Historic Preservation (HSPV)

HSPV 521 American Architecture

This course is a survey of architecture in the United States. The organization, while broadly chronological, emphasizes themes around which important scholarship has gathered. The central purpose is to acquaint you with major cultural, economic, technological, and environmental forces that have shaped buildings and settlements in North America for the last 400 years. To that end, we will study a mix of "high-style" and "vernacular" architectures while encouraging you to think critically about these categories. Throughout the semester, you will be asked to grapple with both the content of assigned readings (the subject) and the manner in which authors present their arguments (the method). Louis Sullivan, for instance, gives us the tall office building "artistically considered" while Carol Willis presents it as a financial and legal artifact. What do you make of the difference? Finally, you will learn how to describe buildings. While mastery of architectural vocabulary is a necessary part of that endeavor, it is only a starting point. Rich or "thick" description is more than accurate prose. It is integral to understanding the built environment - indeed, to seeing it at all.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HSPV 528 American Vernacular Architecture

This course explores the form and development of America's built landscape-its houses, farm buildings, churches, factories, and fields--as a source of information on folk history, vernacular culture, and architectural practice.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HSPV 531 American Domestic Interiors

This course will examine the American domestic interior from the seventeenth century through the twentieth century with emphasis on the cultural, economic, and technological forces that determined the decoration and furnishing of the American home. Topics to be covered include the decorative arts; floor, wall and window treatments; and developments in lighting, heating, plumbing, food preparation and service, and communication technologies. In addition to the identification of period forms and materials, the course will give special emphasis to historical finishes. The final project will involve re-creation of an historic interior based on in-depth household inventory analysis and study. Several class periods will be devoted to off-site field trips.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HSPV 538 Cultural Landscapes and Landscape Preservation

The course introduces the history and understanding of common American landscapes and surveys the field of cultural landscape studies. Methods of landscape preservation are also surveyed. The cultural-landscape perspective is a unique lens for understanding the evolution of the built environment, the experience of landscapes, and the abstract economic, political and social processes that shape the places where most Americans spend most of their time. The course will focus on the forces and patterns (natural and cultural) behind the shaping of recognizably "American" landscapes, whether urban, suburban, or rural. Methods for documenting and preserving cultural landscapes will be surveyed. Class discussions, readings, and projects will draw on several disciplines--cultural geography, vernacular architecture, environmental history, historic preservation, ecology, art, and more.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HSPV 540 Historic Building Technology I

Historic Building Technology is divided into two discreet six week modules conceived in succession and taught during the second half of the first semester and first half of the second semester respectively. Module 1: Building Anatomy will examine traditional construction methods through a typological analysis of construction systems. Module 2: Building Archaeology will address the morphological evolution of a structure and its physical setting, sometimes known as "above ground archaeology." The course is intended to introduce students in Historic Preservation to the physical realities of built form and its analysis through careful observation and description. Note: This course continues in the first half of the spring semester for another 0.5 CU.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

0.5 Course Units

HSPV 541 Historic Building Technology II: Building Archaeology

Built works- be they barns or bridges, gardens or corn fields, palaces or pit houses - all embody something of their makers and users, and the prevailing social and cultural norms of the day. As a form of material culture, things- buildings and landscapes- are made and modified consciously and unconsciously, reflecting individual and societal forces at play. Since the physical fabric and its alteration present one primary mode of evidence, their investigation provides a critical form of research, especially in association (and often in contest) with archival documentary sources and oral histories. This course will examine the theories and techniques used to investigate the morphological evolution of built works, sometimes known as "above ground archaeology". Students will learn and apply methods relevant to the reading of architectural fabric. Methods of investigation will include absolute and relative dating techniques such as dendrochronology, finishes stratigraphy, mortar analysis, and various typological - seriation studies including framing, molding, fastener (nails and screws), and hardware analyses. Students are expected to use this knowledge in combination with the recording skills of HSPV 601 to record their assigned sites.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

0.5 Course Units

HSPV 551 Building Pathology

This course addresses the subject of deterioration of buildings, their materials, assemblies and systems, with the emphasis on the technical aspects of the mechanisms of deterioration and their enabling factors, material durability and longevity of assemblies. Details of construction and assemblies are analyzed relative to functional and performance characteristics. Lectures cover: concepts in durability; climate; psychrometric, soils & hydrologic; conditions; physics of moisture in buildings; enclosure, wall and roof systems; structural systems; and building services systems with attention to performance, deterioration, and approaches to evaluation of remedial interventions.

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: HSPV 555 or one technical course in architecture.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HSPV 552 Building Diagnostics and Monitoring

Building diagnostics pertain to the determination of the nature of a building's condition or performance and the identification of the corresponding causative pathologies by a careful observation and investigation of its history, context and use, resulting in a formal opinion by the professional. Monitoring, a building diagnostic tool, is the consistent observation and recordation of a selected condition or attribute, by qualitative and/or quantitative measures over a period of time in order to generate useful information or data for analysis and presentation. Building diagnostics and monitoring allow the building professional to identify the causes and enabling factors of past or potential pathologies in a building and building systems, thus informing the development appropriate interventions or corrective measures. In the case of heritage buildings, the process informs the selection of interventions that satisfy the stewardship goals for the cultural resource. In the case of recently constructed buildings, the process informs the identification of envelope and systems interventions for improved performance and energy efficiency.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HSPV 555 Conservation Science

This course provides an introduction to architectural conservation and the technical study of traditional building materials. Lectures and accompanying laboratory sessions introduce the nature and composition of these materials, their properties, and mechanisms of deterioration, and the general laboratory skills necessary for field and laboratory characterization. Knowledge of basic college level chemistry is required.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HSPV 572 Preservation Through Public Policy

This course explores the intersection between historic preservation, design and public policy, as it exists and as it is evolving. That exploration is based on the recognition that a network of law and policy at the federal, state and local level has direct and profound impact on the ability to manage cultural resources, and that the pieces of that network, while interconnected, are not necessarily mutually supportive. The fundamental assumption of the course is that the preservation professional must understand the capabilities, deficiencies, and ongoing evolution of this network in order to be effective. The course will look at a range of relevant and exemplary laws and policies existing at all levels of government, examining them through case studies and in-depth analyses of pertinent programs and agencies at the local, state and federal level.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HSPV 600 Documentation, Research, Recording 1

The goal of this course is to help students learn to contextualize the history of buildings and sites. In order to gain first-hand exposure to the actual materials of building histories, we will visit a half-dozen key archival repositories. Students will work directly with historical evidence, including maps, deeds, the census, city directories, insurance surveys, photographs, and many other kinds of archival materials. After discussing each type of document in terms of its nature and the motives for its creation, students will complete a series of projects that develop their facility for putting these materials to effective use. Philadelphia is more our laboratory than a primary focus in terms of content, as the city is rich in institutions that hold over three centuries of such materials; students will find here both an exposure to primary documents of most of the types they might find elsewhere, as well as a sense of the culture of such institutions and of the kinds of research strategies that can be most effective. The final project is the completion of an historic register nomination.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HSPV 601 Documentation, Research, Recording II

Documentation, Research, Recording II. This course provides an introduction to the survey and recording of historic buildings and sites. Techniques of recording include traditional as well as digitally-based methods including field survey, measured drawings, photography and rectified photography. Emphasis is placed on the use of appropriate recording tools in the context of a thorough understanding of the historical significance, form and function of sites. Required for first-year MSHP students; others by permission.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Studio

1 Course Unit

HSPV 606 Historic Site Management

The course focuses on management, planning, and decision-making for all types of heritage sites from individual buildings to historic sites to whole landscapes. Course material will draw on model approaches to management, as well as a series of domestic and international case studies, with the goal of understanding the practicalities of site management. Particular topics to be examined in greater detail might include conservation policy, interpretation, tourism, or economic development strategies.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HSPV 620 Seminar in American Architecture

An examination of a specific topic related to the history of American architecture and planning. Following introductory lectures, students participate through detailed reports and informal discussion. The topic under investigation varies each semester the seminar is offered.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HSPV 621 Social Justice Seminar

How do historic preservation and other design professionals contribute to more equitable and just societies? How can our work be organized to result in greater equity, access and social justice? This seminar will explore connections between historic preservation (and related design, planning and artistic practices) and the pursuit of social justice. Our investigations will focus on both conceptual and theoretical constructions (how we think about social justice) and practical examples of advancing social outcomes through preservation and design. We'll draw on work by: geographers, anthropologists and other social scientists and theorists; historians; design practitioners; heritage organizations; artists; and more. Subjects will include public interest design, creative placemaking, public art, memorialization, and methods of practice and institutional organization. The course will progress through a series of weekly topics, often including guest practitioners and scholars. Students will bear significant responsibility for helping flesh out the topics and cases we study; final projects (individual and and group) will be envisioned as a statement (in the form of a book or exhibit) of how social justice concerns have reshaped practice and how they could reshape our fields in the future.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HSPV 624 Digital Media for Historic Preservation

Techniques will be discussed for preservation use including survey, documentation, relational databases, and digital imaging and modeling.

Taught by: Hinchman

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HSPV 625 Preservation Economics

The primary objective is to prepare the student, as a practicing preservationist, to understand the language of the development community, to make the case through feasibility analysis why a preservation project should be undertaken, and to be able to quantify the need for public/non-profit intervention in the development process. A second objective is to acquaint the student with the measurements of the economic impact of historic preservation and to critically evaluate "economic hardship" claims made to regulatory bodies by private owners.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HSPV 626 Advanced Digital Media for Historic Preservation

Advanced Digital Media focuses on the visualization and dissemination of information for historic preservation. Through a combination of lectures, readings and the use of software, the course will explore integrative and engaging methods of generating and communicating data specifically developed by and for historic preservation. Mapping, graphics, video, apps and web-based platforms will be addressed in this course. Students will be expected to bring topics, ideas and discussion, and through a set of projects asked to find new and innovative ways to visualize and share the information using the communication tools of the modern age.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HSPV 638 Topics in Historic Preservation

his seminar concentrates on a selected topic in the social and cultural history of the built environment. Past themes have included photography and the American city and the relationship between cities and sound.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HSPV 640 Contemporary Design in Historic Settings

Thoughtful contemporary design can add value and meaning to historic settings of any scale. Rigorous dialogue with history and context enriches contemporary design. This seminar immerses students in the rewarding yet challenging realm of design with landmarks and existing structures. It will encourage participants to create their own models for design and preservation planning through discussion of source materials that illustrate the political, cultural and aesthetic environments that have shaped regulation and design with heritage throughout the past century. Sketch problems set in Philadelphia and analysis of case studies from around the world will enable students to critique and communicate a range of responses to landmarks and historic contexts, and to explore the roles of significance, physical and intangible conditions in shaping appropriate responses.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HSPV 656 Advanced Conservation Science

A methodological approach to the examination and analysis of historic building materials is introduced. Experimental design for conducting conservation research plus statistical analysis and modeling of research data will further complete the discussion. Practical analytical techniques appropriate for conservation practice including: classical and advanced instrumental techniques for qualitative and quantitative analysis of organic and inorganic materials will be discussed. Theoretical and practical applications of advanced surface techniques for both elemental and molecular/composition analysis as well as applications of nanotechnology and nanomaterials in conservation will be covered. Students will also learn about deterioration processes and long term effects of conservation treatments through accelerated aging techniques. Course materials will be taught through lectures, invited speakers, lab visits and laboratory sessions by practicing learned techniques and procedures on related masonry samples, along with provided course readings and literature.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HSPV 660 Theories of Historic Preservation

Theories of historic preservation serve as models for practice, integrating the humanistic, artistic, design, scientific and political understandings of the field. This course examines the historical evolution of historic preservation, reviews theoretical frameworks and issues, and explores current modes of practice. Emphasis is placed on literacy in the standard preservation works and critical assessment of common preservation concepts. In addition to readings and lectures, case studies from contemporary practice will form the basis for short assignments. Professional ethics are reviewed and debated. The instructor's permission is required for any student not registered in the Graduate Program in Historic Preservation. Note that the course is organized in two parts; the first half, on the basics of preservation theory, is taught in the fall semester while the second half takes place in the spring semester and engages advanced topics. Note: this course continues in the second half of the spring semester for another 0.5 CU.

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: Instructor's permission required for any student not registered in the Graduate Program in Historic Preservation.

Activity: Lecture

0.5 Course Units

HSPV 661 Theories of Historic Preservation II

Theories of historic preservation serve as models for practice, integrating thehumanistic, artistic, design, scientific and political understandings of the field. HSPV 661 builds on HSPV 660, which examines the historical evolution of historic preservation, reviews theoretical frameworks and issues, and explores current modes of practice. HSPV 661 engages advanced topics such as cultural landscape theory, economics of preservation, sustainability and environmental conservation, social justice, and urban design. In addition to readings and lectures, case studies from contemporary practice will be used to examine theories in practice. The principal assignment will be a term research paper. The instructor's permission is required for any student not registered in the Graduate Program in Historic Preservation. (Note that the course is the second of two parts; the first half, on the basics of preservation theory is taught inthe fall semester while the second half takes place in the spring semester.)

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

0.5 Course Units

HSPV 671 Historic Preservation Law

Introduction to the legal framework of urban planning and historic preservation, with special emphasis on key constitutional issues, zoning, historic districts, growth management, and state and local laws for conserving historic buildings.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HSPV 701 Historic Preservation Studio

The Preservation Studio is a practical course in planning architectural, urban and regional conservation interventions, bringing to bear the wide range of skills and ideas at play in the field of historic preservation. Studio teams undertake documentation and planning exercises for heritage sites and their communities, through research, consultation with stakeholders, analysis of comparables, and policies/project creation. Study sites are often in Philadelphia proper. Students work in teams as well as on individual projects. The preservation studio seeks to demonstrate preservation planning responses to common conflicts between historic preservation, social forces, economic interests, and politics. Recognizing that historical areas are complex entities where communities, cultural and socio-economic realities, land use, building types, and the legal and institutional settings are all closely interrelated, the main goals of the studio are (1) understanding and communicating the cultural significance of the built environment, (2) analyzing its relation to other economic, social, political and aesthetic values, and (3) exploring the creative possibilities for design, conservation and interpretation prompted by cultural significance.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Studio

2 Course Units

HSPV 703 Urban Regeneration in the Americas

This hybrid seminar-studio course will explore advanced topics in urban conservation and landscape preservation through application to the challenges of international case studies. The seminar components of the course will delve into the literature on urban conservation; travel for fieldwork is planned. Permission of department required to enroll.

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: Permission of department required to enroll.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HSPV 705 Topical Studio/Seminar: Interpretation in the Future Tense

The interpretation of heritage places is a core concern of historic preservation professionals, no matter what their area of specialization. Explicit and implicit interpretation is embedded deeply in the field's theory, history and contemporary practice. In contemporary practice, site interpretation is challenged to draw on traditional preservationist modes of practice (based in historical scholarship and formal analysis) as well as new ideas about representation, communication, visitor experience, and information design shared by other fields (including museum studies, art, exhibit design, educational psychology, community development/social justice, and digital media design). This hybrid seminar-studio explores next-generation ideas and practices of heritage place interpretation: first, by building on a thorough program of research and analysis of contemporary best-practices in site interpretation: second, by experimenting along lines suggested by new audiences and innovative thinkers and designers inside and outside the preservation field. The course will include a series of guest presenters from design, public history, management and other fields; exercises to analyze the theoretical bases, best practices and issues facing contemporary practice; and prototyping of new/experimental approaches.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HSPV 710 Thesis I

Students are admitted to thesis after completion of two semesters or their equivalent in the graduate program. Theses should be based on original research and relate to each student's elected concentration. Thesis guidelines, available in the Historic Preservation office, describe other details.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

HSPV 711 Thesis II

Students are admitted to thesis after completion of two semesters or their equivalent in the graduate program. Theses should be based on original research and relate to each student's elected concentration. Thesis guidelines, available in the Historic Preservation office, describe other details.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

HSPV 713 Topical Studio/Seminar: Professional Practice & Architectural Conservation

This course is intended to introduce students to the professional practice of architectural conservation and illustrate how the technical knowledge gained through their academic studies is applied in the real world. It will include a discussion of the role of the architectural conservator within the larger preservation and restoration fields, as well as the concept of professional leadership. A significant portion of the course will be dedicated to project management--from writing a proposal to developing and implementing a work plan for a conservation project. The project management portion of the course will also review the typical progression of a project through design and construction phases, highlighting the role that the conservator plays in both. The course will include: lectures; site visits to current or recently completed conservation projects; in-class discussions and assignments related to typical tasks and challenges faced by architectural conservators in their daily professional life; and guest lecturers. Permission of department required to enroll.

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisites: Permission of the department is required to enroll.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HSPV 739 Conservation Seminar: Masonry

This seminar will offer an in-depth study of the conservation of masonry buildings and monuments with a particular focus on American building stone. Technical and aesthetic issues will be discussed as they pertain to the understanding required for conservation practice. Part 1 will address a broad range of building stone, masonry construction technologies, and deterioration phenomenon; Part 2 will concentrate on conservation methodology as well as past and current approaches for the treatment of stone masonry structures. The subject will be examined through published literature and case studies. Students will gain practical experience through lab and field exercises and demonstrations. The subject matter is relevant to interested students of conservation and preservation, architecture, landscape architecture, architectural history, and archaeology.

Course usually offered in fall term

Prerequisites: Pre-requisite: HSPV 555 Conservation Science and permission needed from department.

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HSPV 740 Conservation Seminar: Finishes

The course will address the technology, analysis, deterioration, and treatment of historic finishes. Students will gain an overview of the materials and technology of which architectural finishes have been most commonly made, the types and causes of deterioration and diagnostic approaches, and treatment. Two categories of treatment will be considered: the replication of paints based on sample analysis and in situ excavation; and the treatment of deteriorated or buried paint intended to be represented as part of the architecture or site. Guest lecturers will elaborate on finishes analysis. A case study site will provide the opportunity for developing skills.

Course usually offered in spring term

Prerequisite: HSPV 555 Conservation Science

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HSPV 743 Conservation Studio/Seminar

This seminar explores advanced topics in conservation practice and research through detailed examination of archives, literature, material collections, and sites. Specific topics rotate, and have included slate, marble, terra cotta.

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisite: HSVPV 555 Conservation Science

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HSPV 747 Conservation of Archaeological Sites and Landscapes

This seminar will address the history, theories, principles, and practices of the preservation and interpretation of archaeological sites and landscapes. The course will draw from a wide range of published material and experiences representing both national and international contexts. Topics will include site and landscape documentation and recording; site formation and degradation; intervention strategies including interpretation and display, legislation, policy, and contemporary issues of descendent community ownership and global heritage. Depending on the site, students will study specific issues leading toward the critique or development of a conservation and management program in accordance with guidelines established by ICOMOS/ ICAHM and other official agencies.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

HSPV 748 Preservation Case Studies

Preservation Case Studies will bring cutting-edge theoretical debates, current issues and the latest work of faculty and guests into the HSPV curriculum. Coordinated by the Chair, but populated with a number of other faculty, practitioners and guest scholars, the course will sample and explore current theoretical, conceptual, political and practical issues facing the historic preservation field.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

HSPV 750 Architectural Conservation Praxis: Traditional Buildings / Traditional Practice

Architectural Conservation Praxis is an intensive 3-week summer course designed for students pursuing studies in architectural conservation and builds on Penn Preservation's core curriculum and the first-year conservation courses. The syllabus is organized around project fieldwork supplemented by lectures, demonstrations, exercises, and site visits that will allow students to experience firsthand the design and construction of vernacular buildings and the application of traditional craft- based methods to preserve them.

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisites: HSPV 540, 541 and 555.

Activity: Studio

1 Course Unit

HSPV 770 Conservation Praxis: Site Analysis, Interpretation, and Management

This course is designed to meet two broad learning outcomes: first, solidify graduate students' basic knowledge of site management and interpretation issues and process; second, document and interpret complex sites using historical research, landscape reading and architectural archaeology methods.

Course usually offered summer term only

Prerequisites: HSPV 540, 541, 660 and 601; 606 preferred; 551 and 555 for conservation-focused students.

Activity: Studio

1 Course Unit

HSPV 790 Historic Preservation Summer Institute

The Summer Institute is a required orientation course designed to prepare incoming, first-year graduate students for the intense coursework of their first semester. Generally, the Institute orients students to the issues and methods of the core MSHP curriculum, begins familiarizing students to the resources of Philadelphia, and begins skill-building exercises, especially in the area of digital media. This non-credit course employs lectures, exercises, and field trips to introduce some of the important skills, questions, and issues that will be at the center of first year's work in the Program. The Summer Institute also constitutes an extended introduction to the Program's faculty and the students in first-year and second-year cohorts. Course enrollment is by permit only.

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Lecture

0 Course Units

Notes: Course fee: $500

HSPV 999 Independent Study

An opportunity for a student to work on a special project under the guidance of a faculty member.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

2 Course Units