Leadership and Communication (LEAD)

The courses listed on this page are exclusive to the LPS BAAS degree and LPS Online certificates.

LEAD 101 Leadership Theory, Practice and Purpose

Using an innovative combination of academic theory, empirical research and self-reflection, this course is an intensive introduction to multiple and and competing concepts of leadership. Students will critically analyze texts and research related to effective leadership and leaders and, at the same time, develop their own, individualized leadership traits and skills profile. A culminating biographical analysis paper requires students to compare and contrast their own distinctive leadership traits and skills to those of an admired leader. The course concludes with each student crafting a 5-year leadership and communication career plan.

Activity: Online Course

1.0 Course Unit

LEAD 102 Leadership Theory and Practice

Using an innovative combination of academic theory, empirical research, and self-reflection, this course is an intensive introduction to multiple and competing concepts of leadership. Students will critically analyze texts and related to effective leadership and leaders and, at the same time, develop their own, individualized leadership traits and skills profile. A culminating biographical analysis paper requires students to compare and contrast their own distinctive leadership traits and skills to those of an admired leader. The course concludes with each student crafting a 5-year leadership and communication career plan.

Activity: Online Course

1.0 Course Unit

LEAD 202 Leadership Lessons from Social Sciences

Drawing on several social science fields and subfields, from economics to psychology and more, this course is an introduction to leadership as studied and applied in various scholarly disciplines in the social sciences. Academic texts will introduce students to several social science fields, while case studies will offer them the opportunity to consider the practical and organizational applications of the theories being studied. Students' papers will synthesize the material of the course in thoughtful ways, and apply it to to problems of leadership. You have the option to enroll in the individual course without committing to the entire Certificate in Leadership and Communication, enjoying the flexibility and expertise offered by Penn LPS Online to suit your schedule and interests.

Activity: Online Course

1.0 Course Unit

LEAD 203 Leadership Lessons from Humanities

Using philosophy, literature, religious studies and biographies of famous public leaders, students conduct a searching examination of competing ideas and concepts regarding leadership, moral reasoning and ethical action. Students reflect on the complexities of problem-solving through an ethical lens and further define their individual interpretations and approaches to ethical decision-making. As an integral part of this simultaneously academic and practical exploration of leadership ethics, students co-author a mini-biography assessing the ethics of a famous (or infamous) public leader. Prerequisite: This course counts toward the Certificate in Leadership and Communication and degree concentration.

Taught by: Rebecca Padot

Prerequisite: LEAD 101 OR LEAD 304

Activity: Online Course

1.0 Course Unit

LEAD 304 Professional Communication and Self-Development

This writing-intensive course is designed to enhance each student's ability to communicate effectively in the workplace and other professional settings. Students will learn how to edit their own writing, give persuasive oral presentations to different audiences, communicate effectively during conflicts or crises, and apply evidence-based lessons from positive psychology to personal development and professional success. Students who have taken LEAD 101 will complete the first draft of a plan.

Activity: Online Course

1.0 Course Unit

LEAD 305 Introduction to Data Analytics

In our digital world, data-driven decision-making is becoming more common and more expected. Effective leadership and communication, therefore, often hinges on the ability to acquire, manage, analyze, and display large, quantitative data sets. Even many entry-level jobs assume or require basic knowledge of data analytics. This course introduces students to important concepts in data analytics across a wide range of applications using the programming language R. Students complete the course with a clear understanding of how to utilize quantitative data in real-time problem identification, decision-making, and problem-solving. No prerequisites in statistics or math are required. This course will have required synchronous sessions and the instructor will offer a choice of times. Only open to Data Analytics certificate students in LPS Online Program. Please email lps@sas.upenn.edu to request a permit.

Taught by: Samantha Sangenito

Also Offered As: DATA 101

Activity: Online Course

1.0 Course Unit

LEAD 310 Leadership and Public Administration

In LEAD 310, Leadership and Public Administration, students are introduced to both classic and contemporary studies of how public laws and policies are translated into effective action, how and why government reform efforts succeed or fail, and complete an original case study on the ongoing revolution in public management theory and practice favoring public-private partnerships and collaborative governance.

Taught by: Rebecca Padot

Activity: Online Course

1.0 Course Unit

LEAD 320 Leadership and Business Organization

In LEAD 320, Leadership and Business Organization, students interactively and critically study five of the most influential books ever published regarding why for-profit enterprises succeed or fail; do an original "management consulting" report on an actual business firm; and write a final paper on what, if any, particular individual styles or institutional structures predictably and reliably enable one to "succeed in business."

Activity: Online Course

1.0 Course Unit

LEAD 330 Ldrshp Nonprofit Mgmt

In LEAD 330, Leadership and Nonprofit Management, students are immersed in research that profiles Americas vast and varied, large and growing independent sector, exploring what works (and what doesnt) when it comes to leadership and innovation in the non-governmental, not-for-profit organizations (charities, churches, private colleges, hospitals, and others) that, even if only counting the about 1.4 million registered with the IRS, now have more $2 trillion a year in annual revenues, more than $5 trillion in total assets, and more than 14 million full-time employees.

Activity: Online Course

1.0 Course Unit

LEAD 340 Introduction to Positive Psychology

In the 20th century, the field of psychology made enormous and important strides in addressing mental health challenges. Today research in the field has expanded, inspired, in part, by Martin E.P. Seligman's 1998 APA presidential address, to include the scientific study of optimal functioning and what helps people live full lives. This course focuses on the science of of thriving-what does it mean to be "happy,"and how can one cultivate well-being at the individual and community level? Students explore the foundations of this science, understand a conceptual framework for well-being, and actively engage in activities that help to cultivate well-being. Drawing upon theory, empirical research, ancient and collective wisdom, , we examine these topics critically and experientially and together build an build an engaged learning community. For those pursuing a Certificate in Applied Positive Psychology, this course is strongly recommended as a prerequisite for the other three courses.

Taught by: na

Also Offered As: APOP 100

Activity: Online Course

1.0 Course Unit

LEAD 350 Human Flourishing: Strengths and Resilience

What does it mean to flourish? What are we like when we are at our best? What helps us bounce back from challenges and adversity? Continuing the exploration of the science of positive psychology, students delve deeply into the study of character strengths as a framework for building positive character and well-being, and explore the concept of resilience, or the ability to overcome challenging situations. In this course, we explore how we can leverage our strengths to more effectively contribute to the greater world and enhance our own well-being. We also study the physical and psychological protective factors that constitute resilience, and how they are cultivated. Students learn about these topics from a scientific and experiential perspective, both as individuals and within our learning community. This course will have required synchronous sessions and the instructor will offer a choice of times. Students will have a more robust learning experience in this course if they first complete Introduction to Positive Psychology.

Also Offered As: APOP 120

Activity: Online Course

1.0 Course Unit

LEAD 360 Positive Psychology at Work

If flourishing is related to our lived daily experience, and approximately 50% of our waking hours are spent working, how do our workplaces contribute to, and diminish, our ability to thrive? Students are exposed to an array of research-informed strategies that have been applied in a variety of disciplines and workplaces, including business, education, health care, and nonprofit organizations. Exploration of case studies and salient research topics such as relationships at work, positive leadership, prosocial behavior, and our sense of meaning and purpose, guide our learning. Students gain an understanding of the variables that contribute to our ability to flourish at work and understand how we both experience and shape our work environments through our individual contributions. This course will have required synchronous sessions and the instructor will offer a choice of times.

Taught by: Meredith Myers

Also Offered As: APOP 200

Activity: Online Course

1.0 Course Unit

LEAD 504 Professional Communication and Academic Writing

Writing effectively for a variety of audiences is a required skill for professional masters students, both inside the classroom and in the workplace. This graduate level online seminar introduces writing and communication strategies and skills for all graduate professional students who wish to pursue leadership opportunities in their chosen fields. Students will learn professional communication and academic writing practices and that will enable them to respond to a variety of workplace scenarios as well as influence and inspire others through effective written communication strategies. Through frequent writing assignments, hands-on exercises during class sessions, and a final analysis paper, students will learn how to write concise prose; summarize and evaluate documents and scenarios effectively; develop technical skills in writing clear instructions; and write persuasive proposals. The class will focus on strategies for effective critical thinking and writing, as well as how to write persuasively for multiple audiences, ranging from the general public to an academic audience. There will be special attention to analysis of genres and audiences, and effective writing and revision strategies. Most importantly, you will be able to use the skills developed in this class throughout your academic and professional careers.

Activity: Online Course

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: The course will meet virtually, via Zoom, on Wednesdays 8-9:30: May 29; June 5, 12, 19, and 26; and July 3, 10, and 17.