Sociology (SOCI)

SOCI 001 Introduction to Sociology

Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Imoagene, Jacobs, Lareau, Wilde, Zuberi

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 002

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 002 Social Problems and Public Policy

This course approaches some of today's important social and political issues from a sociological vantage point. The course begins by asking where social problems come from. The main sociological perspectives of Marx, Weber and Durkheim are developed in connection with the issues of inequality, social conflict and community. We then turn to the social construction of social problems by examining how various issues become defined as social problems. This involves a consideration of the role of the media, social experts and social movements. The last section of the course considers how social problems are addressed. Here we discuss the relative strengths and weaknesses of government programs and regulations versus market-based approached. We also discuss the role of philanthropy and volunteerism. Finally, we consider the risk of unanticipated consequences of reforms. Along the way, we will consider a variety of social issues and social problems, including poverty, immigration, crime, global warming, and education.

Taught by: Bosk, Jacobs

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 003 Deviance and Social Control

A sociological analysis of the origins, development, and reactions surrounding deviance in contemporary society. Topics include labeling theory, stigma, social organization, tradition, social power, crime, sexual deviance, drug use, and racism. Theoretical and methodological issues will be discussed and evaluated.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Bosk

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 004 The Family

Most men and women get married during their lifetimes. In addition, most men and women become fathers and mothers at some point. This class presents social science evidence on the family. For example, it shows how "greedy" workplaces, which require long work hours, create work-family conflicts for husbands and wives. The class also illuminates how men and women have different experiences within families. The lectures will also examine how economic inequality shapes family life. Students will have the opportunity to apply key concepts to daily life. All are welcome.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Lareau, Staff

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: GSWS 004

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 005 American Society

What is American Society? The literary critic, Leslie Fielder once wrote,"...to be an American...precisely to imagine a destiny rather than to inherit one; since we have always been, insofar as we are Americans at all, inhabitants of myth rather than history..." In this course we will explore the elements of the myth that form the basis of the civil religion as well as the facts on the ground that contradict our conceptions of American Society. Examples of mythic elements and their contradiction that we will explore are: A nation founded to pursue liberty and freedom yet allowed slavery, equality of opportunity and persistent structural inequality, and a welcoming of the Immigrant coupled with a suspicion of the outsider.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: Bosk

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Also fulfills General Requirement in Society for Class of 2009 and prior

SOCI 006 Race and Ethnic Relations

The course will focus on race and ethnicity in the United States. We begin with a brief history of racial categorization and immigration to the U.S. The course continues by examining a number of topics including racial and ethnic identity, interracial and interethnic friendships and marriage, racial attitudes, mass media images, residential segregation, educational stratification, and labor market outcomes. The course will include discussions of African Americans, Whites, Hispanics, Asian Americans and multiracials.

Taught by: Charles, Zuberi

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 006, ASAM 006, URBS 160

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 007 Population and Society

The course serves as an introduction to the study of population and demography, including issues pertaining to fertility, mortality, migration, and family formation and structure. Within these broad areas we consider the social, economic, and political implications of current trends, including: population explosion, baby bust, the impact of international migration on receiving societies, population aging, racial classification, growing diversity in household composition and family structure, population and environmental degradation, and the link between population and development/poverty.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Flippen, Kohler, Zuberi

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: GSWS 007

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 008 Introduction to Political Sociology

This course will introduce students to sociological approaches to politics, broadly understood. The class will begin by discussing the nature of power and authority, the rise of the nation-state and the significance of nationalism. Later topics will include social movements, urban political regimes, globalization and transnationalism, citizenship, revolutions, and the rise (and fall?) of welfare states.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 010 Social Stratification

In this course we study the current levels and historical trends of inequality in the United States especially in cross-national comparative perspective. We discuss causes and consequences of inequality as well as various policy efforts to deal with inequality. Topics include intergenerational social mobility, income inequality, education, gender, race and ethnicity among others.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Jacobs, Staff

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 011 Urban Sociology

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the sociological study of urban areas. This includes more general topics as the rise of cities and theories urbanism, as well as more specific areas of inquiry, including American urbanism, segregation, urban poverty, suburbanization and sprawl, neighborhoods and crime, and immigrant ghettos. The course will also devote significant attention to globalization and the process of urbanization in less developed counties.

Taught by: Flippen

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 011, URBS 112

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 012 Globalization

This course analyses the current state of globalization and sets it in historical perspective. It applies the concepts and methods of anthropology, history, political economy and sociology to the analysis and interpretation of what is actually happening in the course of the semester that relates to the progress of globalization. We focus on a series of questions not only about what is happening but about the growing awareness of it and the consequences of the increasing awareness. In answering these questions we distinguish between active campaigns to cover the world (e.g. Christian and Muslim proselytism, free-trade agreements, democratization) and the unplanned diffusion of new ways of organizing trade, capital flows, tourism and remote interaction via the Internet. The body of the course deals with particular dimensions of globalization, reviewing both the early and recent history of each. The overall approach is historical and comparative, setting globalization on the larger stage of the economic, political and cultural development of various parts of the modern world. The course is taught collaboratively by an anthropologist, an historian, and a sociologist, offering the opportunity to compare and contrast distinct disciplinary approaches. It seeks to develop a general social-science-based theoretical understanding of the various historical dimensions of globalization: economic, political, social and cultural.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: Guillen, Spooner

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: ANTH 012, HIST 012

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 027 Introduction to Africana Studies

The aim of this course is to provide an interdisciplinary examination of the complex array of African American and other African Diaspora social practices and experiences. This class will focus on both classic texts and modern works that provide an introduction to the dynamics of African American and African Diaspora thought and practice.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: Charles, Zuberi

Two terms. student may enter either term.

Also Offered As: AFRC 001

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 033 Technology & Society

Technology plays an increasing role in our understandings of ourselves, our communities, and our societies, in how we think about politics and war, science and religion, work and play. Humans have made and used technologies, though, for thousands if not millions of years. In this course, we will use this history as a resource to understand how technologies affect social relations, and conversely how the culture of a society shapes the technologies it produces. Do different technologies produce or result from different economic systems like feudalism, capitalism and communism? Can specific technologies promote democratic or authoritarian politics? Do they suggest or enforce different patterns of race, class or gender relations? Among the technologies we'll consider will be large objects like cathedrals, bridges, and airplanes; small ones like guns, clocks and birth control pills; and networks like the electrical grid, the highway system and the internet.

For BA Students: Society Sector

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: STSC 003

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 041 Freshman Seminars

Two terms. student may enter either term.

Also Offered As: AFRC 041, GSWS 041, URBS 010

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Freshman Seminars. Topics vary from semester to semester. See Freshman Seminar and Sociology websites for current offerings.

SOCI 100 Introduction to Sociological Research

One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research.

Taught by: Armenta, Koppel, Park, Smith, Wilde

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HSOC 100

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 101 Bioethics

This course will take an historical approach to the development of modern bioethics, which is the study of ethical issues in medicine and the life sciences. The first part of the course will be devoted to an introduction to the standard principles of academic bioethics and the way they have structured the field over the last 35 years. We will then consider topics to which the principles have long been applied, such as the care of gravely ill newborns, death and dying, and the ethics of research involving human subjects. The last part of the course will address more recent life sciences policy areas including genetics, cloning, stem cells, biodefense, and neuroscience in relation to national security. Throughout the course I will emphasize the interplay between the development of bioethics and its cultural context.

Taught by: Moreno

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HSOC 102

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 103 Asian Americans In Contemporary Society

This class will introduce you to sociological research of Asian Americans and engage in the "model minority" stereotype. We begin by a brief introduction to U.S. immigration history and sociological theories about assimilation and racial stratification. The class will also cover research on racial and ethnic identity, educational stratification, mass media images, interracial marriage, multiracials, transracial adoption, and the viability of an Asian American panethnic identity. We will also examine the similarities and differences of Asian Americans relative to other minority groups.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ASAM 001

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 105 Indus Rel & Hum Res Mgmt

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 110 The Rich and The Poor

Who is rich? Who is poor? This course examines how wealth and income are distributed in the United States, and how its distribution affects individuals, groups, institutions, and society. We will gain a fuller understanding of what social class is and discuss how it affects all aspects of life, including: quality of schooling, access to employment, child rearing, and even tastes, preferences, and identity.

Taught by: Armenta, Lareau, Staff

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

0 Course Units

SOCI 111 Health of Populations

This course is designed to introduce students to the quantitative study of factors that influence the health of populations. Topics to be addressed include methods for characterizing levels of health in populations, comparative and historical perspectives on population health, health disparities, health policy issues and the effectiveness of interventions for enhancing the health of populations. These topics will be addressed both for developed and developing world populations. The course will focus on specific areas of health and some of the major issues and conclusions pertaining to those domains. Areas singled out for attention include chronic diseases and their major risk factors, such as smoking, physical activity, dietary factors and obesity. Throughout the course, the focus will be on determining the quality of evidence for health policy and understanding the manner in which it was generated.

Taught by: Elo, Kohler

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HSOC 111

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 112 Discrimination: Sexual and Racial Conflict

This course is concerned with the structure, the causes and correlates, and the government policies to alleviate discrimination by race and gender in the United States. The central focus of the course is on employment differences by race and gender and the extent to which they arise from labor market discrimination versus other causes, although racial discrimination in housing is also considered. After a comprehensive overview of the structures of labor and housing markets and of nondiscriminatory reasons (that is, the cumulative effects of past discrimination and/or experiences) for the existence of group differentials in employment, wages and residential locations, various theories of the sources of current discrimination are reviewed and evaluated. Actual government policies and alternatives policies are evaluated in light of both the empirical evidence on group differences and the alternative theories of discrimination.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Madden

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 112, GSWS 114

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 117 Sociology of Work

The material world is shaped and maintained through work, but so is the social world. How work is organized, allocated, and rewarded determines the opportunities people have for developing their own capacities, the kinds of ties they will have with others, and how much control they will have over their own lives. We will consider various sociological perspectives on work and compare alternative ways of organizing work, with a focus on the contemporary United States.

Taught by: Jacobs, Leidner

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 118 Sociology of Bioethics

The Sociology of Bioethics explores the sociological approach to bioethics. The Sociology of Bioethics is not a course in bioethics itself; rather than discussing the merits of a position (Is assisted suicide ethical?), we will ask how the debate has been framed, who is promoting which arguments, why the debate has arisen now, and how the issue is reflected in policy. In order to do so we will make use of social science research, along with philosophical treaties, legislation, and the popular media. The course is also not designed as a comprehensive treatment of the field; it will focus instead on choice topics that we will explore in depth. Our goal is to understand the nature of the bioethics profession and its modes of argumentation, and to explore the cultural, social, political, and professional underpinnings of bioethical debates.

Taught by: Bosk

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 120 Social Statistics

This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests.

Taught by: Allison, Charles, Guillot, Koppel, Park, Parrado

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 120

Activity: Recitation

0 Course Units

SOCI 122 The Sociology of Gender

Gender is an organizing principle of society, shaping social structures, cultural understandings, processes of interaction, and identities in ways that have profound consequences. It affects every aspect of people's lives, from their intimate relationships to their participation in work, family, government, and other social institutions and their place in the stratification system. Yet gender is such a taken for granted basis for differences among people that it can be hard to see the underlying social structures and cultural forces that reinforce or weaken the social boundaries that define gender. Differences in behavior, power, and experience are often seen as the result of biological imperatives or of individual choice. A sociological view of gender, in contrast, emphasizes how gender is socially constructed and how structural constraints limit choice. This course examines how differences based on gender are created and sustained, with particular attention to how other important bases of personal identity and social inequality--race and class-interact with patterns of gender relations. We will also seek to understand how social change happens and how gender inequality might be reduced.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Leidner

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: GSWS 122

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 125 Classical Sociological Theory

This course will cover the founding classics of the sociological tradition including works of Tocqueville, Marx and Engels, Weber, Durkheim, Mauss, Simmel, and G.H.Mead. We will also examine how the major traditions have continued and transformed into theories of conflict, domination, resistance and social change; social solidarity, ritual and symbolism; symbolic interactionist and phenomenological theory of discourse, self and mind. This course satisfies the theory requirement for sociology majors.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 126 Contemporary Sociological Theory

A review of theoretical perspectives developed since the second half of the 20th century. Includes micro-sociological perspectives of phenomenology, ethnomethodology, symbolic interactionism, and neo-Durkheimian interaction ritual theory; social behaviorism and exchange theory; neo-Weberian and neo-Marxian perspectives on power, conflict, and class; and attempts at synthesis by Habermas, Luhmann, and Giddens.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 128 Introduction to Demographic Methods

This course provides an introduction to basic demographic concepts, data, indicators, and techniques. The course emphasizes hands-on applications of techniques in the analysis of population dynamics in the U.S. and elsewhere. Students will learn about the main sources of demographic data, including censuses, surveys, and vital statistics, and methods to estimate demographic processes (e.g. mortality, fertility). Students will leave the course with a solid grounding in a) the sources and limitations of demographic data; b) the construction of basic demographic indicators; and c) appropriate use of basic demographic techniques to answer questions about human populations.

Taught by: Elo, Hannum, Smith

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 134 Health and Social Policy

Health and Social Policy is an interdisciplinary course examining health care and social policy from domestic and international perspectives. The course is designed to engage students in critical thinking about social determinants of health, the organization and outcomes of health care systems and institutions, global health priorities and challenges, and the implications for public policy. Topics include the social inequalities and health; how organizational context of health care impacts outcomes; management of human resources in health nationally and globally; analysis of medical error, its causes, and consequences; review and critique of public policies in U.S. health care; and global health priorities and international health policy. Issues of current public debate in health and health care will provide a context for learning. There are no prerequisites. The course is intended for general lists as well as for those planning careers in health care.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Aiken, Lake

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: NURS 134

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 135 Law and Society

After introducing students to the major theoretical concepts concerning law and society, significant controversial societal issues that deal with law and the legal systems both domestically and internationally will be examined. Class discussions will focus on issues involving civil liberties, the organization of courts, legislatures, the legal profession and administrative agencies. Although the focus will be on law in the United States, law and society in other countries of Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America will be covered in a comparative context. Readings included research reports, statutes and cases.

Taught by: Bosk, Fetni

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 135

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 137 The Sociology of Media and Popular Culture

This course relies on a variety of sociological perspectives to examine the role of media and popular culture in society, with a particular emphasis on the power of the mass media industry, the relationship between cultural consumption and status, and the social organization of leisure activities from sports to shopping.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Grazian

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Also fulfills General Requirement in Arts Letters for Class of 2009 and prior

SOCI 140 Social Conflict

This course will emphasize violent conflict, what leads up to it, and what determines whether it actually happens or not. Micro-sociological observations of conflict and violence as it appears in real-life observations, photos and videos. Topics include: fights and brawls; military combat; crowd and crowd-control violence; bullying and holdups; fair fights and dueling; carousing; sports violence; police violence; gangs violence; terrorist and clandestine violence; school and workplace rampages.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 143 Modern Social Movements

Throughout modern times groups of people have come together in an attempt to change their social world. Their successes and failures teach us about society, organizations, and individuals. This course will examine case studies of historical and contemporary social movements. Using these case studies, this course will evaluate different approaches to understanding social movements, and investigate what these different approaches suggest about individuals, the society in which they live, and the potential for social change.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 152 American Health Policy

This lecture course will introduce students to a broad range of topics that fall under the heading of American health policy. Its main emphasis will be on the history of health care in America from the U.S. Civil War to Obamacare. The primary objective of the course will be to consider why the U.S., until very recently, remained one of the only industrialized nations to have a private, non-nationalized health care system. Some of the themes addressed include: private health insurance(such as Blue Cross/Blue Shield), industrial health and workmen's compensation, the welfare state (in Europe, Canada, and the U.S.), women's health, especially maternal and infant care programs, Medicare/Medicaid, the Clinton Health Plan of 1993, injured soldiers and the Veterans Administration.

Taught by: Linker

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: HSOC 150

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 153 Lang & Social Identity

Also Offered As: LING 152

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 154 Afro-Latinos in the U.S.

This course will explore the arrival, establishment and contributions of free and enslaved Africans in Ibero-America, the region presently known as Latin America, and the Spanish Speaking Caribbean. It will look at how these actors and their descendants known today as Afro-Latinos, shaped and built the foun- dations of Latin American society and culture throughout the centuries from colonial period to present. The course will seek to understand Afro-Latinos' agency and negotiations as intellectual contributors to the ideologies that led to independence and the creation of Latin American nations. Likewise, the course will also explore the accomplishments, controversies and tensions in race dynamics and politics, gender relations, socio-economic issues, among others factors that took and continue to take place as people of African descent negotiate their identity and struggle to uphold their space in Latin America and the U.S.A. today.

Also Offered As: LALS 155

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 161 The History of the Information Age

Certain new technologies are greeted with claims that, for good or ill, they must transform our society. The two most recent: the computer and the Internet. But the series of social, economic and technological developments that underlie what is often called the Information Revolution include much more than just the computer. In this course, we explore the history of information technology and its role in contemporary society. We will explore both the technologies themselves--calculating machines, punched card tabulators, telegraph and telephone networks, differential analyzers, digital computers, and many others--and their larger social, economic and political contexts. To understand the roots of these ideas we look at the prehistory of the computer, at the idea of the post-industrial or information society, at parallels with earlier technologies and at broad historical currents in the United States and the world.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: STSC 160

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 162 Environmental Sociology

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 163 Educational Inequality

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 175 Medical Sociology

This course will give the student an introduction to the sociological study of medicine. Medical sociology is a broad field, covering topics as diverse as the institution and profession of medicine, the practice of medical care, and the social factors that contribute to sickness and well-being. Although we will not explore everything, we will attempt to cover as much of the field as possible through four thematic units: (1) the organization and development of the profession of medicine, (2) the delivery of health-care, especially doctor-patient interaction, (3) the social and cultural factors that affect how illness is defined, and (4) the social causes of illness. The class will emphasize empirical research especially but not only quantitative research.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Schnittker

Also Offered As: HSOC 275

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 200 Criminal Justice

This course examines how the criminal justice system responds to crime in society. The course reviews the historical development of criminal justice agencies in the United States and Europe and the available scientific evidence on the effect these agencies have on controlling crime. The course places an emphasis on the functional creation of criminal justice agencies and the discretionary role decision makers in these agencies have in deciding how to enforce criminal laws and whom to punish. Evidence on how society measures crime and the role that each major criminal justice agency plays in controlling crime is examined from the perspective of crime victims, police, prosecutors, jurors, judges, prison officials, probation officers and parole board members. Using the model of social policy evaluation, the course asks students to consider how the results of criminal justice could be more effectively delivered to reduce the social and economic costs of crime.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: MacDonald

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: CRIM 200

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 221 Sample Survey Methods

This course provides an introduction to survey data collection. In meeting this objective, we examine the major planning tasks necessary for conducting surveys, including problem formulation, study design, questionnaire and interview design, pretesting, sampling, interviewer training and field management, code development and coding of data, and data cleaning and management. We critically explore the design of surveys and collection of data from epistemological and ethical perspectives. Students will leave the class with a solid understanding of the basic process of survey data collection and a familiarity with its strengths and weaknesses as a method of inquiry into human behavior.

Taught by: Hannum, Parrado

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 222 Field Methods of Sociological Research

This course is designed to introduce students to field methods in sociological research, with a focus on participant-observation and interviewing. During this course, students will read original research based on field methods and discuss their strengths, limitations, and ethical dilemmas. Most importantly, students will design their own research projects and become ethnographers and interviewers. Students will be guided through the fieldwork process from data collection to analysis, and will turn in multiple assignments and original research paper.

Taught by: Armenta, Bosk, Koppel, Lareau

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 233 Criminology

This introductory course examines the multi-disciplinary science of law-making, law-breaking, and law-enforcing. It reviews theories explaining where, when, by whom and against whom crimes happen. Police, courts, prisons, and other institutions are also critically examined. This course meets the general distribution requirement.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Adler

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: CRIM 100

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 235 Law and Social Change

Beginning with discussion of various perspectives on social change and law, this course then examines in detail the interdependent relationship between changes in legal and societal institutions. Emphasis will be placed on (1) how and when law can be an instrument for social change, and (2) how and when social change can cause legal change. In the assessment of this relationship, emphasis will be on the laws of the United States. However, laws of other countries and international law relevant to civil liberties, economic, social and political progress will be studied. Throughout the course, discussions will include legal controversies relevanat to social change such as issues of race, gender and the law. Other issues relevanat to State-Building and development will discussed. A comparative framework will be used in the analysis of this interdependent relationship between law and social change.

Taught by: Fetni

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 235, SOCI 460

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 238 Media Culture & Society in Contemporary China

This course studies contemporary Chinese media, culture, and society in the context of globalization. Major topics include Internet expression and censorship, mass media commercialization, entertainment media, middle class and consumerism, environmental degradation, new forms of inequality, and civil society and popular protest. Taking a sociological approach, this course introduces methods and theories for analyzing media, institutions, inequality, and social change.

Taught by: Yang

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: COMM 203

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 239 Sociology of Religion

Classic theory of religion in Durkheim and Weber, as well as contemporary theories of religious movements. Topics include ritual, magic, and mystical experience; religious ethics and salvation beliefs; the dynamics of cults, sects and mainstream churches; origins, expansion and decline of religions; religions and social class; religions and politics. The spectrum of religions in the contemporary United States will be examined, as well as historical comparisons.

Taught by: Wilde

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 252 Human Rights

Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and the world. We live in a world of diverse and conflicting values in which human rights and respect for human dignity have provided a platform for convergence. One important instance of such convergence has been the development of international norms prohibiting genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes and ethnic cleansing. While there is agreement on fundamental principles as reflected in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, differences in interpretation remain. A platform for convergence requires the engagement of a number of constituencies, in particular, state and inter-state entities, corporations, civil society and individuals, as well as the mutual reinforcement of their rights and duties. This course will critically cover the history, practice and social significance of human rights.

Taught by: Zuberi

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 252

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 254 Cities, Suburbs, Regions

This course will explore the political, economic, social, and demographic forces impacting development patterns in metropolitan areas, with a particular focus on Philadelphia. We will examine the government policies, economic forces, and social attitudes that affect the way a region grows, and the impact of these forces on poverty, equity and segregation. Specific topics to be discussed include the factors that make a region competitive, the city's changing role in the region, the impact place has on opportunity, and approaches to revitalizing and improving communities.

Taught by: Black

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: URBS 253

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 259 Social Determinants of Health

Over the last century, we have witnessed dramatic historical change in population incidence and mortality, e.g. rising numbers of women diagnosed withbreast cancer and dramatic declines in death from stomach cancer. There has also been a highly visible social patterning of health and disease, such as socio-economic disparities in AIDS, substance abuse, and asthma in the U.S. today or the association of breast cancer with affluence globally. This course will explore the way researchers, activists, politicians and others in different eras have made sense of these changes and patterns and have responded to them. The course is historical and sociological. At the same time that we examine evidence and theories about the way poverty, affluence, and other social factors influence individual and population health, we will try to understand how social and historical forces have shaped how health and disease have been understood and categorized. In examining our current obesity "epidemic," for example, we will not only consider evidence and claims made about the causal role of market forces and changes in the built environment, but ask why (besides the fact that we are heavier) obesity has become such a visible and important medical and public health issue in the U.S. today.

Taught by: Aronowitz

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: HSOC 260

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 260 Cyberculture

Computers and the internet have become critical parts of our lives and culture.In this course, we will explore how people use these new technologies to develop new conceptions of identify, build virtual communities and affect political change. Each week we'll see what we can learn by thinking about the internet in a different way, focusing successively on hackers, virtuality, community, sovereignty, interfaces, algorithms and infrastructure. We'll read books, articles, and blogs about historical and contemporary cultures of computing, from Spacewar players and phone phreaks in the 1970s to Google, Facebook, World of Warcraft, WikiLeaks, and Anonymous today. In addition, we'll explore some of these online communities and projects ourselves and develop our own analyses of them.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: STSC 260

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 264 Poverty, Race and Health

This course is designed to introduce students to current literature on race/ethnic difference in health and mortality in the United States, covering such topics as explanations for why some race/ethnic groups fare better than others, how inner city poverty and residential segregation may contribute to racial/ethnic differences in health outcomes, and health of immigrants versus native-born populations. Current policy debated and recent policy developments related to health are also briefly discussed. The course is organized as a seminar with a combination of lectures and class discussions.

Taught by: Elo

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: URBS 264

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 266 Latinos in United States

This course presents a broad overview of the Latino population in the United States that focuses on the economic and sociological aspects of Latino immigration and assimilation. Topics to be covered include: construction of Latino identity, the history of U.S. Latino immigration, Latino family patterns and household structure, Latino educational attainment. Latino incorporation into the U.S. labor force, earnings and economic well-being among Latino-origin groups, assimilation and the second generation. The course will stress the importance of understanding Latinos within the overall system of race and ethnic relations in the U.S., as well as in comparison with previous immigration flows, particularly from Europe. We will pay particular attention to the economic impact of Latino immigration on both the U.S. receiving and Latin American sending communities, and the efficacy and future possibilities of U.S. immigration policy. Within all of these diverse topics, we will stress the heterogeneity of the Latino population according to national origin groups (i.e. Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, and other Latinos), as well as generational differences between immigrants and the native born.

Taught by: Parrado, Armenta

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: LALS 235

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 270 The Immigrant City

Immigration is among the most important yet controversial forces shaping cities, regions, and neighborhoods. The diversity of immigrant and receiving communities means that the dynamics and impacts of migration are varied and complex. This course examines the development of immigrant and receiving communities in the United States. It surveys public policy and community and economic development practices related to migration at the local, regional, national, and trans-national scale. Class readings, discussions, and visits to Philadelphia's immigrant neighborhoods explore themes including labor markets, housing experiences, political mobilization, civil society, cultural preservation, and the built environment. The first half of the course surveys migration and community formation among a broad range of ethnic groups in different parts of the city and suburbs, mainly through history, sociology, and geography; the second half focuses on specific policy and community and economic development initiatives. Ultimately, the class aims to provide students with 1) a broad knowledge of immigration and its impacts on cities and regions; 2) an in-depth understanding of urban policies and institutions working on immigration in U.S. cities; and 3) familiarity with community and economic development strategies for migrant and receiving communities.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Hanson, R. Scott

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: URBS 270

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 275 Medical Sociology

This course will give the student an introduction to the sociological study of medicine. Medical sociology is a broad field, covering topics as diverse as the institution and profession of medicine, the practice of medical care, and the social factors that contribute to sickness and well-being. Although we will not explore everything, we will attempt to cover as much of the field as possible through four thematic units: (1) the organization and development of the profession of medicine, (2) the delivery of health-care, especially doctor-patient interaction, (3) the social and cultural factors that affect how illness is defined, and (4) the social causes of illness. The class will emphasize empirical research especially but not only quantitative research.

Taught by: Schnittker

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HSOC 275

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 277 Mental Illness

This course is designed to give a general overview of how sociologists study mental illness. We will be concerned with describing the contributions of sociological research and exploring how these contributions differ from those of psychology, psychiatry, and social work. This overview will be done in three parts: we will discuss (i) what "mental illness" is, (ii) precisely how many Americans are mentally ill, (iii) how social factors (e.g. race, gender, class) and social arrangements (e.g. social networks) lead to mental illness, and (iv) how we as a society respond to and treat the mentally ill. Throughout the course, we will be concerned with uncovering the assumptions behind different definitions of mental health and exploring their political, social, and legal implications.

Taught by: Schnittker

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HSOC 277

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 280 Social Issues in Contemporary China

China's transition to a market-oriented society has effected fundamental changes in the lives of citizens. This class will consider pressing social concerns that China must struggle to address as it continues down the path of market reforms. Using topical problems to illustrate broader issues of social inequality along lines of gender, ethnicity, residence status, and poverty status, we will consider questions such as the following: How are women and men faring differently in China's new labor market and workplaces? Are rural peasants and the emerging underclass of urban laid-off workers being left behind by market transition? How are minorities faring in China's transition? How does the emerging digital divide play into the dichotomies of east-west and urban-rural in China? What is the plight of millions of "floaters" migrating into China's cities, with minimal legal rights and protections? Can China's rapidly-changing public health system handle emerging diseases such as SARS and AIDS? How has the one-child policy affected women, children, and society in China? Who are the "missing girls" of China, and what are the social implications of their disappearance? How was the welfare of children and adolescents changed with market reforms? The class will combine lectures, academic readings, case studies, films, and discussions.

Taught by: Hannum

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 282 Knowledge and Social Structure

This course focuses on science in various institutional contexts and discusses situations ranging widely over time and place. We consider examples drawn from the seventeenth century to the present, the social settings in which science is found (e.g. the prince's court, the society of amateurs, the university, the academic laboratory, industry and in the field, outdoors), and the effects of changes in publishing and patronage. For comparative purposes, we also consider such phenomena as the symphony orchestra, the art market, motion pictures, and literature. Assigned authors range from time-honored authorities, such as Robert Merton, to science writers for The New Yorker.

For BA Students: Humanities and Social Science S

Taught by: Kuklick

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: STSC 288

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 299 Independent Study

Directed readings and research in areas of sociology. Permission of instructor needed.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

SOCI 300 Thesis Workshop

The purpose of this course is to guide senior sociology majors in writing a research proposal for a senior honors thesis. Students will learn about various research approaches, how to write a focused literature review, and kinds of data necessary to answer a wide variety of research questions, including their own. Throughout the course, students will work on designing a research question, generation researchable hypotheses, and coming up with a design for their proposed study. The final paper for this course will be a research proposal that is the basis for students' independent research project. This course satisfies the research requirement for sociology majors and is designed primarily for seniors who are planning to write an honors thesis.

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: SOCI 100

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 322 Advanced Topics in Gender and Sexuality Studies

Violence against Women in Conflict: Sexuality, Terrorism, and Human Rights This course explores how women's experiences of violence in conflict are guided by traditional patriarchal views of femininity, and further how this violence impacts their human rights. Through academic texts, documents produced by the U.N. and NGOs globally, and documentaries, we will consider women's experiences of violence in contexts such as: how rape is used to decipher the borders and boundaries of emerging nations, as in the 1994 genocide in Rwanda; the highly complex experiences of women suicide bombers in the Israeli-Palestinian and Sri Lankan conflicts; the relationship between domestic violence in the private/home space and the violence of war in the public space; and sexual violence against women in the U.S. military.

Also Offered As: GSWS 322

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 330 Special Topics

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 387, ITAL 300

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 340 Special Topics AFRC Stud

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 387

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 380 Neighborhood Dynamics of Crime

Crime varies in time, space and populations as it reflects ecological structures and the routine social interactions that occur in daily life. Concentrations of crime can be found among locations, with antisocial activities like assaults and theft occurring at higher rates because of the demographic make-up of people (e.g. adolescents) or conflicts (e.g. competing gangs), for reasons examined by ecological criminology. Variation in socio-demographic structures (age, education ratios, and the concentration of poverty) and the physical environment (housing segregation, density of bars, street lighting) predicts variations between neighborhoods in the level of crime and disorder. Both ethnographic and quantitative research methods are used to explore the connections between the social and physical environment of areas and antisocial behavior.

Taught by: Loeffler

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: CRIM 280

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 398 Senior Research

Senior Research is for senior sociology majors only. Students are assigned Sociology advisors with assistance from Undergraduate Chair.

Taught by: Sociology Faculty

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

SOCI 399 Independent Study

Independent study section for senior Sociology majors working on an honors thesis. Students are assigned an advisor by the undergraduate chair.

Taught by: Sociology Faculty

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

SOCI 410 Research Seminar in Experiments in Crime and Justice

This seminar focuses on examining data from experiments in criminology including: randomized controlled trials of criminal justice policies, "natural" experiments in crime, and other quasi-experimental studies. A series of experiments conducted by Penn scholars and elsewhere will be examined. This seminar also guides criminology majors in writing a research proposal for their thesis. Students will learn about how to formulate a research question, develop a review of the literature, and how to apply necessary empirical methods. The final paper for this course will be a research proposal that can serve as the basis for the student's senior thesis and to satisfy the senior capstone requirement. Readings will come from the disciplines of criminology, sociology, psychology, economics, and urban planning.

Taught by: Loeffler

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: CRIM 410

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 411 Field Observations in Criminal Courts

The course will serve as an introduction both to qualitative research and to an understanding of the routine workings of the courts in Philadelphia. After a brief discussion of the theoretical underpinnings and practical techniques of ethnography, students will undertake supervised field projects leading to the writing of 5000 words long, examined research reports about different aspects of the social organization of the courthouse and court room.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 420 Perspectives on Urban Poverty

This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to 20th century urban poverty, and 20th century urban poverty knowledge. In addition to providing an historical overview of American poverty, the course is primarily concerned with the ways in which historical, cultural, political, racial, social, spatial/geographical, and economic forces have either shaped or been left out of contemporary debates on urban poverty. Of great importance, the course will evaluate competing analytic trends in the social sciences and their respective implications in terms of the question of what can be known about urban poverty in the contexts of social policy and practice, academic research, and the broader social imaginary. We will critically analyze a wide body of literature that theorizes and explains urban poverty. Course readings span the disciplines of sociology, anthropology, urban studies, history, and social welfare. Primacy will be granted to critical analysis and deconstruction of course texts, particularly with regard to the ways in which poverty knowledge creates, sustains, and constricts meaningful channels of action in urban poverty policy and practice interventions.

Taught by: Fairbanks

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: URBS 420

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 430 Advanced Topics in Sociology

Upper level advance topics vary from semester to semester.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 431, AFRC 630, COMM 496, SOCI 630

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 431 Modern Mexican Society

An introduction to social, political, and economic organization of modern Mexico. This course traces to evolution of Mexico's fundamental societal institutions from their birth during the Mexican Revolution of 1910, through their flowering during the 1950's and 1960's, to recent changes under neoliberal administrations. The course ends with a discussion of Mexico's transition to democracy and the election of the first opposition President in 80 years.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: HIST 233, LALS 431

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 435 Globalization & The City

Over the past two decades, the public imagination has been gripped by the concept of globalization. Scholars, corporations, advertisers and government officials have latched onto this idea as a defining feature of our current era. These various constituencies use globalization not only to account for epochal shifts in our economy and society, but also to justify new types of business strategy and public policy. This course will examine three interlinked dimensions of globalization: Global economic processes (e.g. the transnational operations of multinational firms that have given rise to a new international division of labor); cultural globalization (e.g. the spread of American brands like Coca Cola, Nike and Hollywood films), and political globalization (e.g. the rise of supranational organizations like the IMF, World Bank and WTO that promote the idea of free markets). Moreover, we will study globalization in the context of cities because, given their centrality to globalization processes, it is in cities that we can best understand how globalization takes place. In cities, we can study the global economic processes that restructure urban space, giving rise to new financial districts, international art exhibits and post-modern architecture and entrepreneurial strategies that seek to elevate cities to world city status. The course will examine these processes in a comparative light, contrasting urban globalization processes in Europe and North America with those in Latin America, Asia and Africa.

Taught by: Shankar

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: URBS 457

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 436 Culture, Arts and Media in Urban Context

The purpose of this academic-based service learning course is to examine the development of art, culture and media in cities, with an emphasis on how cultural organizations operate in the urban environment. Through classroom readings and discussions, students will explore a variety of sociological approaches to the analysis of urban culture and the creative economy, local arts and entertainment, new media technology and public policy. In addition, students will conduct several hours per week of community service in one of a variety of local nonprofit arts and other cultural institutions in Philadelphia.

Taught by: Grazian

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 438 SOCIAL SCIENCE STUDIO: IMMIGRANTS MAKE THE CITY

How do American cities grow? Studies of urban transformation have focused on anchor institutions, the growth model of big business-generated employment, and "creative class" gentrification. After decades of decline, many major cities like Philadelphia are seeing gains in population again, as well as new commercial activity and street life, spurred by the influx of new immigrant communities. Yet few scholars have asked: What role do immigrants play in the current revival of the American metropolis? In this Social Science Studio course, 16 students will work collaboratively as in a design studio to conduct research that can answer this important social-scientific question. Students will work on independent projects that engage multiple methods and fields to produce new types of knowledge. They will be introduced to multiple methods drawn from architecture, planning, anthropology and political science, including mapping, interviewing, fieldnotes, socio-economic surveys, sketching, photography and web design to develop independent projects. No prior knowledge is required but students with experience in GIS, STATA, photography, drawing or web design are encouraged to apply.

Taught by: Choudhury, Kushanava

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 450 Online Topics

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HIST 455

Activity: Online Course

1 Course Unit

SOCI 453 Metropolitan Growth and Poverty

This course analyzes the role of metropolitan regions in the U.S. and global economies, including the sources of metropolitan productivity, the ways that metropolitan structures affect residents, and analyses of public policy in metropolitan areas. The economic, political, and social forces that have shaped World War II urban and regional development are explored, including technology, demography, and government. Special attention is paid to how metropolitan change affects residents by income and race. Topics include: gentrification, schools, suburbanization, sprawl, metropolitan fragmentation, concentration of poverty, race, and various economic revitalization initiatives.

Taught by: Madden

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: URBS 453

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 460 Advanced Topics in Africana Studies

Advanced Topics in Africana Studies: The Sociology of W E B Du Bois; GIS for Social Science Research

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 420, AFRC 620, SOCI 235, SOCI 235, SOCI 660

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 473 Community Organizing: History and Theory

Power is the ability to create change. This course will integrate the history and theories of community organizing so that each student will be able to develop a transformational praxis. We will examine social inequality and intersectionality, and explore effective strategies in organizing for social change. This course is inter-disciplinary, involving political economy, sociology, history, social work and leadership theory. Inquiry-based and problem-posing methods will serve as the primary means of formative assessment.

Taught by: Becker

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: URBS 473

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 488 Culture, Sexuality and Global Health

What, if anything, is global in "global health"? Whatever this field might be,it is more often than not actively produced through a range of conflicting ethical commitments of multiple expert cultures, social movements and laypersons. This course explores critical themes in the historical and sociocultural study of global health. Students will engage a number of disciplinary perspectives within the social sciences including the history, sociology, and anthropology of science, and we will pay particular attention to feminist, queer, and postcolonial science studies perspectives. Throughout, we will consider how both global and local cultural transformations have shaped the emergence of this multidisciplinary field of study. To understand the complexity of global health, students will engage with a number of theoretical and ethnographic texts while questioning its stability and coherence as a self-same object given its interdisciplinary character. In doing so, we will explore the ways in which diverse sets of interests converge to constitute as well as contest the ever-shifting boundaries of global health.

Taught by: Fiereck

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: GSWS 488

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 494 Mla Prosem:Global Health

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 524 Advanced Topics in the Sociology of the Family

The course will review a series of theoretical issues in the sociology of the family and examine major empirical studies in which theoretical advances have been made. Special attention will be given to work that has a historical and comparative perspective. Opportunities will be provided for original research on the family.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: DEMG 524

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 530 Advanced Selected Topics

Topics vary from semester to semester. Courses offered in the past were Social Movements and Social Change; Critical Race Theory; Conducting Family Research; Mistakes, Errors, Accidents and Disasters; Sociology of Jewish Bioethics.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 533, LALS 530

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 535 Quantitative Methods in Sociology I

This course is an introduction to the practice of statistics in social and behavioral sciences. It is open to beginning graduate students and--with the permission of the instructor--advanced undergraduates. Topics covered include the description of social science data, in graphical and non-graphical form; correlation and other forms of association, including cross-tabulation; bivariate regression; an introduction to probability theory; the logic of sampling; the logic of statistical inference and significance tests. There is a lecture twice weekly and a mandatory "lab."

Taught by: Allison, Smith

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: DEMG 535

Prerequisite: Basic algebra

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 536 Quantitative Methods in Sociology II

As the second part of a two-semester sequence, this graduate course focuses on regression analysis as used in social science research. In particular, we discuss features and assumptions of linear regression and logistic regression models. We learn how to apply regression models to real social science data using Stata and how to interpret the results.

Taught by: Allison, Kohler, Park, Schnittker, Smith

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: DEMG 536

Prerequisite: SOCI 535 or permission of instructor

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 541 Gender, the Labor Force, and Markets

Drawing from sociology, economics and demography, this course examines the causes and effects of gender differences in labor force participation, earnings and occupation in the United States and in the rest of the developed and developing world. Differences by race, ethnicity and sexual preference are also considered. Theories of labor supply, marriage, human capital and discrimination are explored as explanations for the observed trends. Finally, the course reviews current labor market policies and uses the theories of labor supply, marriage, human capital and discrimination to evaluate their effects on women and men.

Taught by: Madden

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: DEMG 541, GSWS 532

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 542 Work and Gender

This seminar examines the relevance of gender to the organization and experience of paid and unpaid work. Combining materialist and social constructionist approaches, we will consider occupational segregation, the relation of work and family, gender and class solidarity, the construction of gender through work, race and class variation in work experiences, and related topics.

Taught by: Leidner

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: GSWS 542

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 546 Feminist Theory

Feminist activists and academics have posed fundamental challenges to existing approaches to social theory. This seminar explores the development of feminist theory since the 1960s, focusing on approaches that have the most relevance for social science. The relations among feminist theorizing, research, and activism will be emphasized.

