Greek (GREK)

GREK 015 Elementary Modern Greek I

This course is designed for students with no prior knowledge of the modern Greek Language. Instructions are theme based and is supported by a Textbook as well as other written or audiovisual material. It provides the framework for development of all communicative skills (reading, writing, comprehension and speaking) at a basic level. The course also introduces students to aspects of Modern Greek culture that are close to students' own horizon, while it exposes them to academic presentations of Greek history, arts, and current affairs. Quizzes, finals and short individual work with presentation are the testing tools. The completion of this unit does NOT satisfy the language requirement.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Tsekoura

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center.

GREK 016 Elementary Modern Greek II

Continuation of Elementary Modern Greek I, with increased emphasis on reading and writing.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Tsekoura

Course not offered every year

Prerequisites: GREK 015 or equivalent.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center . this section is reserved for heritage learners or by permission of instructor.

GREK 017 Intermediate Modern Greek I

This course is designed for students with an elementary knowledge of Demotic Modern Greek, and aims mainly at developing oral expression, reading and writing skills.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Tsekoura

Course not offered every year

Prerequisites: GREK 015 and 016 or equivalent.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center.

GREK 018 Intermediate Modern Greek II

Further attention to developing oral expression, reading, and writing skills for students with knowledge of Demotic Modern Greek.

For BA Students: Last Language Course

Taught by: Tsekoura

Course not offered every year

Prerequisites: GREK 015, 016, and 017 or equivalent.

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

Notes: Offered through Penn Language Center .

GREK 101 Elementary Classical Greek I

Intensive introduction to Classical Greek morphology and syntax. This course includes exercises in grammar, Greek composition, and translation from Greek to English. Emphasis is placed upon developing the ability to read Greek with facility.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Nishimura-Jensen

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GREK 102 Elementary Classical Greek II

Students complete their study of the morphology and syntax of Classical Greek. We begin the semester with continuing exercises in grammar and translation, then gradually shift emphasis to reading unadapted Greek texts.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Nishimura-Jensen

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: GREK 101 or equivalent.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GREK 105 Modern Greek

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GREK 112 Intensive Elementary Classical Greek

An introduction to the ancient Greek language for beginners, with explanation of basic grammatical concepts and intensive exercises in reading and writing. Ideal for undergraduates or graduate students from Penn or elsewhere with some background in learning other languages, or who need to learn Greek rapidly. The course covers the first year of college-level Greek, equivalent to GREK 101 + GREK 102 at more than twice the normal pace. For further information on Penn's Greek curriculum, visit the Classical Studies department website.

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Seminar

2 Course Units

GREK 115 Greek/Heritage Speakers I

This course is intended to help Heritage Speakers or student with prior knowledge of conversational modern Greek (or even Ancient Greek) to refresh or enrich their knowledge of modern Greek and who would not be a good fit for the elementary or intermediate classes. A theme based textbook and instructions along with a comprehensive overview of grammar as a whole is presented while original text, songs, video and other media are used in order to augment vocabulary and increase fluency in modern Greek. Students are expected to properly use the language, do theme-based research on the themes examined and provide written work on various subjects and make conversation in class. Presentations on researched topics account for final exam.

For BA Students: Language Course

Taught by: Tsekoura

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GREK 116 Greek/Heritage Speakers II

It is the continuation of GREK 115 with completing Grammar (passive voice as well as unusual nouns and adjectives etc.,) and adding more challenging reading and writing material. The completion of this course satisfies the language requirement. ALL students completing the HSI GREK 115 are eligible toenroll. ALL OTHERS will have to take a placement test.

For BA Students: Last Language Course

Taught by: Tsekoura

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

GREK 203 Intermediate Classical Greek: Prose

This course is for those who have completed Ancient Greek 102, Greek 112 or equivalent. You are now ready to begin reading real Greek! We will read a selection of passages from Greek prose authors, focusing on language and style.

For BA Students: Language Course

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: GREK 102, GREK 112 or equivalent

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GREK 204 Intermediate Classical Greek: Poetry

We will read a selection of passages from Greek poetic authors, ranging from Homer to tragedy.

For BA Students: Last Language Course

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: GREK 203 or equivalent.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GREK 212 Intensive Intermediate Greek

An introduction to the basic history and conventions of Greek prose and poetry, with continuous readings from classical authors accompanied by grammar review and exercises. Ideal for undergraduates or graduate students from Penn or elsewhere who have completed the equivalent of one year Greek (e.g., GREK 112). The course covers the second year of college-level Greek, equivalent to GREK 203 + GREK 204 at more than twice the normal pace.

For BA Students: Last Language Course

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Seminar

2 Course Units

GREK 309 Topics in Greek Literature: Socrates

This course is for those who have completed Greek 204, Greek 212, or equivalent. Close reading and discussion of a Greek author or a particular genre of Greek literature. Topics will vary each semester, and the course may be repeated for credit. Socrates wrote nothing; and yet he had an unparalleled influence on classical Athenian culture and the whole later history of western thought. Who was he? Was he a truly wise person, or a smart-alec self-promoter? What were his actual beliefs or teachings, if any? Can we reconcile the characterizations of Socrates in our very different contemporary sources? In this upper-level Greek course, we will read the three main ancient sources: Aristophanes Clouds, which offers a funny and contradictory portrait of an avaricious, self-important sophist; parts of Xenophons Memorabilia and his Apology of Socrates, which suggests a wise, fairly conventional thinker; and selections from Plato, which portray Socrates as a far more challenging and unusual kind of person.

Taught by: Wilson

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: GREK 204

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GREK 401 Greek for Advanced Students

For graduate students in other departments needing individualized study in Greek literature.

For BA Students: Advanced Language Course

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GREK 540 The Greek Text: Language and Style

What do we need to read texts in ancient Greek? In this course we read just one prose text and one poetic text, or a very limited number of texts and passages, with a focus on language and formal analysis (such as diction, grammar, stylistics, metrics, rhetoric, textual criticism). A range of exercises will be used to develop these skills, including composition, lexical studies, recitation, memorization, exegesis, written close-readings, and sight-translation.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GREK 541 Greek Literary History

Through selected readings from both poetry and prose, we will survey the range and evolution of ancient Greek literary practice and will identify some of Greek literature might be constructed.

Taught by: Murnaghan

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GREK 600 Graduate Greek Seminar: Aeschylus, Oresteia

A close reading of Aeschylus' trilogy, with consideration of its role as an important touchstone for fifth century ideas about justice, political leadership, gender roles, Athenian institutions, and dramatic form.

Taught by: Murnaghan

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GREK 602 Graduate Greek Poetry

This graduate seminar will explore the rich and varied intellectual debates of the Classical period, using early Hippocratic texts to introduce some of the major questions that occupied contemporary thinkers. Such topics include, among others, the nature of matter and the body, the interaction of humans and environment, 'anthropology', empiricism, inference from signs, health and disease. We will focus on selections from the Greek texts of the Hippocratic 'Airs Waters Places', 'Nature of Man', 'Sacred Disease', 'On Ancient Medicine', and Epidemics in their relation to other contemporary authors, such as Herodotus, Thucydides, assorted Presocratics and Sophists, and Plato.

Taught by: Ralph Rosen

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GREK 609 GREEK AESTHETIC THEORY

This seminar will explore ancient Greek (and some Roman) approaches to the arts. Greek audiences and critics alike were deeply interested in both theoretical and practical questions about the arts, especially literature. We will consider not only the philosophical tradition, but also popular notions of aesthetic value, including the varieties of audience responses and fandom. Among the authors we will study are various early Greek philosophical and sophistic thinkers, Plato, Aristotle, Hellenistic literary theorists, including Philodemus, Horace, Longinus, and selected theorists of late antiquity.

Taught by: Rosen

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Graduate Students only

GREK 611 Greek Epigraphy

An introduction to the principles and practices of Greek Epigraphy. Study of selected Greek inscriptions.

Taught by: McInerney

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

GREK 990 Masters Thesis

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Masters Thesis

1 Course Unit

GREK 998 Supervised Reading

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

GREK 999 Independent Study

For doctoral candidates.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit