Latin American & Latino Studies (LALS)

LALS 016 Topics in Literature

An introduction to Writing about Literature, with emphasis on a particular theme, genre, or period. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of current offerings.

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: CIMS 015, CLST 019, ENGL 015, GSWS 017

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 060 Latina/o Literature and Culture

This course offers a broad introduction to the study of Latina/o/x culture. We will examine literature, theater, visual art, and popular cultural forms, including murals, poster art, graffiti, guerrilla urban interventions, novels, poetry, short stories, and film. In each instance, we will study this work within its historical context and with close attention to the ways it illuminates class formation, racialization, and ideologies of gender and sexuality as they shape Latino/a/xs' experience in the U.S. Topics addressed in the course will include immigration and border policy, revolutionary nationalism and its critique, anti-imperialist thought, Latinx feminisms, queer latinidades, ideology, identity formation, and social movements. While we will address key texts, historical events, and intellectual currents from the late 19th century and early 20th century, the course will focus primarily on literature and art from the 1960s to the present. All texts will be in English.

Taught by: Sternad Ponce de Leon

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ARTH 070, COML 070, ENGL 070, GSWS 060

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 070 Colonial Latin America

The year 1492 was pivotal in the history of the world. It precipitated huge population movements within the Americas and across the Atlantic - a majority of them involuntary as in the case of indigenous and African people who were kidnapped and enslaved. It led to cataclysmic cultural upheavals, including the formation of new cultures in spaces inhabited by people of African, European and indigenous descent. This course explores the processes of destruction and creation in the region known today as Latin America in the period 1400 - 1800. Class readings are primary sources and provide opportunities to learn methods of source analysis in contexts marked by radically asymmetrical power relationships.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Norton

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 070, HIST 070

Activity: Recitation

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 071 Modern Latin America, 1808-Present

This course examines central themes of Latin American history, from independence to the present. It engages a hemispheric and global approach to understand the economic and social transformations of the region. We will explore the anti-imperial struggles, revolutions, social movements, and global economic crises that have given rise to new national projects for development, or have frustrated the realization of such goals. Taking a historical perspective, we ask: What triggers imperial breakdown? How did slaves navigate the boundary between freedom and bondage? Was the Mexican Revolution revolutionary? How did the Great Depression lead to the rise of state-led development? In what ways have citizens mobilized for equality, a decent standard of living, and cultural inclusion? And what future paths will the region take given uneasy export markets and current political uncertainty?

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Teixeira

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: HIST 071

Activity: Recitation

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 072 Introduction to Latin American and Latino Studies

Designed to introduce students to the interdisciplinary field of Latin American and Latino Studies, this is a seminar oriented toward first and second year students. Readings will range widely, from scholarly work on the colonial world that followed from and pushed back against the "conquest"; to literary and artistic explorations of Latin American identities; to social scientists' explorations of how Latinos are changing the United States in the current generation.

Taught by: Dr. Ann Farnsworth-Alvear

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: HIST 072

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 078 The African Diaspora: Global Dimensions

This class examines the cultural and social ramifications of the African diaspora on a global level. It is divided into two major sections. The first section provides the historical background to the African diaspora by focusing on the forced migration of Africans to Spanish and Portuguese colonies in the Americas. We will then delve into the black experience in French and British colonial spaces. In this section, we will also endeavor to move beyond the Atlantic-centric paradigm in studies of the African diaspora by examining free and unfree migrations of African people across the Indian Ocean to places as far away as India and the Philippines. The second half of the class devotes significant attention to the historical legacy of slavery and colonialism in places like Brazil, Cuba and the United States. In this section, we will discuss such issues as race relations, the struggle for civil rights for African-descent people as well as the emergence and the implementation of affirmative action policies in places like Brazil and the US.

Taught by: Ferreira

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AFRC 073, HIST 078

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 091 Sustainable Development and Culture in Latin America

This interdisciplinary course exposes students to the three dimensions of sustainable development -environmental, economic, and social- through an examination of three products -peyote, coca, and coffee- that are crucial in shaping modern identity in areas of Latin America. The course integrates this analysis of sustainable development in relation to cultural sustainability and cultural practices associated with peyote, coca, and coffee and their rich, traditional heritage and place in literature, film, and the arts.

Taught by: Gimenez

Course offered fall; even-numbered years

Also Offered As: ANTH 091, ENVS 091, SPAN 091

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 107 Freshman Seminar: The World After 1800

Freshmen seminars are small, substantive courses taught by members of the faculty and open only to freshmen. These seminars offer an excellent opportunity to explore areas not represented in high school curricula and to establish relationships with faculty members around areas of mutual interest. See www.college.upenn.edu/admissions/freshmen.php

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 012, PSCI 010

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 116 Caribbean Culture and Politics

This course offers anthropological perspectives on the Caribbean as a geo-political and socio-cultural region, and on contemporary Caribbean diaspora cultures. We will examine how the region's long and diverse colonial history has structured relationships between race, ethnicity, class, gender and power, as well as how people have challenged these structures. As a region in which there have been massive transplantations of peoples and their cultures from Africa, Asia, and Europe, and upon which the United States has exerted considerable influence, we will quesiton the processes by which the meeting and mixing of peoples and cultures has occurred. Course readings include material on the political economy of slavery and the plantation system, family and community life, religious beliefs and practices, gender roles and ideologies, popular culture, and the differing ways national, ethnic, and racial identities are expressed on the islands and throughout the Caribbean diaspora.

