity looks for the next generation of pre-manufactured wall systems; getting away from field constructed walls and looking at critical issues of mass-produced wall systems; flexibility, mobility, structural stability, acoustics, transparency/opacity, and operability. During the workshop, students will explore the context that creates the unique need for a new product and have an opportunity to conceptualize their design ideas through sketches, scale model studies and partial prototypes.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ARCH 733

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

IPD 532 Surface Effects

Several sections are offered from which students make a selection. This year'sselections include: Space and Structure; Surface/Effects.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

IPD 544 Digital Fabrication

A seminar and design workshop that explores associative and parametric CAD-CAM strategies, to enable an interactive continuity between conception and fabrication. Through parametric 3D constructions, students will explore how to link dink different aspects of the architectural projects, such as: (1) design intention; (2) control of variation and adaptation; (3) construction constraints; (4) digital fabrication processes. The course emphasizes the cross-fertilization of formal, technical and performative aspects of the design activity.

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: ARCH 744

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

IPD 545 Eng Entrepreneurship I

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: EAS 545

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

IPD 549 Product Development in Entrepreneurial Ventures

A product is any artifact, service or experience for which a buyer is willing to pay. Product Design and Development is at the core of entrepreneurship. Though in the modern mythology it is a solitary effort by a passionate individual, entrepreneurship is frequently more successful when pursued in an interdisciplinary environment. Though it rarely requires the greatest time investment, concentration of personnel, the majority of the funding or even the greatest depth of expertise to accomplish, excellent product design can be the difference between a successful or failed venture. A poorly designed "product" can prevent a venture from being successful. An excellently designed product can make a competent business plan much more successful. A well defined and designed product solution will create differentiation, and cannot only meet customer expectation, but can create desirability. Through the review and discussion of case studies, lecture subjects, guest lecturers, field trips, and a semester long interdisciplinary team project, this class will provide insight into the problem identification and product design processes, user needs research, intellectual property research, experience design, Industrial Design, Interface Design, brand development and product centric fundraising processes.

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: EAS 449

Prerequisites: Seniors and Graduate students from the School of Design, Engineering or Business that have an interest in product design and/or integrated product development in an entrepreneurial environment.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

IPD 551 Design Processes

This studio is structured for IPD students as an intensive, interdisciplinary exploration of Design as purposeful for Integrated Product Design. The goal of the studio is to give students a firsthand experience of various processes involved in creating successful integrated product designs.This first semester of the four-semester studio sequence focuses on giving students experience developing designs based on a range of starting points: form, function, materiality and manufacturing process. Students will practice design through rigorous, consistent processes for thinking through the evolution of their ideas. In this course, they will go through an entire design process from conceptualization to design to producing prototypes. They will be taught to focus on the specifics of their designs, causing them to be conscious of what drives their choices as designers and providing them with a wider range of tools to design from in successive projects. Course work will involve readings, assignments, class participation, in-class exercises, a mid-term presentation and a final submission.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

IPD 552 Problem Framing

In the second semester of the four-semester studio sequence, we ask students to take a step back from what and how they are designing and ask the question of why they are designing it. We will teach them a rigorous process for understanding stakeholder needs and for translating those needs into implications for product design. They will begin to develop greater awareness of the personal, social, competitive and technological contexts that their products fit into, and to learn how to design for those contexts. They will develop the ability to dive into a topic and frame a design problem, and to understand the implications of how they frame the problem on what they design. Ideally, they will use this process to identify a problem or opportunity to work on for their final project. Course work will involve readings, assignments, class participation, in-class exercises, and a final submission.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

IPD 561 IPD Theories/Methods I

Activity: Seminar

0.5 Course Units

IPD 562 IPD Theories/Methods II

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: ARCH 562

Activity: Seminar

0.5 Course Units

IPD 568 Integration Design Studio: Biological Design

This course is a research-based design studio that introduces new materials, fabrication, and prototyping techniques to develop a series of design proposals in response to the theme: Biological Design. The studio introduces life sciences and biotechnologies to designers, artists, and non-specialists to develop creative and critical propositions that address the social, cultural, and environmental needs of the 21st century. The course will be a pilot study of the first biodesign challenge organized by CUT/PASTE/GROW. The final projects will be submitted to a competition and the winning entry will be featured at Biofabricate in Summer 2017.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: FNAR 268, FNAR 568

Activity: Studio

1 Course Unit

IPD 599 Master's Independent Study

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

IPD 699 IPD Seminar.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

IPD 799 Studio Project Thesis.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit