Latin American & Latino Studies (LALS)

LALS 016 Topics in Literature

Freshman Seminars under the title "Topics in Literature" will afford entering students who are considering literary study as their major the opportunity to explore a particular and limited subject with a professor whose current work lies in that area. Topics may range from the lyric poems of Shakespeare's period to the ethnic fiction of contemporary America. Small class-size will insure all students the opportunity to participate in lively discussions. Students may expect frequent and extensive writing assignments, but these seminars are not writing courses; rather, they are intensive introductions to the serious study of literature. One of them may be counted toward the English major and may be applied to a period, genre, or thematic requirement within the major.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Freshman Seminar

LALS 070 Latina/o Literature and Culture

This course provides an introduction to the broad literature on Latin America's rich colonial history. We will begin by tracing some of the early originas of - and points of contact between - the Indian, Iberian, and Africa men and women who formed the basis of colonial society. As the course progresses, we will explore the variety of ways in which colonial subjects lived, worked, ate, worshipped, and socialized. Lectures and reading assignments will draw upon a variety of sources, including court cases, artistic renderings, city maps and street plans, travel accounts of visits to the regions, and the material, cultural, and intellectual products made possible by the wealth and dynamism of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The course will conclude with an analysis of the Age of Revolutions, a period of dramatic upheaval that remains at the center of lively scholarly debates. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage the key questions driving these debates, the most important of which, perhaps, is: what is Latin America's colonial legacy?

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Walker, T.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Recitation

1 Course Unit

Notes: Fulfills History Tradition Distribution Requirement

LALS 071 Latin America 1782-Present

Surveys Latin American and Caribbean history from the Haitian Revolution of 1791 to the present. We will examine the legacy of Spanish colonialism and slavery, movements for national and cultural independence, twentieth-century radicalism, and the politics of race in contemporary Latin America. Readings include fictional as well as analytical representations, and a film series will accompany the course.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Farnsworth-Alvear

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

LALS 072 Introduction to Latin American and Latino Studies

Designed to introduce students to the interdisciplinary field of Latin American and Latino Studies, this is a seminar oriented toward first and second year students. Readings will range widely, from scholarly work on the colonial world that followed from and pushed back against the "conquest"; to literary and artistic explorations of Latin American identities; to social scientists' explorations of how Latinos are changing the United States in the current generation.

Taught by: Dr. Ann Farnsworth-Alvear

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

LALS 107 Freshman Seminar: The World After 1800

Freshmen seminars are small, substantive courses taught by members of the faculty and open only to freshmen. These seminars offer an excellent opportunity to explore areas not represented in high school curricula and to establish relationships with faculty members around areas of mutual interest. See www.college.upenn.edu/admissions/freshmen.php

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

LALS 116 Caribbean Culture and Politics

This course offers anthropological perspectives on the Caribbean as a geo-political and socio-cultural region, and on contemporary Caribbean diaspora cultures. We will examine how the region's long and diverse colonial history has structured relationships between race, ethnicity, class, gender and power, as well as how people have challenged these structures. As a region in which there have been massive transplantations of peoples and their cultures from Africa, Asia, and Europe, and upon which the United States has exerted considerable influence, we will quesiton the processes by which the meeting and mixing of peoples and cultures has occurred. Course readings include material on the political economy of slavery and the plantation system, family and community life, religious beliefs and practices, gender roles and ideologies, popular culture, and the differing ways national, ethnic, and racial identities are expressed on the islands and throughout the Caribbean diaspora.

Taught by: Thomas, D.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

LALS 174 Reform and Revolution in the Americas

The United States and Latin America produced a remarkable series of revolutions and reforms during the twentieth century. This course examines efforts throughout the hemisphere to define and address problems around land, labor, and property; nation, empire, and autonomy; and racism, democracy, and citizenship. It considers the relationship between national upheavals, the global consequences of events in the hemisphere, and the relation between social and political history, on the one hand, and the development of economic ideas, on the other.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Offner

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

LALS 175 Society and Culture in Brazil

With its booming economy, the recent inauguration of its first female president, and its selection as host to the 2012 World Cup and Olympic games, Brazil is growing in global prestige. But amid all these exciting developments are devastating socioeconomic inequalities. Access to safe living conditions, livable wages, higher education, and overall social mobility remain painfully out of reach to many Brazilians, the majority of whom are the descendants of slaves. Why do these problems persist in a country that has had such an enduring and widespread reputation as a "racial democracy"? What are the possibilities of closing the equality gap in Brazil?

Taught by: Walker, T.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

LALS 208 International Organizations in Latin America

International Organizations play a powerful role in mitigating conflict at the global level. What role do they play in solving problems related to global politics, economic development, corruption, inequality and civil society in Latin America? How much power, influence and control do they possess in the region? This course examines the role and impact international organizations have had on Latin America since the mid-20th century. After a review of theoretical and methodological persectives on the significance of IOs in international relations, students will examine the workings, issues and often controversies surrounding IOs in Latin America, including the IMF, World Bank, UN, OAS and ICC as wellas regional organizations such as the Inter-American Court of Human Rights and area trade blocs and agreements of Mercosur, NAFTA and others. Students will also explore the regional impact of transnational civil society organizations, such as human rights organizations and the International Olympic Committee. Students will be invited to participate in the Washington Model OAS from April 10-17.

Taught by: Bartch

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

LALS 209 Latino/as and the Law

Based in concepts and principles of Constitutional law, this course explores the interpretation and impact of seminal court cases in U.S. history as applied to Latino/as in the United States and abroad. With a particular focus on the 20th century, students will examine how court decisions have affected civil rights, immigration policies, welfare, political incorporation and identity and other important issues affecting Latino/as. Students will also explore additional themes including the status and treatment of Latinos in the criminal justice system, representation of Latino/as in the judiciary, and how Supreme Court decisions have also affected U.S. foreign policy with Latin America. Students will be introduced to a number of guest speakers who are academic experts and practioners in the field.

Taught by: Bartch

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

LALS 213 Latin American Politics

This course examines the dynamics of political and economic change in twentieth century Latin America, with the goal of achieving an understanding of contemporary politics in the region. We will analyze topics such as the incorporation of the region to the international economy and the consolidatio of oligarchic states (1880s to 1930s), corporatism, populism, and elict pacts (1930s and 1940s), social revolution, democratic breakdown, and military rule (1960s and 1970s), transitions to democracy and human rights advocacy (1980s) makret-oriented reforms (1990s), and the turn to the left of current governments (2000s). The course will draw primarily from the experiences of Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Chile and Mexico. No prior knowledge of the region is required.

Taught by: Falleti

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Recitation

0 Course Units

LALS 227 Educating for Democracy in Latin America and the U.S.

What does it mean to educate for a democracy, and for what type of democracy should we educate for? This course will examine these central questions and others pertaining to citizenship, democracy, and education as it relates to Latin America and Latino/as in the U.S. The course will first examine theoriesof education for democracy comparing and contrasting the works of persons including U.S. progressive-era writer John Dewey, Brazilian scholar Paolo Freire, and Penn President and political scientist Amy Gutmann. The course will delve into a civic and political education curriculum and pedagogies that have beencarried out in institutions, inequality, and culture in the region. The latterpart of the course will examine civic education practices of Latino/as here in the U.S. from primary schools to higher education. This course offers a service-learning component where students will be encouraged to volunteer with educational organizations in the Philadelphia community.

Taught by: Bartch

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

LALS 231 Perspectives in Brazilizan Culture

Topics vary. For current course description, please see department's webpage: http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/roml/portuguese/undergraduate/courses.html

Taught by: Flannery Marcia

Course not offered every year

Prerequisite: Taught in Portuguese

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

LALS 233 World History: Latin America Topics vary.

Topics vary

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

LALS 235 Latinos in United States

This course presents a broad overview of the Latino population in the United States that focuses on the economic and sociological aspects of Latino immigration and assimilation. Topics to be covered include: construction of Latino identity, the history of U.S. Latino immigration, Latino family patterns and household structure, Latino educational attainment. Latino incorporation into the U.S. labor force, earnings and economic well-being among Latino-origin groups, assimilation and the second generation. The course will stress the importance of understanding Latinos within the overall system of race and ethnic relations in the U.S., as well as in comparison with previous immigration flows, particularly from Europe. We will pay particular attention to the economic impact of Latio immigration on both the U.S. receiving and Latin American sending communities, and the efficacy and future possililities of U.S. immigration policy. Within all of these diverse topics, we will stress the heterogeneity of the Latino population according to national origin groups (i.e. Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, and other Latinos), as well as generational differences between immigrants and the native born.

