Professional Writing (PROW)

The courses listed on this page are exclusive to the LPS BAAS degree and LPS Online certificates.

PROW 100 Fundamentals of Professional Writing

Using an immersive, scenario-based teaching style, this course is an introduction to critically analyzing any writing situation and making your writing a purposeful act of communication. You engage in a series of authentic writing scenarios and a range of activities that provide hands-on practice and instructor coaching and feedback. Coursework includes targeted exercises for improving grammar, mechanics, clarity, precision, and persuasiveness. This collaborative, problem-based learning approach provides you with the strategies and flexibility you need to adapt to an ever-changing multimedia communication environment.

Taught by: Michael Chiappini

Activity: Online Course

1.0 Course Unit

Notes: Program fee of $175 for On Campus Learning Experience for those enrolled in the HYBRID sections of the course. The HYBRID sections of PROW 100 are open to admitted BAAS students only. Those sections which are NOT HYBRID are open to PENN LPS Online certificate students, BAAS students, Gateway students, and other coursetakers. Please check with your advisor if you have questions.

PROW 101 Writing for Specialized Audiences: Private Sector

Using case studies and other real-world examples, this course provides an introduction to writing for audiences in the private sector, including business, technical and professional organizations. Students learn to identify the different purposes, genres and specialized audiences one encounter when writing in the private sector, as well as methods for effectively reaching and persuading these audiences. The course also provides practical simulations to aid students as they adapt their processes and styles to specialized situations, expanding their writers repertoire while deepening their understanding of writing for a specific context. Genres to be studied include e-mail, letters (for example sales, job applications, rejection letters, responses to complaints), mission/vision/goal statements, biographical notes, organization descriptions and reports. PROW 100 is a prerequisite for students who are enrolled in the PROW certificate.

Activity: Online Course

1.0 Course Unit

PROW 102 The Elements of Style

This course is for anyone who has been charmed by a novel, article, or tweet and wanted to have similar power as a writer. What makes a sentence pop? What makes a piece of writing seem effortless? Effective writers use words purposefully and grab their readers attention by fulfilling and sometimes disrupting expectations. Grammar is not a set of rules so much as it is a set of tools that enable us to make meaning; it allows us to appeal to the senses by creating rhythm and helping readers to feel and see our ideas. We will fill our collective toolbox through sentence-level choices such as arrangement of words, concrete versus abstract language, and sentence length. We will provide customized exercises for those who wish to work on their grammar and mechanics alongside developing other strategies for powerful, effective writing.

Activity: Online Course

1.0 Course Unit

PROW 200 Writing with Data

TBA

Taught by: Dana Walker

Activity: Online Course

1.0 Course Unit

PROW 201 Presentation Design

This class focuses on how to build powerful, persuasive presentations as well as to provide advanced insight and practice in the fundamentals of professional writing. We study the genre of presentations to familiarize you with major applications--PowerPoint, Keynote, and Google Slides--as well as basic presentation formats, including live group delivery; pre-recorded narration (for asynchronous presentations); and the recent trend of slides used on corporate and other websites to provide more detailed information about the organization or its products. We also explore different presentation subgenres, such as the Ted Talk, lightning talks, and Pecha Kucha (20 slides, 20 seconds each, auto-advance). Throughout, we focus on tailoring your presentation to target audiences and purposes as we explore and practice the design elements of building presentation: space, grids, choice of fonts, images, and animation. Finally and most importantly, we work on building a powerful message, teaching you how to develop ideas and translate content into a deck that exemplifies your understanding of information hierarchies and human cognition with the goal of engaging, informing, and persuading your audiences.

Taught by: n/a

Activity: Online Course

1.0 Course Unit

PROW 301 The Power of Storytelling

From business and science to medicine and nonprofit organizations, storytelling is increasingly recognized as one of the strongest tools of communication and persuasion. This course introduces students to the use and art of storytelling, also known as narrative studies. Students review storytelling in academic and professional communities as both a research tool for gathering information about particular communities or types of individuals,and as an effective rhetorical strategy for generating emotional appeal and action, and brand identity. They also explore storytelling as a compelling means of conveying complex and memorable information. This course explores how storytelling may be variously used for inquiry, evidence gathering and persuasion. Lessons are reinforced through the examination of business anecdotes, case studies, narrative medicine, biographical notes, personal statements, and cover letters.

Activity: Online Course

1.0 Course Unit

PROW 400 Writing for Social Media

This course explores the use of social media campaigns for building a positive identity with customers or other audiences. We look at how to use social media to create coherent messaging, build a reputation and cultivate reader loyalty. We also explore how readers and designers approach multimedia texts as complex entities that bring together language, image, sound, and gesture to to produce a coherent message. With its multiple modalitiesvisual, aural, and somaticsocial media makes different types of demands of its creators and its audiences than those imposed by conventional top-down, left-to-right texts that one encounters in books, essays or letters, requiring an expanded understanding of rhetorical strategies and contexts.

Activity: Online Course

1.0 Course Unit