Taught by: Leidner

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: GSWS 546

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 550 Social Inequality

This course will study social stratification primarily in contemporary societies. We will examine both the distribution of social rewards as well as process for the allocation of these rewards. Stratification theory and research on social mobility will be considered. Topics include the influence of education, race and gender, and structural and organizational factors on individual success. Acquaintance with stratification theory and quantitative methods would be helpful but not required.

Taught by: Jacobs

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 553 Field Methods in Qualitative Research

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to basic skills and concepts in ethnographic field research, including participant observation, interviewing, field documentation, and the scholarly presentation of qualitative data. Students will learn to apply these skills and concepts through an assigned set of exercises in concert with a semester-long project based on intensive fieldwork at a research site of their choosing. In addition, we will examine exemplars of published fieldwork in both classical and contemporary sociology. Students outside of the Department of Sociology need permission of the instructor to enroll.

Taught by: Bosk, Grazian, Lareau

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 555 Pro-Seminar in Sociological Research

In the non-credit seminar students will be introduce to key areas in sociological research, and a set of professional skills necessary to navigate graduate school and a successful academic career. Students will also be introduced to faculty and resources available at Penn. This course is required for all first-year graduate students in Sociology

Taught by: Hannum, Jacob, Kao, Leidner, Smith

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

0 Course Units

SOCI 556 Pro-Seminar in Sociological Research II

This graduate seminar for first-year graduate students will be a two-semester course covering the major subfields of sociology -- their classical and contemporary theories, current methods and substance.

Taught by: Collins, Grazian, Hannum, Park, Schnittker, Smith, Wilde

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 561 Class Cultures and Historical Change

Culture as lifestyle, therefore as the immediately visible aspect of social class, as well as the status groups that may cut across class. Examines micro-sociological evidence (including photos and other images; and literary and other textual sources) of how class and status are performed in everyday life. Goffmanian and subsequent theory of interaction rituals applied across long-term historical changes, and their causes. Topics include Norbert Elias's theory of civilizing process; stratification in patrimonial/aristocratic societies; the modern shift to bureaucracy plus private households; the effects of democratization, social movements, wars, revolutions, and status leveling; informalization and antinomian counter-cultures; youth cultures and cults of mass entertainment. Concluding with what electronic communications are doing to the future of class cultures and self-presentation.

Taught by: Collins

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 562 Soci Movements & Poli Sc

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 570 VISUALIZING W. E. B. DUBOIS

This seminar will focus on a project that views history as a result of our contemporary society in witch biographical truths are constantly shifting. So the historical biographers write about the way they remembered and visualize the past, and not about the way that it happened. We will take Du Bois's biography in his own words and interrogate his narrative with the visual narratives of his life and influence produced by others. "Visualizing W.E.B Du Bois" focuses on photographic, film, and video representations intended to present some aspect of Du Bois's reality, primarily for the purposes of instruction or maintaining a historical record. Such projects include photos, materials originally shot on film stock, and digital images that can be either displayed in a book or magazine, and moving images made into a film or video for a TV show or released for screening in cinemas, or other broadcast mediums like YouTube and Vimeo.

Taught by: Zuberi

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 571

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 572 Health Care and Social Policy

This course is an area study or survey of social policy issues in contemporary health care. Topics include social contexts of health care and health policy; the organization and financing of health services; the health professions; health and illness over the life cycle; achieving equitable access to health services; the interface between health and social services. Health problems of national significance will be addressed including infant mortality, teenage pregnancy, AIDS, the chronically mentally ill and homeless, and health impaired elderly.

Taught by: Aiken

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 595 Media, Culture, and Society

This course will begin by surveying approaches to culture that are characteristic of general theory in sociology. We will then deal in depth with theories of recorded culture that have developed within the sociology of culture and related disciplines, including the role of the media in constructing social reality, the interpretation and reception of texts, recorded culture and the creation of symbolic boundaries, the social construction of art, the organization of cultural industries, sacred symbols and political integration, and the relationship between culture and the state.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 596 Sociology of Education

This graduate seminar will introduce students to some of the key theoretical and empirical work in the sociology of education. We will examine how schools work to maintain or alleviate inequality, and focus on differences in educational achievement and attainment by race, ethnicity, immigrant status, class, and gender. We will review work on the educational experiences of youth from early childhood to young adulthood.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ASAM 590, SOCI 496

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 597 MLA Proseminar

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 601 Contemporary Social Theory

This is a graduate-level seminar structured around the main theoretical debates of contemporary sociology, including the interplay of rationality and emotion, the relationship between structure and agency, the nature of power, and the role of chance and contingency. In considering alternative positions on these debates, we will encounter the major theorists of the past fifty years, including Parsons, Merton, Goffman, Homans, Schutz, Coleman, Bourdieu, Luhmann, Habermas, Collins, and Giddens. Requirements include intensive primary source reading, writing, and participation. The course assumes, and does not provide, prior familiarity with the main theoretical perspectives, and thus does not substitute for the undergraduate theory course (SOCI 126)

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 602 Proseminar in Classical Sociology

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to the classical foundations of sociology by drawing on canonical readings by Marx, Engels, Durkheim, Weber, Du Bois, Addams, Simmel, Park, and Goffman, among others. We will read these texts in the context of three major sociological themes: work and social inequality, culture and social structure, and urban interaction and culture in the city. Final papers will require students to draw on classical sociological works in their analyses of contemporary empirical research in sociology.

Taught by: Grazian

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 603 Master's Research in Sociology

This graduate course is intended to be helpful to students as they produce an MA thesis. The course is structured to provide social support and feedback as students move through the stages in the development of a project (i.e. data analysis, review of the literature, development of a thesis, and revision). Students should begin the semester with a data set in hand; additional data analysis will occur during the term. (In some cases, students may be finishing their data collection.) In addition, the course is intended to provided professional development opportunities for students by providing "insider" information about the publication process. Students will be given examples of journal review (including reviews that reject a paper), copies of papers as they move through the revision process, and guidelines for producing a publishable piece of work The goal is for students to produce a manuscript that can be submitted for publication in the near future. This is a required course for second year gradate students in Sociology.

Taught by: Bosk, Grazian, Jacobs, Kao, Lareau, Leidner, Park, Schnittker

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: DEMG 707

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 604 Methodology of Social Research

This course will give students familiarity with the common research methods social scientists use to conduct research. Ethnographic, interview, survey, experimental and historical/comparative research methods will be covered. Four themes will be explored: 1) the basics of solid research design, 2) the various advantages and disadvantages of each method, 3) when the use of a method is appropriate or inappropriate for the research question, and 4) how to evaluate researchers' claims on the basis of the evidence they present. These themes will be explored by reading examples of and conducting exercises designed to give students hands-on experience in each of the methods. Students will conduct the exercises on a topic of their choice, which together will culminate in their final paper. The course is required and restricted to second year students in sociology and demography.

Taught by: Smith, Wilde, Zuberi

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: DEMG 604

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 607 Introduction to Demography

A nontechnical introduction to fertility, mortality and migration and the interrelations of population with other social and economic factors.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: DEMG 607

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 609 Basic Methods of Demography

The course is designed to introduce students to basic concepts of demographic measurement and modeling used to study changes in population size and composition. The course covers basic measures of mortality, fertility and migration; life table construction; multiple decrement life tables; stable populations; population projections; and age patterns of vital events. Students will learn to apply demographic methods through a series of weekly problem sets.

Taught by: Elo, Guillot, Smith

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: DEMG 609

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 611 Structural Equation Models

Statistical modeling with multiple equations and latent variables. The first part of the course will focus on linear models that could be estimated with any of the well-known SEM programs (e.g., LISREL, EQS, or Amos). Both Mplus and SAS will be used exclusively in this part of the course. The second part will focus on Mplus models for variables that are categorical, count, or censored. Maximum likelihood methods for missing data will also be covered.

Taught by: Allison

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: DEMG 611

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 612 Categorical Data Analysis

This course deals with techniques for analyzing multivariate data which the dependent variable is a set of categories (a dichotomy or polytomy). Topics will include linear probability models, logit (logistic) regression models, probit models, logit analysis of contingency tables, cumulative logit and probit (for ordinal data), multinomial logit, conditional logit (discrete choice), unobserved heterogeneity, log-linear models, square tables, response-based sampling, and repeated measures. Methods will be illustrated using the Stata System. There will be several assignments using Stata to analyze data provided by the instructor.