Taught by: Emilio Parrado

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

LALS 238 Spanish Civil War & Postwar

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

LALS 248 Haitian Revolution

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

LALS 250 C.I.A. Assasinations and Coups in Latin America

Why has the United States government participated in political assasinations and coups d'etat in Latin America? How have these interventions affected Latin American political and economic outcomes? How have they helped or hurt U.S. interests in the region? This lecture course provides an introduction to the history and politics of U.S.-led assassinations and coups in Latin America since 1949. For each event, the course will help students understand (1) the goals of the U.S. government; (2) the historical and political context of the intervention; and (3) the outcomes and consequences, both in Latin America and for the United States. Knowledge of the history of U.S. involvement in regime change is critical for understanding contemporary foreign policy.

Taught by: Kronick

Course offered spring; odd-numbered years

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

LALS 254 Archaeology of the Inca

The Inca created a vast and powerful South American empire in the high Andes Mountains that was finally conquered by Spain. Using Penn's impressive Museum collections and other archaeological, linguistic, and historical sources, this course will examine Inca religion and worldview, architecture, sacred temples, the capital of Cuzco, ritual calendar, ceque system, textiles, metalworking, economic policies and expansionist politics from the dual perspectives of Inca rulers and their subjects. Our task is to explain the rise, dominance, and fall of the Incas as a major South American civilization.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Erickson

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

LALS 258 Caribbean Music & Diaspora

This survey course considers Caribbean musics within a broad and historical framework. Caribbean musical practices are explored by illustrating the many ways that aesthetics, ritual, communication, religion, and social structure are embodied in and contested through performance. These initial inquiries open onto an investigation of a range of theoretical concepts that become particularly pertinent in Caribbean contexts <-concepts such as post-colonialism, migration, ethnicity, hybridity, syncretism, and globalization. Each of these concepts, moreover, will be explored with a view toward understanding its connections to the central analytical paradigm of the course <- diaspora. Throughout the course, we will listen to many different styles and repertories of music, ranging from calypso to junkanoo, from rumba to merengue, and from dancehall to zouk. We will then work to understand them not only in relation to the readings that frame our discussions but also in relations to our own North-American contexts of music consuption and production.

Taught by: Rommen

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

LALS 273 The Immigrant City

Immigration is among the most important phenomena shaping neighborhoods, cities, and regions. Understanding migration is fundamental to understanding urbanization, community development, and urban society today. This course examines the development of immigrant communities in United States cities and suburbs. Class readings, discussions, and visits to a variety of Philadelphia immigrant neighborhoods explore themes including labor markets, commerce, housing, civil society, racial and ethnic relations, integration, and the public sphere. We study the diverse dynamics and impacts of immigration through foundational readings and close observation of various newcomer and receiving communities. The first part of the course surveys migration and community formation among a broad range of ethnic groups in different sorts of city and suburban neighborhoods, mainly through history, sociology, and geography. The second part focuses on public policy and community and economic development practices related to migration at the local, regional, national, and trans-national scales.

Taught by: Vitiello, Domenic

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

LALS 274 Facing America

This course explores the visual history of race in the United States as both self-fashioning and cultural mythology by examining the ways that conceptions of Native American, Latino, and Asian identity, alongside ideas of Blackness and Whiteness, have combined to create the various cultural ideologies of class, gender, and sexuality that remain evident in historical visual and material culture. We also investigate the ways that these creations have subsequently helped to launch new visual entertainments, including museum spectacles, blackface minstrelsy, and early film, from the colonial period through the 1940s.