Taught by: Thomas, D.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 116, ANTH 116

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 121 Silver and Gold in the Americas from pre-history to the present

Precious metals have shaped economies and socio-cultural processes in the Americas for thousands of years. Students will work with pre-Columbian gold objects held by the University Museum and be introduced to the long history of indigenous metallurgy. We will also analyze the way gold and silver sent from the "New World" to the "Old World" played a key role in changing economies around the globe. Locally, mining centers were places marked by forced labor, conspicuous consumption, and the destruction of ecosystems. Internationally, gold and silver prices had outsized effects on monetary and trade policies. This course uses case studies to delve into the fascinating history of precious metals and mining in North and South America. We will analyze documents describing the gold objects ransacked by Spanish conquistadors, examine 17th Century proto-industrial silver mining at Potosi, Bolivia, trace the impact and human cost of the huge gold strikes in Minas Gerais, in colonial Brazil, read new work on the California and Yukon moments of "rush", and briefly discuss the role of precious metals in money laundering. An introductory unit focuses on the history of the gold standard in the United States and internationally.

Taught by: Farnsworth-Alvear

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: HIST 121

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 157 Accordions of the New World

This course focuses on the musical genres and styles (both traditional and popular) that have grown up around the accordion in the New World. We will begin our explorations in Nova Scotia and move toward the Midwest, travelling though the polka belt. From there, our investigation turns toward Louisiana and Texas--toward zydeco, Cajun, and Tex-Mex music. We will then work our way through Central and South America, considering norteno, cumbia, vallenato, tango, chamame, and forro. Our journey will include in the Caribbean, where we will spend some time thinking about merengue and rake-n-scrape music. Throughout the semester, the musical case studies will be matched by readings and films that afford ample opportunity to think about the ways that music is bound up in ethnicity, identity, and class. We will also have occasion to thinkabout the accordian as a multiply meaningful instrument that continues to be incorporated into debates over cultural politics and mobilized as part of strategies of representation through the New World.

Taught by: Rommen, T.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 157, FOLK 157, MUSC 255

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 158 Latin American Music

This survey course considers Latin American musics within a broad cultural and historical framework. Latin American musical practices are explored by illustrating the many ways that aesthetics, ritual, communication, religion, and social structure are embodied in and contested through performance. These initial inquiries open onto an investigation of a range of theoretical concepts that become particularly pertinent in Latin American contexts--concepts such as post-colonialism, migration, ethnicity, and globalization. Throughout the course, we will listen to many different styles and repertories of music and then work to understand them not only in relation to the readings that frame our discussions but also in relation to our own, North American contexts of music consumption and production. (Formerly Music 158).

Taught by: Rommen

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: MUSC 258

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 174 Capitalism, Socialism and Crisis in the 20th Century Americas

From the crisis of the Great Depression through the 1970s, the United States and Latin America produced remarkable efforts to remake society and political economy. This course analyzes the Cuban and Guatemalan revolutions, as well as social movements that transformed the United States: the black freedom movement, the labor movement, and changing forms of Latino politics. In all three countries, Americans looked for ways to reform capitalism or build socialism; address entrenched patterns of racism; define and realize democracy; and achieve national independence. They conceived of these challenges in dramatically different ways. Together, we'll compare national histories and analyze the relationships between national upheavals. In studying the US and Latin America together, the class allows students to explore central questions in both regions' histories. What did capitalism, socialism, and communism amount to? What did democracy mean? What were the roots of racial inequality and how did Americans address it? Why were Americans so enticed by economic growth, and how did they pursue it? How did the Cold War shape social movements? What purposes did unions serve? How did Christianity inform movements for and against social change? Studying these regions together also allows us to explore international interactions. How did the black freedom movement in the US relate to the Cuban revolution? How did Latin American immigration shape the US labor movement? How did US Cold War policy influence Latin American revolutionary movements? The goal of this class is for you to interpret the readings and decide what you think. What you learn in this class, and the quality of our experience together, depends on your reading closely, coming to class with informed ideas and questions, and being prepared to help your classmates answer theirs. We will read approximately 100 pages per week. No background is required.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Offner

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: HIST 174

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 175 Society and Culture in Brazil

With its booming economy, the recent inauguration of its first female president, and its selection as host to the 2012 World Cup and Olympic games, Brazil is growing in global prestige. But amid all these exciting developments are devastating socioeconomic inequalities. Access to safe living conditions, livable wages, higher education, and overall social mobility remain painfully out of reach to many Brazilians, the majority of whom are the descendants of slaves. Why do these problems persist in a country that has had such an enduring and widespread reputation as a "racial democracy"? What are the possibilities of closing the equality gap in Brazil?

Taught by: Walker, T.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 175, HIST 175

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 177 Colonial Pasts and Indigenous Futures: A History of Belize and Central America

The small country of Belize (formerly British Honduras) represents the past history and ongoing story of Central America and the region. Belize has a colonial past and present with strong ties to the UK and emerging connections to the US. At the same time, there is a growing post-colonial debate within the country about the role of indigenous Maya people in the past, present and future of the country. This course will be the first of two courses which will lead to active work in Belize during the summer of 2021 with the development and creation of a Community Museum within the Maya village of Indian Creek in southern Belize. This course will be taught by Richard M. Leventhal who has worked in Belize for the past 20 years. Leventhal will be joined by 3 Maya activists from Belize who will co-teach the class for 5-6 weeks out of the semester.

Taught by: Leventhal

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANTH 177, HIST 073

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 180 From Ayahuasca to Zoloft: Anthropological Approaches to Drugs and Drug Use

In this course we will consider the cultural, social, political, medical, and biological aspects of drugs (legal, illegal, pharmaceutical, botanical, and otherwise) through space and time. We will take a broad approach, thinking critically about what, who, and under what circumstances a given substance becomes a "drug." In doing so, we will be able to interrogate the linguistic dimensions of drugs, considering the way in which language creates social worlds and social meanings. We will explore different kinds of drugs, their origins, biochemical properties, and the biological pathways through which they affect us. We will also think about how drugs and drug use has changed over time, taking a cross-cultural and materialist perspective to investigate drug use past and present. Topics we will address include debates over the commercialization, criminalization, and decriminalization of hallucinogenic plants such as marijuana, the recent use of drugs ranging from LSD to magic mushrooms to treat depression and other mental illnesses, the legacies of colonialism and botanical migrations, the ethics of the pharmaceutical industry, and comparative explorations of the language about and approaches to addressing both the "crack epidemic" of the early 80s and 90s and the current opioid crisis. We will read both classic anthropological texts including ethnographies as well as works from other disciplines including science studies, biology, history, ethnobotany, and sociology.

Taught by: Hoke

Course offered fall; even-numbered years

Also Offered As: ANTH 180

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 208 International Organizations in Latin America

International Organizations (IOs) play a powerful role in mitigating conflict at the global level. What role do they play in solving problems related to global politics, economic development, corruption, inequality and civil society in Latin America? How much power, influence and control do they possess in the region? This course examines the role and impact international organizations have had on Latin America since the mid-20th century. After a review of theoretical and methodological perspectives on the significance of IOs in international relations, students will examine the workings, issues and often controversies surrounding IOs in Latin America, including the IMF, World Bank, UN, OAS and ICC as well as regional organizations such as the Inter-American Court of Human Rights and area trade blocs and agreements of Mercosur, NAFTA and others. There will be a special focus on the Organization of American States in preparation for the Washington Model OAS students will be invited to attend from April 6-10, 2020 in Washington, D.C. Students attending this simulation will represent the delegation of Dominican Republic. In addition, the course hosts policymakers and scholars as guest speakers throughout the semester.

Taught by: Bartch

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: PSCI 208

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 209 Latino/as and the Law

Based in concepts and principles of Constitutional law, this course explores the interpretation and impact of seminal court cases in U.S. history as applied to Latino/as in the United States and abroad. With a particular focus on the 20th century, students will examine how court decisions have affected civil rights, immigration policies, welfare, political incorporation and identity and other important issues affecting Latino/as. Students will also explore additional themes including the status and treatment of Latinos in the criminal justice system, representation of Latino/as in the judiciary, and how Supreme Court decisions have also affected U.S. foreign policy with Latin America. Students will be introduced to a number of guest speakers who are academic experts and practioners in the field.

Taught by: Bartch

Also Offered As: PSCI 202

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 210 Indigenous Communities and Community Museums: Directions for the Future

Community museums are becoming more commonplace within indigenous communities throughout the Americas. These museums are created internally, by and for communities, as a way of framing self-identity and representation. The development of these museums is focused upon the need to define and highlight identity and differences between indigenous communities and the surrounding world. These community museums contrast dramatically with other cultural museums where the stories and histories of groups tend to be controlled by the nation-state and professional curators. This course will focus on the nature of indigenous communities, cultural representation, and identity with a focus upon the modern Maya communities of southern Belize. In addition, museums and community museums, world-wide, will be examined and analyzed. What are the different models of community museums and what is the process for the development of such museums? Is the only de-colonized museum one created and framed within and by the community? Seminar format with weekly discussions, readings, and a final research paper. There are no pre-requisites for this course and a background in anthropology is not required. This course will be connected to a community museum project in Indian Creek, Belize where travel and work will be initiated over the summer of 2021. This course is recommended but not required for participation in summer research program in Belize

Taught by: Leventhal

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANTH 209

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 213 Latin American Politics

This course examines the dynamics of political and economic change in twentieth century Latin America, with the goal of achieving an understanding of contemporary politics in the region. We will analyze topics such as the incorporation of the region to the international economy and the consolidatio of oligarchic states (1880s to 1930s), corporatism, populism, and elict pacts (1930s and 1940s), social revolution, democratic breakdown, and military rule (1960s and 1970s), transitions to democracy and human rights advocacy (1980s) makret-oriented reforms (1990s), and the turn to the left of current governments (2000s). The course will draw primarily from the experiences of Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Chile and Mexico. No prior knowledge of the region is required.

Taught by: Falleti

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: PSCI 213

Activity: Recitation

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 227 Educating for Democracy in Latin America and the U.S.

What does it mean to educate for a democracy, and for what type of democracy should we educate for? This course will examine these central questions and others pertaining to citizenship, democracy, and education as it relates to Latin America and Latino/as in the U.S. The course will first examine theoriesof education for democracy comparing and contrasting the works of persons including U.S. progressive-era writer John Dewey, Brazilian scholar Paolo Freire, and Penn President and political scientist Amy Gutmann. The course will delve into a civic and political education curriculum and pedagogies that have beencarried out in institutions, inequality, and culture in the region. The latterpart of the course will examine civic education practices of Latino/as here in the U.S. from primary schools to higher education. This course offers a service-learning component where students will be encouraged to volunteer with educational organizations in the Philadelphia community.

Taught by: Bartch

Also Offered As: PSCI 228

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 231 Perspectives in Brazilizan Culture

Topics vary. For current course description, please see department's webpage: http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/roml/portuguese/undergraduate/courses.html

Taught by: Mercia Flannery

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: PRTG 221

Prerequisite: PRTG 202

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 232 Race and Ethnic Politics

This course examines the role of race and ethnicity in the political discourse through a comparative survey of recent literature on the historical and contemporary political experiences of the four major minority groups (Blacks or African Americans, American Indians, Latinos or Hispanic Americans, and Asian Americans). A few of the key topics will include assimilation and acculturation seen in the Asian American community, understanding the political direction of Black America in a pre and post Civil Rights era, and assessing the emergence of Hispanics as the largest minority group and the political impact of this demographic change. Throughout the semester, the course will introduce students to significant minority legislation, political behavior, social movements, litigation/court rulings, media, and various forms of public opinion that have shaped the history of racial and ethnic minority relations in this country. Readings are drawn from books and articles written by contemporary political scientists.

Taught by: Gillion

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 232, PSCI 231

Activity: Recitation

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 233 World History: Latin America Topics vary.

Topics vary

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: AFRC 234, ARTH 369, EALC 141, GSWS 233, HIST 233

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 235 Latinos in United States

This course presents a broad overview of the Latino population in the United States that focuses on the economic and sociological aspects of Latino immigration and assimilation. Topics to be covered include: construction of Latino identity, the history of U.S. Latino immigration, Latino family patterns and household structure, Latino educational attainment. Latino incorporation into the U.S. labor force, earnings and economic well-being among Latino-origin groups, assimilation and the second generation. The course will stress the importance of understanding Latinos within the overall system of race and ethnic relations in the U.S., as well as in comparison with previous immigration flows, particularly from Europe. We will pay particular attention to the economic impact of Latio immigration on both the U.S. receiving and Latin American sending communities, and the efficacy and future possililities of U.S. immigration policy. Within all of these diverse topics, we will stress the heterogeneity of the Latino population according to national origin groups (i.e. Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, and other Latinos), as well as generational differences between immigrants and the native born.

Taught by: Emilio Parrado

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: SOCI 266

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 238 Span Civil War & Postwr

Also Offered As: HIST 238

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 248 The Haitian Revolution

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 248, HIST 248

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 250 U.S. Intervention in Latin America

Why has the United States government participated in regime change in Latin America? How have these interventions affected Latin American political and economic outcomes? How have they helped or hurt U.S. interests in the region? This lecture course provides an introduction to the history and politics of U.S. participation in regime change in Latin America since 1949. For each event, the course will help students understand (1) the goals of the U.S. government; (2) the historical and political context of the intervention; and (3) the outcomes and consequences, both in Latin America and for the United States. One set of short writing assignments will train students to identify the main argument of a reading and assess the quality of the evidence presented in support of that argument; a second set of short writing assignments will train students to make and defend their own argument (see draft syllabus for details).

Taught by: Kronick

Course offered spring; even-numbered years

Also Offered As: PSCI 250

Activity: Recitation

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 254 Archaeology of the Inca

The Inca created a vast and powerful South American empire in the high Andes Mountains that was finally conquered by Spain. Using Penn's impressive Museum collections and other archaeological, linguistic, and historical sources, this course will examine Inca religion and worldview, architecture, sacred temples, the capital of Cuzco, ritual calendar, ceque system, textiles, metalworking, economic policies and expansionist politics from the dual perspectives of Inca rulers and their subjects. Our task is to explain the rise, dominance, and fall of the Incas as a major South American civilization.

For BA Students: History and Tradition Sector

Taught by: Erickson

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANTH 254

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 258 Caribbean Music and Diaspora

This course considers Caribbean musics within a broad and historical framework.Caribbean musical practices are explored by illustrating the many ways that aesthetics, ritual, communication, religion, and social structure are embodied in and contested through performance. These initial inquiries open onto an investigation of a range of theoretical concepts that become particularly pertinent in Caribbean contexts--concepts such as post-colonialism, migration, ethnicity, hybridity, syncretism, and globalization. Each of these concepts, moreover, will be explored with a view toward understanding its connections to the central analytical paradigm of the course--diaspora. Throughout the course, we will listen to many different styles and repertories of music ranging from calpso to junkanoo, from rumba to merengue, and from dance hall to zouk. We will then work to understand them not only in relation to the readings that frame our discussions but also in relation to our own North-American contexts of music consumption and production. (Formerly Music 258).

Taught by: Rommen

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANTH 256, MUSC 257

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 273 The Immigrant City

This course focuses on immigrant communities in United States cities and suburbs. We survey migration and community experiences among a broad range of ethnic groups in different city and suburban neighborhoods. Class readings, discussions, and visits to Philadelphia neighborhoods explore themes including labor markets, commerce, housing, civil society, racial and ethnic relations, integration, refugee resettlement, and local, state, and national immigration policies. The class introduces students to a variety of social science approaches to studying social groups and neighborhoods, including readings in sociology, geography, anthropology, social history, and political science. Ultimately, the class aims to help students develop: 1) a broad knowledge of immigration and its impacts on U.S. cities and regions; 2) a comparative understanding of diverse migrant and receiving communities; and 3) familiarity with policies and institutions that seek to influence immigration and immigrant communities.

For BA Students: Society Sector

Taught by: Vitiello, Domenic

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: SOCI 270, URBS 270

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 274 Facing America

This course explores the visual history of race in the United States as both self-fashioning and cultural mythology by examining the ways that conceptions of Native American, Latino, and Asian identity, alongside ideas of Blackness and Whiteness, have combined to create the various cultural ideologies of class, gender, and sexuality that remain evident in historical visual and material culture. We also investigate the ways that these creations have subsequently helped to launch new visual entertainments, including museum spectacles, blackface minstrelsy, and early film, from the colonial period through the 1940s.

Taught by: Shaw, Staff

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 294, ARTH 274, ARTH 674, ASAM 294, CIMS 293

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 291 Latin American Literature

This course explores an aspect of Latina/o literature intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ENGL 270

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 310 Transdisciplinary Environmental Humanities

Emergent transdisciplinary fields, such as the environmental humanities, reflect a growing awareness that responses to contemporary environmental dilemmas require the collaborative work of not only diverse scientists, medical practitioners, and engineers, but also more expansive publics, including artists, urban and rural communities, social scientists, and legal fields. This course is inspired by the need to attend to environmental challenges, and their health, justice, and knowledge production implications, as inherently social concerns. The class is co-taught by faculty from the School of Arts and Sciences and the School of Medicine, and will address the challenges and possibilities of working across disciplinary boundaries, building collaborative affinities, and negotiating frictions between diverse methodologies and epistemological approaches. Dr. Kristina Lyons from the Department of Anthropology brings years of experience collaborating with soil scientists, small farmers, indigenous communities, lawyers, and judges in Colombia on watershed restoration projects, soil degradation, toxicity, and the implementation of socio-ecological justice. Dr. Marilyn Howarth is a medical doctor from the Center of Excellence in Environmental Toxicology of the School of Medicine and has experience engaging the public, legislators and regulators around environmental health issues affecting the quality of air, water, soil and consumer products. Through their different lenses, they will foster interdisciplinary environmental collaboration and scholarship by engaging students in discussions and research that bring together the arts and sciences regarding issues of urban air pollution, soil remediation, deforestation, and water contamination, among other environmental health problems. This inaugural course seeks to explore environmental humanities on the global scale. Using Dr. Lyons' deep insight and valuable connections to communities in Colombia, we will explore the experience of environmental degradation, opportunities and challenges for mitigation, and socio-environmental health implications there while placing these issues in conversation with U.S. public health, regulatory and political frameworks and community experiences on similar issues. A comparative exploration of environmental justice in both Colombia and the U.S. will be infused into much of the discussion. This class offers a unique opportunity for students from engineering, natural and social sciences, humanities and the arts to learn to converse and collaborate around pressing socio-environmental and public health issues.

Taught by: Lyons

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: ANTH 310

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 314 Transtitions to Democracy

Taught by: Falleti

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: PSCI 314

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 317 The Politics of Matter and the Matter of Politics

What is nature? What is culture? What kinds of practices and actors constitute what we call science? Who and what constitute the sphere we refer to as politics? A number of theoretical developments in cultural anthropology, political theory, critical geography, and feminist science studies have problematized the modernist ontological divide between Nature and Culture and a whole series of binary oppositions (such as objects/subjects, matter/form, bio/geo) that follow from it. Taking inspiration from this literature and placing it in conversation with Native and Indigenous scholarship and a series of contemporary socio-environmental struggles occurring in Latin America and beyond, this course will discuss the conceptual-methodological tools that a concern with politics of matter has generated. The epistemic and political implications of these tools go beyond their analytical usefulness as innovative devices to explore novel phenomena. They complicate well-established fields of inquiry, such as political ecology and economy, environmental studies, ethics, social justice, and modern politics; and, indeed, the singular ontology that these fields may inadvertently and explicitly sustain. We will explore how it is that things, stuff, matter, 'nature' came to fall outside modern politics as such, and the kinds of ethico-political repercussions that problematizing this division may produce.

Taught by: Kristina Lyons

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: ANTH 317

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 328 Diplomacy in the Americas - The Penn Model OAS Program

"Diplomacy in the Americas" an academically based community service course in which students work with Philadelphia and Norristown public school students to explore solutions to critical problems facing the Americas. Entrenched political, economic, and social inequality, combined with environmental degradation, weak institutions, pervasive health epidemics, weapon proliferation, and other issues pose formidable hurdles for strengthening democratic ideals and institutions. The Organization of the American States (OAS), the world's oldest regional organization, is uniquely poised to confront these challenges. "Diplomacy in the Americas" guides students through the process of writing policy resolutions as though the students were Organization of the American States (OAS) diplomats, basing their research and proposals on democracy, development, security, and human rights - the four pillars of the OAS. Students will also read literature about what it means to educate for a democracy and global citizenry, and they will have the opportunity to turn theory into practice by creating and executing curriculum to teach and mentor the high school students through interactive and experiential pedagogies.

Taught by: Bartch

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: PSCI 328

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 350 Archaeology of Civilizations in South America

This course provides a basic survey of the archaeology of civilizations of South America (the Andean region of the central highland and coastal areas that today are Peru and Bolivia and parts of Ecuador, Chile, and Argentina). Topics include the history of South American archaeology, peopling of the continent, origins and evolution of agriculture, early village life, ceremonial and domestic architecture, prehistoric art and symbolism, Andean cosmology and astronomy, indigenous technology, the historical ecology of landscapes, outside contacts and relationships, economics and trade, social and political structure, state formation and urbanism, and early contacts with Europeans. The lectures and readings are based on recent archaeological investigations and interpretations combined with appropriate analogy from ethnohistory and ethnography. The prehistory of the Amazonian lowlands and northern South America will be covered in other courses.

Taught by: Erickson

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANTH 350

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 359 Nutritional Anthropology

The course is an introduction to nutritional anthropology, an area of anthropology concerned with human nutrition and food systems in social, cultural and historical contexts. On the one hand, nutritional anthropologists study the significance of the food quest in terms of survival and health. On the other hand, they also know that people eat food for a variety of reasons that may have little, if anything, to do with nutrition, health, or survival. While the availability of food is dependent upon the physical environment, food production systems, and economic resources, food choice and the strategies human groups employ to gain access to and distribute food are deeply embedded in specific cultural patterns, social relationships, and political and economic systems. Thus, nutritional anthropology represents the interface between anthropology and the nutritional sciences, and as such, can provide powerful insights into the interactions of social and biological factors in the context of the nutritional health of individuals and populations. Because food and nutrition are quintessential biocultural issues, the course takes a biocultural approach drawing on perspectives from biological, socio-cultural and political-economic anthropology. Course content will include: a discussion of approaches to nutritional anthropology; basics of human nutrition; food systems, food behaviors and ideas; methods of dietary and nutritional assessment; and a series of case studies addressing causes and consequences to nutritional problems across the world.

Taught by: Hoke

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANTH 359, URBS 359

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 382 Blackness in Latin American Visual Culture, 16th-19th Centuries

The presence of Africans and their descendants produced a complex visual culture in colonial and 19th century Latin America. This course introduces students to a rich body of imagery from the Spanish and Portuguese-speaking Americas in order to explore the multiplicity of meanings ascribed to Blackness across the region; from colonial conceptions rooted in lineage and bloodlines, to the construction of race as an material and biological 'fact' in the 19th century. Sources include the casta paintings of colonial Mexico, fashion and material culture, the popular iconography and print culture forged by costumbrismo, and late 19th century photography. Focusing on several countries including Brazil, Cuba, Mexico and Peru, this seminar provides a thematic exploration of these sources through topics including slavery, citizenship, national identities, religion, self-fashioning and resistance. The aim is to explore how ideas of Blackness were configured, imposed and remade, through representations of Afrodescendants in the visual arts, and the production and use of visual and material culture in Black self-fashioning and collective identities.

Taught by: Melling

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AFRC 382, ARTH 308

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 384 Cuban Visual Culture

This course will focus on the urban history and cultural politics of contemporary Cuba with an emphasis on contemporary art and contemporary developments in the city of Havana. Students will learn about the Spanish influence on early colonial art, the development of formal academic art training and the changes to art instruction and the form and content of art created since the Revolution.

Taught by: Shaw, Schmenner

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 384, ARTH 384

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 385 Rel & Pol in Latin Amer

This course offers an introductory examination of the political and social role that the Catholic Church has played in Latin America from the time of the Spanish and Portuguese conquests in the 16th century to the end of the 20th century. Throughout this five-century period, the Catholic Church has not acted as a monolithic institution. Some members of the church have been associated with governments and those in power in order to exert control and domination over the population. Others have been among the few individuals or institutions that have spoken up against the injustices and oppression both of colonial governments in the 16th to 18th centuries, and of authoritarian regimes of independent republics in the 19th and 20th centuries. In this latter period, our analysis will include the churchs role in defending human, civil, political, and indigenous rights and in promoting the transition from the period of military or civilian dictatorships that ruled a good part of the region starting in the 1960s to civilian democratic regimes in the 1980s and 1990s. We will analyze six countries, three of which were under national security regimes: Brazil, Chile, and Argentina, and three others that experienced internal wars between guerrillas and military-backed civilian juntas: Guatemala, El Salvador, and Nicaragua.

Taught by: Lombera

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 386 Studies in Spanish Culture

This course covers topics in contemporary Spanish Culture, its specific emphasis varying with the instructor. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: CIMS 385, SPAN 386

Prerequisite: SPAN 219 OR SPAN 223

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 387 Topics in Africana Studies

Topics vary: Black Feminist Approaches to History & Memory - The term black feminism emerged in public discourse amid the social, political, and cultural turbulence of the 1960s. The roots of black feminism, however, are much older, easily reaching back to the work of black women abolitionists and social critics of the nineteenth century. The concept continued to grow and evolve in the work of twentieth century black women writers, journalists, activists, and educators as they sought to document black women's lives. Collectively, their work established black feminism as a political practice dedicated to the equality of all people. More recently, black feminism has been deployed as a tool for theoretical and scholarly analysis that is characterized by an understanding that race, class, gender, and sexuality are inextricably interconnected.

Taught by: Osuji, Sanders-Johnson, Willis

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 387, GSWS 387, HIST 387

Prerequisites: Junior and Senior Seminar

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 388 Topics in Spanish and Latin American Cinema

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: CIMS 388, SPAN 388

Prerequisite: SPAN 219 SPAN 223

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 389 Topics in Modern and Contemporary Art

Topic varies. Spring 2019: The end of the last century saw a shift in the way contemporary artistic practice was conceived. This class will consider the work and writings of key artists and thinkers of the last 50 years who have tackled issues of race, class, consumption, marginality, nationality, and modernism.

Taught by: Shaw

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AFRC 388, ARTH 388

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 391 Sustainable Development And Culture in Latin America

This interdisciplinary course exposes students to the three dimensions of sustainable development -environmental, economic, and social- through an examination of three products -peyote, coca, and coffee- that are crucial in shaping modern identity in areas of Latin America. The course integrates this analysis of sustainable development in relation to cultural sustainability and cultural practices associated with peyote, coca, and coffee and their rich, traditional heritage and place in literature, film, and the arts. This is an upper level seminar open to majors and minors of Spanish and those who have completed Pre-requiste SPAN 219 or SPAN 223 or permission of the Undergraduate Chair.

Taught by: Gimenez

Course offered fall; even-numbered years

Also Offered As: ENVS 391, SPAN 391

Prerequisite: SPAN 219 OR SPAN 223

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 394 Spanish American Fiction

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: SPAN 394

Prerequisite: SPAN 219 OR SPAN 223

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 395 Hispanic Theater

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: SPAN 395

Prerequisite: SPAN 219 OR SPAN 223

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 396 Introduction to Spanish American Literature

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CIMS 390, COML 390, GSWS 391, SPAN 390

Prerequisite: SPAN 219 OR SPAN 223

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 397 Studies in Spanish American Culture

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CIMS 396, GSWS 396, SPAN 396

Prerequisite: SPAN 219 OR SPAN 223

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 398 History of Spanish American Culture

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CIMS 397, GSWS 397, SPAN 397

Prerequisites: SPAN 219, 223

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 399 Independent Study

Individual research to be taken under the direction of a faculty member. Students wishing to do an independent study should contact the Latin American and Latino Studies program.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Independent Study

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 402 Us-Latin American Rel

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 417 Comparative Racial Politics

This course combines scholarship on race and racism in plural societies with qualitative approaches to the study of political institutions, phenomena and actors. Germany, Brazil, France and Cuba will be examined as individual country cases and in comparative perspective. Conceptual and theoretical readings on race, racism and politics provide students with the analytic too to draw more abstract lessons and generalizable conclusions about how racial and ethno-national hierarchy involves the role of the state and political economy, culture, norms and institutions. Students will also examine the impact of civil rights movements for political equality in response to legacies of racial and ethno-national hierarchy and inequality. Finally, students will become familiar with scholarship on nationalism and social movements as they relate to racial politics.

