Public Health Studies (PUBH)

PUBH 500 Foundations of Public Health

This course will provide a topical overview of the inter-disciplinary field of public health and provides grounding in the public health paradigm. Through a series of lectures and recitation sessions, students will learn about the history of public heatlh and the core public health sciences including behavioral and social sciences, biostatistics, epidemiology, environmental health, and policy and management. Other topics include ethics in public health, context analyses (specifically sociographic mapping and urban health), community participation in research, public health promotion, and the prevention of chronic and infectious diseases.

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: NURS 570

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 501 Introduction to Biostatistics

Introduction to Biostatistics This course is designed to provide a broad overview of biostatistics methods as well as applications commonly used for public health research. Topics covered include measurement and categorizing variables, use and misuse of descriptive statistics, testing hypotheses, and applying commonly used statistical tests. An emphasis will be placed on the practical application of data to address public health issues, rather than theoretical and mathematical development. Students will learn how to choose and apply statistical tools to data sources, when and how statistical tools can be used to analyze data, and how to interpret others' quantitative studies. Students will gain experience using online datasets and the STATA statistical software package.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 502 Introduction to the Principles and Methods of Epidemiology

This course will provide an introduction to the principles and methods of epidemiology as a research science. The course introduces the student designs applied to human populations, including randomized trials and observational studies (cohort, case-control, cross-sectional, ecological). Homework and in- class assignments focus on building skills in locating, assessing, and synthesizing evidencefrom the epidemiologic literature, with an emphasis on critical thinking, causal inference, and understanding bias and confounding.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 503 Environmental and Occupational Health

This course will provide a broad introduction to the scientific basis of occupational and environmental health. Content will address issues in the ambient, occupational and global environments as well as the tools, concepts and methods used in environmental health.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 504 Public Health Theories & Frameworks

This course provides students with a solid foundation in behavioral and social science theory, research, and interventions as they pertain to public health. Content will provide exposure to a broad range of theories, including the theoretical foundations of social science applications for help-seeking, gender, race, ethnicity and social class. These theories will be discussed using examples of their applications to numerous public health problems including HIV/AIDS, violence, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, obesity, and diabetes.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 505 Public Health Policy and Administration

This course is an introduction to health policy and management. It examines both the historical and current state of health policy in America and integrates these concepts within the context of public health practice. We will examine key concepts in understanding US health care organization, financing and delivery, our current political and economic debate on health care reform, exmamining the role and management issues of public health departments, and case studies in public health policy and management.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 506 Methods for Public Health Practice

This is a course designed around modules whose objective is to provide students with greater familiarity in a range of methods essential to public health practice. The course will be framed around an indepth capacity and needs assessment and community public health planning in Philadelphia. Topics covered will include data collection and evaluation, both quantitative and qualitative, uses of informatics in public health, analysis of vital statistics, working with communities, methods for developing and facilitating solutions to public health problems, including concepts of advocacy and policy formation and development of interventions. The course demonstrates how core public health competency areas in data analysis and communication provide foundations for applications for both practice and practice-based research.

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 507 Public Health Law & Ethics

What is best - or, at least, seems best -- for the public's health is not always consistent with society's view of what is legal, ethical, or good policy. This course introduces key concepts of legal, ethical, and policy analysis and attempts to demonstrate with current examples how these forces empower, guide, and constrain public health decision-making and actions. The course will combine lecture, Socratic dialogue, and group discussion in an informal setting. The course will feature guest lectures by several distinguished experts from Penn and from other universities.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 508 Capstone Seminar I

The Capstone is a culminating experience required for graduation in the Master of Public Health Program. In two Capstone seminars, students will have an opportunity to synthesize the knowledge and public health competencies they have developed through their coursework. Capstone students will apply their knowledge and skills to public health problems in a chosen area of interest. They will engage their peers in scholarly discussion, drawing from relevant scientific literature and public health experience in order to begin to develop a common grounding and identity as public health professionals. The Capstone incorporates two semester-long seminars and a research project. over the course of the Castone, students will develop, propose, revise, implement, and present their projects. As their projects successfully come to fruition they will also adivse their junior colleagues still in the proposal stage.

Two terms. student may enter either term.

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 509 Capstone Seminar II

This course is the second of two Capstone courses related to the culminating project required for graduation in the Master of Public Health Program. MPH students apply their knowledge and skills to public health problems in a chosen area of interest under the guidance of a Capstone Mentor.

Two terms. student may enter either term.

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 514 Environmental and Occupational Health Experiences

This course seeks to develop students' ability to analyze and understand environmental and occupational health concepts, and identify and synthesize policy and practice solutions to the world's most pressing environmental and occupational health issues. This course provides an introduction to environmental an doccupational health concepts, with a focus public ehalth policy and practice at the local, state, and federal levels. In-class lecture content includes tools, concepts, and research methods to examine categories of environmental and occupational risks and associated health conditions, and identify and develop solutions. Out-of-class experiences provide the opportunity to learn directly from experts in a variety of related fields, and gain first-hand experience in environmental and occupational health practice.

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 517 Geography & Public Health

This course will provide an introduction to GIS in public health research and practice. Through a series of lectures and labs students will explore theories linking health and the environment, spatial analysis and spatial epidemiology, and applications of GIS-related data collection and analysis.

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: EPID 518

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 519 Issues in Global Health

This course presents an overview of issues in global health from the viewpoint of many different disciplines, with emphasis on economically less developed countries. Subjects include: millennium goals; measures of disease burden; population projections and control; environmental health and safe water; demography of disease and mortality; zoonotic infectious diseases; AIDS and HIV prevention; vaccine utilization and impact; eradication of polio virus; chronic diseases;tobacco-associated disease and its control; nutritional challenges; social determinants of global health; harm reduction and behavioral modifications; women's reproductive rights; health economics and cost-effective interventions; health manpower and capacity development; bioethical issues in a global context. Undergraduates interested in taking this course should contact the program to request a permit; permits are only granted to students who have previously taken HSOC 010-401, and preference is given to juniors and seniors.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 521 Program Evaluation in Public Health

There are many public health programs developed to promote change and improve individual and community health. The question most funders and organizations have for public health programs is: Did it work? And how do we know? This course is designed to review the practices of evaluation planning and methods of measurement. Students learn how evaluation can provide practical tools for identifying public health problems, program development, program implementation, including taking a reflective practice approach, ensuring equity and fairness in program delivery (i.e., combating disparities), and generally promoting public health through effective and efficient programmatic efforts. This course builds upon Methods for Public Health Practice and students will be allowed to design an evaluation of the program designed in this course or to choose another program. Note: This course satisfies the RTE requirement for the Generalist Track.

Taught by: Samantha Matlin

Course offered spring; odd-numbered years

Prerequisite: PUBH 506

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 523 Epidemics: Social causes and consequences of outbreaks, emergencies, threats

Public health demands both critical thinking and quick decision-making--often without the benefit of all the data we desire. Take this course to learn how other public health professionals (and lawyers/doctors/activists/educators/policymakers) have responded, both successfully and disastrously, to evolving health threats. Using a case-based method, the course will probe true public health emergencies, considering the (limits of) information available to scientists; the public response; political/economic considerations; media coverage; policy/programmatic response; and health/social outcomes. The course will tackle cases from infectious disease and social epidemiology, and will cover: outbreak investigation, lay epidemiology, surveillance and rapid response, and strategies to address the social determinants of health, including poverty/SES and racism. Students in the class will develop key skills in critical epidemiological reasoning and public health action. Note: This course satisfies the RTE requirement for the Environmental Health track.

Taught by: Carolyn Cannuscio

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 525 Health & Human Rights

This course will explore the interplay between health and human rights and enable students to critically apply human rights to public health practice. We will explore the development of health as a human right and how public health research and policy can affect human rights. Students will learn about core human rights principles and mechanisms and the international development agenda. The class will examine topics at the intersection of global health and human rights including HIV/AIDS, harm reduction, migration, sexual and reproductive health, and climate change. Class material will primarily focus on public health challenges in the global south; however, we will also discuss health and human rights issues faced by volnerable populations in the United States.

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 529 Public Health Perspectives on Sexual & Reproductive Health

This course will survey a range of key current and historic topics in reproductive and sexual health nationally and internationally with a particular emphasis on implications for public health. Policy, epidemiology, clinical practice, advocacy, and service delivery topics will be covered through presentations and conversations with leaders in the fields of reproductive and sexual health. The course will provide students with a broad general introduction to these topics which is appropriate for those interested in either public health or clinical aspects of the field. For students who wish to pursue a focused career in this area, this course is a necessary introduction. Students who will be working in related areas of public health will have exposure to a broad general understanding of reproductive and sexual health.

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 530 Environmental Toxicology: Risk Assessment and Health Effects

This course presents general principals of toxicology and the disposition of toxins in the body. Case studies of the effects of environmental and occupational toxins on individuals will be analyzed. This course is designed for students who desire a strong foundation in toxicological concepts and principals and provides an overview of major toxins in our environment and their association with human health. Prerequisite: Undergraduates needs permission

Taught by: Liu

Course not offered every year

Also Offered As: NURS 677

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 531 Public Health Nutrition

The course is designed to introduce students to the core concepts, policies andpractice of public health nutrition. The course will draw upon real world examples of local, national, and global initiatives to decrease risk of chronic diseases related to the World Health Organization's (WHO) major nutrition-related chronic diseases.

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 538 Qualitative Methods in Health Research

The purpose of this course is to expose students to a variety of qualitative approaches/methodologies that may be used in health services/policy research. In didactics we will discuss the pros and cons of a range of qualitative Methods, how the method is actually implemented (with multiple experts presenting approaches), and pair the presentation with a broader discussion in which students compare and contrast health oriented articles in which the method was used. Students will have the opportunity to apply the theoretical approaches to their own research interests with direct input from the faculty and their peers. Prerequisite: Permission needed from Instructor.

Taught by: Drs. Frances barg and Judy Shea

Course usually offered summer term only

Also Offered As: HPR 503

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 539 Designing Interventions to Promote Health and Reduce Health Disparities

Advanced analysis, design and evaluation of interventions to promote health and reduce health disparities with a focus on underserved ulnerable minority or ethnic populations, through culturally competent research, education and clinical practice. Areas to be evaluated include: -- Health disparities as it relates to health promotion and disease prevention behavioral intervention research in vulnerable communities -- Concepts of marginalization, race, ethnicity, class, gender and culture as it relates to health disparities -- Social-psychological theoretical and research approaches related to developing culturally congruent health promotion interventions to reduce health disparities for vulnerable populations -- The use of elicitation, focus groups and ethnographic techniques to tailor health behavior theory to meet the needs of the population -- Culturally competent research methodologies, involving education and/or clinical practice, e.g. culturally competent measures, recruitment, retention, and informed consent in hard to reach populations -- Community participatory research as a strategy for working with the community to build research partnership and build capacity for sustained health promotion initiatives -- Health promotion intervention strategies for reducing health disparities in vulnerable communities -- Strategies to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions using randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in community and clinical settings -- Strategies for tailoring successful evidenced-based health promotion interventions to a variety of different populations for use in clinical trials and community settings -- Examine approaches for the translating and disseminating evidenced-based intervention research Prerequisite: PhD Students

Course offered spring; odd-numbered years

Also Offered As: NURS 823

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 540 Go Global

This course is designed to house a country-specific course with time in country to build partnerships and work through public health challenges. The country of focus rotates based on the year and current events.

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 541 Social Epidemiology

This class is designed to expand student knowledge about social factors that are known or suspected to influence population health. These factors include, among others, race, gender, socioeconomic status, and social support. Understanding how to talk and think about these social factors is essential to effective participation in public health research and practice. The course will focus on conceptual and theoretical basis of these social factors, exploring both their measurement in epidemiologic research, and the mechanisms by which they are thought to affect health. Potential strategies for ameliorating social determinants of disease and disability - and particularly those relying on legal and policy reform - will be discussed along with their associated political impediments. HIV/AIDs and aggressive policing will provdie recurring topical examples.

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 545 Contemporary Issues in Maternal Child Health

This course will survey a range of key current and historic topics in maternal child health regionally, nationally, and internationally. Policy, epidemiology, clinical practice, advocacy, and service delivery topics will be covered through readings, lectures, presentations, and conversations with local leaders in the field of maternal child health.

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 547 Public Health & the Criminal Justice System

This class is designed to introduce students to the myriad ways that the criminal justice system influences individual and community health. The class begins by providing foundational knowledge about criminal justice processes. Deploying an epidemiological lens, the course introduces four criminal justice system exposures: policing and arrest, adjudication, incarceration, and community supervision (e.g., probation). For each exposure, class will explore (1) its legal status within the criminal justice process, (2) its incidence and distribution within one or more populations, and (3) its relationship to one or more health outcomes. The exploration of the incidence and distribution of the exposures will also consider measurement challenges. In exploring health effects, we will strive for depth and diversity of mechanism. Throughout the course, the instructors will refer to recent innovations in domestic criminal justice policies or alternate regulatory and enforcement approaches from other countries. Broadly speaking, this course aims to encourage and empower students to bring their public health training to bear on ongoing efforts to create a healthier criminal justice system through research, advocacy or practice.

Taught by: Evan Anderson

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 551 Global Health Policy and Delivery

This participatory interdisciplinary seminar course examines contemporary issues in global health policy and delivery. The overall organizing framework for the class is the social determinants of health. The class will consider evidence that inequalities in education, income, and occupation influence health status. Students will develop skills in policy analysis, policy brief development, and policy impact monitoring. The public policy process will be explored using a variety of contemporary global health case studies which focus on content areas such as maternal health, HIV policy, refugee health an global healthcare delivery. Finally, we will examine the global health workforce and the impact of widespread global migration of health professionals on receiving and sending countries.

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: NURS 640, SWRK 793

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 553 Science and Politics of Food

This course provides an introduction to the many forces that shape what we eat.These include psychological, political, biological, legal, economic, and social influences. We will discuss and critically evaluate sceintific research on food policies designed to improve the world's diet. This course will have strong focus on the communication of health information and issues of health disparities as they relate to food environments and food policies. In addition, course assignments, activities, and lectures are designed to develop skills related to critiquing research and communicating evidence-based opinions in a clear and compelling manner.

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 554 Impact Evaluation of Global Health Programs

This course will provide an introduction to impact evaluation, an important methodology for evidence-based health policies and programs. Impact evaluation comprises a set of approaches to generating robust evidence of program performance against desired objectives. A distinct type of broader monitoring and evaluation approaches, impact evaluation focuses on identifying a credible counterfactual (what would have happened in the absence of the program of interest?) to permit attribution of observed outcomes to interventions. In this course, we will cover the why, when, and how of impact evaluation, including basic econometric methods for study design, data collection, and anaylsis. Both experimental and quasi-experimental designs will be discussed. Case studies and exercises will draw on classic studies and the contemporary evaluation literature, and will allow students to "get their hands dirty" with data manipulation and analysis.

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 555 A Public Health Approach to Behavioral Health

This course is designed to focus on the public health issue of behavioral health, with a focus on mental health and its relation to substance use. The course will apply public health approaches beyond individual clinical treatment to take a population level approach to behavioral health. In addition to learning the prevalence and impact of behavioral health conditions, this course will also look at: the historical impact of mental health policy, including the Community Mental Health Services Act of 1963, on behavioral health services and public health issues like homelessness; strategies to address behavioral health taking a public health approach, e.g., widespread universal screening, community activation, community level interventions, and health promotion in addition to prevention; and local examples of community level interventions to address behavioral health including Mural Arts' Porch Light Program, a partnership with the City of Philadelphia Department of Behavioral Health.