Taught by: Shaw

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

LALS 291 Latin American Literature

This course explores an aspect of Latina/o literature intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

Notes: Spaces will be reserved for English Majors

LALS 314 Transtitions to Democracy

Taught by: Falleti

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

LALS 317 The Politics of Matter and the Matter of Politics

What is nature? What is culture? What kinds of practices and actors constitute what we call science? Who and what constitute the sphere we refer to as politics? A number of theoretical developments in cultural anthropology, political theory, critical geography, and feminist science studies have problematized the modernist ontological divide between Nature and Culture and a whole series of binary oppositions (such as objects/subjects, matter/form, bio/geo) that follow from it. Taking inspiration from this literature and placing it in conversation with Native and Indigenous scholarship and a series of contemporary socio-environmental struggles occuring in Latin America and beyond, this course will discuss the conceptual-methodological tools that a concern with politics of matter has generated. The epistemic and political implications of these tools go beyond their analytical usefulness as innovative devices to explore novel phenomena. They complicate well-established fields ofinquiry, such as political ecology and economy, environmental studies, ethics, social justice, and modern politics; and, indeed, the singular ontology that these fields may inadvertently and explicitly sustain. We will explore how it is that things, stuff, matter, 'nature' came to fall outside modern politics as such, and the kinds of ethico-political repercussions that problematizing this division may produce.

Taught by: Lyons

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

LALS 328 Democracy in Trouble: OAS to the Rescue?

Democracy in the Americas is in trouble. Entrenched political, economic, and social inequality, combined with environmental degradation, weak institutions, pervasive health epidemics, weapon proliferation, and other pressing issues pose formidable challenges for strengthening democratic ideals and institutions. TheOrganization of American States (OAS), is uniquely poised to confront and purposively focused to strengthen peace, security, democracy, and human rights. In this community based course, students will study the role and history of the OASwhile working directly with area public high school students in preparation forthe OAS annual high model OAS simulation in Washington, DC.

Taught by: Bartch

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

LALS 385 Religion and Politics in Latin America

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

LALS 387 Topics in Africana Studies

Topics vary: Black Feminist Approaches to History & Memory - The term black feminism emerged in public discourse amid the social, political, and cultural turbulence of the 1960s. The roots of black feminism, however, are much older, easily reaching back to the work of black women abolitionists and social critics of the nineteenth century. The concept continued to grow and evolve in the work of twentieth century black women writers, journalists, activists, and educators as they sought to document black women's lives. Collectively, their work established black feminism as a political practice dedicated to the equality of all people. More recently, black feminism has been deployed as a tool for theoretical and scholarly analysis that is characterized by an understanding that race, class, gender, and sexuality are inextricably interconnected.

Taught by: Osuji, Sanders-Johnson, Willis

One-term course offered either term

Prerequisites: Junior and Senior Seminar

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

LALS 388 Topics in Spanish and Latin American Cinema

Prerequisite: Spanish 219 or Spanish 223

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

LALS 389 Topics in Modern and Contemporary Art

Topic varies. Spring 2019: The end of the last century saw a shift in the way contemporary artistic practice was conceived. This class will consider the work and writings of key artists and thinkers of the last 50 years who have tackled issues of race, class, consumption, marginality, nationality, and modernism.

Taught by: Shaw

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

LALS 394 Spanish American Fiction

Topics vary. See the Romance Languages Department's website at http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/roml for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Prerequisite: Span 219

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

LALS 395 Hispanic Theater

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

Taught by: Regueiro

Course not offered every year

Prerequisite: Spanish 219 or Spanish 223

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

LALS 396 Introduction to Spanish American Literature

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

Course not offered every year

Prerequisite: Spanish 219 or Spanish 223

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

LALS 397 Studies in Spanish American Culture

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

Course not offered every year

Prerequisite: Spanish 219 or Spanish 223

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

LALS 398 History of Spanish American Culture

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

Course not offered every year

Prerequisite: Span 219

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

LALS 399 Independent Study

Individual research to be taken under the direction of a faculty member. Students wishing to do an independent study should contact the Latin American and Latino Studies program.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1 Course Unit

LALS 402 Why Latin America Matters: Examining Us-Latin American Foreign Relations

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

LALS 417 Comparative Racial Politics

This course combines scholarship on race and racism in plural societies with qualitative approaches to the study of political institutions, phenomena and actors. Germany, Brazil, France and Cuba will be examined as individual country cases and in comparative perspective. Conceptual and theoretical readings on race, racism and politics provide students with the analytic too to draw more abstract lessons and generalizable conclusions about how racial and ethno-national hierarchy involves the role of the state and political economy, culture, norms and institutions. Students will also examine the impact of civil rights movements for political equality in response to legacies of racial and ethno-national hierarchy and inequality. Finally, students will become familiar with scholarship on nationalism and social movements as they relate to racial politics.

Taught by: Hanchard

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

LALS 420 Adv Tpcs in Afrcana Stds

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

LALS 424 Latinx Communities and the Role of CBO's in Social Change

The purpose of this course to create a Latino Studies/Service Learning ABCS course that cultivates dialogue and knowledge about the social, political, cultural and historical complexities of the Latinx experience in the United States (Philadelphia in particular) and the roles Latinx CBO's play in meeting the needs of Latinx communities and in impacting social change.

Taught by: Irizarry

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

LALS 425 Latin@ Cultural History: the Resiliency and Impact of Latin@ Cultural Expressions in the Us

This course takes a multi-disciplinary approach to the study of the resiliency and impact of Latin@ cultural and artistic contributions, esthetics, expressions and institution building int he United Stats from the Civil Rights Era to the present. We will explore how Latin@s arguculturally defining being "American"; how their artistic expressions fit and influence the creativity and productivity of American and global Arts & Cultural expressions; and the Latin@ interactions of race, culture, society, economy and politics in the U.S.

Taught by: Irizarry, Johnny

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

LALS 431 Modern Mexican Society

An introduction to social, political, and economic organization of modern Mexico. This course traces to evolution of Mexico's fundamental societal institutions from their birth during the Mexican Revolution of 1910, through their flowering during the 1950's and 1960's, to recent changes under neoliberal administrations. The course ends with a discussion of Mexico's transition to democracy and the election of the first opposition President in 80 years.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

LALS 433 Andean Archaeology

Consideration of the culture history of the native peoples of the Andean area, with emphasis on the pre-conquest archaeology of the Central-Andean region.

Taught by: Erickson

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

LALS 436 Latina/Os and the Law

Activity: Lecture

1 Course Unit

LALS 437 Love,Anger,Madness: Love, Anger, Madness: History and Silences in Modern Haiti

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

LALS 526 Transitional Justice in Latin America

Activity: Online Course

1 Course Unit

LALS 527 Spring 2015: Race, Gender & Auto/Biography

SPRING 2017: Market Women, Madames, Mistresses & Mother Superior studies gender, labor, sexuality, and race in the Caribbean. In our historical examination of primary source documents alongside literature, and popular media, we will question some of the iconic representations of Caribbean and Latin American women in order to understand the meaning, purpose and usages of these women s bodies as objects of praise, possession, obsession and/or ridicule by communities, governments and religions within and outside of the region. Beginning in the late-18th century and ending with contemporary migration narratives, this course considers the relationship between slave society and colonial pasts on gender performance in the modern Caribbean, Latin America, and their diasporas.

Taught by: Sanders

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

LALS 557 Seminar in Archaeological Theory and Method: Archaeology of Landscapes

Advanced seminar for potential professional archaeologists. Course will examine critically main past and present theoretical issues in archaeological research and interpretation, and consider various methodologies utilized towards these interpretive ends.

Taught by: Erickson, C.

Course not offered every year

Prerequisites: ANTH 241 or ANTH 600 and one archaeology area course or permission from instructor

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

LALS 590 Introduction to Francophone Literature

An introduction to major literary movements and authors from five areas of Francophonie: the Maghreb, West Africa, Central Africa, the Caribbean and Quebec.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

LALS 655 Democratization

This graduate class focuses on issues of democratization (and de-democratization), as studied in the comparative politics literature. The course is structured in four parts. In the first part, we scrutinize conceptualizations and measurements of democracy. In the second part, we study competing political theories about the origins of democracy. The third part of the seminar is devoted to the study of democratic transition and consolidation processes. To finish, we tackle specific issues in democratization such as social capital and civic participation, as well as the resilience of (subnational) authoritarianism.

Taught by: Falleti

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

LALS 694 Spanish & Latin Am Cine

Topics vary. See the Romance Languages Department's website at http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/roml/ for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

LALS 697 Studies in Latin American Culture

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

Course not offered every year

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit

LALS 771 Oral History

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1 Course Unit