Taught by: Allison, Smith

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: DEMG 612

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 613 Event History

An applications-oriented course on statistical methods for the analysis of longitudinal data on the occurrence of events, also known as survival analysis, failure-time analysis, hazard analysis or duration analysis. Emphasis on regression-like models in which the risk of event occurrence is a function of a set of explanatory variables. Topics include accelerated failure-time models, hazard models, censoring, Cox regression models, time-dependent covariates, completing risks, repeated events, unobserved heterogeneity, discrete-time methods.

Taught by: Allison

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: DEMG 613

Prerequisite: SOCI 536 or equivalent

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 617 Theories of Racial and Ethnic Differentiation

This course provides an overview of prominent theories and theorists of race and ethnicity, and is concerned with: 1) Understanding the nature and persistence of race and ethnicity as meaningful social groupings in contemporary American society, and 2) Explaining the social significance of these group identities--that is, how these groupings are related to social stratification, to socio-cultural relations, and to the political and economic dynamics in our society.

Taught by: Charles

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 617

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 620 Doctoral Seminar in Sociological Research II

This course is intended to aid in the selection, framing, writing and revising of sociological dissertation proposals. It is also intended to provide a forum for the presentation of dissertation research in progress. The goal is to provide a forum for the acquisition of professional socialization in sociology. We will discuss the framing of research questions, the design of research strategies, and the writing of dissertation proposals. We will discuss the process of submitting manuscripts for conferences and journals, preparing a curriculum vitae, job search strategies, and preparing for effective colloquium presentations. We will also review articles currently under review at the American Sociological Review. It is expected that third year graduate students in Sociology will enroll in this class.

Taught by: Grazian, Hannum, Jacobs, Schnittker, Wilde

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: Third year graduate students

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 621 Mortality

The course focuses on the description and explanation of health and mortality in human populations and their variability across several dimensions such as age, time, place, social class, race, etc. The course includes general theories of health, mortality and morbidity, investigations of mortality and related processes in developing and developed countries, and discussions of future mortality trends and their implications for individual lives and the society at large.

Taught by: Elo, Kohler

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: DEMG 621

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 622 Fertility

The biological, social and demographic factors explaining the levels, trends and differentials in human fertility. Data, measures, and methods used in the context of the more and the less developed countries, with an emphasis on the historical and current course of the fertility transition.

Taught by: Kohler, Smith

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: DEMG 622

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 623 Workshop in Urban Ethnography

The ethnographic and sociological interpretation of urban life. Conceptual and methodological issues will be thoroughly discussed. Ongoing projects of participants will be presented in a "workshop" format, thus providing participants the opportunity of learning from and contributing ethnographic work in progress. Selected ethnographic works will be read and assessed.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 623, URBS 623

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 630 Advanced Special Topics: Demography of Race

This course will examine demographic and statistical methods used to capture the impact of racial stratification in society. This course covers the skills and insights used by demographers and social statisticians in the study of racial data. A key challenge facing researchers is the interpretation of the vast amount of racial data generated by society. As these data do not directly answer important social questions, data analysis and statistics must be used to interpret them. The course will examine the logic used to communicate statistical results from racial data in various societies. We will question the scientific claims of social science methodology by extending the critical perspective to biases that may underlie research methods. We will discuss good and bad practices within the context of the historical developments of the methods. This advanced special topics course and course description is for Fall 2017 only.

Taught by: Zuberi

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 431, AFRC 630, DEMG 630, SOCI 430

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 633 Population Processes I

This is one of two courses that serve as an introduction to core areas of demography and important developments in the field. Population Processes I introduces students to broad set of issues in health, mortality, and aging. Readings cover overviews of major topics as well as recent approaches to the subject. Attention is focused on description and explanation of variation in health across time, space and social groups. One consequence of mortality decline is population aging. We will cover some of its implications for individuals, families and societies.

Taught by: Elo, Guillot, Parrado, Schnittker

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: DEMG 633

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 634 Population Processes II

Population Processes II is part of a two-course sequence designed to introduce students to the core areas of demography (fertility, mortality, and migration) and recent developments in the field. PP II is divided into two parts. The first focuses on family demography and the biological, social and demographic factors explaining levels, trends, and differentials in human fertility transition with an emphasis on the historical and current course of fertility transition in developed and developing countries. The second part of the course provides a comprehensive review of theories and research on international migration. Readings examine patterns and processes of global migration during the classic age from 1800-1914 as well as during the postwar period from 1945 to the present. The course also covers a history and evaluation of immigration policies around the world, and devotes significant attention to theoretical and empirical perspectives on immigrant adaptation, including the relationship between gender and migration.

Taught by: Flippen, Kohler, Parrado, Smith

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: DEMG 634

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 640 Global Health and Health Policy

This participatory interdisciplinary seminar course examines contemporary issues in public health policy and global health. The organizing framework is social determinants of health. We consider evidence that inequalities in education, income, and occupation influence health status, and the policy dilemma that broad interventions to improve population health may increase health disparities. We critically examine whether prevention is always better than cure, and what modern medicine has to offer in terms of health. We explore the public policy process in health using the "tobacco wars" as a case example, of how politics, policy, law, commercial interests, and research intersect to affect the public's health. We examine whether global health is in a state of decline, and the extent to which failures in public health, public policy, and foreign policy have contributed to increasing threats to world health. Likewise we will examine the potential for greater integration of health into foreign policy to create global infrastructure upon which to advance health. We will examine the global health workforce and the impact of widespread global migration of health professionals on receiving and sending countries. There are no prerequisites. The course is designed for graduate students in the social and behavioral sciences, health professions, public health, business and law. Advanced undergraduate students will be admitted with permission.

Taught by: Aiken

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: NURS 640

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 643 Social Stratification

This is an advanced level graduate seminar where we will review contemporary research on social stratification and mobility. We will examine empirical and theoretical studies not only in the US but also in other countries to address how the pattern of social stratification varies across societies and over time. The main topics to be discussed are social mobility, occupational attainment, educational inequality, gender and race, and family processes and stratification. We will also examine studies that address how national contexts mediate social stratification. Advanced undergraduate students will be admitted with permission.

Taught by: Jacobs, Park

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: DEMG 643

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 644 Empirical Methods in Bioethics

This course provides an introduction to social science research design and methods for students interested in conducting research on issues in bioethics. The course is appropriate for students who, rather than conducting research themselves, will use research findings to make or challenge arguments in policy statements or other writings. Emphasis is placed on the logic of research design as the way to relate topic of inquiry with methods so that evidence produced is pertinent and useful. Students will design research projects and explore a variety of methods available to conduct research. Students will also integrate research ethics into the formulation and design of their inquiries.

Taught by: Bosk

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: BIOE 604

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 649 A Course on Elites

Most of the studies of inequality look at poverty and the impact of poverty. This course will be a study of those at the top of the social stratification system. We will take a broad vision of elites of to include the upper-middle-class as well as those in the top 1%. The course will examine the concentration of wealth in American society. It will examine elite families. It will also look at elite education. There will be a unit on the financial industry, the 2008 debacle, and the failure of the government to regulate this important industry. We will also study the influence of race by comparing the black upper-middle-class with white upper-middle-class families. Thus, we will also look at the power of elites in a number of spheres. Finally, we will also read theoretical perspectives including the work of C. Wright Mills, Marx, and Bourdieu. Thus, in addition to the focus on social stratification, this course cuts across sociology of the family, economic sociology, cultural sociology, and race and ethnic relations.

Taught by: Lareau

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 650 Social Inequality

This course will study social inequality primarily in contemporary societies. We will examine both the distribution of social rewards as well as processes for the allocation of these rewards. Stratification theory and research on social mobility will be considered. Topics include the influence of education, race and gender, and structural and organizational factors on individual success. We will also discuss how societies' stratification systems vary across time and place. Acquaintance with stratification theory and quantitative methods would be helpful but not required.

Taught by: Jacobs

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 660 Advanced Topics in Africana Studies

Advanced Topics in Africana Studies: The Sociology of W E B Du Bois; GIS for Social Science Research

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 420, AFRC 620, SOCI 460

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 662 Panel Data Analysis

Also Offered As: DEMG 662

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 664 Digital Media & Soc Theo

This seminar explores critical issues in contemporary society through the lens of digital media studies and social theory. Special attention will be given to how social theory may inform the theorizing and empirical analysis of digital culture, digital politics, and digital practices. We will read recent monographs on the meanings and uses of digital media in international development, international migration, state power and popular protest, symbolic violence, and the formation and contestation of identities, communities, and publics. These works will be examined alongside the social theories of Jeffrey Alexander, Ulrich Beck, Bourdieu, Judith Butler, Foucault, Giddens, Goffman, Habermas, Melucci, Victor Turner, and others. A term paper required

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: COMM 665

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 667 Social Interaction

The dynamics of interpersonal interaction, especially in face-to-face encounters during limited short periods of time. Topics include: the theory of interaction rituals deriving from Durkheim, Goffman and their contemporary followers; conversation analysis; micro-ethnographic studies of non-verbal behavior and embodied interaction; sociology of emotions; symbolic interactionist theory and the social nature of mind, self, and inner dialogue; electronically mediated interaction and its effects on social ties; and the relationship between micro and macro sociology.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 670 Family Data

This two semester course will engage each graduate student in an analysis project with qualitative and quantitative components, using a linked qualitative longitudinal data set. Students will use survey data from the baseline and 12 month wave of the Fragile Families study (described at http://crcw.princeton.edu/fragilefamilies/), a national survey of unwed and married parents who have just had a child (with unmarried parents over sampled) They will also use transcripts and coded data from the TLC3 study, which involved qualitative couple and individual interviews conducted with a subset of 75 of the couples in the FF survey in 3 waves: about 3 months after the birth and then again 12 and 24 months after the birth. Most of these are low-income, unmarried, cohabiting parents. The goal of the course is for each student to use these two data sets, and the analytic techniques and literature covered in the course, to write a paper that can be submitted for publication. The spring will also include lots of tips on how to construct a publishable paper. Students should only enroll in this course if they plan to take the spring sequel course as well.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: DEMG 670

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 677 International Migration

A comprehensive review of theories and research on international migration. The course introduces the basic precepts of neoclassical economics, the new economics of labor migration, segmented labor market theory, world systems theory, social capital theory and the theory of cumulative causation. Readings examine patterns and processes of global migration during the classic age from 1800?1914 as well as during the postwar period from 1945 to the present. The course also covers a history and evaluation of immigration policies around the world, and devotes signification attention to theoretical and empirical perspectives on immigrant adaptation. Within this larger topic, we will also discuss internal migration and urbanization; the relationship between gender and migration; the spatial distribution of immigrants within the United States, immigrant communities, and ethnic enclaves; and the undocumented population in the United States.

Taught by: Flippen

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: DEMG 677

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 680 Pro seminar in Criminology

This course explores the basic scope, mission and methods of the science of criminology. The course proceeds to cover the current state of theory, research, and accomplishments in both knowledge and policy about criminality and criminal events. Students will read widely and report to the seminar on their readings, as well as assessing key readings and central ideas for their potential guidance of future research. The course focuses primarily on criminology of criminal events, including law-making and law-breaking. The criminology of reactions to crime is covered in the second semester pro-seminar in criminal justice, CRIM 601/SOCI 681.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: CRIM 600

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 681 Pro-seminar in Criminal Justice

A wide-ranging introduction to theory and research on responses to crime under the rubric of criminal law. Theories of deterrence, procedural justice, reintegrative shaming, defiance and other interactions between legal sanctions and legal conduct will be examined in light of the most recent research. Issues of discrimination, disparity, and fairness in the operation of criminal law will be considered with evidence from around the world. Patterns, causes, and consequences of legal sanctioning patterns will be systematically documented, and major gaps in knowledge will be identified.

Taught by: MacDonald

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: CRIM 601

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 685 Sociology of Violence

General theory of social conflict, with an emphasis on violent conflict. Specific applications include fights, riots, combat, and gang violence; tribal and modern war; abuse of the weak' domestic conflict; sexual conflict and rape; homicide; social movements and moral crusades; conflict management and social control; state breakdowns and revolutions; ethnic conflict and genocide.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 690 Sociology Writing Workshop I

Taught by: Jacobs, Lareau

Also Offered As: DEMG 707, DEMG 708, SOCI 691

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 691 Sociology Writing Workshop II

Taught by: Jacobs, Lareau

Also Offered As: DEMG 707, DEMG 708, SOCI 690, SOCI 707, SOCI 708

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 702 Political Economy Social History of Africa/African Diaspora

The topic of this course will be Africa and the African Diaspora. The emphasis will be on readings, class discussions, and seminars to reflect the ongoing discussions in the field. We will provide a series of readings for background to each section.

Taught by: Zuberi

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 702, AFRC 710, AFST 702, LALS 702

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 707 Second-Year Research Seminar I

This course is intended to hone the skills and judgment in order to conduct independent research in sociology and demography. We will discuss the selection of intellectually strategic research questions and practical research designs. Students will get experience with proposal writing, the process of editing successive drafts of manuscripts, and the oral presentation of work in progress as well as finished research projects. The course is designed to be the context in which master's papers and second year research papers are written. This is a required course for second year graduate students in Demography. Others interested in enrolling in only one of the courses may do so with the permission of the Chair of the Graduate Group in Demography.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: DEMG 707

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 731 Advanced Demographic Methods

This course considers a variety of procedures for measuring and modeling demographic processes. We will consider both deterministic (drawn from classic demographic methods, stable population theory, and the like) and stochastic (drawn from statistics) perspectives and methods, including their integration. Pre-requisites: DEMG 609 and SOCI 536 (or its equivalent).

Taught by: Smith

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: DEMG 731

Prerequisites: DEMG 609 and SOCI 536 (or its equivalent)

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 777 Special Topics in Demography

Topics vary from semester to semester.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 777, DEMG 777

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 796 Demographic, Economic, and Social Interrelations

The course investigates economic and social determinants of fertility, mortality, and migration, and it discusses the effects of population variables on economic and social conditions, including economic and social development. Topics discussed in the course include: How do economic changes affect marriage, divorce, and child bearing decisions? How do households make decisions about transfers and requests? How can economic and sociological approaches be combined in explanatory models of demography change? How does immigration to the US affect the ethnic composition of the population, the earnings of native workers, taxes on natives, and the macro-economy? What causes the aging of populations, and how will population aging affect the economies of industrial nations, and in particular, pension programs like Social Security? What accounts for the rise in women's participation in the wage labor force over the past century? How are family composition and poverty interrelated? Does rapid population growth slow economic development with low income countries? In addition to these topics, the course also covers selected methods not included in Dem/Soc 535/536 and 609.

Taught by: Madden, Kohler

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: DEMG 796, ECON 791

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 821 Proseminar in Health Outcomes Research

This course is designed for doctoral students interested in conducting health outcomes research. The course focuses on conceptual, methodological, statistical, feasibility and data issues central to the conduct of health outcomes research. Penn faculty researchers will use their ongoing studies to illustrate how study design, sampling, measurement, and advanced statistical techniques can be employed to address the various challenges inherent in health outcomes research.

Taught by: Aiken, Lake

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: NURS 821

Prerequisites: Prior coursework at undergraduate or masters level in statistics and quantitative methods.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 822 Applications of Health Outcome Research

This the second of a two-course sequence designed for doctoral students interested in conducting health outcomes research. The first course (821) focuses on conceptual, methodological, statistical, feasibility and data issues central to the conduct of health outcomes research; the second course (822) focuses on applying health outcomes research through the development and implementation of a research project. In the first course Penn faculty researchers will use their ongoing studies to illustrate how sampling, study design, measurement, and advanced statistical techniques can be employed to address the various challenges inherent in health outcomes research. In the second course, students will design and implement a health outcomes research project.

Taught by: Aiken

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: NURS 822

Prerequisites: Prior coursework at undergraduate or masters level in statistics and quantitative methods, Nursing 821/Sociology 821 is preferred

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

SOCI 860 Global Media Activism

Also Offered As: COMM 860

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 867 Media & Social Movements

Examines the meanings and roles of media and communication in social movements; analyzes media reform activism; studies both historical movements and contemporary protests around the world (Arab Spring, Indignados, Occupy, etc.); covers a broad range of theoretical perspectives, especially network and diffusion theories, political economy, narrative theory, and theories of performance. Students are required to submit a final research paper.

Taught by: Yang

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COMM 867

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 888 Special Topics

Also Offered As: COMM 888

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

SOCI 998 Independent readings and research

For advanced students who work with individual instructors upon permission. Intended to go beyond existing graduate courses in the study of specific problems or theories or to provide work opportunities in areas not covered by existing courses.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

SOCI 999 Directed Readings and Research

Primarily for advanced students who work with individual instructors upon permission. Intended to go beyond existing graduate courses in the study of specific problems or theories or to provide work opportunities in areas not covered by existing courses.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit