Nursing (NURS)

NURS 061 Biologically-Based Chemistry

A contextual approach will be used in studying the concepts in General, Organic and Biological Chemistry that are foundational to an understanding of normal cellular processes. Topics that will be covered include measurements, atomic structure, bonding, chemical reactions, properties of gases and liquids, solutions, equilibrium, acids and bases, pH, buffers, nuclear chemistry, nomenclature and properties of the main organic functional groups, and the structures and function of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids.

Taught by: Lafferty-Della Valle

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: One year of high school general chemistry or its equivalent

Activity: Lecture

0.5 Course Units

Notes: 0.5 course units

NURS 065 Fundamentals of Nutrition

Essentials of normal nutrition and their relationships to the health of individuals and families. These concepts serve as a basis for the development of an understanding of the therapeutic application of dietary principles and the nurse's role and responsibility in this facet of patient care.

Taught by: Compher; Dolan; Caspar-Clark

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: NURS 061; NURS 062 (or equivalent Science Sequence Courses)

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 068 Integrated Cell Biology and Microbiology

This course will include the major topics of cell biology and microbiology that are foundational for an understanding of normal and pathological cellular processes. Topics will include the brief study of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell structures and functions; the main biological molecules; membrane transport; cellular communications; the flow of genetic information; cell division; and cellular metabolism. The course will also examine the role of cells and microbes in human health and infectious diseases. It will include a description of the main types of microbes, how they are identified, their growth requirements, and the role of the immune system in controlling infections, the control of microbes, host-microbe interactions. The context for this course will be the application of cell biology and microbiology for understanding the cellular basis of cancer and infectious human infection disease processes. This course will include special sessions from a clinical perspective in the various fields of medicine, microbiology, and immunology.

Taught by: Johnson, Ross

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 098 Sexual Health Promotion & Risk Reduction in West Philadelphia: A Seminar on Urban Campus/Community Norms

This course is a unique combination of hands-on research, teaching, and serviceto the West Philadelphia community. Students research sexual risk behaviors and risk reduction for HIV and FSTI's in the West Philadelphia community, both on and off Penn's campus, and make concrete recommendations for interventions to promote sexual health & reduce risks for infection based on their findings. This course satisfies the Society & Social Structures Sector for Nursing Class of 2012 and Beyond.

Taught by: Jemmot

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior academic standing

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Satisfies Society Social Structures Sector for Nursing Class of 2012 and Beyond

NURS 101 The Nature of Nursing Practice

This course facilitates students' ability to conceptualize the experiences of individuals, families, communities, and populations living with health and illness. It emphasizes the integration of knowledge from other disciplines and of nursing science as the basis for practice. The course introduces the four core themes of the undergraduate nursing program: engagement, inquiry, judgment, and voice and examines how the themes are used to characterize the nature of nursing practice.

Taught by: Kutney-Lee; Brooks-Carthon; Wiltse Nicely

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

0.5 Course Units

Notes: 0.5 course units

NURS 102 Situating the Practice of Nursing

This course emphasizes not only how nursing is practiced, but also where it is practiced. The course further explores the four core themes of engagement, inquiry, judgment, and voice as it provides guided observational experiences in a wide variety of settings. These experiences help the student to discover what is not known and what is subsequently necessary to know. These experiences also explore the place of the natural and social sciences and the arts and humanities in nursing practice. This course also will highlight the relationships between and among members of the interprofessional team and families and patients. NURS 102 fosters development of the professional role and sets the stage for life-long learning.

Taught by: Kutney-Lee; Brooks-Carthon; Kaufman; Brewer

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: NURS 101

Activity: Lecture

0.5 Course Units

Notes: 0.5 course units

NURS 103 Psychological and Social Diversity in Health and Wellness

This course explores and integrates the intersection of psychological, cognitive, and social development with the lived experiences of individuals, families, and communities across the lifespan in order to conduct socially contextualized health assessments and health teaching. Extant theories will be critically analyzed and examined with respect to issues of health care access, health history, health promotion, and issues of equity and diversity from a life-course perspective. This knowledge will be synthesized and integrated with the development of the student's communication skills and interviewing processes necessary to develop socially attuned health history and teaching that promote psychological well being and healthy lifestyles. Simulated and observational experiences provide students with opportunities to acquire and apply knowledge necessary for conducting a comprehensive health history of an individual situated within a diverse community. They also provide opportunities to develop prioritized health teaching plans in partnership with that individual.

Taught by: Connolly; Lewis, L,; George

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: NURS 101

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered in Summer for Accelerated BSN Program

NURS 112 Nutrition: Science & Applications

An overview of the scientific foundations of nutrition. The focus is on the functions, food sources and metabolism of carbohydrate,fat, protein, vitamins and minerals. Effects of deficiency and excess are discussed and dietary recommendations for disease prevention are emphasized. Current issues and controversies are highlighted. Students will analyze their own dietary intakes and develop plans for future actions.

Taught by: DeJonghe; Hayes

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: For Non-Nursing Majors

NURS 131 Human Anatomy and Physiology - Part A

The structural and functional organization of the human organism is presented, along with the fundamentals of developmental anatomy and embryology. Histologic and gross anatomical features of selected organ systems are related to the physiologic and biochemical mechanisms which enable the human body to maintain homeostasis in an ever-changing environment.

Taught by: Scanga

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: NURS 61 and NURS 62 (or equivalent College Level Chemistry and Biology)

Activity: Lecture

1.5 Course Unit

Notes: 4 h. lec. 2 h. lab. $100 lab fee

NURS 132 Human Anatomy and Physiology - Part B

The structural and functional organization of the human organism is presented, along with the fundementals of developmental anatomy and embtyology. Histologic and gross anatomical features of each organ system are related to the physiologic and biochemical mechanisms which enable the human body to maintain homeostasis in an ever-changing environment. Basic concepts of pathophysiology are introduced and applied to certain clinical disorders.

Taught by: Scanga

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: NURS 131

Activity: Lecture

1.5 Course Unit

Notes: 4 h. lec. 2 h. lab. $100 lab fee.

NURS 159 Pathways To Practice

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 160 Physical Assessment

This is a laboratory course designed to help beginning nursing students to develop competence in the process of physical assessment. Students engage in actual practice of physical assessment with fellow students as their 'patient' subject. A blending of instructor demonstration and supervision of physical examination practice sessions is used in the learning laboratory setting. Students prepare via self-learning activities with a variety of supplied resources (readings, videotapes, computer programs) and have the opportunity to refine their skill though faculty-supervised practice sessions. Procedural skills that correlate with the presentations of physiologic system assessment are included.

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisite: Matriculation in the Accelerated BSN Nursing Program

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: For Students in Accelerated BSN Nursing Program Only

NURS 162 Pathophysiology, Pharmacology, and Therapeutics

Pathophysiologic concepts and processes are introduced with major emphasis on commonly occurring acute and chronic illnesses and their therapeutic interventions. Major classes of drugs that are used to support organ function are explored. The physiological and pathophysiological rationale for each drug indication, mechanisms of drug action, individualized dosing implications, and adverse drug events will be explored for prototypical agents used in the selected cases. The course will enhance the student's comprehension of the scientific complexity of therapeutic interventions in various conditions and will build upon the foundational sciences.

Taught by: Boullata

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: NURS 215

Activity: Lecture

1.5 Course Unit

Notes: For Students in Accelerated BSN Nursing Program Only

NURS 163 Integrated Anatomy, Physiology, and Physical Assessment I

This is the first part of a two-semester course designed to provide a comprehensive study of the structure and function of the human body along with essential embryology and maturational physiology. Histological and gross anatomical features of selected organ systems are related to the physiologic and biochemical mechanisms that enable the human body to maintain homeostasis. Within each system, deviations from normal are considered to situate the student's understanding of health problems and to foster an appreciation for the complexity of the human organism. Integrated into each topic are the correlated physical assessment parameters and related procedural skills. Laboratories exercises and case study analysis provide a contextual base to acquire and use domain-specific knowledge of concern to the practice of nursing.

Taught by: Scanga; Quigley

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: NURS 061; NURS 062; NURS 063; (or equivalent Science Sequence Courses)

Activity: Lecture

2 Course Units

Notes: 2.0 course units

NURS 164 Integrated Human Anatomy, Physiology & Physical Assessment II

This is the second part of a two semester course designed to provide a comprehensive study of the structure and function of the human body along with essential embryology and maturational physiology. Histological and gross anatomical features of selected organ systems are related to the physiologic and biochemical mechanisms that enable the human body to maintain homeostasis. Within each system, deviations from normal are considered to situate the student's understanding of health problems and to foster an appreciation for the complexity of the human organism. Integrated laboratories and case studies provide a contextual base to acquire and use domain-specific knowledge that includes physical assessment, and procedural.

Taught by: Scanga; Quigley

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: NURS 163

Activity: Lecture

2 Course Units

Notes: 2.0 course units

NURS 165 Integrated Pathophysiology, Pharmacology, and Therapeutics

Pathophysiologic concepts and processes are introduced with major emphasis on commonly occurring acute and chronic illnesses and their therapeutic interventions. Major classes of drugs that are used to support organ function are explored. The physiological and pathophysiological rationale for each drug indication, mechanisms of drug action, individualized dosing implications, and adverse drug events will be explored for prototypical agents used in the selected cases. The course will enhance the student's comprehension of the scientific complexity of therapeutic interventions in various conditions and will build upon the foundational sciences. Additionally the course will provide the student with sufficient scientific knowledge and skills to prepare administer and monitor drugs and therapies in a safe and effective manner.

Taught by: Boullata

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: NURS 164 (or Equivalent)

Activity: Lecture

2 Course Units

Notes: 2.0 course units

NURS 215 Nursing of Women and Infants

This course emphasizes the child-bearing cycle, and the related issues of maternal and infant mortality and morbidity. It also explores women and infant's health care and health promotion needs across the lifespan. It provides a global perspective, and uses the United Nations' Pillars of Safe Motherhood and World Health Organization's Millennium Development Goals as the vehicles to enable students to understand the interrelationships among issues of health and health promotion; social, economic, political and environmental contexts; and the care of women across the lifespan. Clinical experiences provide opportunities for students to understand the connections between the local and the global; to use their developing knowledge base to affect the health of women and their infants. Students will have opportunities for hospital-based care of child-bearing women and their infants. In addition, community-based experiences with individual women and with groups of women across the life cycle will be provided in order to enhance teaching, interviewing and assessment skills.

Taught by: Guidera; O'Hare; Hill-O'Neill

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: NURS 101; NURS 102; NURS 103; NURS 164 (Traditional) or NURS 106 (Accelerated)

Activity: Lecture

1.5 Course Unit

NURS 225 Pediatric Nursing

This course considers how nursing influences the health and healing capacities of infants, children, adolescents and their families. It focuses on the knowledge and skill acquisition needed to care for these patients at particular moments, across the continuum of care, and through transitions in an illness experience. It addresses pediatric nursing phenomena of concern and major final common pathways of pediatric illness from infancy through adolescence using a using a developmental and systems approach. Emphasis is placed on family-centered care through transitions in the illness and recovery phases. The course emphasizes clinical reasoning; family centered strategies for optimizing health and maintaining individuality; promoting optimal developmental, physiological, and psychological functioning; and enhancing strengths within the context of family. Clinical experiences at various children's hospitals and simulation experiences provide sufficient opportunities for clinical reasoning, clinical care and knowledge integration.

Taught by: Hickerson

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: NURS 215

Corequisite: NURS 235

Activity: Lecture

1.5 Course Unit

Notes: Clinical 12 hours weekly and 2 hours Simulated Laboratory Weekly

NURS 230 Statistics for Research and Measurement

This course examines statistical methods used by scientists in the analysis of research data. The fundamental theorem for this course is the "square root law" (central limit theorem). Students become literate in statistical terminology and symbols and knowledgeable of assumptions for statistical tests. Fundamental statistics include basic theorems and principles, sample, population and data distributions, measures of central tendency, correlational techniques, and commonly used parametric and nonparametric statistical tests. Parameters for inferential and descriptive statistics are examined as the basis for explaining the results from research studies. Students apply chance models in estimating confidence intervals of percentages and means, and in hypothesis testing. This content is taught in the context of nursing research and measurement of nursing phenomena. Examination of research publications enable students to apply their knowledge to reading and understanding data analyses used in studies. Students evaluate tables and graphs as ways to summarize research findings. Course content prepares students to examine statistical and clinical significance of research findings.

Taught by: Tulman

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 235 Psychiatric Nursing

This course examines how nursing influences the health and healing capacities of individuals and families experiencing severe psychiatric distress. It focuses on the knowledge and skill acquisition needed to care for these patients at particular moments, across the continuum of care, and through transitions in an illness experience. The course addresses nursing phenomena of concern related the meanings of an illness experience, the development of healing relationships with or within individuals, families, and groups, and on the advanced communication strategies needed to engage individual and families in mental health promotion strategies. It also provides the tools to enable students to construct effective treatment groups with patients; work groups with disciplinary and inter-professional colleagues; and to understand the healing dimensions of environments. Clinical and simulation experiences provide sufficient opportunities for clinical reasoning, clinical care and clinically situated knowledge integration.

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: NURS 215

Corequisite: NURS 225

Activity: Lecture

1.5 Course Unit

Notes: Clinical 12 hours weekly and 2 hours Simulated Laboratory Weekly

NURS 245 Nursing of Young and Middle Aged Adults

This course considers how nursing influences the health and healing capacities of young and middle aged adults who experience functional status impairments as a result of serious illness or injury. It focuses on the knowledge and skill acquisition needed to care for these patients at particular moments, across the continuum of care, and through transitions in an illness experience. It addresses nursing phenomena of concern, including risk factors for illness or injury, strategies to overcome barriers and support personal health resources, alleviate suffering and reduce the impact of illness or injury on the functioning of the person. Content and clinical experiences integrate developmental and role issues; policy, cultural and ethical considerations. Clinical experiences in acute care hospital units and simulation experiences provide opportunities for clinical reasoning, clinical care, and knowledge integration.

Taught by: Walsh-Brennan

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: NURS 215

Corequisite: NURS 255

Activity: Lecture

1.5 Course Unit

Notes: Clinical 12 hours weekly and 2 hours Simulated Laboratory Weekly

NURS 255 Nursing of Older Adults

This course considers how nursing influences the health and healing capacities of older adults. It focuses on the knowledge and skill acquisition needed to care for these patients at particular moments, across the continuum of care, and through transitions in an illness experience. It addresses nursing phenomena of concern including the unique set of principles and body of knowledge and skills necessary to the practice of nursing with older adults. Students are provided with the theoretical background necessary to understand health system issues affecting older adults. Students will attain the knowledge necessary to complete a comprehensive assessment of the older adult's physical, functional, psychosocial, and cognitive capacities. Common problems associated with cardiovascular, respiratory, neurological, musculoskeletal, sensory, and genitourinary systems that affect older adults will be discussed. In addition, principles of continuity of care, rehabilitation, nutritional and pharmacodynamic changes, cultural diversity and ethics will be integrated throughout the course. Clinical experiences in acute care hospitals and simulation experiences provide sufficient opportunities for clinical reasoning, clinical care, and knowledge integration. Special emphasis is placed on transitional care for older adults across the health care continuum.

Taught by: Matura

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: NURS 215

Corequisite: NURS 245

Activity: Lecture

1.5 Course Unit

Notes: Clinical 12 hours weekly and 2 hours Simulated Laboratory Weekly

NURS 299 Independent Study in Nursing

An opportunity to develop and implement an individual plan of study under faculty guidance.

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and NURS 106

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

NURS 303 Contemporary Issues in Human Sexuality and Health

Course content emphasizes theories of sexual development and factors influencing sexual behavior within the continuum of health and illness. Common sexual practices of people are studied within the context of lifestyle and situational life crises. Concepts of normal sexual function and dysfunction are examined. Contemporary sexual issues are explored.

Taught by: Stevens

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: GSWS 303, NURS 503

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 304 Contemporary Issues in Global Women's Health

This undergraduate elective course will provide an introduction to contemporary issues in global women's health and multiple theoretical perspectives related to global women's health. This course will examine and analyze various women's health issues across the globe within historical, social, cultural, economic, political and environmental contexts. This course will have particular emphasis on intensive analyses of gender equity and cultural sensitivity issues in providing appropriate and adequate care for women across the globe.

Taught by: Im

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: Nursing Students must have completed NURS 215

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Freshmen and Sophomores need Instructor Permission

NURS 305 Narrative Matters in Health and Illness Experiences

This course emphasizes the uses of narrative and memoir to consider major themes and events related to the experience of health and illness in the United States as well as the carative role, as either family member or health professional and crafting policy.

Taught by: Connolly, C

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Foundational Course for History, Health, and Humanities Minor

NURS 312 Nutritional Aspects of Disease

This course provides an advanced understanding of the role of nutrition in integrated biological systems. Students will develop a rigorous comprehension of major clinical disorders, including the underlying pathophysiology and conditions that are affected by nutrition and how optimization of nutritional variables may modulate these processes. A critical overview of the role of nutrition in disease prevention, management and treatment, and in health maintenance will be emphasized throughout the course.

Taught by: Hayes, M

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: NURS 112

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 313 Obesity and Society

This course will examine obesity from scientific, cultural, psychological, and economic perspectives. The complex matrix of factors that contribute to obesity and established treatment options will be explored. This course satisfies the Society & Social Structures Sector for Nursing Class of 2012 and Beyond.

Taught by: Compher

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: NURS 513

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 315 Sociocultural Influences on Health

This course is intended for students interested in U.S/Global Healthcare. It includes lectures, discussions, readings, and written assignments focused on various social, cultural, and economic factors that impact the health and illness perceptions and behaviors of various ethnic and minority groups. In particular, it focuses on how culture affects health and disease, and how health and disease affect culture. This course takes a critical approach to knowledge development by scrutinizing values, theories, assumptions, and practices cross culturally. It relies upon a range of interdisciplinary approaches to analyze how disease is diagnosed, treated, and experienced differently in various cultural contexts. At the same time, students will have the opportunity to examine and critique cultural assumptions and theories, the shifting nature of cultures, the situational use of cultural traditions, and the ethnocentrism of contemporary Western health care. Special attention is given to the influence of race, class, gender, religious, and spiritual ideas about health and illness.

Taught by: Wall

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: NURS 515

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Foundational Course for Minor in Multicultural/Global Health Care

NURS 316 International Nutrition: Political Economy of World Hunger

A detailed consideration of the nature, consequences, and causes of hunger and undernutrition internationally. Approaches are explored to bringing about change, and to formulating and implementing policies and programs at international, national, and local levels, designed to alleviate hunger and under-nutrition.

Taught by: Chrzan

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: NURS 516

Prerequisites: Junior-year or higher; at least one background course in nutrition, anthropology, sociology or economics

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 318 Race, Gender, Class and the History of American Health Care

This multidisciplinary course surveys the history of American health care through the multiple perspectives of race, gender, and class, and grounds the discussions in contemporary health issues. It emphasizes the links between the past and present, using not only primary documents but materials from disciplines such as literature, art, sociology, and feminist studies that relate both closely and tangentially to the health professions and health care issues. Discussions will surround gender, class-based, ethnic, and racial ideas about the construction of disease, health and illness; the development of health care institutions; the interplay between religion and science; the experiences of patients and providers; and the response to disasters and epidemics. Skills for document analysis and critique are built into the course as is the contextual foundation for understanding the history of health care. This course satisfies both the Society & Social Structures and the Histories & Traditions sectors for the Nursing Class of 2012 and beyond.

Taught by: Fairman

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: GSWS 318

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For Benjamin Franklin Scholars Nursing Honors Students.

NURS 319 Etiology and Treatment of Contemporary Chronic Diseases in America: Focus on Obesity and Cancer

This course will focus on two of the major public health problems in the United States-obesity and cancer. These diseases will be considered from a variety of perspectives: epidemiological, environmental, physiological and behavioral. In addition, the course will focus on the range of interventions being developed to treat as well as prevent both diseases.

Taught by: Glanz; Jacobs, L.; Sarwer

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: NURS 519

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 324 Children's Health in the United States, 1800-2000

This course explores the impact of historical ideas, events, and actors pertaining to the history of children's health care in the United States. Emphasis is placed on tracing the origins and evolution of issues that have salience for twenty-first century children's health care policy and the delivery of care. This course satisfies the History & Traditions Sector for Nursing Class of 2012 and Beyond.

Taught by: Connolly

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: GSWS 324

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For Benjamin Franklin Scholars Nursing Honors Students

NURS 330 Theoretical Foundations of Health Care Ethics

The theoretical foundations of health care ethics including definitions of ethics, history of bioethics and nursing ethics, and the influence of religion,psychology of moral development and philosophy in the development of ethical theory. Nursing code of ethics, changing ideas in ethics, and discussion of the developing profession of nursing are included.

Taught by: Perlman; Ulrich

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 331 Forensic Mental Health

Forensic mental health is the interface between the law and mental health. This course examines the components of human behavior that bring people into a judicial setting. Content will cover: criminal personalities, forensic interview, and the role of forensic psychiatry. Domestic violence offenders, sex offenders, stalkers, gang members, and offenders who commit homicide will be discussed. Definitions and dynamics of criminal motherhood and the psychodynamics of violent juvenile offenders will be presented. Use of the internet by offenders will also be discussed. This course also offers a field experience in which student's interview incarcerated individuals. As of Spring 2016, students in the College of Arts and Sciences are not permitted to enroll in this course.

Taught by: Brown, K.; Sabella

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: NURS 531

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 332 Forensic Science I

This course discusses the interface of law and science. Forensic science is theapplication of scientific principles in the legal arena. This course examines the contribution of forensic science to criminal and civil investigation. Crime sceanalysis is accomplished via disciplines within forensic science. The role of tmedical examiner, the structure and function of crime laboratories, death investigation and the role of health care personnel in forensic cases is discused. As of Spring 2016, students in the College of Arts and Sciences are not permitted to enroll in this course.

Taught by: Cronin, G.

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: NURS 534

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 333 Victimology

This course examines the wide range of victimization experiences from the perspective of the victim, their families and society. Crimes to be studied include workplace violence, corporate crime, robbery, burglary, assault, rape, stalking, domestic violence, homicide, suicide, elderly abuse and child sexual abuse and exploitation. The role of the medical examiner, health care providers and the FBI as they relate to victims of crime will be discussed. Emphasis will be given to exploring the elements of each crime and response patterns to victimizations. Services available to victims of crime will be discussed. As of Spring 2016, students in the College of Arts and Sciences are not permitted to enroll in this course.

Taught by: Cronin G

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: NURS 533

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 334 Public Policy and the Nation's Health

This course examines health care and social policy from domestic and international perspectives. It is designed to engage undergraduate students in critical thinking about health policy issues as they affect our health care, employment, taxes, and social investments. The current national debate on health care reform is used as a frame of reference for examining the strengths and weaknesses of health care services in the U.S. from the perspectives of patients/families, health professionals, health services providers, insurers, employers, and public policy makers, and the pros and cons of a range of prescriptions for system improvement from across the political spectrum. About a third of the course focuses more specifically on global public health challenges and the policy strategies for reducing health disparities worldwide.

Taught by: Sochalski

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: NURS 540

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 335 Global Food Security for Ten Billion

This is an interdisciplinary course on the problems of food demand and consumption, production and supply in our increasingly globalized and urbanizing world. Special attention will be given to the intersections of current technologies of food production, current nutritional problems, environmental change and resource degradation, and the changing quality of human social life under globalization. Where and how will sufficient nutritious food be produced sustainably and how can the politics and economics of equitable distribution in such large urban populations be achieved?

Taught by: Spooner; Compher; Muecke; Chrzan

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: ANTH 335, ANTH 635

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Cross Currents Course

NURS 336 Current Topics in Pain

This course focuses on biopsychosocial aspects of the pain experience and interpatient differences and how these form the basis for understanding pain perception, physiological and behavioral reactions and response to pain interventions. Content includes an integrated overview of the neurobiology of pain, measurement pain, pharmacological and nonpharmacological approaches for acute and chronic pain syndromes, health policy and care delivery models for improving pain assessment and management. Peripheral processing, neuroanatomical pathways and central integrating mechanisms involved in nociception and pain are examined. The roles of individual biochemical mediators, neurotransmitters and neuromodulators are examined and linked to theeffectiveness of pharmacological and alternative methods for pain control. The challenges of pain assessment and pain management in special clinical populations are considered. Relevant topics of special interest to course participants will be introduced for class discussion in the form of student presentations.

Taught by: Polomano

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: Junior or senior status in the nursing curriculum or by permission of the instructor

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 338 "Sweet Little Old Ladies and Sandwiched Daughters": Social Images and Issues in our Aging Society

This course is an intensive and focused introduction to social gerontology as a trans-disciplinary lens through which to examine aspects of social structure, actions, and consequences in an aging society. A variety of sources are employed to introduce students from any field focused on human behavior and interaction to classical notions of social gerontology and current scholarly inquiry in gerontology. Field work in the tradition of thick thickdescription creates a mechanism to engage students in newly gerontological understandings of their life worlds and daily interactions. Weekly field work, observing aspects of age and representations of aging and being old in every day experiences forms, is juxtaposed against close critical readings of classical works in social gerontology and current research literature as well as viewings of film and readings of popular literature as the basis for student analysis. Student participation in the seminar demands careful scrutiny and critical synthesis of disparate intellectual, cultural, and social perspectives using readings and field work and creation of oral and written arguments that extend understandings of the issues at hand in new and substantive ways. Emphasis is placed on analysis of field work and literature through a series of media reports and a final term paper. Creative approaches to identifying literature, analyzing field work and representing critique are encouraged. This course satisfies the Society & Social Structures Sector for Nursing Class of 2012 and Beyond.

Taught by: Kagan

Course offered spring; even-numbered years

Also Offered As: GSWS 338, HSOC 338

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Third or fourth year undergraduate students in any major BFS, JWS, and NUHP students

NURS 339 "Aging, Beauty, and Sexuality": Psychological Gerontology in the 21st Century

This honors course examines the psychological gerontology of advancing age and identity in the 21st century. Examination emphasizes gendered notions of beauty and sexuality in ageing and the life span to foster discourse around historical notions and images of beauty and ugliness in late life in contrast to contemporary messages of attractiveness and age represented by both women and men. The course is designed to create intellectual foundations as place from which to critique socially mediated and personally conveyed images and messages from a variety of media and their influence on intrapersonal and interpersonal constructions and social processes. Contemporary and historical ideas encompassing stereotypical and idealized views of the older person are employed to reflect dialogue around readings and field work. Classical and contemporary scholarship from gerontology, anthropology, biomedicine and surgery, nursing, and marketing among other disciplines as well as select lay literature are critiqued and compared with interpretation of field work to build understandings of diverse individual, familial, and cultural impressions of aging and identity. Skills for participant observer field work in the tradition of thick description are built to allow reflection and analysis of discourse about aging, beauty, sexuality, and other relevant aspects of human identity. This course satisfies the Society & Social Structures Sector for Nursing Class of 2012 and Beyond.

Taught by: Kagan

Course offered spring; odd-numbered years

Also Offered As: GSWS 339

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Third or fourth year undergraduate students in any major BFS, JWS, and NUHP students

NURS 343 Global Engagement Seminar Environmental Health Issues

Cross Listed with NURS 543

Also Offered As: NURS 543

Prerequisites: General college-level chemistry and biology knowledge (e.g. CHEM/ BIOL 101, 102) to understand the science underlying environmental health topics or special permission

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: This course will be a broad overview on current environmental health issues that contribute to significant global morbidity and mortality due to increased urbanization and growth in the economy. The course will cover basic principles of environmental epidemiology, toxicology, health effects of environmental exposures, risk assessment, as well as environmental policy and ethics. The class will have two portions. The first part of the class will be taught lectures, case studies, discussions on campus and a local field trip in the Philadelphia area. The second part of the course will involve a field trip to China during the early summer to help students gain a global perspective on environmental health concerns.

NURS 344 Etiology and Treatment of Contemporary Chronic Diseases in America: Focus on Obesity and Cancer

This course will focus on two of the major public health problems in the United States - obesity and cancer. These diseases will be considered from a variety of perspectives: epidemiological, environmental, physiological and behavioral. In addition, the course will focus on the range of interventions being developed to treat as well as prevent both diseases.

Taught by: Glanz; Sarwer; Jacobs, L.

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: NURS 544

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 354 Case Study - Addressing the Social Determinants of Health: Community Engagement Immersion

Prerequisite: Completion of sophomore year nursing requirements

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: This case study offers students experiential learning to develop an in depth understanding of social determinants of health in vulnerable, underserved populations and to collaboratively design and refine existing health promotion programs based on the needs of the community site. Grounded on an approach thatbuilds upon the strengths of communities, this course emphasizes the development of techniques to lead effective, collaborative, health-focused interventions for underserved populations. Students are required to draw on skills and knowledge obtained from previous classes related to social determinants of health and community engagement and will engage in specific creative, innovative community based programs developed for populations across the life span. These culturally relevant programs, which have been shown to positively impact communities, create opportunities for students to address thethe social determinants of health, build engagement and leadership skills and increase program success and sustainability.

NURS 355 Case Study: Self-care of Chronic Illness

This case study introduces the role of self-care by patients with chronic illness. We will discuss the history, definitions, predictors, and outcomes of self-care in various chronically ill populations. A focus of discussion will be an in depth exploration of the factors that influence self-care. Understanding these factors will prepare nurses for their role in promoting patient self-care. Fieldwork experiences will enable students to gain practical experience in engaging chronically ill individuals in self-care.

Taught by: Riegel

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: NURS 215

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: 2 hour seminar; 1 hour fieldwork / week

NURS 356 Case Study: Culture of Birth

This course will explore the cultural context of birth and the activities of women and professionals and/or attendants in meeting the health care needs of pregnant women. The history of caring for women at birth, international health care, cultural mores/societal values, place of birth, psychosocial factors, ethical decision-making and the role of technology are content areas that will be discussed.

Taught by: McCool

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: NURS 215, 225 or Permission of Instructor

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 358 Case Study: Nurses and the Child Welfare System

Building on knowledge and skill acquired through undergraduate nursing courses, this case study offers nursing majors an in depth and interprofessional opportunity to study research, policy, and practice-based issues in children and families involved with the child welfare system. Special emphasis is placed on the role of the nurse in the child welfare system. Fieldwork experiences will enable students to gain practical experience regarding the needs of children and families with an emphasis on a consideration of how to achieve partnership and create alliances with parents and youngsters.

Taught by: Connolly

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: NURS 165; NURS 215

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 359 Case Study: Quality Care Challenges in an Evolving Health Care Market

Quality care is an issue for consumers, providers, purchasers, and policy makers. This case study examines the multiple challenges that surround the quality of health care in the evolving United States health care marketplace. Through classroom discussion and special project experience, the student will become familiar with the concept of health care quality and approaches to the measurement and management of quality. Using Donabedian's construct of structure, process and outcomes, strategies to improve quality while containing or reducing costs are reviewed, including the contributions of clinical practice guidelines. The evolving dominant structures for providing health care services, managed care and integrated delivery systems, and their approaches to quality management and reporting will be explored.

Taught by: Pinola; Sparrow

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: NURS 104, 106

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 360 Case Study: Nursing Practice with HIV+ Patients

This course is directed at the need to increase nursing majors knowledge and clinical expertice in the care of persons with HIV/AIDS. Hands on clinical practice with nurses who are AIDS experts will be combined with seminars that provide epidemiologic, clinical assessment, infection control, symptom management, patient teaching, psychosocial, ethical, cultural, political, and policy information.

Taught by: Vincent

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: NURS 104, 106

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 361 Case Study: Breast Feeding & Human Lactation

Human milk is recognized universally as the optimal diet for newborn infants. The health benefits of breastfeeding are so significant that a National Health Objective set forth by the Surgeon General of the United States for the year 2010 is to increase the proportion of mothers who breastfeed their babies in the postpartum period. Through classroom and clinical experiences, this course will provide an in depth examination of the anatomy and physiology of lactation, essential aspects of establishing and maintaining lactation, and the nurses' role in counseling the breastfeeding family. Emphasis will be placed on current research findings in the content area.

Taught by: Spatz

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: NURS 104, 106

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 363 Case Study: Aggressive Behavior in Healthcare: Assessment Prevention and Treatment

The escalating incidence and prevalence of aggression in the health care setting requires that providers acquire a new set of pragmatic competencies for managing its complex sequelae. This course presents theoretical frameworks for understanding, predicting, preventing and responding to aggressive behaviors across the life span. Historical, bio-behavioral, social, and cultural explanations for aggression will be synthesized and analyzed within the context of multiple points of entry into the health care system across clinical settings. Personal self-awareness, debriefing, and stress management techniques exemplify techniques to prevent untoward consequences in providers. This course also uses exemplars and a range of experiential learning strategies, including skill development, situation analysis, concept mapping, unfolding case studies and cooperative learning, to examine the assessment, prevention, treatment, and response to aggressive behavior in patients and management of its consequences in self and others.

Taught by: Coleman

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: NURS 104, 106

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 364 Case Study: Cancer

This elective case study offers students the opportunity to learn about the etiology, diagnosis, and management of cancer across the lifespan. Building on existing clinical knowledge and skills, students will explore cancer care from the perspectives of prevention, early detection, treatment, survivorship, and death. Observational clinical experiences and selected case studies will enhance students' understanding of patients' and families' cancer experience.

Taught by: Hollis

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: NURS 104, 106

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 365 Case Study: Case Analysis in Clinical Nutrition

This course is designed for present and future nurse professionals who wish to increase their knowledge of nutrition and expertise and application of knowledge to achieve optimal health of clients and themselves. Principles of medical nutrition therapy in health care delivery are emphasized in periods of physiologic stress and metabolic alterations. Individual nutrient requirements are considered from pathophysiologic and iatrogenic influences on nutritional status. Nutritional considerations for disease states will be explored through epidemiological, prevalence, incidence, treatment and research data. Understanding application of medical nutrition therapy are included through case analysis and field experiences

Taught by: Dolan

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: NURS 104, 106

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 366 Case Study: Living with Dementia

Living with Dementia provides a two fold experience: guided observation of an individual with dementia and a seminar series on dementia - neuropathology, assessment, care and treatment. Students will interact with a person with AD and his/her caregiver. The goal is to understand the demented individual's functional abilities and impact of environment on performance and behavior. A further goal is to develop an appreciation of the primary caregiver's role and the strengths and limitations of community support systems. Each team of two to three will be assigned a family unit for study. In so far as possible, teams will be interdisciplinary.

Taught by: Strumpf; Kagan; Cotter

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: NURS 566

Prerequisites: NURS 104, 106 or Permission from Instructor

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 367 Case Study: Principles of Palliative Care

This course prepares students to collaborate effectively with an interdisciplinary team in assessing patients and families, and planning and evaluating palliative and end of life care for diverse populations with progressive illness in multiple health care settings. Course content and assignments focus on the nurse's role in addressing the complex assessment and responses to the psychosocial and spiritual concerns of patients and caregivers across the trajectory of advanced illness.

Taught by: Ersek

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: NURS 557

Prerequisites: NURS 104, NURS 106

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 368 Case Study: Home Health Care

This course examines the major aspects of home-based care across patients' life spans from acute to long term care. New trends, advances, and issues in home management of complex conditions, innovative delivery systems and legal, ethical and policy consideration will be explored.

Taught by: Doyle

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: NURS 550

Prerequisites: NURS 104, NURS 106

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 375 Nutrition Throughout The Life Cycle

Understanding and meeting nutritional needs from conception through adulthood will be addressed. Nutrition-related concerns at each stage of the lifecycle, including impact of lifestyle, education, economics and food behavior will be explored.

Taught by: Berman-Levine

Course offered fall; odd-numbered years

Prerequisites: NURS 54, or NURS 112, comparable nutrition course, or approved introductory course

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 376 Issues in Nutrition, Exercise, and Fitness

An examination of the scientific basis for the relationship between nutrition, exercise and fitness. The principles of exercise science and their interaction with nutrition are explored in depth. The physiological and biochemical effects of training are examined in relation to sports performance and prevention of the chronic diseases prevalent in developed countries.

Taught by: Compher; Dougherty

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 380 Nursing in the Community

This course considers how nursing influences the health and healing capacities of both communities as a whole (populations) and of groups, families, and individuals living within particular communities locally and globally. It addresses the complexity of nursing practice using a public health paradigm. It requires students to draw from prior class and clinical knowledge and skills and apply this practice base to communities across care settings, ages, and cultures with different experiences of equity and access to care. It provides the tools needed to engage in collaborative community work and to give voice to the community's strengths, needs, and goals. It also moves students from an individual and family focus to a population focus for health assessment and intervention. Students consider the science, policies, and resources that support public health, and community based and community-oriented care. Clinical and simulated experiences in community settings provide sufficient opportunities for clinical reasoning, clinical care and knowledge integration in community settings. Students will have opportunities to care for patients and populations within selected communities.

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: NURS 225; NURS 235; NURS 245; NURS 255

Activity: Lecture

2 Course Units

Notes: Clinical 16 hours Weekly and 2 hours Simulated Laboratory Weekly Also Offered Summer Session (12 Weeks)

NURS 386 Nursing Honors Research Project

This course is an advanced seminar for research and scholarship to be taken by honors students in nursing. Enrollment is concurrent with implementation of the individual student's honors project. Practical considerations in carrying out such a project, including scholarly approach and scientific integrity as well as scholarly writing and dissemination will be discussed and illustrated, using exemplars and student projects. The various phases of students' projects will be used as launching points for discussions and to complement students' work with their faculty supervisors. Paths and planning for careers in nursing and related disciplines and the idea of scholarship and research trajectories will be developed throughout the course.

Taught by: Kagan; McCauley, K

Course not offered every year

Prerequisites: NURS 260 or NURS 637, NURS 385H

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Enrollment in Nursing Undergraduate Honors Program Required

NURS 389 Research/Inquiry-Based Service Residency

This course is designed to facilitate students' intellectual curiosity and independence in exploring the research process relevant to an area of interest. Students expand their research knowledge base provided in NURS 230 and NURS 547 through a structured individualized faculty mentored experience based on specific learning objectives. Students identify a faculty advisor and, in collaboration with the advisor, define learning objectives to guide a plan of study. All research or inquiry residencies are under the guidance of a faculty member in the School of Nursing, but students may also interact with affiliated investigators and clinicians who contribute to and enrich the course. The residency offers students opportunities to experience at any level systematic methods for research, or service-based clinical inquiry or quality improvement. This mentored residency can be fulfilled by one of the following options: * Research-based practicum in basic science, clinical research, nursing history, healthcare policy, ethics, or informatics. * Inquiry-based Service practicum such as conducting quality improvement procedures or program evaluations in an affiliated healthcare institution. * Taking one of the University's Academically Based Community Service (ABCS) courses with prior approval by the Steering Committee. * Individualized study abroad experience with prior approval by the Steering Committee.

Taught by: Curley; Leary, M.

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: NURS 547

Activity: Lecture

0.5 Course Units

Notes: 0.5 course units

NURS 390 Leadership in the Complex Healthcare System

This two-part course provides the didactic and clinical experiences in increasingly complex nursing care situations and environments which facilitate the students' transition to independent practice. In the lecture component, the focus is on the integration of knowledge and skill for nursing practice and develops the ability of students to see nursing practice as part of a complex system. It examines systems thinking and complexity, development of a leadership role and skills, inter-professional communication and teamwork, and leading change in healthcare organizations. This course also examines the nurse's role in improvement science and patient care delivery, focusing on quality improvement processes, patient safety, nurse sensitive process and outcome metrics with micro-systems. This course also allows students to develop the capacity for clinical expertise, leadership, and for translating the science of the profession into practice. Students also are assigned to a seminar component that is correlated with their selected site for the specialty clinical practicum. This aspect of the course allows the student to develop additional expertise in a specialty area of practice and to develop competences specific to that population of patients. These seminar components are adult health and illness; adult critical care, obstetrics/labor & delivery, psychiatric/mental health, and pediatrics. Advanced simulation experiences and extensive clinical practice in an area of the students' choice provide multiple opportunities to synthesize the multidimensional aspects of nursing, and provide the environment which facilitates transition to professional nursing practice. Students select from a variety of settings in which to refine their practice skills. Principles of leadership, accountability and change will be applied to clinical practice as the student begins to operationalize the professional nursing role. Emphasis is placed on the nurse as a knowledgeable provider of health care who is both a change agent and advocate.

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: NURS 380

Activity: Lecture

3 Course Units

Notes: Clinical 16 hours Weekly and 2 hours Simulated Laboratory Weekly

NURS 399 Faculty Directed Research Practicum

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and completion of a research course (NURS 260 or NURS 637)

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

NURS 400 Advances In Health Systems Research And Analysis

Capstone Course for NURS/WH Joint Degree Students.

Taught by: Sochalski; McHugh, M

Course offered spring; odd-numbered years

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: by Permission Only

NURS 500 Introduction to Principles and Methods of Epidemiology

This course provides an introduction to epidemiologic methods and overview of the role of epidemiology in studies of disease etiology and in the planning, delivery and evaluation of health services. The population-based approach to the collection and analysis of health data will be emphasized throughout the course. Through textbook reading, problems sets, class discussion and review of the recent literature, students will become acquainted with the basic designs of epidemiologic studies in theory and in practice. Students will develop the basic skills necessary to use epidemiologic knowledge and methods as the basis for scientific public health practice.

Taught by: Schmitz

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: PUBH 502

Prerequisite: Elementary statistics

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 503 Contemporary Issues in Human Sexuality and Health

Emphasizes the theories of sexual development and sexual behavior within the continuum of health and disease. Common sexual practices of people are studied in relation to life-style and/or situational life crisis. Contemporary issues in sexuality and health will be examined. This course satisfies the Society & Social Structures Sector for Nursing Class of 2012 and Beyond.

Taught by: Guidera; Villari

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: GSWS 303, NURS 303

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Junior and Senior undergraduates. Open to all graduate students

NURS 509 The Medically Fragile Child

This course is designed to assist prospective practitioners develop advanced skills in identifying the needs and interventions for medically fragile neonataes, children and their families.

Taught by: Deatrick

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Summer Session II

NURS 511 Loss, Grief and Bereavement

Loss, grief and bereavement are pervasive aspects of the human experience. The content of this course provides a basis both for personal development and professional growth. Through a series of seminars, key issues surrounding loss, death, dying, grief and bereavement will be examined.

Taught by: Sabella

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Summer Session II

NURS 513 Obesity and Society

This course will examine obesity from scientific, cultural, psychological, and economic perspectives. The complex matrix of factors that contribute to obesity and established treatment options will be explored. This course satisfies the Society & Social Structures Sector for Nursing Class of 2012 and Beyond.

Taught by: Compher

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: NURS 313

Prerequisite: Undegraduates by permission of instructor

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 515 Sociocultural Influences on Health

This course is intended for students interested in U.S/Global Healthcare. It includes lectures, discussions, readings, and written assignments focused on various social, cultural, and economic factors that impact the health and illness perceptions and behaviors of various ethnic and minority groups. In particular, it focuses on how culture affects health and disease, and how health and disease affect culture. This course takes a critical approach to knowledge development by scrutinizing values, theories, assumptions, and practices cross culturally. It relies upon a range of interdisciplinary approaches to analyze how disease is diagnosed, treated, and experienced differently in various cultural contexts. At the same time, students will have the opportunity to examine and critique cultural assumptions and theories, the shifting nature of cultures, the situational use of cultural traditions, and the ethnocentrism of contemporary Western health care. Special attention is given to the influence of race, class, gender, religious, and spiritual ideas about health and illness.

Taught by: Wall

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: NURS 315

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 516 International Nutrition: Political Economy of World Hunger

A detailed consideration of the nature, consequences, and causes of hunger and undernutrition internationally. Approaches are explored to bringing about change, and to formulating and implementing policies and programs at international, national, and local levels, designed to alleviate hunger and under-nutrition. This course satisfies the Society & Social Structures Sector for Nursing Class of 2012 and Beyond.

Taught by: Chrzan

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: NURS 316

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Graduate Students Only

NURS 517 Advanced Nutrition and Metabolism

Essentials of nutritional biochemistry from the molecular level to the level of the whole human organism. Nutrient functions and inter-relationshps are explored with attention to the association between nutrients and disease risk. Topics include energy metabolism and regulation of fat storage, new functions of vitamins and minerals, gene nutrient interactions and current research topics.

Taught by: Compher

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: Nurs 54 or Nurs 112 (Students with extensive background in life sciences by permission of faculty)

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 518 Nursing and the Gendering of Health Care in the United States and Internationally, 1860-2000

This course examines changing ideas about the nature of health and illness; changing forms of health care delivery; changing experiences of women as providers and patients; changing role expectations and realities for nurses; changing midwifery practice; and changing segmentation of the health care labor market by gender, class and race. It takes a gender perspective on all topics considered in the course. A comparative approach is used as national and international literature is considered. This focus is presented as one way of understanding the complex interrelationships among gender, class, and race in health care systems of the United States and countries abroad.

Taught by: Wall

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: GSWS 518

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 519 Etiology and Treatment of Contemporary Chronic Diseases in America: Focus on Obesity and Cancer

This course will focus on two of the major public health problems in the United States-obesity and cancer. These diseases will be considered from a variety of perspectives: epidemiological, environmental, physiological and behavioral. In addition, the course will focus on the range of interventions being developed to treat as well as prevent both diseases.

Taught by: Glanz; Jacobs, L.; Sarwer

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: NURS 319

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 521 Current Topics in Nutrition

The objective of the course is to integrate the nutrition knowledge obtained from previous course work in nutrition and provide the student the opportunity to explore, analyze and formulate implications of the research and related literature on a self-selected topic under the guidance of the faculty coordinator. Current topics and controversies in nutrition will be discussed weekly. Readings will be assigned in coordination with each discussion topic and students will be required to seek out other sources of information to add to the class discussion. Topics will change from year to year to reflect the most recent interests and issues.

Taught by: Compher

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

0.5 Course Units

NURS 523 Advanced Nutrition: Molecular Basis of Nutrition

Prerequisite: NURS 065 or 112

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Essentials of nutritional biochemistry of macronutrient (protein, carbohydrate,lipid) metabolism from the molecular level to the level of the whole human organism. Linkages between energy and nitrogen balance and states of health anddisease are examined. Topics include energy metabolic pathways, nutrient transportation, nutrient catabolism, nutrient anabolism, body composition, and biomarkers.

NURS 524 Advanced Human Nutrition and Micronutrient Metabolism

Prerequisite: NURS 605 or NURS 112 or Special Permission

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Essentials of vitamin and mineral digestion, absorption, metabolism, and function in humans during states of health and disease are examined. Linkages between key vitamins and their function in biological systems, such as bone health, energy metabolism, hematopoetic function, and immune function, are explored in depth. Topics include pertinent research methodologies, biomarkers,deficiency and toxicity states, and requirements across the life cycle.

NURS 525 Ethical Aspects of Health and Technology

Interdisciplinary approach to the study of the interface between ethics and law in the provision of health and illness care. This course draws upon the disciplines of philosophy, law, biomedical engineering and nursing in examining such concepts as the use/nonuse of biomedical technology, who and how one decides what shall be done for a given "patient," and the "rights" and responsibilities (accountability) of all persons involved in health/illness care decisions. The interplay of ethical theory, personal value systems, law and technology will be stressed throughout. Lectures, seminars and case studies will be used. This course satisfies the Society & Social Structures Sector for Nursing Class of 2012 and Beyond.

Taught by: Ulrich

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 526 Child and Adolescent Mental Health

This course is designed to prepare advanced practice registered nurses to address mental health concerns of children, adolescents and their families from a bio-psycho-socio-cultural perspective. Prevention, assessment, and treatment of psychiatric disorders affecting children and adolescents in a variety of settings will be presented in the context of mental health, school and primary health care delivery systems. Students will explore both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment strategies, as well as methods to identify and implement evidence-based practice in child and adolescent populations. Mental health policy, as well as the unique needs of special populations (e.g., youth in the juvenile justice system) will also be discussed.

Taught by: Brawner

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: Matriculation in a MSN Program or permission of instructors

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Priority will be given to Psychiatric Mental Health NP students

NURS 531 Forensic Mental Health

Forensic mental health is the interface between the law and mental health. This course examines the components of human behavior that bring people into a judicial setting. Content will cover: criminal personalities, forensic interview, and the role of forensic psychiatry. Domestic violence offenders, sex offenders, stalkers, gang members, and offenders who commit homicide will be discussed. Definitions and dynamics of criminal motherhood and the psychodynamics of violent juvenile offenders will be presented. Use of the internet by offenders will also be discussed. This course also offers a field experience in which student's interview incarcerated individuals. As of Spring 2016, students in the College of Arts and Sciences are not permitted to enroll in this course.

Taught by: Brown, K.

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: NURS 331

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 532 Cognitive Behavior Strategies in Health Care

Cognitive therapy will be studied as it has been adapted to treat a broad spectrum of clinical disorders including depression, anxiety, phobias, substance, obesity, marital problems, sexual dysfunction, and psychosomatic disorders. Students will have an opportunity to study and observe the crucial link between thoughts and emotions and the sense of competency patients can develop through self-help techniques. The course utilizes didactic, experiential and observational techniques.

Taught by: Kuehlwein

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 533 Victimology

This course examines the wide range of victimization experiences from the perspective of the victim, their families and society. Crimes to be studied include workplace violence, corporate crime, robbery, burglary, assault, rape, stalking, domestic violence, homicide, suicide, elderly abuse and child sexual abuse and exploitation. The role of the medical examiner, health care providers and the FBI as they relate to victims of crime will be discussed. Emphasis will be given to exploring the elements of each crime and response patterns to victimizations. Services available to victims of crime will be discussed. As of Spring 2016, students in the College of Arts and Sciences are not permitted to enroll in this course.

Taught by: Cronin, G.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: NURS 333

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered Fall, Spring Summer I

NURS 534 Forensic Science I

This course discusses the interface of law and science. Forensic science is theapplication of scientific principles in the legal arena. This course examines the contribution of forensic science to criminal and civil investigation. Crime sceanalysis is accomplished via disciplines within forensic science. The role of tmedical examiner, the structure and function of crime laboratories, death investigation and the role of health care personnel in forensic cases is discused. As of Spring 2016, students in the College of Arts and Sciences are not permitted to enroll in this course.

Taught by: Cronin, G.

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: NURS 332

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 535 Comparing Health Care Systems in an Intercultural Context: Study Abroad

This course offers students an opportunity to: 1) expand their knowledge base in health care systems; 2) develop intercultural competency skills and 3) shape a conceptual framework for improving the quality of health care for the individual, the family, the community and society at large. Emphasizes the relational, contextual nature of health care and the inseparability of the notions of the health of individuals and the health of family, society, and culture. Includes field experience.

Taught by: Kagan; Stringer; Muecke

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Seminar held in Spring, study abroad field experience held intra-session

NURS 540 Current Issues In Health and Social Policy

Analysis of key contemporary issues in health and social policy that will provide students with a deeper understanding of the design and structure of the U.S. health care system, the policy initiatives that have shaped it, and the roles of the government, the private sector, and consumers and advocacy groups in setting the policy agenda. Seminars will examine the origins of each issue, the policies enacted and their effects, both intended and unintended, and will propose and debate the merits of alternative policy solutions. The role of health services and policy research in informing the policy debate and directions will be highlighted. This course satisfies the Society & Social Structures Sector for Nursing Class of 2012 and Beyond.

Taught by: Sochalski; McHugh, M

Course usually offered summer term only

Also Offered As: NURS 334

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 543 Global Engagement Seminar Environmental Health Issues

Cross Listed with NURS 343

Also Offered As: NURS 343

Prerequisites: General college-level chemistry and biology knowledge (e.g. CHEM/ BIOL 101, 102) to understand the science underlying environmental health topics or special permission

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: This course will be a broad overview on current environmental health issues that contribute to significant global morbidity and mortality due to increased urbanization and growth in the economy. The course will cover basic principles of environmental epidemiology, toxicology, health effects of environmental exposures, risk assessment, as well as environmental policy and ethics. The class will have two portions. The first part of the class will be taught lectures, case studies, discussions on campus and a local field trip in the Philadelphia area. The second part of the course will involve a field trip to China during the early summer to help students gain a global perspective on environmental health concerns.

NURS 544 Etiology and Treatment of Contemporary Chronic Diseases in America: Focus on Obesity and Cancer

This course will focus on two of the major public health problems in the United States - obesity and cancer. These diseases will be considered from a variety of perspectives: epidemiological, environmental, physiological and behavioral. In addition, the course will focus on the range of interventions being developed to treat as well as prevent both diseases.

Taught by: Glanz; Sarwer; Jacobs, L.

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: NURS 344

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 545 Maternal and Infant Care in the Americas

This clinical elective will provide an intensive historical, sociopolitical, and cultural perspective of health and health care delivery in the Americas with a special emphasis on Latin America and the Caribbean. Classroom, direct clinical care and field experiences are designed to provide students with a broad view of the history and culture system of the country of focus. The delivery of health care to women and children will be explored from a sociopolitical, cultural and historical context. Service learning experiences are an integral component of this course. The course includes 5 seminars on campus and 10-14 days on site in the country of focus. The country of focus may vary each semester.

Taught by: Guidera; Durain

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Registration By Permission of Instructor

NURS 547 Scientific Inquiry for Evidence-based Practice

This course is designed to advance students' understanding of the research process, methods of scientific inquiry, and analytical techniques. Students acquire knowledge of systematic approaches used by scientists to design and conduct studies. Course content prepares students to appraise quantitative and qualitative research, and evaluate the scientific merit and clinical significance of research for translation into practice. Evidence-based guidelines are examined and rated for strength of evidence and expert consensus using evidence grading systems and defined criteria. Students engage in variety of creative learning experiences to facilitate appreciative inquiry, clinical reasoning, and evidence-based practice. Quality improvement, comparative effectiveness analyses, information science, and electronic health systems technology demonstrate the capacity for measurement and surveillance of nursing-sensitive and other outcomes used to evaluate quality nursing care and test interventions. Ethical, legal and health policy implications for research are explored. This course serves as the basis for scientific inquiry about human experiences to address important problems that require solutions and to expand the research and the evidence base for professional nursing practice.

Taught by: Spatz; Kutney-Lee; Polomano

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: NURS 230

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 548 Negotiations in Healthcare

This course examines the process that leads to change in health care settings and situations. Students will develop skills that lead to effective negotiations in interpersonal and organizational settings. Included in the discussion are: concepts of organizational structure and power, negotiating in difficult situations, and the role of the health care professional in negotiation and change. The course also examines techniques leading to successful implementation of negotiated change in the practice setting. This course satisfies the Society & Social Structures Sector for Nursing Class of 2012 and Beyond.

Taught by: Burke, K.;

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: Undergraduates must have permission of instructor

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 550 Home Health Care Concepts: Mgmt. & Delivery of Community-Based Care

This course examines the major aspects of home-based care across patients' life spans from acute to long term care. New trends, advances, and issues in home management of complex conditions, innovative delivery systems and legal, ethical and policy consideration will be explored.

Taught by: Doyle

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: NURS 368

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 551 Applied Health Informatics

Catalogue Description: This course is designed to address issues related to the impact of information technology on health care practitioners and consumers of all ages. Students will learn about and gain experience with practical applications of information technology (Access, handheld devices, telehealth, Internet resources) that improve the qualityof health care communication and delivery and facilitate health care research. Class projects include working with clinical databases and evidence based information sources.

Taught by: Bowles

Course offered fall; even-numbered years

Prerequisites: Experience in using the Internet to retrieve information. Basic knowledge of Microsof Access is expected.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 552 Health Care and Social Policy

This course is an area study or survey of social policy issues in contemporary health care. Topics include social contexts of health care and health policy; the organization and financing of health services; the health professions; health and illness over the life cycle; achieving equitable access to health services; the interface between health and social services. Health problems of national significance will be addressed including infant mortality, teenage pregnancy, AIDS, the chronically mentally ill and homeless, health impaired elderly.

Taught by: Aiken

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

0.5 Course Units

NURS 553 Innov & Appld Tech II

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

0.5 Course Units

NURS 555 Women and Incarceration

This elective course will afford students the opportunity to develop and implement health education workshops for incarcerated women in the Philadelphiajail system. Students will explore the social and historical framework and trends in the incarceration of women, as well as the needs of this population, and will identify specific areas that need to be addressed by particular disciplines or professions. Students will have direct contact with the jail system, its staff, and female inmates.

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: GSWS 555

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 557 Principles of Palliative Care

This course examines national and global perspectives and clinical issues in the delivery of palliative care with diverse populations in multiple health care settings. Students focus on the care of persons with life-threatening, progressive illness, emphasizing respect for patients' and families' beliefs, values, and choices. Students also explore psychosocial and spiritual dimensions of palliative care. Historical, sociocultural, economic, legal, and ethical trends in palliative care are discussed. Factors affecting health care systems and societal attitudes are considered in evaluating the delivery of care during advanced illness and at the end of life. Students engage in the critical analysis of literature, research, and observational experiences concerning biopsychosocial needs of patients and families. Students acquire competencies in patient/family assessment, communication, decision-making, and interdisciplinary collaboration in palliative care. This course satisfies the Society & Social Structures Sector for Nursing Class of 2012 and Beyond.

Taught by: Ersek

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: NURS 367

Prerequisite: Undergraduate Students Need Permission

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: for Graduate Students and Junior and Senior Undergraduate Nursing Students (with Course Faculty Permission)

NURS 562 Case Study in Complementary and Alternative Medicine

This course will examine the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in health promotion and disease prevention, as well as in acute and chronic health conditions, through evidence-based research and practice. Implications of CAM on culture, health disparities, society, economics, safety, legal, ethical, and health policy issues will be explored and discussed.

Taught by: Cuellar

Course offered spring; odd-numbered years

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Undergrads Need Permission

NURS 566 Living with Dementia

Living with Dementia provides a two fold experience: guided observation of an individual with dementia and a seminar series on dementia - neuropathology, assessment, care and treatment. Students will interact with a person with AD and his/her caregiver. The goal is to understand the demented individual's functional abilities and impact of environment on performance and behavior. A further goal is to develop an appreciation of the primary caregiver's role and the strengths and limitations of community support systems. Each team of two to three will be assigned a family unit for study. In so far as possible, teams will be interdisciplinary.

Taught by: Strumpf; Cotter

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: NURS 366

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 567 An Evidence-based Approach to Managing Symptoms in Advanced Illness

This course uses an evidence-based approach towards systematic assessment and management of common symptoms and symptom clusters accompanying progressive, life-limiting illnesses within a framework of nationally recognized standards and guidelines for palliative and end-of-life care. Students are prepared to apply principles of palliative management to diverse patient populations across clinical settings including acute, primary, long-term, and community care. Refer to course syllabus or email course faculty for respective requirements.

Taught by: Meghani; Ersek

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: Junior and Senior undergraduate students may be admitted with course faculty permission

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 570 Introduction to Public Health

This course will provide a foundational overview of the field of public health and grounding in the public health paradigm. Content will include the history of public health, an introduction to the basic public health sciences including behavioral and social sciences, biostatistics, epidemiology, environmental public health, policy and management and prevention of chronic and infectious diseases and injuries, future directions for public health and aan introduction to issues in international health, ethics, context analysis (specifically the notion of urban health), health promotion and disease prevention paradigms.

Taught by: Buttenheim; Nguyen

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: PUBH 500

Prerequisite: Undegrads Need Permission

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 575 Health, Sustain & Design

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 577 Advanced Practice Issues for Palliative Care Nurses

This course provides an in-depth examination of 1) key practice, policy, and ethical issues affecting the delivery of palliative care and 2) the responsibilities of advanced practice nurses (APRN) providing care to patients with progressive, life-limiting illness and their families. Learning experiences will focus on conducting patient/family conferences; examining selected ethical issues in palliative care; analyzing organizational, economic and health policy issues that affect the delivery of hospice and palliative care; exploring current and emerging models of palliative care delivery; and creating approaches to enhancing continuity of palliative care across settings. Students will choose assignments to meet their professional goals.

Taught by: Ersek; Meghani; Polomano

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisite: NURS 557

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Undergraduates Need Permission

NURS 580 Pharmacology of Anesthesia and Accessory Drugs I

This course explores the various routes of anesthetic administration addressing the potential benefits and risk of each. Special emphasis is placed on specific anesthetic agents and their appropriate use. The responses and common complications associated with these agents are discussed.

Taught by: Magro; Lynn

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: NURS 617

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 587 Advanced Leadership Skills in Community Health

Grounded in a social justice perspective, this course aims to provide the student with a foundational overview of the field of community health and leadership skills in public health advocacy. The course encourages critical thinking about health outcomes framed by the broad context of the political and social environment. This course analyzes the range of roles and functions carried out by leaders in healthcare advocacy for marginalized communities; integrates knowledge of health policy and the key influence of government and financing on health outcomes; explores community-based participatory research and interventions as tools for change; and discuss ways to develop respectful partnerships with community organizations. An assets-based approach that draws upon the strengths of communities and their leaders provides a foundation for community-engagement skill building. The course emphasizes the development of skills and techniques to lead effective, collaborative, health-focused interventions for disenfranchised groups, including residents of urban neighborhoods.

Taught by: Margo; Klusaritz; Lipman

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: PUBH 588

Prerequisite: Enrollment in a Masters or Doctoral program

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Undergraduates with permission of the instructor

NURS 588 The Politics of Women's Health Care

This course will utilize a multidisciplinary approach to address the field of women's health care. The constructs of women's health care will be examined from a clinical, as well as sociological, anthropological and political point of view. Topics will reflect the historical movement of women's health care from an an obstetrical/gynecological view to one that encompasses the entire life span and life needs of women. The emphasis of the course will be to undertake a critical exploration of the diversity diversity of women's health care needs and the past and current approaches to this care. Issues will be addressed from both a national and global perspective, with a particular focus on the relationship between women's equality/inequality status and state of health. This course satisfies the Society & Social Structures Sector for Nursing Class of 2012 and Beyond.

Taught by: McCool; Durain; Lewis, L.

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: GSWS 588

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 600 Principles and Practice of Transformative Nursing Education

This course is designed to provide expert advanced practice nurses and midwives, currently holding faculty positons, with a theory and practice base to promote excellence in classroom teaching. The focus of the course is theories and principles of teaching and learning related to adult learning. Personal and educational philosophies and their relationship to the learner are explored. Basic components of curriculum development are integral to the course. A designated mentor teacher at the home university with a Masters or Doctorate degree, nominated by the student and approved by the Course Director, works in partnership with the student and Penn faculty.

Taught by: McHugh; Keim; Klenke-Borgmann

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: Baccalaureate in Nursing plus a Master's Degree in Nursing or in a Health Related Area. Current Master or Doctoral Students with permission of the Program Director and the Course Director.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 601 Integrating Classroom and Clinical Pedagogies in Nursing Education

This course builds on the knowledge attained in NURS 600 as well as the knowledge and skills of the expert clinician. The focus of the course is clinical teaching for the advanced practitioner, perceptor preparation and issues related to establishing and maintaining clinical sites. Academic responsibilities of faculty members, ethical and legal issues in education and educational effects of professional trends, health care policies and rapidly changing environments are also explored.

Taught by: McHugh; Keim; Klenke-Borgmann

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: NURS 600

Activity: Lecture

2 Course Units

NURS 604 Chronic Illness in the Community: Lifespan Approach

This course focuses on theory and research from the behavioral and nursing sciences on the psychological and social consequences of on-going illness. In addition, the health policy issues engendered by these problems will be addressed.

Taught by: Shaughnessy, Buzby, Murphy

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisite: Primary Care Majors or instructor permission

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 605 Biochemical and Physiological Aspects of Metabolism and Human Disease

Selected aspects of genetics, biochemistry, physiology and pharmacology are presented and applied to nursing care. Embryonic, histologic, and gross anatomical features of certain organ systems are functionally related to biochemical and physiological mechanisms essential for the maintenance of a stable internal environment. Special emphasis is placed upon integrating functions of the nervous and endocrine systems. Certain deviations from normal metabolism, structure and function are detailed.

Taught by: Lafferty; Malseed, Z.; Tkacs

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Summer I

NURS 607 Advanced Physiology and Pathophysiology

This course will integrate advanced physiology with pathophysiology and clinical implications across the lifespan for advanced nursing practice. Organ systems function and dysfunction from the level of the cell through integrated organ levels will be presented, and the genetic basis of disease will be discussed. Recent scientific advances will be discussed with application to new approaches to disease and symptom management. The interrelationships between basic physiology, clinical pathophysiology, and genetics are emphasized through lecture and case studies.

Taught by: Tkacs

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: Completion of undergraduate courses that include Biochemistry, Nutrition, Anatomy and Physiology or permission of the instructor.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 608 Advanced Pharmacology and Therapeutics for Nursing Practice

Advanced principles of clinical pharmacology and therapeutics are applied to the nursing care of individuals across the life-stage spectrum. It focuses on the content and knowledge employed by the advanced practice registered nurse in the management of various conditions and disease states. The course builds on the pharmacology knowledge base acquired in the baccalaureate nursing program. The advanced pharmacology and therapeutics of several common diseases or conditions found in the acute care and primary care setting is presented. This is supplemented with pharmacotherapy modules to meet program specific needs.

Taught by: Boulatta; Carey; Manning

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: NURS 607 or NURS 685

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 610 Concepts in Healthcare Economics

This course examines health care from an economic perspective tailored for the nurse manager and executive. Emphasis is on the allocation of health care resource policies in the United States with examination of different health care programs. Within the health care industry, focus is on public and private health care funding in addition to the role of managed care systems with relation to financing and delivery of health services. This course satisfies the Society & Social Structures Sector for Nursing Class of 2012 and Beyond.

Taught by: Piper, A

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

0.5 Course Units

NURS 612 Principles and Practice of Healthcare Quality Improvement

Healthcare delivery is complex and constantly changing. A primary mission of leading healthcare organizations is to advance the quality of patient care by striving to deliver care that is safe, effective, efficient, timely, cost-effective, and patient-centered (Institute of Medicine). The goal of this interprofessional course is to provide students with a broad overview of the principles and tools of quality improvement and patient safety in healthcare as well address the knowledge, skills and attitudes as defined by the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) guidelines. It will provide a foundation for students or practicing clinicians who are interested in quality improvement and patient safety research, administration, or clinical applications. Content will address the history of the quality improvement process in healthcare, quality databases and improvement process tools and programs. Through the use of case studies and exercises students will be become familiar with the use of several quality improvement programs and tools. For example, the Plan-Do-Study- Act (PDSA) cycle, Six Sigma and the Toyota Production System known as Lean Production processes will be addressed. Students can use this course to identify the tools and design the methods that they plan to employ in a quality improvement or patient safety project in their area of interest.

Taught by: Myers, J.; Burke, K.

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: HPR 504

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 617 Principles of Nurse Anesthesia Practice I

This course explores the various routes of anesthetic administration addressing the potential benefits and risk of each. Special emphasis is placed on the monitoring of patients during the intra-operative phase. The responses to the common complications that occur during the intra-operative phase are discussed utilizing a case study approach.

Taught by: Magro; Lynn

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: 12-Week Summer Session

NURS 618 Principles of Nurse Anesthesia Practice II

This course explores the indications, contraindications and considerations regarding the administration of regional, epidural and spinal anesthesia. Anatomical and physiological considerations regarding the administration, monitoring and reversing of anesthetic agents are reviewed. Common side effects and adverse effects are discussed and the effective treatments of each are explained. Factors leading to substance abuse are identified and discussed. Opportunities to practice spinal needle placement and administration of anesthetics are provided in the simulation laboratory.

Taught by: Magro; Lynn

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: NURS 617

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 619 Principles of Nurse Anesthesia Practice III

This course explores the special considerations of pediatric, obstetric, and geriatric patients undergoing anesthesia. The pre-anesthesia assessment of these patients is discussed with particular emphasis on the commonly occurring complications and how to anticipate and manage them. Monitoring for anesthetic effect, hemodynamic effect and potential adverse reactions is reviewed using a case study approach

Taught by: Magro; Lynn; Winner

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisite: NURS 618

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: 12-Week Summer Session

NURS 620 Principles of Nurse Anesthesia Practice IV

This course provides a systems approach to examining specialty surgical procedures and the anesthesia requirements for each. Analysis of the pre-anesthesia assessment, the intraoperative monitoring and the post-anesthesia care required for patients undergoing the surgical procedure will be presented. Population specific considerations will be emphasized.

Taught by: Magro; Lynn

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: NURS 619

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 621 Principles of Nurse Anesthesia Practice V

This course provides a systems approach to examining specialty surgical procedures and the anesthesia requirements for each. Analysis of the pre-anesthesia assessment, the intraoperative monitoring and the post-anesthesia care required for patients undergoing the surgical procedure will be presented. Population specific considerations will be emphasized.

Taught by: Magro; Lynn

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: NURS 620

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 622 Pathogenesis of Mental Disorders Across the Lifespan

The conceptual and practice application of brain-behavior relationships for individuals with mental health and psychiatric conditions is developed in this course. Students learn interview and differential diagnostic skills toscreen for neuropsychological etiologies of mental disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorders, mood disorders and anxiety disorders. The course reviews specific theories of etiology and diagnostic classifications found in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition- Text Revision (DSM IV- TR). Students develop the ability to make critical decisions as they learn finer points of differentiial diagnosing of mental disorders using a case based method of learning, allowing students to focus on specific populations such as aged, adults, adolescents, anchildren.

Taught by: Hanrahan; Tkacs

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 625 Clinical Modalities Across the Life Cycle in Advanced Practice Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing

Crisis intervention, brief psycho-therapy, group processes and practices, milieu therapy, and intervention with families are examined as they relate to nursing practice in mental health.

Taught by: Coleman, C.

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 626 Family and Organizational Systems Across the Life Span

This course presents Bowen Family Systems Theory as it applies to families over the life and organizations over time. This is a theoretical course whose purpose is to provide the student with a broad, systemic perspective on human functioning. The course begins with a detailed presentation of Systems Theory, from both a family and organizational perspective. As presented there is a continual compare and contrast to other dominant theories of human functioning. It then applies the concepts of Systems Theory to the understanding and assessment of the stages of the normal family life cycle from a multi-generational, multi-cultural perspective. This is followed by discussions of the theory's application to the emotional problems of children, adolescents, adults and their families. Likewise, application to organizational behavior is made, including health care organizations. Relevant research is discussed throughout.

Taught by: Pollack, F.

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Summer Session I

NURS 628 Mental Health and Aging

An examination of the psycho-socio-cultural processes which influence the behavior patterns, coping, and adaptation of older adults. The course emphasizes strategies to promote mental health as well as assessment, presentation, and intervention in the major acute and chronic psychiatric disorders affecting the older adult.

Taught by: Cacchione; Evans

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 629 Bas Prin Nurse Anethesia

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 637 Introduction to Research Methods and Design

The relationships among nursing theory, research and practice will be examined. An emphasis will be placed on research competencies for advanced practice nurses (APNs), including understanding nursing research methods and strategies in order to evaluate research results for applicability to practice and to design projects for evaluating outcomes of practice. An understanding of statistical techniques will be integrated into the course and build on the required undergraduate statistics course. Published nursing research studies will be evaluated for scientific merit and clinical feasibility, with a focus on evidence-based practice.

Taught by: Tulman; Polomano; Spatz; Hatfield

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Undegraduate Statistics Class. Must hold an RN license.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Also offered in 6 week Summer Session I

NURS 640 Global Health and Health Policy

This participatory interdisciplinary seminar course examines contemporary issues in public health policy and global health. The organizing framework is social determinants of health. We consider evidence that inequalities in education, income, and occupation influence health status, and the policy dilemma that broad interventions to improve population health may increase health disparities. We critically examine whether prevention is always better than cure, and what modern medicine has to offer in terms of health. We explore the public policy process in health using the "tobacco wars" as a case example, of how politics, policy, law, commercial interests, and research intersect to affect the public's health. We examine whether global health is in a state of decline, and the extent to which failures in public health, public policy, and foreign policy have contributed to increasing threats to world health. Likewise we will examine the potential for greater integration of health into foreign policy to create global infrastructure upon which to advance health. We will examine the global health workforce and the impact of widespread global migration of health professionals on receiving and sending countries. There are no prerequisites. The course is designed for graduate students in the social and behavioral sciences, health professions, public health, business and law. Advanced undergraduate students will be admitted with permission.

Taught by: Aiken; Voet; McLaughlin

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: PUBH 551, SOCI 640, SWRK 793

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 641 Autism Spectrum Disorder: Prevalence, Etiology, Screening and Assessment

Through classroom and clinical experiences, this course provides an overview of the public health problem of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Content addresses the natural history, etiology, rising prevalence, risk factors, and core features. Changes in prevalence statistics and possible causes are outlineThese subjects are described in general terms for an overall picture of the disorder. Taking a developmental approach, students begin case management and follow a family through screening, diagnosis and treatment planning. Key information is elaborated through case studies. The course highlights the important and evolving role of nurses in the care of people with ASD. Content is supported by the scientific literature. Students' clinical experiences startthe identification of and collaborative work with a family that has a young chiwith ASD. The student follows that family and the child through diagnosis, treatments and long term planning. This case approach allows the student to work with the same family over the entire post-masters program to learn the value of interdisciplinary, contiguous care.

Taught by: Pinto-Martin; Souders

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: Post-BSN students only.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Junior and senior undergraduate students may be admitted with course faculty permission.

NURS 642 Health and Behavioral Care Planning and Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorder

Through classroom and clinical experiences, this course focuses on the application of various treatment approaches to the management of acute and chronic problems of autism spectrum disorder. Approaches to behavioral, psychological and medical co-morbidities are explored, practiced and evaluated. Students' clinical experiences build on the previous semester and continue with the application of class instruction to patient and family care. The student works closely with behaviorists, psychologists and occupational therapists to integrate nursing care planning with other services. This case approach continues, and exposure to a second family is added to expand learning opportunities and develop nursing services.

Taught by: Pinto-Martin; Souders

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: NURS 641

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 643 Leadership, Advocacy, and the Practice of Integrated Nursing Care of ASD

Emphasis is on the synthesis of course content practice. Through classroom and clinical experiences, students critically examine the role of nursing in the life-long care of people with ASD, and identify ways to expand the scope of nursing care for this vulnerable population. Students explore the availability of services in the community and discuss approaches to patient advocacy. Students have opportunities to select an area of specialization to develop specific practice expertise. Such areas are Diagnosis and Referral Practices (e.g. ADOS Training), Behavioral Therapy Training (e.g. Applied Behavioral Analysis), and clinical research. Practical issues of collaboration and reimbursement for services are explored. Students' clinical experiences are designed to facilitate scholarship, independence and advanced specialization in a chosen component of ASD care, for example, behavioral analysis, screening and/or diagnosis, or an agenda for research. Students identify and implement an independent project.

Taught by: Pinto-Martin; Souders

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisite: NURS 642

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Spring and/or Summer Offering

NURS 644 Health Care in an Aging Society

Individual and societal influences on the care of older adults are examined in detail within the context of an emerging health care system. Normal changes in physical and psychological health are explored in depth. Significant issues affecting care of older adults and their families at the global and national level are discussed.

Taught by: Bradway;

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 645 Psychopharmacology Across the Lifespan

This course focuses on the development of knowledge and skills related to the use of psychopharmacologic agents to treat mental illness by the advanced practice nurse. Using a case study method to encourage the application of knowledge to clinical practice, the course addresses culturally diverse client populations, across the life span, who present with a range of symptom manifestations, at all levels of severity. The course emphasizes evidence-based practice, research-based clinical decision making and a wholistic approach to integrating the science and biology of the mind with social and behavioral interventions. The case base method allows students to focus on specific populations such as older adults, adults, adolescents, and children.

Taught by: Hanrahan

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: NURS 622

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 646 Primary Care: Diagnosis and Management of Adults Across the Lifespan

This course focuses on development of critical thinking skills to address health care problems of adults across the lifespan, with an emphasis on middle-aged and older adults, develop differential problem solving skills and determine appropriate management interventions. The management of common acute and chronic health conditions will include evidence based primary preventions, drug and treatment therapeutics, and referral to other health care providers. Students have the opportunity to build on previously acquired skills and to apply concepts of primary care to manage the health problems of adults across the lifespan.

Taught by: Bradway; Cotter

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: NURS 657

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 647 Primary Care Clinical Practicum: Diagnosis and Management of Adults across the Lifespan

Management and evaluation of primary care problems of middle-aged and older adults in a variety of ambulatory and occupational settings. Opportunity to implement the role of the nurse practitioner with middle-aged and older adults and their families in the community. Interdisciplinary experiences will be pursued & collaborative practice emphasized. Students are expected to assess and begin to manage common chronic health problems in consultation with the appropriate provider of care. The initiation of health promotion & health maintenance activities with individuals and groups is stressed. Includes 16 hours a week of clinical experience with a preceptor.

Taught by: Cross; O'Sullivan

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: NURS 657

Corequisite: NURS 646

Activity: Clinic

1 Course Unit

NURS 648 Primary Care: Complex Diagnosis and Management of Adults across the Lifespan

This course will build on concepts presented in the Diagnosis and Management of Adults across the Lifespan (NURS 646) course. The focus is on refining health assessment skills, interpreting findings, developing and implementing appropriate plans of care to meet common health maintenance needs of adults and to promote the health of adults with more complex health problems with an emphasis on the frail adult. The student will gain increased expertise in communication skills, health assessment skills, interpreting findings, epidemiological concepts and developing and implementing plans of care. The emphasis will be placed upon managing an aging population with complex, chronic healthcare needs and promoting healthy behaviors across the lifespan.

Taught by: Cotter

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: NURS 646, 647

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 649 Primary Care Clinical Practicum: Complex Diagnosis and Management of Adults across the Lifespan

The focus of this course is the application of concepts presented in the Complex Diagnosis and Management of Adults Across the Lifespan (NURS 648) including initial workups of new patients, and the evaluation and management of patients with self-limiting acute problems, or stable chronic illnesses. Students will gain increased clinical expertise in a variety of community-based clinical settings including but not limited to health maintenance organizations, community clinics, long term care, assisted living, continuing care retirement communities, occupational health settings, and private practice. The student will gain increased expertise in communication skills, health assessment skills, interpreting findings, applying epidemiological concepts and developing and implementing plans of care for adults across the lifespan with health maintenance needs, and/or common acute and chronic health problems.

Taught by: Cotter; Taylor

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: NURS 646, 647

Corequisite: NURS 648

Activity: Clinic

1 Course Unit

NURS 650 Systems Thinking in Patient Safety

This blended online/in-classroom graduate level course integrates principles of systems thinking with foundational concepts in patient safety. Utilizing complexity theories, students assess healthcare practices and identify factors that contribute to medical errors and impact patient safety. Using a clinical microsystem framework, learners assess a potential patient safety issue and create preventive systems. Lessons learned from the science of safety are utilized in developing strategies to enhance safe system redesign. Core competencies for all healthcare professionals are emphasized, content is applicable for all healthcare providers including, but not limited to, nurses, pharmacists, physicians, social workers and healthcare administrators, and may be taken as an elective by non-majors.

Taught by: Keim; Burke, K.

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: HPR 650

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 651 Nursing Informatics

This course is designed to introduce the student to fundamental concepts and issues surrounding technology and information management in today's rapidly changing health care environment. Emphasis will be placed on defining informatics and the models and theories used in its development. To prepare the student to take a leadership role in information system design and selection the class will study the process of information systems analysis, implementation and evaluation involving functional, organizational and human aspects.

Taught by: Bowles; Maffei

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisite: Basic Computer Skills

Activity: Online Course

1 Course Unit

NURS 652 Applied Healthcare Accounting and Business Planning

This course focuses on the management of financial resources in the healthcare industry particularly in inpatient and ambulatory care settings. Specific emphasis is on applied accounting, budgeting, capital planning, nursing staffing/scheduling and variance analysis. Additionally, students will apply concepts in developing a business/program plan including completion of an environmental scan, cost-benefit analysis and marketing plan. Students will engage in strategic planning, stakeholder analysis and benchmarking efforts.

Taught by: Keim; Fuir

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 655 Nursing Administration Practicum

This administrative practicum will be individually tailored to meet each student's career goals. Students will be placed with an expert role model who in most instances will be a practicing nurse executive. The setting may vary according to the student's interests and objectives. Examples include acute care, home care, long term care, occupational health, community based clinics, consulting groups and political/legislative experiences.

Taught by: Keim, DiMichele

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: NURS 699

Activity: Clinic

1 Course Unit

NURS 656 Professional Role Issues for Nurse Practitioners

This course is intended for students planning a career that involves primary health care delivery. It includes lectures, discussions, readings, and projects focused on health, social, economic and professional factors influencing health care delivery in the community.

Taught by: O'Sullivan; Bryan

Course usually offered in fall term

Corequisite: NURS 657

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 657 Advanced Physical Assessment and Clinical Decision Making

This is a laboratory/clinical course designed to help prospective nurse practitioners develop advanced clinical assessment skills. Provider-patient interaction, data collection, and hypothesis formulation are emphasized. All participants engage in actual practice with fellow students, and/or models, and consenting patients.

Taught by: Buzby; Reger; Sherry

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Laboratory

1 Course Unit

NURS 658 Clinical Management of Primary Care with Young Families

Assessment and treatment of the young child in ambulatory care settings is the focus of this developmentally organized course. This course provides the nurse practitioner student with the necessary knowledge and experience to assist individuals with the most common health problems, including acute episodic illness as well as stable chronic disease. The concepts of health promotion and health maintenance are integrated throughout the curriculum. Using a developmental framework, the maturational tasks and problems of children and their families in relation to illness and health are explored.

Taught by: O'Sullivan

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: NURS 656, 657

Corequisite: NURS 659

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 659 Clinical Practicum: Primary Care with Young Families

Management and evaluation of primary care problems of children in a variety of ambulatory settings. Opportunity to implement the role of nurse practitioner with children and their families in the community occurs under the guidance of faculty and experienced preceptors. The initiation of health promotion and health maintenance activities with individuals and groups is stressed. Collaborative, interdisciplinary practice is emphasized as students assess and manage common problems in consultation with an appropriate provider of care. 20 hours a week of clinical experience with a preceptor is arranged.

Taught by: O'Sullivan

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: NURS 656, 657

Corequisite: NURS 658

Activity: Clinic

1 Course Unit

NURS 660 Clinical Practice with Select Populations: Adolescents

Focus on assessment and treatment of adolescents in a variety of settings. Didactic emphasis is on the special needs encountered among adolescents. This course adds to the student's previous knowledge and skill in the delivery of primary care. Working with this specific population the student gains necessary knowledge and experience in assisting individuals with most common health problems, including acute episodic illness and stable chronic disease, as well as health promotion needs.

Taught by: O'Sullivan

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisites: NURS 656, 657, 658, 659

Activity: Clinic

1 Course Unit

Notes: Summer Session I

NURS 661 Clinical Management of Primary Care with Adults

Assessment and treatment of younger adults in ambulatory care settings is the focus of this clinical course.The course provides the nurse practitioner student with the necessary knowledge and experience to assist individuals with most common health problems, including acute episodic illness. The concepts of health promotion and health maintenance are integrated throughout the curriculum. Using a developmental framework, maturational tasks and problems of the adult and family in relation to illness and health are explored.

Taught by: O'Sullivan

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisites: NURS 646, 647 or NURS 658, 659

Activity: Clinic

0 Course Units

Notes: Summer Session I

NURS 663 Advanced Concepts in Primary Care

In conjunction with the development of advanced clinical skills, students focus on advanced practice role development and the study of issues in health service delivery related to the practice of primary health care. Economics, case management and cultural/ethical aspects of care are discussed.

Taught by: O'Sullivan

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisite: NURS 660 or NURS 661

Activity: Clinic

1 Course Unit

Notes: Summer Session II

NURS 664 Advanced Practice Nursing for Oncology Care

Students are introduced to cancer epidemiology and pathophysiology, cancer genetics, prevention, risk assessment and reduction for specific cancers, screening techniques, diagnostic procedures and criteria, and local and systemic therapies used to treat cancer. The influence of individual characteristics on health promotion, health behaviors, population cancer risk, and cancer detection are explored in the context of biological, psychological, socioeconomic and sociocultural factors across age groups from adolescents to older adults. Evidence-based practice guidelines and research are applied to promote healthy lifestyles, monitor cancer risk, address psychosocial issues, facilitate access to care, and reduce health care disparities for populations at risk and diagnosed with cancer, and cancer survivors.

Taught by: Hollis; Polomano

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: NURS 607; NURS 637

Activity: Online Course

1 Course Unit

Notes: Summer 12 Week Session ; Permission to take this course as an elective must be approved by the course faculty.

NURS 666 Effects of Cancer and Cancer Therapy

Principles of cancer treatment, associated responses and symptom management are presented. Emphasis is on the development of advanced clinical decision making skills in identifying multiple alterations resulting from cancer and cancer therapy.

Taught by: Walker; Prechtel-Dunphy

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: NURS 646, 664

Corequisite: NURS 667

Activity: Online Course

1 Course Unit

NURS 667 Oncology Nursing: Assessment, Diagnosis, & Cancer Management

Emphasis is on the application of critical thinking and diagnostic reasoning skills in advanced clinical decision making. Students access, diagnose, and manage the care of oncology patients with a variety of cancers. The delivery of care and evaluation of role effectiveness within the health care system are examined.

Taught by: Polomano; Walker; Prechtel-Dunphy

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: NURS 664, NURS 666

Corequisite: NURS 666

Activity: Online Course

1 Course Unit

Notes: $60 Lab Fee

NURS 670 Principles of Adult Gerontology Acute Care I

This didactic course examines the epidemiologic, assessment, diagnostic, management and evaluation of acutely or critically ill adults across the adult-older adult age spectrum. Students explore the dynamic interplay between the pathophysiologic basis of disease and the psychosocial and socio-cultural responses to acute and critical illness and injury as they develop clinical decision-making skills. An evidence-based approach to nursing and medical management including pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic modalities is emphasized. Cardiovascular and pulmonary systems, infectious and prevention issues commonly encountered by adults are covered. Particular focus is placed on specific issues related to the older adult such as frailty, dehydration, loss of functional mobility, falls, and other geriatric syndromes.

Taught by: Pawlow; Elgart; Becker; Doherty

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 671 Principles of Adult Gerontology Acute Care II

In this didactic course, students learn to integrate their advanced pharmacology and pathophysiology background with their understanding of acute illness and injury. The focus is on the evidence-based management of patients with neurologic, gastrointestinal, renal, oncologic, and metabolic health problems. Students develop skills to create a differential diagnosis when an adult/older-adult presents with a constellation of symptoms. Common and atypical presentations of illness and disease are explored. Focus is placed on holistic care including the psychosocial, cultural, and spiritual aspects of patients' response to their illness or injury. Epidemiology, assessment, diagnosis, management, and advanced clinical decision making based on current clinical research are emphasized.

Taught by: Pawlow; Elgart; Becker; Doherty

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 672 Principles of Adult Gerontology Acute Care III

This didactic course examines issues related to the epidemiology, assessment, diagnosis, management and evaluation of acute, critical and complex chronically ill adults across the adult-older adult age continuum. Students explore the dynamic interplay between the pathophysiologic basis of disease and the psychosocial and socio-cultural responses to illness and injury across the adult age continuum as they develop clinical decision-making skills. An evidence-based approach to nursing and medical management including pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic modalities is emphasized. Content focuses on special adult and older adult patient populations with commonly encountered health problems.

Taught by: Pawlow; Elgart; Becker; Doherty

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 673 Advanced Clinical Decisions in Adult Gerontology Acute Care

This didactic and fieldwork course focuses on development of a systematic approach to advanced physical assessment, the use and interpretation of diagnostic technologies and development of diagnostic reasoning as it applies to patient management of the adult-older adult acutely ill or injured patient. Emphasis is placed on development of competence to perform a comprehensive history and physical examination, incorporating the analysis of biotechnological data trends. Building fundamental skills in developing differential diagnoses and clinical decision making for acutely ill patients across the adult age continuum is a focus of this course.

Taught by: Pawlow; Griffith; Becker

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: NURS 607, 657

Corequisite: NURS 670

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

NURS 674 Adult Gerontology Acute Care NP: Professional Role and Clinical Practicum I

This didactic and clinical fieldwork course explores issues relevant to the role of the Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner within the complex U.S. health care system. Role development, reimbursement issues, provision of quality and ethical care and evidence-based nursing and medical interventions are introduced and discussed in the classroom. Clinical fieldwork focuses on assessment of complex acute, critical and chronically-ill patients for urgent and emergent conditions, using both physiologically and technologically derived data, to evaluate for physiologic instability and potential life-threatening conditions, development of differential diagnoses, application of diagnostic reasoning and formulation, implementation, evaluation and modification of individualized plans of care including pharmacological and non-pharmacological modalities. Development of advanced clinical competencies and clinical decision making abilities about adults across the age continuum is emphasized. .

Taught by: Becker ; Griffith

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: NURS 673

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 675 Adult Gerontology Acute Care NP: Professional Role and Clinical Practicum II

This didactic and fieldwork course focuses on the role of the Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner and the expansion of advanced clinical competencies and clinical decision making abilities. Clinical experiences in acute care settings provide the student with opportunities to refine history and physical examination techniques, diagnostic reasoning, formulation, implementation, evaluation and modification of individualized management plans. Specific attention is given to the unique presentation of syndromes and constellation of symptoms that may be typical or atypical presentation of complex acute, critical and chronic illness in adults and older adults. Facilitating transition of patients at varying life stages through the complex health care system is encouraged exploring the multiple governmental, social and personal resources available to acutely ill adults across the age continuum. The application of advanced nursing, medical and biopsychosocial knowledge in the management of patients and the collaboration between the nurse practitioner and the patient, family and interprofessional healthcare team are emphasized.

Taught by: Becker; Griffith; Doherty

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisites: NURS 670, 671, 672, 673, 674

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Summer I II - 12 Week Course

NURS 677 Environmental Toxicology: Risk Assessment and Health Effects

This course presents general principals of toxicology and the disposition of toxins in the body. Case studies of the effects of environmental and occupational toxins on individuals will be analyzed. This course is designed for students who desire a strong foundation in toxicological concepts and principals and provides an overview of major toxins in our environment and their association with human health.

Taught by: Liu

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: PUBH 530

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Undergraduates Need Permission

NURS 681 Applied Physiology for Nurse Anesthetists I

This course provides an in-depth analysis of the anatomy, physiology and patho-physiology of the respiratory and cardiovascular systems and related anesthesia implications. The concepts of ventilation and perfusion as they relate to oxygen and anesthetic delivery and metabolism are examined. The effects of compromised cardiac and pulmonary function and their implications for the patient and anesthesia plan are reviewed. The impact of anesthesia on the structure and function of the heart as a pump as well as the characteristics of systemic circulation will be explored. The effect of surgery and anesthesia on the respiratory and cardiovascular systems will be emphasized.

Taught by: Magro; Lynn; Tkacs

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: 12 Week Summer Session

NURS 682 Applied Physiology for Nurse Anesthetists II

This course provides an in-depth analysis of the anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology of the hepatic, renal, nervous, hormonal, immunologic and hematological systems and related anesthesia implications. The focus of discussion will be on the special considerations when delivering anesthetic agents to patients. Emphasis will be placed on the assessment of the patient with common disorders of these systems. Nurse anesthesia care related to patients undergoing surgeries involving each system will be discussed.

Taught by: Magro; Lynn; Libonati

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: NURS 681

Corequisite: NURS 607

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 683 Applied Science Related to Anesthesia

This course is an in-depth analysis of the chemical and physical principles as they apply to nurse anesthesia practice. Aspects of organic and biochemistry including the chemical structures of compounds and its significance in pharmacology will be explored. Applications of the laws of physics as they pertain to nurse anesthesia practice will be reviewed with specific examples. Emphasis on the dynamics of the anesthesia delivery system and related equipment will be presented.

Taught by: Magro; Lynn; Scanga

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: NURS 607, 681, 682

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 685 Advanced Developmental Physiology and Pathophysiology

This course will address advanced human embryology, physiology and pathophysiology. Biochemical genetics and the genetic basis of disease will be discussed. Normal fetal development and physiology of organ systems will be used as the foundation for understanding the pathophysiology of disease across the lifespan.

Taught by: Trimarchi; Marino

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in Anatomy & Physiology

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 686 Well Woman Health Care

This course focuses on the management and evaluation of physical, emotional, socio-cultural and educational needs of gynecologic primary health care of women from adolescence through post-menopausal years. The content is directed at expanding the expertise of the student in in meeting the primary women's health care needs in contemporary society. Social influences that have an impact on women's lives are also explored.

Taught by: Durain; Grube; Nagtalon-Ramos

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: NURS 736, NURS 781

Prerequisite: NURS 657

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 688 Complementary/Alternative Therapies in Women's Health

The dramatic rise in the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) by the American public requires that the contemporary health care practitioner have an awareness of CAM therapies and modalities currently available. The end result of this is course will not be proficiency in the practice of any of these modalities in particular, but rather a basic understanding of each approach to common conditions and their potential contribution to health and well-being. The focus of the CAM modalities discussed in this course will center on their use in women's health care provision.

Taught by: Grube

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 690 Family Focused Primary Care of the Middle-Aged and Older Adult

This course focuses on primary care problems encountered by middle-aged and older adults and their families. Students have the opportunity to build on previously acquired skills and to apply concepts of primary care to manage the complex health problems of middle-aged and older adults.

Taught by: O'Sullivan

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: NURS 656, 657

Corequisite: NURS 691

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 691 Clinical Practicum: Family Focused Primary Care of the Middle Aged and Older Adult

The focus of this course is the evaluation and management of primary care problems in middle-aged and older adults. Students will have an opportunity to implement the role of the nurse practitioner in the clinical setting. Interdisciplinary collaborative experiences will be essential to the clinical practicum. The initiation of health promotion and health maintenance activities with individuals, groups and families is stressed. Students are expected to assess and manage common chronic health problems in the clinical setting.

Taught by: O'Sullivan

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: NURS 656, 657

Corequisite: NURS 690

Activity: Clinic

1 Course Unit

NURS 693 Professional Issues in Midwifery

In-depth discussion of current issues facing the profession of nurse-midwifery which impact on professional education, certification, and practice. Includes ethical, legal, and political aspects of nurse-midwifery practice.

Taught by: McCool; Reale; Guidera

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: NURS 787, 788

Corequisite: NURS 786

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 697 Leadership in Advanced Oncology Nursing Practice

Students explore the diagnosis and treatment of common cancers in a multidisciplinary approach. The broad array of bio-medical and psychosocial issues that result from the disease itself across the illness continuum are studied. Quality of life, rehabilitation and palliative care issues related to cancer care are addressed. Additionally, students complete an administrative practicum with a nursing leader in an oncology specialty area within a healthcare organization.

Taught by: Keim; Prechtel Dunphy; Sherry; Walker

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisites: NURS666 and all requisite nursing courses in the Nursing & Healthcare Administration (NADM) program. May be taken concomitantly with NURS699 or at the discretion of the NADM Program Director.

Activity: Field Work

1 Course Unit

NURS 698 Practicum: Quality Improvement in Healthcare

Building on coursework that provided a broad overview of the principles and tools of quality improvement and patient safety in healthcare, students will apply this knowledge through completion of a mentored quality improvement project in a healthcare organization. In collaboration with faculty and health organization preceptors, students will identify a quality improvement opportunity and develop specific project objectives including, but not limited to, the use of appropriate tools, identification of measureable aims and evaluation methods, sustainable recommendations for process improvement and a comprehensive report of findings and recommendations. This course is part of the Quality Improvement and Safety Processes in Healthcare Minor and should be completed by the student as the capstone course in that minor; students engage in 192 hours of on-site project work.

Taught by: Piper; Keim

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: NURS 650, NURS 537, NURS 612

Activity: Field Work

1 Course Unit

Notes: Summer and Fall Placement

NURS 699 Advanced Roles in Administrative Nursing Practice

Offered at the end of the Nursing and Health Care Administration or Health Care Leadership programs, this course prepares the graduate for entry into a myriad of administrative or leadership roles. Students will explore role responsibilities for various levels of management positions; health care consultants; health policy advocates; global health leaders; staff development directors; and administrators in non-traditional settings i.e., journal editors, professional associations etc.

Taught by: Rich ; Keim

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisites: For Students of the Nursing Administration and Healthcare Leadership Only

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 705 Advanced Practice Nursing Practice: Psychiatric Mental Health NP I

Supervised advanced psychiatric mental health nursing practice with children, adolescents and their families, or adults and/or older adults and their families in a variety of settings, depending on the subspecialty option selected. Focus is on clinical assessment/diagnosis and decision-making. A minimum of 16 hours of practice and 3 hours of small group supervision is required.

Taught by: Leahy; Mulligan; Josey

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

NURS 706 Advanced Practice Nursing Practice: Psychiatric Mental Health NP II

Supervised advanced psychiatric mental health nursing practice with children, adolescents and their families, or adults and/or older adults and their families in a variety of settings, depending on the subspeciality option selected. Refinement and development of clinical intervention with an increasingly diverse caseload. A minimum of 16 hours of practice and 3 hours of small group supervision is required.

Taught by: Leahy; Mulligan; Josey

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

NURS 707 Advanced Practice Nursing Practice: Psychiatric Mental Health NP III

Supervised advanced psychiatric mental health nursing practice with children, adolescents and their families, or adults and/or older adults and their families in a variety of settings, depending on the subspecialty option selected. Outcome evaluation, termination and professional role development. A minimum of 16 hours of practice and 3 hours of small group supervision is required.

Taught by: Leahy; Mulligan; Josey

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Summer Session I

NURS 708 Public Policy Leadership in the American Public/Private System of Health Care

This course will explore the philosophy and growth of public policy that has directed the American Health Care System in its ever expanding movement toward universal health care for all citizens. Analysis of health policy and systems content will assist the students to identify the knowledge and skills needed for the health or human service provider to assume leadership roles in the formulation of public policy for change; this includes system restructuring, service delivery and funding of health care. Emphasis will be on the effect of policy on the individual/family user of health care services rather than the effect on professional health care providers or health care delivery systems. Special attention will be given to the effect of policy on populations, both urban and rural, living near and below the poverty level.

Taught by: Durain

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 714 Management of Critically Ill Children with Acute and Chronic Conditions: Nursing of Critically Ill Children Advanced Clinical

This clinical course is designed with emphasis on continued development of advanced clinical decision-making skills in the care of critically ill children. Emphasis is placed on knowledge and skills that allow the advanced practitioner to efficiently and effectively manage children who are dependent upon or assisted by technological devices to carry out life processes.

Taught by: Verger; Bartke

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisites: NURS 712, 713

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Summer Session II

NURS 715 Common Management Issues of Children with Acute and Chronic Conditions: Pediatric Oncology

This course examines the unique contribution made by nurses with advanced clinical skills inthe care of children with oncologic and hematologic disorders, and their families, from the time of diagnosis throughout the treatment period and beyond. The course provides the student with the most recent advances in knowledge about cancer in childhood. While the focus is on oncology, hematologic disorders as well as AIDS will be discussed. Recent methods of treatment and the nursing management of children and their families will be addressed.

Taught by: Hobbie

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 720 Nursing of Children Theory I: Child and Family Development

This course focuses on developmental theories and concepts that form the basis for nursing assessment and intervention with children and families. Emphasis is given to current research and issues in child and family development and functioning.

Taught by: Deatrick; Murphy, K

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 721 Advanced Physical Assessment and Clinical Decision Making: Nursing of Children Clinical I

This clinical course is designed to help prospective advanced practice nurses develop advanced skills in physical and developmental assessment of children in a variety of well-child, clinic and hospital settings. Data collection, data interpretation, and hypothesis formulations are emphasized for the purpose of clinical decision making. The role of the advanced practice nurse in assessment of primary health care issues and health promotion is incorporated throughout the course. Collaboration as an integral part of assessment will be an ongoing focus.

Taught by: Lipman; Reilly, L.

Course usually offered in fall term

Corequisite: NURS 685

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 731 High-Risk Neonate, Theory

This course focuses on the care of high-risk neonates within the context of the family unit. The biological and psychosocial aspects are studied as a basis for nursing practice. Emphasis is placed on the role of the Advanced Practice nurse in improving services to high-risk neonates with the purpose of decreasing mortality and morbidity rates and improving the quality of life of high-risk newborns and infants.

Taught by: Verger; Steele

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: NURS 684, 720, 721

Corequisite: NURS 733

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Summer Session I

NURS 733 Clinical Practicum for the High Risk Neonate

This clinical course focuses on the care of the high risk infant within the context of the family unit. Clinical experiences provide students with opportunities to expand their skills in managing the care of infants, both acutely ill and growing neonates. Students continue their experiences with neonatal nurse practitioners to examine role issues of these individuals.

Taught by: Verger; Steele

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: NURS 684, 720, 721

Corequisite: NURS 731

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 734 Intermediate Principles of Pediatric Acute Care

This course focuses on evidenced based care for infants, children, and adolescents with complex acute and chronic health conditions. Emphasis is placed on developing a framework for practice based on a synthesis of knowledge from biological, behavioral, and nursing sciences through the process of advanced clinical decision making. The student gains the necessary clinical management skills to provide specialized patient centered care across the entire pediatric age spectrum from complex chronic illness to physiologic deterioration and life threatening instability with emphasis on the patient and family as a full partner in decision making.

Taught by: Murphy, K.; Verger

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: NURS 720; NURS 721; NURS 685 or NURS 607

Corequisite: NURS 735

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 735 Pediatric Acute Care Nurse Practitioner: Professional Role and Intermediate Clinical Practice

This course focuses on the implementation of the professional role of the Pediatric Acute Care Nurse Practitioner (PNP-AC). Particular emphasis is placed on the role components of the nurse practitioner in pediatric acute care. Applications of nursing, biological and behavioral science are emphasized in the advanced clinical assessment, clinical decision making and management skills needed to care for complex, unstable acutely and chronically ill children and their families. The role of the advanced practice nurse in promoting optimal child/family outcomes is emphasized.

Taught by: Verger; Lipman; Schucker; Campisciano

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: NURS 720; NURS 721; NURS 685 or NURS 607

Corequisite: NURS 734

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 736 Advanced Principles of Pediatric Acute Care

This course expands the student's understanding evidenced based care for infants, children, and adolescents with complex acute and chronic health conditions. Emphasis is placed on advancing a framework for practice based on a synthesis of knowledge from biological, behavioral, and nursing sciences through clinical decision making. The student continues to gain the necessary clinical management skills to provide specialized patient centered care across the entire pediatric age spectrum from complex chronic illness to physiologic deterioration and life threatening instability with emphasis on the patient and family as a full partner in decision making.

Taught by: Murphy, K; Verger; Lipman

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisite: NURS 734; NURS 735

Corequisite: NURS 737

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 737 Pediatric Acute Care Nurse Practitioner: Professional Role and Advanced Clinical Practice

This course focuses on the implementation of the professional role of the Pediatric Acute Care Nurse Practitioner (PNP-AC). This course adds to the students' previous knowledge and skills and prepares them to deliver care to children of any age who require frequent monitoring and intervention. Applications of nursing, biological and behavioral science are emphasized in the advanced clinical assessment, clinical decision making and management skills needed to care for complex, unstable acutely and chronically ill children and their families.

Taught by: Verger; Lipman; Schucker; Campisciano

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisite: NURS 734; NURS 735

Corequisite: NURS 736

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 740 Advanced Practice Concepts for the Childbearing Family

The seminar will provide students with the skills necessary to provide primary health care to high risk infants in ambulatory settings. Course material will include detailed physical assessment skills of the infant through the first year of life. The clinical component will include home visits and experience in the ambulatory and long term care settings.

Taught by: Steele

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 741 Management of Children with Acute and Chronic Conditions: Nursing of Children in the Community Advanced Clinical

This clinical course focuses on the implementation of the role of the advanced practice nurse with particular emphasis on providing continuity of care for children with specialized health needs across their transitions in sites of care delivery and throughout phases in the cycle of their illnesses. Application of nursing, biological and behavioral science is emphasized in the community aspects of clinical assessment and management of children with health care needs and their families.

Taught by: Deatrick; Lipman; Murphy, K.

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisites: NURS 724, 725

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Summer Session II

NURS 743 Fetal Evaluation

This course focuses on identifying at risk and high risk maternal fetal dyads, developing knowledge relating to assessment of fetal well being, and understanding the implications of obstetric, non obstertric, and fetal complications on the management of the high risk pregnancy. Additionally the course provides an understanding of the scientific basis for new technologies used to evaluate at risk and high risk populations. Information about the physics of ultrasound, pulse echo imaging, and doppler techniques will be provided. Students must be able to practice ultrasound skills while in this course.

Taught by: Stringer

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: NURS 607

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 746 Evidence-Based Practice for Nurse Anesthetists I

This course examines the evidence-based research to determine whether the procedures and techniques performed by nurse anesthetists are supported by the literature. Population specific topics of concern to nurse anesthetists are discussed. Student led seminars will guide the classroom discussions.

Taught by: Magro; Lynn; Gidaro

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: 12 Week Summer Session

NURS 747 Evidence-Based Practice for Nurse Anesthetists II

This course examines the evidence-based research to determine whether the procedures and techniques performed by nurse anesthetists are supported by the literature. Population specific topics of concern to nurse anesthetists are discussed. Student led seminars will guide the classroom discussions.

Taught by: Magro; Lynn; Gidaro

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: NURS 746

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 748 Leadership Development in Healthcare

This course will provide the conceptual and theoretical framework for examining the concept of leadership within the contexts of health systems, health professionals and health policy. It will focus on characteristics of personal and professional leadership, change theory, and the application of critical thinking to the analysis of work environments, systems and the politics of health.

Taught by: Fidyk

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 749 History, Health and Social Policy

This course explores the impact of historical ideas, events, and actors on current issues in health and illness care. Topics include the movement from hospitals to health care systems; the changing definitions of professionalism and professional practice patterns; and the ways historical context shapes definitions of leadership roles and theoretical knowledge.

Taught by: D'Antonio

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 750 Inquiry and Nursing

This course introduces students to the process of intellectual inquiry. It explores the intellectual foundations of scholarly disciplines in general and the discipline of nursing in particular. Emphasis is placed on the process of knowledge development, with particular emphasis on historical, philosophical, positivist, and gendered and phenomenological ways of knowing. Emphasis is also placed on having students develop their particular intellectual approach to disciplinary inquiry and on formulating ideas for publications and presentations.

Taught by: Richmond

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: For doctoral students in nursing

NURS 752 Issues of Nursing Leadership in Planning and Policy Making

A critical examination of the role of nursing leadership in light of current health care issues. Among the topics to be considered are: identification of leadership behaviors and characteristics that influence organizations and individuals; processes required to influence the improvement of health; theoretical models of planned change; and different views of futurist models.

Taught by: McCausland; O'Sullivan

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: For doctoral students in nursing

NURS 753 Evolving Nursing Science

A consideration of contemporary nursing research as it pertains to the current state of the art and directions for future study. Advanced analysis of methodology, assumptions, and theoretical structures that underpin the work.

Taught by: Sommers; Riegel

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: NURS 750

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: For doctoral students in nursing

NURS 754 Quantitative Research Design and Methods

This one semester survey course provides an overview of quantitative clinical research design and methods. Ethical and legal considerations in human subjects research, access to patient populations, sampling designs and power analysis, experimental and non-experimental designs, measurement of variables, data collection techniques, and data management are included. This course is intended for doctoral students in the health sciences.

Taught by: Pinto-Martin; Meghani

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: Students must have completed at least one doctoral-level statistics course. The current doctoral recommendations include: SOCI 535; SOCI 536; STAT 500; STAT 501; PUBH 501; EPID 524; EPID 525. Please contact course faculty for permission for courses taken outside of the above recommendations

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: For doctoral students in nursing.

NURS 755 Application of Statistics to Nursing Research II

Integration of non-experimental quantitative research designs and methodologies, including common statistical techniques for analyzing resulting data. Statistical techniques examined include: factor analysis, multiple regression, canonical correlation, causal modeling, and logistic regression. Power analysis of statistical tests to estimate sample size discussed. Data analysis practice using computer software integrated throughout course.

Taught by: Tulman

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: NURS 754

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: For doctoral students in nursing

NURS 756 Nurse Anesthesia Res I

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 764 Advanced Technologies & Clinical Decisions in Acute Care

This fieldwork course focuses on development of a systematic approach to advanced physical assessment, the use of diagnostic technologies and the development of a diagnostic reasoning as it applies to patient management of the acutely ill and injured. Emphasis is placed on development of competence to perform a comprehensive history and decision making for the management of acutely ill patients.

Taught by: Becker; Griffith; Bartke

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: NURS 607, 657

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 768 Role of the Clinical Nurse Specialist

This clinical course provides students the opportunity to apply CNS theory to practice and enables students to develop strategies to overcome barriers to safe, quality healthcare delivery. Students acquire knowledge and skills characteristic of CNS practice particularly as it relates to clinical judgment, facilitation of learning, advocacy and moral agency, caring practice and response to diversity.

Taught by: Becker; Pawlow; Fisher

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 769 Clinical Nurse Specialist Clinical I

This clinical course provides students the opportunity to apply CNS theory to practice and enables students to develop strategies to overcome barriers to safe, quality healthcare delivery. Students acquire knowledge and skills characteristic of CNS practice particularly as it relates to clinical judgment, facilitation of learning, advocacy and moral agency, caring practice and response to diversity.

Taught by: Becker; Dubendorf; Muller

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: NURS 657

Corequisite: NURS 768

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 770 Clinical Nurse Specialist Clinical II

This clinical course focuses on the application of CNS theory to practice. Students focus on furthering the development of the knowledge and skills related to the core competencies of the CNS. Strategies to improve provider and system issues related to the provision of care to the population of interest are developed, implemented and evaluated. Developing leadership in the development of system-wide or healthcare policy is promoted. Advocating for the individual, family, caregiver and population of interest needs within the context of clinical practice and policy making is encouraged.

Taught by: Becker; Dubendorf; Muller

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisites: NURS 657, NURS 768, NURS 769

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Also Offered in Summer 12 Week Session

NURS 775 Post-Masters Psychiatric Mental Health NP Clinical Practicum & Seminar

This clinical course prepares individuals have completed a Psychiatric Mental Health Clinical Nurse Specialist or an Adult Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner program to meet the clinical requirements for certification as a Family Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner. This clinical practicum and seminar will complement previous education in advanced practice Psychiatric Mental Health nursing. The focus of the course is on skill development in therapeutic relationships with clients, interviewing, assessing client strengths and needs for mental health services, selecting and implementing interventions including psychopharmacologic agents, and maintaining a role in a mental health setting which allows active collaboration with other health professionals. A minimum of 16 precepted practicum hours per week is required in a selected community or institutional setting and a minimum of 250 total precepted clinical hours during the semester is required. In addition, there will be on-campus seminars and individual and group supervision conference calls throughout the semester.

Taught by: Cacchione; Josey; Mulligan; Leahy

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisites: Masters degree in Psychiatric Mental Health Advanced Practice Nursing and approval of Program Director

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: By Permission Only

NURS 776 High Risk Neonate Theory II

This course examines specific pathophysiological mechanisms which may result in body system failure. Strategies for clinical management are examined based on a synthesis of biological, behavioral, medical, pharmacological, and nursing knowledge. Theoretical analysis of the roles of the advanced practitioner with critically ill patients is emphasized.

Taught by: Verger; Steele

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisites: NURS 731, 733

Corequisite: NURS 777

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 777 High Risk Neonatal Clinical II

This clinical course is designed with emphasis on continued development of advanced clinical skills in the care of critically ill children. Emphasis is placed on integration of the roles of the advanced practitioner. This course adds to the student's previous knowledge and skills in advanced practice and prepares them to manage care of critically ill children.

Taught by: Verger; Steele

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisites: NURS 731, 733

Corequisite: NURS 776

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 778 High Risk Neonatal Clinical III

This clinical course is designed with emphasis on continued development of advanced clinical decision-making skills in the care of critically ill children. Emphasis is placed on knowledge and skills that allow the advanced practitioner to efficiently and effectively manage children who are dependent upon or assisted by technological devices to carry out life processes.

Taught by: Verger; Steele

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisites: NURS 776, 777

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 780 Health Care of Women and Primary Care

The focus of this course is a clinical approach to primary care problems commonly encountered by women in an ambulatory setting. This course provides the women's health care nurse practitioner and midwifery student student with the knowledge and problem solving approach to assist individuals with the most common health problems, including acute episodic illness as well as stable chronic disease. The concepts of health promotion and health maintenance are integrated throughout the curriculum.

Taught by: Grube; Nagtalon-Ramos

Course usually offered summer term only

Corequisite: NURS 657

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 781 Well Women Health Care, Theory

This course focuses on the management and evaluation of physical, emotional, socio-cultural and educational needs of gynecologic primary health care of women from adolescence through post-menopausal years. The content is directed at expanding the expertise of the student in in meeting the primary women's health care needs in contemporary society. Social influences that have an impact on women's lives are also explored.

Taught by: Durain; Grube; Nagtalon-Ramos

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: NURS 686

Prerequisites: NURS 607, 657, 780

Corequisite: NURS 782

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 782 Well Women Health Care, Clinical

This clinical course further prepares students in understanding and developing the Women's Health Care Nurse Practitioner and Nurse-Midwifery roles. This clinical course focuses on the management and evaluation of physical, emotional, socio-cultural and educational needs of gynecologic primary health care needs of women from adolescence through post-menopausal years. Emphasis is placed on promoting and maintaining wellness, clinical decision making, systematic health interview, physical assessment, interpretation of laboratory findings, and diagnosis and treatment of gynecological problems.

Taught by: Durain; Grube; Nagtalon-Ramos

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: NURS 607, 657, 780

Corequisite: NURS 781

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 783 Health Care of Childbearing Women, Theory

The antepartum course builds upon the well-woman health care course. The focus is management of prenatal care for the childbearing family. Conceptual threads of public policy and ethics are integrated within the content to help students to identify broader implications for prenatal care. Content includes theory and practice related to nurse-midwifery/ nurse practitioner management of the normal pregnant woman, and nurse-midwifery/ nurse practitioner management and strategies to reduce selected obstetric complications.

Taught by: Trout; Lewis, J.; Grube

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: NURS 781, 782

Corequisite: NURS 784

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 784 Health Care of Childbearing Women, Clinical

This course focuses on the management and evaluation of the childbearing women and their families in primary care settings. The course presents the opportunity to implement the role of the Nurse Practitioner with the childbearing woman and her family. The focus is on comprehensive physical, psychosocial and educational management of women and their families during pregnancy and postpartum.

Taught by: Trout; Lewis, J.; Grube

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: NURS 781, 782

Corequisite: NURS 783

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 785 Integration I

Intensive integration of theory and clinical practice in women's health care with emphasis on ambulatory care. Clinical practice in all areas of ambulatory women's health care, teaching rounds, case presentations, and seminars with professional colleagues.

Taught by: Stringer; McCool; Reale; Nagtalon-Ramos

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisites: NURS 783, 784

Activity: Clinic

1 Course Unit

NURS 786 Integration II: Midwifery Integration

Intensive integration of theory and clinical practice in women's health care with emphasis on intrapartum, postpartum, and newborn care. Clinical practice during the intrapartum and postpartum, teaching rounds, case presentations, and seminars with professional colleagues.

Taught by: McCool; Reale

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: NURS 783, 784

Corequisite: NURS 785

Activity: Clinic

1 Course Unit

NURS 787 Intrapartum / Postpartum / Newborn Care, Theory

Anatomy and physiology relevant to the care of the women and their families during the intrapartum, postpartum and newborn periods. Includes management of selected obstetrical emergencies and medical complications.

Taught by: McCool; Reale ; Stringer

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisites: NURS 783, 784

Corequisite: NURS 788

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 788 Intrapartum / Postpartum / Newborn Care, Clinical

Clinical care and management of women, newborns and their families during the intrapartum, postpartum and newborn periods. Includes management of selected obstetrical emergencies and medical complications. Clinical assignments related to module objectives.

Taught by: McCool; Reale

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 791 Clinical Fieldwork in Nurse Anesthesia Practice I

This course provides students the opportunity to integrate theory into practice within the clinical setting. The focus is on the development of diagnostic, therapeutic, ethical and cultural judgments with the perioperative patient. Students progress from the care of healthy patients undergoing minimally invasive surgical procedures to the more complex patient with multiple health issues. The student begins to develop an advanced practice nursing role that integrates role theory, nursing theory, and research knowledge through weekly seminars. Scope of practice, role development and nursing interventions will be introduced and explored in the classroom, and principles will be applied in the clinical practicum.

Taught by: Magro; Lynn; Briel

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

NURS 792 Clinical Fieldwork in Nurse Anesthesia Practice II

This course provides the opportunity for students to integrate theoretical knowledge and research finding into practice within the clinical setting. Students progress by providing anesthesia care for patients with more complex health problems. Techniques for managing the acute pain of clients are emphasized. Anesthetic requirements as dictated by patient assessment including the surgical procedure are studied in greater depth. The student now possesses the ability to combine theories and skills in selected clinical situations. The guidance of CRNA faculty preceptors contributes to the development of the student's critical thinking.

Taught by: Magro; Lynn; Briel

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: NURS 791

Activity: Seminar

2 Course Units

NURS 793 Clinical Fieldwork in Nurse Anesthesia Practice III

This course focuses on the delivery of anesthesia care within advanced nursing practice in a broad range of clinical situations for patients with multiple, complex health problems. Through refinement of asssessment and management skills, critical thinking is further developed. Students progress by providing anesthesia care for special populations of patients with simple and complex health problems. The guidance of CRNA faculty preceptors contributes to the development of the student's critical thinking. Collaborative practice within a care team model is emphasized and with supervision, the student assumes more overall responsibility for the quality of care for the patients throughout the perioperative experience.

Taught by: Magro; Lynn; Briel

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisite: NURS 792

Activity: Seminar

2 Course Units

Notes: 12 Week Summer Session

NURS 794 Nurse Anesthesia Residency I

This course is the first of two residencies that provide the nurse anesthetist student the opportunity to attain competencies within the Certified Registered Nurse Anesthesia (CRNA) scope of practice. Throughout the residency, the nurse anesthesia resident will utilize appropriate clinical judgment to manage the complex medical, physical and psychosocial needs of clients in the perioperative phases. Further refinement of the patient assessment, anesthesia administration, and critical thinking skills is emphasized. Students progress by providing anesthesia care for patients throughout the continuum of health care services. The guidance of CRNA faculty preceptors contributes to the development of the independence of the CRNA student. Collaborative practice within a care team model is emphasized and the student assumes more overall responsibility for the quality of care for the patients throughout the perioperative experience, with clinical support as required.

Taught by: Magro; Lynn; Briel

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: NURS 793

Activity: Seminar

2 Course Units

NURS 795 Nurse Anesthesia Residency II

This course is the second of two residencies that provide the nurse anesthetist student the opportunity to attain competencies within the Certified Registered Nurse Anesthesia (CRNA) scope of practice. Throughout the residency, the nurse anesthesia resident will utilize appropriate clinical judgment to manage the complex medical, physical and psychosocial needs of clients in the perioperative phases. Further refinement of the patient assessment, anesthesia administration, and critical thinking skills is emphasized. Students progress by providing anesthesia care for patients throughout the continuum of health care services. The guidance of CRNA faculty preceptors contributes to the development of the independence of the CRNA student. Collaborative practice within a care team model is emphasized and the student assumes more overall responsibility for the quality of care for the patients throughout the perioperative experience, with clinical support as required.

Taught by: Magro; Lynn; Briel

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: NURS 794

Activity: Seminar

2 Course Units

NURS 796 Diagnosis and Management of Adult Gerontology Acute Care Patients I

This on-line, didactic course is designed for the practicing nurse practitioner or clinical nurse specialist who seeks to gain additional knowledge and skills related to the care of adult gerontology acutely ill patients with a specific focus on cardiovascular and pulmonary systems, thoracic issues, infectious processes, wound healing and diabetes. Particular focus is placed on specific issues related to the older adult such as frailty, dehydration, loss of functional mobility, falls, and other geriatric syndromes.The basics of ECG, CXR and PFT interpretation, ABG analysis and ventilator modes are highlighted. This course examines the epidemiologic, assessment, diagnostic, management and evaluation of acutely or critically ill adults across the adult-older adult age spectrum. An evidence-based approach to nursing and medical management including pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic modalities is emphasized.

Taught by: Becker

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: For Streamlined Adult Gero Program Students Only

NURS 797 Diagnosis and Management of Adult Gerontology Acute Care Patients II

This online didactic course, designed for the practicing nurse practitioners or clinical nurse specialists seeking to gain knowledge and skills relative to care of adult gerontology acute care patients, focuses on the medical and surgical issues of the neurological, renal, gastrointestinal, hematological, oncologic and orthopedic systems. This course examines the epidemiology, assessment, diagnosis, management and evaluation of acutely or critically ill adults across the adult-older adult age spectrum. An evidence-based, interprofessional team approach to the nursing and medical management of patients is emphasized.

Taught by: Becker

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: For Streamlined Adult Gero Program Students Only

NURS 798 Adult Gerontology Acute Care NP: Professional Role & Clinical Practicum for Primary Care Prepared Providers

This online didactic course and accompanying clinical fieldwork focuses on issues essential to the implementation of the role of the Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner. Clinical fieldwork focuses on the unique assessment, diagnosis, management and evaluation of acutely, critically and complex chronically-ill adults, across the adult age continuum, experiencing acute, urgent and emergent conditions, using both physiologically and technologically derived data. Evaluating for physiologic instability and potential life-threatening conditions is emphasized. Attention is given to the typical and atypical presentation of syndromes and constellation of symptoms exhibited by adults and older adults experiencing complex acute, critical and complex chronic illness. Issues related to the transition of patients through the health care system are explored. Collaboration between the nurse practitioner, patient, family and interprofessional healthcare team are encouraged.

Taught by: Becker

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: NURS 796 completion

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For Streamlined Adult Gero Program Students Only

NURS 799 MSN Clinical Remediation

Students whose clinical performance would benefit from additional clinical exposure in order to demonstrate the expected competencies are, with course faculty and faculty advisor approval, eligible to register for NURS 799. This experience will be allotted no more than one credit unit and must be completed in a time frame not to exceed one academic semester. A course may be remediated only one time.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Clinic

1 Course Unit

NURS 800 Dissertation Seminar I

Advanced study and research in nursing leading to the completion of the dissertation proposal.

Taught by: Bowles, K.; Lake

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: NURS 750, 753, 754, 813, 2 semesters of Statistics, plus six concentration courses

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For doctoral students in nursing

NURS 803 Clinical Scholars in the Discipline of Nursing

This 2-semester course is designed to enhance the understanding of the practice of nursing as an intellectual discipline for doctoral students who have limited clinical practice experience prior to pursuing the PhD. It consists of individualized clinical experiences that are integrally related to the student's area of research interest and which are facilitated by clinician guides in a variety of settings. Students actively participate in seminars that focus on examining the health needs of individuals and vulnerable patients, the praxis of nursing and its place within the complex health care delivery system, health policy and society at large. Research informing practice and practice informing research are highlighted using the clinical practice experiences as case exemplars. NURS 803 is a course designed specifically for two groups of PhD students: the Hillman Scholars in Nursing Innovation and post-baccalaureate students completing an MS in passing who have limited clinical experience as a professional nurse. This course is designed to expose students to carefully selected clinical experiences that provide opportunities to build a clinical appreciation of the practice of nursing as an intellectual discipline, to gain an enhanced understanding of the health care delivery system, and to examine the intersection of research, policy, and practice at the frontlines of nursing practice. To this end, this course combines the clinical experiences with a weekly seminar facilitated to dissect common issues experienced by vulnerable patients and families across care settings and specialties, to critically examine the contributions of nursing science to that care, and to examine how the health care system contributes or detracts from optimal care.

Taught by: Clinican Educators from the Standing Faculty

Two terms. student must enter first term.

Prerequisite: Selection as a Hillman Scholar in Nursing Innovation or at the recommendation of the student's PhD academic advisor

Activity: Seminar

2 Course Units

Notes: First Fall-Spring post-BSN semesters in the PhD program for Hillman Scholars

NURS 811 Historical Thought in Nursing

A seminar open to enrolled doctoral students who plan to conduct historical research as some aspect of their program. Meets for one semester on a schedule determined by participants and faculty.

Taught by: Fairman

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For doctoral students in nursing

NURS 813 Qualitative Paradigm Empirical Nursing Research

Study of selected qualitative paradigm empirical research approaches, including design and methodology. Critique of selected qualitative research reports from the literature of nursing and related disciplines. Fieldwork exercise and research proposal required.

Taught by: Deatrick

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: NURS 750

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For doctoral students in nursing

NURS 814 Doctoral Seminar: Ethics and Nursing

A critical review of the theoretical and empirical literature dealing with bioethics, nursing ethics, moral development, women's ethics and specific ethical concerns in health and illness care. Students will study topics related to their own interests/needs, guided by the instructor in relation to the discipline of ethics.

Taught by: Deatrick

Course offered spring; odd-numbered years

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For doctoral students in nursing

NURS 817 Theoretical Perspectives of Growth and Development: A Health Care Perspective

This seminar will explore issues related to the theoretical perspectives of growth and development during childhood. Areas of emphasis will include: methodological issues related to research of childhood growth and development, the analysis of developmental data, and measurement issues common to research of development. Included in the discussion will be an analysis of theories in relationship to research of childhood development. The seminar will conclude with an agenda for future directions of research of growth and development.

Taught by: Medoff-Cooper; Deatrick; Lipman; O'Sullivan

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

NURS 818 Families and Research

This seminar will explore issues related to research of families. Included in the ongoing discussion will be an analysis of nursing and other theories in relationship to research of families. Methodological issues related to research of families will be discussed, as will the analysis of family data and measurement issues common to research of families. The seminar will conclude with an agenda for future directions to research of families.

Taught by: Deatrick

Course offered spring; even-numbered years

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For doctoral students in nursing

NURS 819 Seminar on the Social History of Nursing

This course will involve a guided review of the pertinent literature relating to the history of technology in 20th century America. The focus will include a critical examination and review of the social origins and implications of technological development and diffusion in healthcare. Various theoretical frameworks in the history of technology will be closely examined in attempt to assist the student in the development of their own framework.

Taught by: Fairman

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For doctoral students in nursing

NURS 821 Proseminar in Health Outcomes Research

This the first of a two-course sequence designed for doctoral students interested in conducting health outcomes research. The first course (821) focuses on conceptual, methodological, statistical, feasibility and data issues central to the conduct of health outcomes research; the second course (822) focuses on applying health outcomes research through the development and implementation of a research project. In the first course Penn faculty researchers will use their ongoing studies to illustrate how study design, sampling, measurement, and advanced statistical techniques can be employed to address the various challenges inherent in health outcomes research. In the second course, students will design and implement a health outcomes research project.

Taught by: Lake; Aiken

Course offered spring; odd-numbered years

Also Offered As: SOCI 821

Prerequisites: Prior coursework at undergraduate or masters level in statistics and quantitative methods.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

NURS 822 Applications of Health Outcome Research

This the second of a two-course sequence designed for doctoral students interested in conducting health outcomes research. The first course (821) focuses on conceptual, methodological,statistical, feasibility and data issues central to the conduct of health outcomes research; the second course (822) focuses on applying health outcomes research through the development and implementation of a research project. In the first course Penn faculty researchers will use their ongoing studies to illustrate how sampling, study design, measurement , and advanced statistical techniques can be employed to address the various challenges inherent in health outcomes research. In the second course, students will design and implement a health outcomes research project.

Taught by: Aiken

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: SOCI 822

Prerequisites: Prior coursework at undergraduate or masters level in statistics and quantitative methods, Nursing 821/Sociology 821 is preferred

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

NURS 823 Designing Interventions to Promote Health and Reduce Health Disparities

Advanced analysis, design and evaluation of interventions to promote health and reduce health disparities with a focus on underserved ulnerable minority or ethnic populations, through culturally competent research, education and clinical practice. Areas to be evaluated include: -- Health disparities as it relates to health promotion and disease prevention behavioral intervention research in vulnerable communities -- Concepts of marginalization, race, ethnicity, class, gender and culture as it relates to health disparities -- Social-psychological theoretical and research approaches related to developing culturally congruent health promotion interventions to reduce health disparities for vulnerable populations -- The use of elicitation, focus groups and ethnographic techniques to tailor health behavior theory to meet the needs of the population -- Culturally competent research methodologies, involving education and/or clinical practice, e.g. culturally competent measures, recruitment, retention, and informed consent in hard to reach populations -- Community participatory research as a strategy for working with the community to build research partnership and build capacity for sustained health promotion initiatives -- Health promotion intervention strategies for reducing health disparities in vulnerable communities -- Strategies to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions using randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in community and clinical settings -- Strategies for tailoring successful evidenced-based health promotion interventions to a variety of different populations for use in clinical trials and community settings -- Examine approaches for the translating and disseminating evidenced-based intervention research

Taught by: Jemmott; Teitelman

Course offered spring; odd-numbered years

Also Offered As: PUBH 539

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Doctoral Students Only

NURS 824 Health Equity: Conceptual, Linguistic, Methodological, and Ethical Issues

The course focuses on advanced analysis and evaluation of theories, concepts, and methods related to health equity. Topic areas include models and frameworks of health equity; linguistic choices related to equity, disparity, and vulnerability; role of economics, class, gender, sex, sexuality, race, and ethnicity; health equity in special populations; and issues in health policy, research ethics, and research methods. Emphasis is on advanced discourse and analysis of health equity theory and research.

Taught by: Sommers

Course offered fall; odd-numbered years

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For Doctoral Students Only

NURS 825 Proseminar on Integrative Science in Aging

Taught by: Cacchione; Ersek

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For Doctoral Students Only

NURS 826 Advanced Qualitative Research Methods

The course extends beginning qualitative research methods skills to a more advanced level. Students planning a dissertation or career focus in qualitative or mixed methods may use the course to refine interest and skill. The focus of the course centers on interactionist perspectives and collective analysis though methods tangential to these perspectives. Standpoint and participatory methods and analysis may be considered given sufficient student interest. Students are actively involved in selection and critique of seminal and critical readings. Students must have at their disposal a suitable dataset with commensurate permissions or have plans to collect qualitative data amenable to analysis during the course term. This data base can be from previous research proposals and fieldwork can be used as the building blocks for the course assignment(s). The course will focus on data collection, analyses, interpretation, and presentation of results. Skill building will center on collection and management of data; analytic technique including comparative, narrative, and text analysis; development and management of coding schemas; abstraction and development of situation specific theory; and dissemination and diffusion of findings, theories, and relevance to similar phenomena and use in practice.

Taught by: Kagan

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For Doctoral Students Only

NURS 827 Self-Care of Chronic Illness

This course introduces the history, definitions, predictors, measurement, and outcomes of self-care in chronic illness. Historical, classic and current literature from various disciplines will be studied to give students a broadened perspective of the self-care construct and the issues that patients face when dealing with chronic illness.

Taught by: Riegel

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For PhD Students Only

NURS 828 Response to Chronic Illness: Theory and Research

Millions of people of all ages live with chronic illness(es). A diagnosis of a chronic illness is a life-changing event, causing disruption and a sense of loss for many. Common early responses are stress, anxiety, depression, fear, and anger. Over time, with support and experience with the illness, many adjust. But, others report persistent feelings of loss due to physical, emotional, spiritual/existential, social, occupational, and/or financial influences of chronic illness. Those who adjust the best typically find a way to return a sense of normalcy to their lives. Loved ones and caregivers are equally affected by chronic illness and much has been written in recent years about caregiver burden. However, some individuals (caregivers and patients) report positive responses to illness, including a deepened purpose for living and a reordering of life priorities. The focus of this course is on individual responses to chronic illness- the person diagnosed and his/her loved ones. This course is intended to complement N818, which focuses on families and dyads dealing with chronic illness. In this course we will explore the major theoretical perspectives that underlie this field. The literature describing common responses of both those diagnosed and their loved ones as well as the social and cultural context that helps explain the responses of individuals facing chronic illness will be examined. Methods used to study chronic illness will be explored in depth.

Taught by: Riegel

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: Permission of faculty

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

NURS 829 Measurement of Physiologic Variables Related to Health Outcome Disparity

This graduate course is an advanced exploration of biometric methods (branch of science that includes the measurement of physiological variables and parameters) and their use in quantitative research. A particular focus will be on biological measures that can be used as outcome variables to evaluate interventions to promote health and health equity, and reduce health outcome disparities in vulnerable or marginalized populations. Areas to be evaluated include: * Measurement theory and instrument science as they relate to biological signals; role of biometrics in health outcome disparities research * Ethical considerations and how they relate to biometrics; mitigating perceived threats (profiling, stereotyping); the role of human subjects considerations; the responsible conduct of research * Derivation and types of biologic signals; time-based characteristics * Accuracy and precision of biologic measures; random and non-random error; application and exemplars of strategies to determine accuracy and precision * Role of biological rhythms in biometric measurement; analysis of multiple data points and repeated measures of biological variables * Methods relative to vulnerable women, children, and families: genetics; environmental contaminants; digital image analysis; hormones, metabolites; drugs and alcohol

Taught by: Sommers

Course offered fall; even-numbered years

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For Pre-Doctoral and Post-Doctoral students interested in describing health disparities and developing and testing interventions in vulnerable women, children, and families.

NURS 830 Conducting Research in Global Women's Health

An introduction to theoretical and methodological issues as they relate to conducting research in global women's health. Advanced analysis of historical, social, cultural, economic, political, technological and geographical contexts as they influence the health of girls and women across the lifespan and thier relation to health care systems as both clients and providers. This includes contextual issues that constrain the provisiond & receipt of adequate healthcare. A critical examination of theoretical and methodological issues pertaining to research on women and girls condcuted around the world across disciplines. A focused and intenstive exploration of place as it pertains to women and girls formal and informal structors of health care delivery as those needing and/or seeking health care, and as those providing health care to others. Students will examine the multiple dimensions and qualities of these endeavors (e.g. activity, power, control, visibility, value, and remuneration) and the intersection of gender and health - locally, globally and across borders. Students will focus thier examination on the implicaitons of seeking and providing health care for women's and girls' health and well-being. By examining issues in local and global contexts and across geographical boundaries, students will have the opportunity to challenge gendered, class, political, and cultural assumptions related to women's health.

Taught by: Teitelman

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: GSWS 830

Prerequisites: Completion of course in global health (this may include a reputable online course eg: Coursera), or equivalent background (eg. global health field experience). Permission of Instructor.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For graduate and professional students from any field with an interest in global women's health; Masters students by permission of instructor.

NURS 831 Advanced Topics in Health Informatics

This course is designed to survey a broad range of advanced topics in the field of health informatics. Course faculty and invited speakers will provide the content for weekly meetings conducted in a blended environment (both on-line and in the classroom). Each week, students will listen to a lecture and then participate in a group discussion. Approximately half of these lecture/discussion sessions will take place in a a "live" classroom, while the remainder will be available asynchronously in an online setting (i.e. using Blackboard). There will be no textbook, however each speaker will provide links to web-based resources that provide either background information or further elaboration of their topic. A group of students (depending upon size of class, probably 2-3 per topic) will take the lead for each topic, communicating with the speaker and facilitating the class discussion. As a final project, these student groups will also develop a more complete web resource for their selected topic.

Taught by: Bowles

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: NURS 651, NURS 551, SYS 528, or permission of instructor

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 832 Laboratory Based Biological Measures

This graduate course is an advanced, mentored exploration of biological measurement techniques used in nursing research. This course will provide an opportunity to gain a broad-based understanding of laboratory methodology, biomarkers, and translational research. Concepts of biological sample processing, storage, quality assurance and control and analysis will be covered. Laboratory measurements with a focus on genetic regulation of biomarkers related to stress, pain, and sleep/fatigue will be covered.

Taught by: Libonati; Muthukumaran

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: Biology, Chemistry, Physiology, and Permission of Instructor

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: For Doctoral and Post-Doctoral students interested in biobehavioral research laboratory techniques.

NURS 833 Measurement of Health-Related Behavior and Determinants

Taught by: Karen Glanz

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: This one semester seminar will provide a detailed overview of measurement of health-related behaviors and determinants of behavior. The course will cover ccharacteristics of measures, data collection, and how to apply the science of measurement to specific health research questions. The course will emphasize This one semester seminar will provide a detailed overview of measurement of hethe intersection of self-report measures with biological and physical measures,and the use of newer technologies to collect data and improve data quality. Students will integrate concepts and topics covered in the course as they work on a measurement project in their specific area(s) of interest and engage in problem-solving with their peers. This course is intended for doctoral studentand advanced masters-level students in the health sciences.

NURS 836 Patient-Reported Symptoms & Outcomes for Clinical Research

Patient-reported symptoms and outcomes are central to health science and have assumed increasing importance in the broader research arena. The research goal, conceptual clarity of variables, participant characteristics, instrument psychometrics, degree of coarseness/specificity, and participant burden are all essential to consider in selecting patient-reported symptom and outcome measures. This course focuses on linking study needs, design considerations, theoretical concepts, empirical measures, data collection strategies, and analytic approaches to patient-reported symptoms and outcomes for clinical research. Specific symptoms and outcomes examined in detail may include functional status, quality of life, health status, well-being, sleep, fatigue, weight, pain, shortness of breath, depression, stress, and nausea but each semester will be tailored to the research interests of the seminar participants.

Taught by: Richmond

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

NURS 837 Web-based Research Methodology

This doctoral elective course will provide an introduction to Web-based research methods in health-related disciplines. This course will examine research methods that have been adapted to the study of human subjects through the Web. This course will have particular emphasis on quantitative and qualitative empirical methods using the Web as a data collection medium. Another important feature of this course will be intensive analysis of ethical and methodological issues conducting research through the Web. Areas to be analyzed include: types of Web-based research; advantages and disadvantages of Web-based research; vehicles (e.g. funding, mentoring) that have supported Web-based research; human subject protection issues; issues/concerns in recruitment and data collection in Web-based research; and professional vehicles (e.g. scholarly publication, lay publications, speaking forums) that have helped disseminate the knowledge derived from Web-based research.

Taught by: Im

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisite: Enrollment in a Doctoral Program

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

NURS 851 Translating Evid To Prac

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 852 Translating Ev - Prac II

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

NURS 890 Nursing Doctoral Teaching Residency

The purpose of this required one semester teaching residency is to enhance the expertise of students in the role of educator. The residency will be tailored to the student's individual learning needs. At the minimum, students with no or minimal prior teaching experience will gain a beginning level of expertise in course planning, course evaluation, dealing with difficult student situations, test construction, paper assignment construction and grading, content delivery methods, as well as other aspects of the faculty teaching role. Students with more extensive teaching experience will tailor their residences with their residency supervisor to enhance their expertise in these various areas.

Taught by: Designated Member of the School of Nursing Grad Group

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

Notes: For Nursing Doctoral Students Only

NURS 897 Nursing Doctoral Research Residency

The purpose of this required one semester research residency is to enhance student research training early in the doctoral program by providing a mentored research experience. The residency is designed to be a tailored hands-on experience to provide students with exposure and the opportunity to participate in one or more aspects of an on-going research project. Research residencies are experiential activities designed to meet the student's individual learning needs. At the minimum, students with no or minimal prior research experience will gain a beginning level of experience on a variety of components of an ongoing research project. Students with more extensive research experience will tailor their residences with their residency supervisor to enhance their expertise in these various areas.

Taught by: Designated Member of the School of Nursing Grad Group

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

Notes: For Nursing Doctoral Students Only

NURS 900 Directed Study

Must be arranged with the written permission of the sponsoring faculty member prior to registration.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

NURS 995 Dissertation

Dissertation General Tuition

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Dissertation

1 Course Unit