Taught by: Samantha Matlin

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 565 Health Communication in the Digital Age

Health communication spans activities from in-person communication to technology based interventions and mass media campaigns. Health communication interventions are applied across a variety of health promotion and disease prevention activities. In this course, we will explore a variety of approachesto using communication strategies to improve individual and population health. The course will provide an introduction to the theory, design, and evaluation of health communication programs. We will review and critique several health communication interventions. The course will also include a special emphasis on new media and technology, as well as developing practical skills for developing health communication programs.

Also Offered As: NURS 353, NURS 565

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 570 Evidence-Based Strategies to Improve Adolescent and Young Adult Health

This course examines the health and well-being of young people between 10 and 26 years of age in the United States, and the influence of evidence-based practice, programs, and policy on the health of this important age group. The course includes an examination of adolescent and young adult (AYA) health and well-being within a life-course framework; biological, psychological, gender and sexual development between 10 and 26 years of age including issues specific to sexual minority youth; nutritional health and health policy; and reproductive health and health policy. We will examine the influence of systems and policy on key AYA health issues using case studies in injury prevention, obesity prevention, HIV testing and care, and access to routine health care and reproductive health services. The impact of MCH/Title V, Title X, the ACA, and legislation related to child nutrition and school food programs on AYA health will be integrated throughout the course.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 573 Substance Use as a Public Health Issue

Over 70,000 people died from drug overdoses in the US in 2017 alone, exceeding the number of US soldiers who died in the twenty years of the Vietnam War. This course will provide an overview of the contemporary challenges in addressing substance use as a public health problem. Students will learn about the personal and environmental factors that often contribute to substance use, as well as the downstream consequences, including HIV and hepatitis C. Students will also learn public health strategies to address substance use, including primary prevention and ahrm reduction. Finally, issues around drug policy at the local, state, and federal level will be discussed. While this course will use opioids and the crisis in Philadelphia as the primary case study, other drugs will be touched upon as well. The course combines lecture, interactive class exercise, and group discussion.

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 575 Intimate Partner Violence

Intimate partner violence (IPV), defined as physical, sexual or psychological harm imposed by a current or former intimate partner, is a public health problem leading to increased morbidity and mortality worldwide. The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the definition, theories, dynamics, scope, consequences of, and interventions to prevent and address, violence among intimate partners. Through this course, students will gain insight into the epidemiology of IPV across the life course, including risk and protective factors and examine unique considerations for vulnerable populations. The course will highlight current measurement issues in the field of IPV assessment and address IPV-related policies to address screening, prevention, and response to IPV. Using a social-ecological framework, we will examine the issue of IPV prevention and intervention from the individual, relationship, community, and society perspectives, and explore approaches to and need for screening, as well as primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of prevention.

Taught by: Rachel Myers

Also Offered As: SWRK 775

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 578 Housing Quality, Equity and Public Health

This course examines housing as a social determinant of health through the lens of environmental justice and health equity. The course examines the direct mental and physical impacts of housing quality and accesss, specifically for urban, low-income children and adults; the plicies, social and economic factors that create inequities; and solutions to address these issues. Key concepts include: the public health impact of housing environmental quality and affordability; environmental justice; racial equity in housing policy.

Course usually offered in spring term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 584 Health Messaging in Africa: Public Performance and Community Health Education

Health Messaging in Africa: Public Performance as Participatory Action Research". This course asks, What about performance offers a unique opportunity to learn from and with communities? How might dramatic performance be used to share information while learning from an audience? This course examines the work and research of young artists from Liberia, West Africa who used street theatre to teach best practices for prevention during the Ebola crisis and considers how their use of dialogical performance contributed to critical knowledge which iteratively informed interventions throughout their awareness campaign. The visiting artists will share their firsthand experiences and guide the class through use of their playwriting model for community change. Students will design public performance projects around local-global community-based concerns using the tools they have learned. Students may choose from a variety of local organizations dedicated to serving immigrant communities and local communities of color in Philadelphia to develop performance-based public health messaging informed by a communications for development approach. Public health researchers who are looking for innovative ways to share their data will gain insights into this experimental ethnographic method and practitioners who want to offer their communities ways to connect best practices to lived experience will develop new pedagogical tools.

Taught by: Jasmine Blanks

Course not offered every year

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 588 Advanced Leadership Skills in Community Health

Grounded in a social justice perspective, this course aims to provide the student with a foundational overview of the field of community health and leadership skills in public health advocacy. The course encourages critical thinking about health outcomes framed by the broad context of the political and social environment. This course analyzes the range of roles and functions carried out by leaders in healthcare advocacy for marginalized communities; integrates knowledge of health policy and the key influence of government and financing on health outcomes; explores community-based participatory research and interventions as tools for change; and discusses ways to develop respectful partnerships with community organizations. An assets-based approach that draws upon the strengths of communities and their leaders provides a foundation for community-engagement skill building. The course emphasizes the development of skills and techniques to lead effective, collaborative, health-focused interventions for disenfranchised groups, including residents of urban neighborhoods. Prerequisite: Undergraduates with permission of the instructor

Taught by: Klurasitz

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: HPR 588, NURS 587

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 589 The Public Health Challenges of Alzheimer's Disease and Cognitive Aging

Once upon a time, Alzheimer's disease was a rare disease, and then it became common, but soon thereafter, it turned into a crisis. What happened, and what do we need to do? This course will lead students to find the answers to this question, answers that are at the intersections of medicine, ethics, public policy, culture and health care. Topics covered include the histories of Alzheimer's disease and cognitive aging and their changing definitions, the concepts of cognition and function and how they are assessed, the contested science and practice of measuring the disease's prevalence and mortality, autonomy and capacity, risk and preventative factors for cognitive decline, the demography and economics of caregiving, and the creative public health initiatives and models of care that could reduce stigma, enhance cognition and maintain independence. Students will apply biostatistical and epidemiological methods to critique papers, close textual analysis to understand concepts and their shifting meanings, and writing to clearly and succinctly frame a problem, its costs and solutions. The course will include lectures, readings from the literature, group discussions and in-class exercises, and interviews with guest experts. Evaluation will be based on participation, presentations, written assignments, and exam results.

Taught by: Jason Karlawish

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 590 BGS Public Health Certificate Students' Seminar Series.

For BGS Public Health Certificate students only.

Taught by: H. Nelson

One-term course offered either term

Activity: Seminar

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 604 Qualitative Research in Social Sciences

This course explores the theory, methods, ethics, and practicalities of qualitative research. Its central goal is to leave students prepared to lead their own qualitative projects, whether MPH capstones, other theses, or future research pursued after graduate education. Qualitative analysis has broad utility for the examination of experience, cognition, culture, language, and social interaction. Accordingly, we will progress through readings conveying insights of qualitative researchers from numerous disciplines. We will begin by clarifying the kinds of knowledge that qualitative methods generate. We will then seek to demystify the role of theory in qualitative research. Next, we will cover the major aspects of preparing a qualitative study: identifying appropriate sites and samples, communicating with stakeholders and facilitators, and cultivating a reflexive mindset attuned to ethical issues. We will subsequently examine the various methods for creating qualitative data (observation, interviewing, and their variants) before turning to the analysis of this data using an iterative coding process managed via software. Finally, we will work on developing explanatory theory from this analysis.

Taught by: Justin Clapp

Course usually offered in fall term

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 605 Epidemiology and Control of Infectious Diseases

This course will focus on the application of epidemiological methods to the discovery, detection, and evaluation of infectious disease threats together with an evidence based assessment of the value of public health interventions intended to reduce prevalence and severity of disease in people. In-class assignments are intended to build skills in location, interpreting, assessing, and synthesizing evidence from the epidemiologic literature, with an emphasis on critical thinking, causal inference, and understanding bias and confounding.

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 606 Interpreting Epi Literature to Inform and Influence

This course is designed for students interested in further exploration of epidemiologic methods and the challenge of establishing a causal relationship between exposure and outcome using an observational science. We will utilize case studies to address the application of epidemiologic data to specific issues of relevance to public health. The nature of observational data will be explored through these case studies and specific methodological challenges will be highlighted and examined.

Taught by: Amanda Bennett Palladino; Kate Wallis

Also Offered As: NURS 616

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 607 Adv Local Policymaking

This course is designed to provide the foundational context and practical skills necessary to effectively advocate for evidence-based policy change in furtherance of public health objectives. The class will be interactive in nature and will require participation in public health advocacy exercises in order to hone advocacy skills. There will also be a focus on persuasive communication, both oral and written. We will explore the entire advocacy process from the identification of a problem and evaluation of possible policy solutions to utilizing the full range of advocacy tools to promote policy change. We will be using real-time examples of public health challenges affecting the health, safety and well-being of children and families here in Philadelphia and in communitites across the country.

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 608 Behavioral Economics and Health

This course will explore answers to pressing public health questions through the lens of behavioral economics. Behavioral economics, a field at the intersection of psychology and economics, suggests that humans rarely behave rationally when making health-related decisions. The course will take a very pragmatic, hands-on orientation to behavioral economics and health research and practice. It will also leverage the deep and rich expertise of Penn's Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics, a leading research organization in the field.

Also Offered As: NURS 613

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 609 Management & Leadership in Public Health

The goal of this course is to build upon management and leadership skills, and learn and apply public health management and leadership tools (mlts) to effectively use in practice. This course uses pubh 506 to build a foundation, with increased emphasis on financial, administrative, operational, and human resource management and leadership in public health. Students will have the ability to apply key concepts and further develop their leadership and management skills and apply specific mlt tools. The course uses a case-based framework an dpulls from real life examples. The course is ideally designed for the student who will use the mph to advance in careers leading and managing public health initiatives across a variety of sectors.

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 610 Mathematical Models for the Control of Infectious Diseases

As infectious diseases are transmitted from one host to another, the dynamics of transmission in the population of hosts follow certain basic rules. If one knows and understands these rules, one can plan rational strategies to prevent or control infections. One of the principal tools of those interested in public health interventions to control or ameliorate infectious diseases is the mathematical model. A model is just a means of representing and manipulating something that would not otherwise be accessible. This course provides students with the opportunity to construct models of the transmission of infectious diseases and to use these models to plan or compare disease control strategies. The course is predicated upon the notion that the act of building a mathematical model of disease transmission is often the very best way of understanding what is going on. This understanding will be further refined by the examination of more complicated and sophisticated model structures as they appear in the recent published literature. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor A disproportionate number of emerging infectious diseases and recent disease outbreaks in the United States and elsewhere have shared a common characteristic-they affect veterinary as well as human populations. Many are also vector-borne, passing between different species of hosts through insects and other invertebrates. In some cases humans are only 'spillover hosts' whose infection is incidental to the transmission cycle. Interdisciplinary approaches are especially important to control such diseases. As a particular focus of the course, students will learn the tools needed for successful collaborations to address the growing problem of zoonotic and vector-borne diseases.

Taught by: Levy,Smith

Course usually offered in fall term

Also Offered As: EPID 516

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 617 Glocalizing Health Security: The Local to Global Role of PH in Preparedness

This course provides an introduction to health security issues and its challenges. The course will introduce students to the historical development, structure, operation, and current and future directions of the major components of global, regional, national, and local health security systems. It examines the ways in which health security programs are organized and delivered, with attention to risks and vulnerabilities of special populations; roles of private- and public-sector actors, civil society organizations, and philanthropy in health security; the influences that impact health security policy decisions; factors that determine the allocation of health security resources and the establishment of priorities; and the relationship of costs to benefits (and how those are measured).

Taught by: Lydia Ogden

Prerequisite: PUBH 505

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit

PUBH 637 Advocacy & Public Health

This course is designed to provide the foundational context and practical skills necessary to effectively advocate for evidence-based policy change in furtherance of public health objectives. the class will be interactive in nature and will require participation in public health advocacy exercises in order to hone advocacy skills. there will also be a focus on persuasive communication, both oral and written. we will explore the entire advocacy process from the identification of a problem and evaluation of possible policy solutions to utilizing the full range of advoacy tools to promote policy change.

Course usually offered in spring term

Also Offered As: HPR 637

Prerequisite: PUBH 505 OR PUBH 507

Activity: Lecture

1.0 Course Unit