Taught by: Hanchard

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 417, HIST 467, PSCI 412, SOCI 417

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 420 Advanced Topics in Africana Studies

Topics vary. See the Africana Studies Department's course list at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offering. After an examination of the philosophical, legal, and political perspectives on Human Rights, this course will focus on US policies and practices relevant to Human Rights. Toward that end, emphasis will be placed on both the domestic and the international aspects of Human Rights as reflected in US policies and practices. Domestically, the course will discuss (1) the process of incorporating the International Bill of Human Rights into the American legal system and (2) the US position on and practices regarding the political, civil, economic, social, and cultural rights of minorities and various other groups within the US. Internationally, the course will examine US Human Rights policies toward Africa. Specific cases of Rwanda, Kenya, South Africa and Egypt, as well as other cases from the continent, will be presented in the assessment of US successes and failures in the pursuit of its Human Rights strategy in Africa. Readings will include research papers, reports, statutes, treaties, and cases.

Taught by: Charles, Hanchard, Fetni, Zuberi

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 420, SOCI 460

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 424 Latinx Communities and the Role of CBO's in Social Change

The purpose of this course to create a Latino Studies/Service Learning ABCS course that cultivates dialogue and knowledge about the social, political, cultural and historical complexities of the Latinx experience in the United States (Philadelphia in particular) and the roles Latinx CBO's play in meeting the needs of Latinx communities and in impacting social change.

Taught by: Irizarry

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: SOCI 424

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 425 Latin@ Cultural History

This course takes a multi-disciplinary approach to the study of the resiliency and impact of Latin@ cultural and artistic contributions, esthetics, expressions and institution building int he United Stats from the Civil Rights Era to the present. We will explore how Latin@s arguculturally defining being "American"; how their artistic expressions fit and influence the creativity and productivity of American and global Arts & Cultural expressions; and the Latin@ interactions of race, culture, society, economy and politics in the U.S.

Taught by: Irizarry

Also Offered As: SOCI 425

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 433 Andean Archaeology

Consideration of the culture history of the native peoples of the Andean area, with emphasis on the pre-conquest archaeology of the Central-Andean region.

Taught by: Erickson

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANTH 433

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 437 Afrc Undergrad Seminar

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: AFRC 436, GSWS 436, HIST 436

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 451 The U.S. and the World since 1898

This class examines the emergence of the U.S. as a world power since 1898, and considers both the international and domestic consequences of U.S. foreign relations. In one respect, the twentieth century was a strange time to become a global empire: it was the period when colonial systems centered in Europe, Russia, Japan, and Turkey collapsed, and new nations emerged throughout Africa and Asia. This class explores the changing strategies of military, economic, and political intervention that the U.S. pursued as colonization lost legitimacy. Within that framework, the class invites students to think about several questions: How did the idea and practice of empire change over the twentieth century? How did the United States relate to new visions of independence emerging in Africa, Asia, and Latin America? How did global interactions both inform and reflect racial ideology in the United States? Finally, how did international affairs transform U.S. politics and social movements?

Taught by: Offner

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: HIST 451

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 510 Inner Outer Space Travel Writing: A Creative Writing Workshop

Inner Outer Space Travel Writing is a creative writing workshop focused on writing work within the science fiction/speculative fiction/alternative futurities, science/land/travel writing, and creative-critical nonfiction traditions. Students will work within a variety of genres, with an emphasis on the essay, the short story, screen/tele-play, play, blog and performance. Students will read recommended texts from within their particular interests, and the course will culminate in both a public performance and dissemination/publication via another media platform (zine, website, podcast, etc). All levels of experience, from none/first-time writer to published writers, are encouraged to register for the course.

Taught by: Bracho

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ENGL 131, GSWS 510

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 511 Ethics, Archaeology, and Cultural Heritage

This seminar will explore some of the most important issues that are now a central part of archaeological, anthropological and historical research throughout the world. The identification and control of cultural heritage is a central part of the framework for research within other communities. Issues for this course will also include cultural identity, human rights, repatriation, colonialism, working with communities and many other topics. Field research today must be based upon a new series of ethical standards that will be discussed and examined within this class. Major topics include: cultural heritage - definitions and constructs, cosmopolitanism and collecting, archaeology and looting, cultural heritage preservation, museums - universal and national, museum acquisition policies, cultural identity, international conventions (including underwater issues), national laws of ownership, community based development, cultural tourism, development models, and human rights.

Taught by: Leventhal

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: ANTH 511

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 512 Passion Projects: Radical Experiments in Writing Plays, Screenplays, and Pilots

This creative writing workshop will focus on writing for screen, stage and internet and is open to undergraduate and graduate students at every level of writing experience. The course will be writing intensive and also include the reading and analysis of feminist, trans, queer, working class and racially liberatory plays, films, television and performance as models of inspiration. Meditation, drawing, theater games, improv exercises, screenings and outings to see work on and off campus will round out this holistic and experimental approach to making work that illuminates and entertains audiences from across the US and global audience spectrum.

Taught by: Bracho

Also Offered As: ENGL 134, GSWS 512

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 513 Latin American Politics

This graduate level course will be embedded in course PSCI/LALS 213, the same way that PSCI 517 (Russian Politics) is embedded in PSCI 217. In other words, graduate students taking this course will have to attend lectures twice a week, but instead of discussing materials in recitations will meet with Professor Falleti, either weekly (one hour) or biweekly (two hours), to discuss the main topics of the course and research questions and proposals related to the course.

Taught by: Falleti

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: PSCI 513

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 526 Trans Just in Latin Amer

Activity: Online Course

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 527 Spring 2015: Race, Gender & Auto/Biography

SPRING 2017: Market Women, Madames, Mistresses & Mother Superior studies gender, labor, sexuality, and race in the Caribbean. In our historical examination of primary source documents alongside literature, and popular media, we will question some of the iconic representations of Caribbean and Latin American women in order to understand the meaning, purpose and usages of these women s bodies as objects of praise, possession, obsession and/or ridicule by communities, governments and religions within and outside of the region. Beginning in the late-18th century and ending with contemporary migration narratives, this course considers the relationship between slave society and colonial pasts on gender performance in the modern Caribbean, Latin America, and their diasporas.

Taught by: Sanders

One-term course offered either term

Also Offered As: AFRC 527, GSWS 527

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 528 Latinxs and the Law

Based in concepts and principles of Constitutional law and critical race theory, this course explores the interpretation and impact of seminal court cases in U.S. history as applied to Latinxs in the United States and abroad. With a particular focus on the 20th century, students will examine how court decisions have affected civil rights, immigration policies, welfare, political incorporation, education, and other important issues affecting Latinxs. Students will also explore additional themes including the status and treatment of Latinxs in the criminal justice system, representation of Latinxs in the judiciary and how Supreme Court decisions have affected U.S. foreign policy with Latin America.

Taught by: Bartch

Course usually offered summer term only

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 557 Seminar in Archaeological Theory and Method: Archaeology of Landscapes

Advanced seminar for potential professional archaeologists. Course will examine critically main past and present theoretical issues in archaeological research and interpretation, and consider various methodologies utilized towards these interpretive ends. Prerequisite: If course requirement not met, permission of instructor required.

Taught by: Erickson, C.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: AAMW 557, ANTH 557

Prerequisite: ANTH 241 OR ANTH 600

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 590 Introduction to Francophone Literature

An introduction to major literary movements and authors from five areas of Francophonie: the Maghreb, West Africa, Central Africa, the Caribbean and Quebec.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CIMS 580, COML 590, ENGL 590, GSWS 589

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 655 Democratization

This graduate class focuses on issues of democratization (and de-democratization), as studied in the comparative politics literature. The course is structured in four parts. In the first part, we scrutinize conceptualizations and measurements of democracy. In the second part, we study competing political theories about the origins of democracy. The third part of the seminar is devoted to the study of democratic transition and consolidation processes. To finish, we tackle specific issues in democratization such as social capital and civic participation, as well as the resilience of (subnational) authoritarianism.

Taught by: Falleti

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: PSCI 655

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 656 Topics in Black Political Thought: Difference And Community

This course is designed to familiarize graduate students with some of the key texts and debates in Africana Studies concerning the relationship between racial slavery, modernity and politics. Beginning with the Haitian Revolution, much of black political thought (thinking and doing politics) has advocated group solidarity and cohesion in the face of often overwhelming conditions of servitude, enslavement and coercion within the political economy of slavery and the moral economy of white supremacy. Ideas and practices of freedom however, articulated by political actors and intellectuals alike, have been as varied as the routes to freedom itself. Thus, ideas and practices of liberty, citizenship and political community within many African and Afro-descendant communities have revealed multiple, often competing forms of political imagination. The multiple and varied forms of political imagination, represented in the writings of thinkers like Eric Williams, Richard Wright, Carole Boyce Davies and others, complicates any understanding of black political thought as having a single origin, genealogy or objective. Students will engage these and other authors in an effort to track black political thought's consonance and dissonance with Western feminisms, Marxism, nationalism and related phenomena and ideologies of the 20th and now 21st century.

Taught by: Hanchard

Also Offered As: AFRC 655, GSWS 655, PSCI 612

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 661 Language Diversity and Education

Exploration of issues affecting educational policy and classroom practice in multilingual, multicultural settings, with an emphasis on ethnographic research. Selected U.S. and international cases illustrate concerns relating to learners' bilingual/bicultural/biliterate development in formal educational settings. Topics include policy contexts, program structures, teaching and learning in the multilingual classroom, discourses and identities in multilingual education policy and practice, and the role of teachers, researchers, and communities in implementing change in schools. Prerequisite: Permission needed from the department.

Taught by: Hornberger/Flores

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: EDUC 661

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 683 Collective Violence, Trauma, and Representation

This seminar is organized as a laboratory space for graduate students and faculty working in a number of adjacent fields and problems. Seminar discussions will be led not only by the primary instructors, but also by a number of guests drawn from the Penn faculty. For the first weeks of the course, we will focus on seminal works in the interlinked areas of history and memory studies, cultural representations of collective violence, trauma studies, and other related topics. Beginning with the Xth week of the course, we will turn to case studies in a variety of geographic, cultural and historical contexts. Additionally, some later sessions of the course will be devoted to a presentation and discussion of a work in progress of a Penn graduate student, faculty member or a guest lecturer.

Taught by: Platt

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: COML 683, ENGL 791, REES 666

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 694 Spanish & Latin Am Cine

Topics vary. See the Romance Languages Department's website at http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/roml/ for a description of the current offerings.

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: CIMS 694, SPAN 694

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

LALS 697 Studies in Latin American Culture

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: SPAN 697

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit