Spanish (SPAN)

SPAN 0091 Sustainable Development and Culture in Latin America

This interdisciplinary course exposes students to the three dimensions of sustainable development -environmental, economic, and social- through an examination of three products -peyote, coca, and coffee- that are crucial in shaping modern identity in areas of Latin America. The course integrates this analysis of sustainable development in relation to cultural sustainability and cultural practices associated with peyote, coca, and coffee and their rich, traditional heritage and place in literature, film, and the arts.

Fall, even numbered years only

Also Offered As: ANTH 0091, ENVS 0053, LALS 0091

1 Course Unit

SPAN 0092 Corona Capitalism: Crisis and Inequality Across the Americas

The coronavirus pandemic has exacerbated existing social inequalities. It has also accelerated the pace of history so sharply that the course of events has become nearly impossible to predict. This CWiC critical speaking seminar takes as its starting point our shared participation in the experience of uncertainty. At the same time, in looking to Latin America and the US, it articulates the fact that COVID-19 is anything but a "great equalizer": its impact varies widely and decisively across race, class, and gender. As the world confronts multiple layers of wreckage, not only biological but also ecological and economic, how can we frame and communicate both uncertainty and truth in a thoughtful way? We will examine social problems that have been laid bare by the pandemic and have since become sites of ethical and political reevaluation, namely health disparities, ecological racism, the distribution of labor, and criminal justice. This seminar's aim is to collaboratively assess one fundamental question: How can we understand COVID-19 not as an exceptional moment in history, but as a crisis of racial capitalism? By studying media, activism, policy, and scholarship produced during the pandemic alongside foundational critical theory, students will gain the analytical tools to contextualize its disproportionate global impact on poor communities and people of color, and to envision a just post-pandemic recovery. We will engage Marxist, feminist, and anti-racist theoretical approaches, and while familiarity with these methods is not necessary, an openness to them is. Self-examination is crucial to the success of the course, which requires students reflect on their own political, intellectual, and emotional investments in racialized inequality. This is a speaking intensive seminar intended to improve students' oral communication and listening skills through class discussions, prepared presentations, and mixed-media communication projects. Conducted in English.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: LALS 0092

1 Course Unit

SPAN 0093 Latinx Environmental Justice

This course explores the involvement of the Latinx environmental justice movement since the 1960s. It addresses theories and concepts of environmental racism and environmental justice, underscoring how Latinx have challenged, expanded, and contributed to the environmental justice discourse. In this course, students will explore national case studies of environmental and racial injustice as they bear on Latinx communities both in rural areas and in urban barrios throughout the United States. The course will analyze these case studies through the lens of Latinx artistic and literary texts (essays, paintings, short stories, documentaries, and short films) as they provide a unique historic and multicultural perspective of the Latinx experience with environmental injustice and of how Latinxs imagine alternative transitions and responses to environmental marginalization. In addition, the works of Latinx artists and writers will serve as case studies to deconstruct racial stereotypes of Latinxs as unconcerned about environmental issues, shedding light on how they share a broad engagement with environmental ideas. The case studies analyzed in this course emphasize race and class differences between farmworkers and urban barrio residents and how they affect their respective struggles. The unit on farmworkers will focus on workplace health issues such as toxic chemicals and collective bargaining contracts. The unit on urban barrios will focus on gentrification, affordable housing, and toxic substances in the home. We will also review current and past programs that have been organized to address the aforementioned problems. This is an Academically Based Community Service Course (ABCS course) through which students will learn from and provide support to a Latinx-serving organization in the City of Philadelphia on preventing exposure to hazardous substances, thus bridging the information gap on environmental justice issues in the Latinx community in Philadelphia. Information dissemination and education efforts will be conducted by collaborating with Esperanza Academy Charter School in Philadelphia to implement lessons on preventing exposure to hazardous substances. Studying environmental justice and pairing it with community service will heighten students' awareness of the complexities of culture, race, gender, and class while providing them with an invaluable experience of cross-cultural understanding.

Spring

Also Offered As: ANTH 0930, ENVS 0054, LALS 0093, URBS 0093

1 Course Unit

SPAN 0100 Elementary Spanish I

This course is a first-semester language course that emphasizes the development of foundational listening, speaking, reading and writing skills while exploring the rich cultural mosaic of the Spanish-speaking world. Through listening activities and videotaped interviews with native speakers, your aural and oral abilities will improve at the same time that you will become familiarized with different varieties of standard spoken Spanish. You will be given ample opportunities to practice orally and in writing so that you can reinforce newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures. Reading strategies will facilitate your comprehension of the texts included in the course syllabus. Readings focused on a specific country or region, visual items (such as maps, photos, films) and a class project will advance your knowledge of Hispanic cultural practices and products while increasing your intercultural competence. Conducted entirely in Spanish, this class will provide you with guided practice before moving to more independent and spontaneous language production. Working in small groups and in pairs, you will participate in class activities that simulate real-life situations that will help you gain confidence communicating in Spanish. Goals: By the end of this course you can expect to handle a variety of day-to-day situations in a Spanish-speaking setting: 1) Greet and introduce people, invite people to events, accept or reject invitations, ask for directions, tell time, shop and order meals in a restaurant. 2) Talk about yourself, family, and friends regarding physical and emotional states, daily routines, leisure, preferences and plans. 3) Use the cultural information learned in class as an icebreaker to find common ground with a wide variety of Spanish speakers. Pre-requisite: Score below 380 on the SAT II or; below 285 on the online placement examination

Fall

1 Course Unit

SPAN 0105 Spanish for the Medical Professions, Elementary I

This course is a first-semester elementary Medical Spanish Language course and the first in the Spanish for Medical Professions sequence. It is designed for students with no prior coursework in Spanish. This course teaches beginning students the fundamentals of practical Spanish with an emphasis on medical situations and basic medical terminology. In this course, particular attention will be given to developing speaking and listening skills, as well as cultural awareness. It incorporates activities, vocabulary, and readings of particular interest to healthcare practitioners, while adhering to the goals and scope of Spanish 0100, the first-semester Spanish language course. Students who have already taken Spanish 0100 will not receive credit for Spanish 0105. Although these courses have different numbers, they are at the same level. Students who have already fulfilled the language requirement (AP, SAT II, etc.) or have taken courses at the 1000 and 3000 level, may not take basic-level language courses in the same language. They will not receive credit for this course (Spanish 0105). Prerequisite: Offered through the Penn Language Center.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

SPAN 0120 Elementary Spanish I and II: Accelerated

This course is an intensive course designed for students who have already satisfied the language requirement in another language and have not previously studied Spanish. By combining the curriculum of Spanish 0100 and 0200, Spanish 0120 seeks to develop students' foundational listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills s while exploring the rich cultural mosaic of the Spanish-speaking world. Through listening activities and mini documentaries shown in class, students will develop their aural and oral skills at the same time that they will become familiarized with different varieties of standard spoken Spanish. Students will be given ample opportunities to practice orally and in writing so that they can reinforce newly acquired vocabulary and linguistic structures. Readings focused on a specific country or region, visual items (such as maps, photos, and films) and a class project will advance students' knowledge of Hispanic cultural practices and products while increasing their intercultural competence. Goals: By the end of this course students can expect to handle a variety of day-to-day situations in a Spanish-speaking setting such as: 1) Introduce themselves, use greetings, describe people, places and things, give instructions, tell time, go shopping, order meals in a restaurant, and make travel plans. 2) Talk about themselves, families, and friends regarding academic life, daily routines, health, work, leisure, and preferences (using the present and past tenses). 3) Use the cultural information learned in class as an icebreaker to find common ground with a wide variety of Spanish speakers. Permit required from the course coordinator

Fall

2 Course Units

SPAN 0200 Elementary Spanish II

The continuation of Spanish 0100, Spanish 0200 is a second-semester elementary language course. See the description of Spanish 0100.

Spring

1 Course Unit

SPAN 0205 Spanish for the Medical Professions, Elementary II

The continuation of Spanish 0105, Spanish 0205 is a second-semester Elementary Medical Spanish 0105 course. Note: offered through the Penn Language Center. Pre-requisite: successful completion of Spanish 0100 or 0105 or a score of 380-440 on the SAT II or 285-383 on the online placement examination.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

SPAN 0210 Elementary Spanish I and II: Advanced Beginners

This course is designed for students who have some prior experience in Spanish. It is an intensive elementary-level language course that in one semester covers the material studied over two semesters in our Spanish 0100 and Spanish 0200. The course provides a quick-paced review of material normally covered in a first-semester Spanish course and then proceeds to introduce new material so students will be prepared to take Spanish 0300 during the subsequent semester. As in other Spanish courses, Spanish 0210 emphasizes the development of foundational listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills while exploring the rich cultural mosaic of the Spanish-speaking world. Through listening activities and mini documentaries shown in class, students will develop their aural and oral skills at the same time that they will become familiarized with different varieties of standard spoken Spanish. Students will be given ample opportunities to practice orally and in writing so that they can reinforce newly acquired vocabulary and linguistic structures. Readings focused on a specific country or region, visual items (such as maps, photos and films) and a class project will advance students' knowledge of Hispanic cultural practices and products while increasing their intercultural competence. Conducted entirely in Spanish, this class will provide you with guided practice before moving to more independent and spontaneous language production. You will participate in paired, small-group and whole-class activities that simulate real-life situations that will help you gain confidence communicating in Spanish. Goals: By the end of this course students can expect to handle a variety of day-to-day situations in a Spanish-speaking setting such as: 1) Introduce themselves, use greetings, describe people, places and things, give instructions, tell time, go shopping, order meals in a restaurant, and make travel plans. 2) Talk about themselves, families, and friends regarding academic life, daily routines, health, work, leisure, and preferences (using the present and past tenses). 3) Use the cultural information learned in class as an icebreaker to find common ground with a wide variety of Spanish speakers.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

SPAN 0215 Spanish for Health Care Professionals I and II

Spanish 0215 Elementary Medical Spanish I and II is an accelerated elementary-level language course that covers in one semester the material studied over two semesters in Spanish 0215 and 0205 (first and second semester elementary Medical Spanish). Designed for students who have some prior experience with the language, this course teaches the fundamentals of Spanish with an emphasis on medical situations and basic medical terminology. Particular attention is given to developing speaking and listening skills, as well as cultural awareness. Course activities, vocabulary, and materials are selected to be of particular relevance to healthcare practitioners. After successful completion of this course, students will be prepared to enroll in either SPAN 0300 or 0305. Prerequisite: A score between 380 and 440 on the SAT II or the written departmental exam; a score between 285 and 383 on the online placement examination, or permission of the instructor.

Summer Term

1 Course Unit

SPAN 0300 Intermediate Spanish I

This course, a first-semester intermediate-level course, emphasizes students' acquisition of new vocabulary and linguistic structures in a cultural and communicative context while building on their previous speaking, reading, listening and writing skills. A substantial amount of the course is devoted to learning and using the past tenses. As in other Spanish courses, students will take part in a wide range of activities, including role-plays, film viewings, listening to music and class discussions of current social and cultural topics. Goals: By the end of this course students can expect to handle a variety of common situations in a Spanish-speaking setting such as: 1) Narrate past actions, ranging from personal anecdotes to historical events 2) Give advice, recommendations, and commands to people 3) Express their feelings and doubts when reacting to what others have said 4) Talk about their future expectations and wishes 5) Demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of Hispanic cultural practices and products.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

SPAN 0305 Spanish for the Medical Professions: Intermediate I

This course is a first-semester intermediate-level language course that emphasizes the development of the four basic skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking), and the acquisition of medical terminology. Students will be expected to participate in classroom activities such as role-plays based on everyday situations that they may encounter at work settings such as doctors' offices, clinics, hospitals, and emergency rooms in order to develop meaningful and accurate communication skills in the target language. Students will also review and acquire other essential tools of communication in the target language applicable both within and outside the medical field. Major course goals include: the acquisition of intermediate-level vocabulary, the controlled use of the past tense, and the development of writing skills at a paragraph level with transitions. Students who have already taken Spanish 0300 will not receive credit for Spanish 0305. Although these courses have different numbers, they are at the same level. Students who have already fulfilled the language requirement (AP, SAT II, etc.) or have taken courses at the 1000-3000 level may not take basic-level language courses in the same language. They will not receive credit for this course (Spanish 0305). Note: Offered through the Penn Language Center.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

SPAN 0340 Intermediate Spanish I and II: Accelerated

This course is limited to those students who have satisfied the language requirement in another language. Spanish 0340 is an intensive intermediate-level language course that covers the material presented in Spanish 0300 and Spanish 0400. The course emphasizes the development of the four canonical skills (reading, writing, listening and speaking) within a culturally based context. Class time will focus on communicative activities that combine grammatical concepts, relevant vocabulary, and cultural themes. Students will participate in pair, small-group and whole-class activities to practice linguistics skills in a meaningful context. Major course goals include: the acquisition of intermediate-level vocabulary, the controlled use of the past tense and major uses of the subjunctive, and the development of writing skills. Students who have already fulfilled the language requirement in Spanish may not take basic level language courses (0100-0405) in the same language. Any questions about placement should be addressed to the Director of the Spanish Language Program.

Spring

2 Course Units

SPAN 0400 Intermediate Spanish II

This course is a fourth-semester language course that both reinforces and enhances the communicative skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) previously acquired while exploring the rich cultural mosaic of the Spanish-speaking world. Class activities are designed so that students can build up these four skills in order to function at an intermediate language level. Readings focused on contemporary social and political issues of the Hispanic world will advance your knowledge of Hispanic and cultural practices while increasing your intercultural competence. Unique to this course is the preparation of an oral presentation on a topic related to the Hispanic world throughout the semester and presented during the last days of classes. The purpose of this task is to help students develop their presentational competence in Spanish. Conducted entirely in Spanish, this class will provide students with ample opportunities to work in small groups and in pairs while gaining confidence communicating in Spanish. This course satisfies the language requirement at Penn. Goals: By the end of this course, students can expect to handle a variety of situations in a Spanish-speaking setting, such as: 1) Express their opinions on a variety of contemporary events and issues 2) Defend their position when presented with a hypothetical situation 3) Deliver short presentations on a chosen subject after thorough preparation 4) Demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of Hispanic cultural practices and products.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

SPAN 0405 Spanish for the Medical Professions: Intermediate II

Spanish 0405, the continuation of Spanish 0305, is an intermediate-level integrated skills language course. It emphasizes the development of reading, writing, listening, and speaking abilities. Students will be expected to participate actively in classroom activities such as communicative activities, role-playing based on typical doctor/patient interactions as well as other medical situations. Students will also review and learn other essential tools of communication applicable both inside and outside the medical field. Students who have already taken Spanish 0400 will not receive credit for Spanish 0405. Although these courses have different numbers, they are at the same level. Students who have already fulfilled the language requirement (AP, SAT II, etc.) or have taken courses at the 1000-3000 level may not take basic level language courses in the same language. They will not receive credit for this course (Spanish 0405). This course satisfies the language requirement in Spanish. Note: Course is offered through the Penn Language Center. Pre-requisite: successful completion of Spanish 0300 or 0305 or a score of 550-640 on the SAT II or 454-546 on the online placement examination.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

SPAN 0800 Spanish Conversation

SPAN 0800 is a half-credit conversation course. This course is restricted to residents of the Modern Language College House.

Two Term Class, Student must enter first term; credit given after both terms are complete

0.5 Course Units

SPAN 1000 Advanced Spanish

The purpose of this course is twofold: (a) to develop students' communicative abilities in Spanish, that is, speaking, listening, reading and writing, and (b) to increase their awareness and understanding of Hispanic cultures and societies. Homework and classroom activities are designed to help students build their oral proficiency, expand and perfect their knowledge of vocabulary and grammatical structures, improve their reading and writing skills, and develop their critical thinking abilities. The material for this class includes short stories, newspaper articles, poems, songs, cartoons, video clips and a novel, such as Cesar Aira's La villa. At the completion of this course, students will feel confident discussing and debating a variety of contemporary issues (cultural and religious practices, family relationships, gender stereotypes, political events, immigration to the USA, etc.). Any questions about placement should be addressed to the Director of the Spanish Language Program.

Fall or Spring

Prerequisite: SPAN 0400

1 Course Unit

SPAN 1005 Advanced Spanish for the Medical Professions

The goal of this course is to provide advanced practice in Spanish to those students who are interested in pursuing careers in the medical and health care fields. Through readings and authentic materials on contemporary health issues, for example, i.e., H1N1 influenza, comparative healthcare systems, obesity, "chagas" disease, etc., students will acquire the vocabulary and grammatical structures needed to discuss a wide array of topics pertaining to the health-related professions. Students will also gain awareness of those health care issues affecting the Hispanic/Latino patient. Oral and written presentations will complement topics covered in class.

Spring

Prerequisite: SPAN 0400 OR SPAN 0405

1 Course Unit

SPAN 1010 Business Spanish I

Spanish for Business I provides advanced-level language students with technical vocabulary and communicative skills covering business concepts as they apply to the corporate dynamics of the Spanish-speaking world, with a special emphasis on Latin America. Through readings, presentations, discussions, and video materials, we shall analyze those cultural aspects that characterize the business environment in the region as well as focus on economies and markets in light of their history, politics, resources and pressing international concerns.

Fall or Spring

Prerequisite: SPAN 0400

1 Course Unit

SPAN 1110 Business Spanish II

This course is specifically designed for advanced speakers of Spanish (e.g., native speakers, high-level heritage speakers, and students who have studied in a Spanish-speaking country for at least one semester). Students will take an in-depth look at the corporate dynamics of a number of countries in Latin America, focusing on their economies and markets, as well as on the cultural and business protocols of each region. Through the creation of an entrepreneurial project and the writing of a business plan, students will enhance their business and language skills. Any questions about placement should be addressed to the Director of the Spanish Language Program.

Fall

1 Course Unit

SPAN 1200 Advanced Spanish II: Grammar and Composition

This course is an advanced-level language course that emphasizes the acquisition of the tools necessary for successful written expression in Spanish. These tools include a solid knowledge of the major points of Spanish grammar, an ample vocabulary, control of the mechanics of the language (spelling, punctuation, etc.), and a thorough understanding of the writing process. Throughout the semester, students will use these tools to analyze authentic texts and to produce a variety of written assignments. By the end of the course, students will have developed their awareness of the norms of standard Spanish and learned to incorporate these features into their own writing. The class will be conducted in Spanish and students are expected to speak in Spanish at all times. Any questions about placement should be addressed to the directors of the Spanish language program.

Fall or Spring

Prerequisite: SPAN 1000

1 Course Unit

SPAN 1210 Spanish for the Professions

Spanish for the Professions is designed to provide advanced-level language students with a wide-ranging technical vocabulary and the enhancement of solid communicative skills within the cultural context of several developing Latin American countries. Focusing on topics such as politics, economy, society, health, environment, education, science and technology, the class will explore the realities and underlying challenges facing Latin America. Through essays, papers, articles, research, discussions, case studies, and videotapes, we shall take an in-depth look at the dynamics of Latin American societies. The course will focus on--but not be restricted to--Mexico, Cuba and Argentina. Any questions about placement should be addressed to the Director of the Spanish Language Program.

Spring

Prerequisite: SPAN 1000

1 Course Unit

SPAN 1300 Foundations of Spanish Culture and Civilization

A general introduction to the study of Spanish culture, this course is designed to help students understand the historical foundations of contemporary Spanish society, its values and its institutions. The focus is on the main events of Spanish history and the origins and continuity of social and political institutions from pre-modern Spain up to the beginning of the modern era. This course is offered in the Penn-in-Madrid summer program.

Summer Term

1 Course Unit

SPAN 1800 Contexts of Hispanic Culture and Civilization

The primary aim of this course is to develop students' knowledge of the geographical, historical and cultural contexts in those regions where Spanish is used . At the same time that they are introduced to research techniques and materials available in Spanish, students strengthen their language skills through readings, class discussions, and frequent writing assignments. This course is designed to give students a broad understanding of Hispanic culture that will prepare them for upper-level course work and study abroad.

Fall or Spring

Prerequisite: SPAN 1000 OR SPAN 1200

1 Course Unit

SPAN 1900 Introduction to Literary Analysis

By helping students develop skills to carefully read and analyze Spanish literary works, Spanish 1900 prepares them for upper-level courses and study abroad. After reviewing the main elements and conventions of the most popular genres (narrative, poetry, theater and essay), students become familiarized with current theoretical approaches to the study of literature with the purpose of applying them to their own analytical writing. The last weeks of the semester are devoted to the reading of a well-crafted detective novel and the examination of both its formal features and its ideological underpinnings. Throughout the course, students will have ample opportunities to hone their skills through the close reading and class discussion of varied and stimulating literary works produced by canonical and non-canonical Hispanic authors.

Fall or Spring

Prerequisite: SPAN 1800 OR SPAN 1900

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3110 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics

This course is an introduction to Hispanic linguistics, with special emphasis on the Spanish sound system (phonetics and phonology) and Spanish word-formation (morphology). Topics to be covered include articulatory phonetics, use of the phonetic alphabet, English and Spanish contrastive phonology, regional and social variations of Spanish pronunciation, word formation (derivation and composition), and the structure of the Spanish verb (inflection). We all also explore basic notions of morphosyntax. of Evaluation will be based on participation and homework, periodic quizzes, mid-term exam, and a final examination during finals week. Students will be required to write a linguistic autobiography.

Not Offered Every Year

Prerequisite: SPAN 1800 OR SPAN 1900

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3120 History of the Spanish Language

The course will explore three main issues: (1) The external history of the Spanish language: How do linguists read history? What cultural and historical events are important for the development of the Spanish language? As linguistic historians, we shall follow a canonical chronology that will examine pre-Roman influences, the spread of Latin, the linguistic fragmentation of the Peninsula, medieval attempts at standardization, trans-Atlantic expansion, the rise of the Academía, and the linguistic revival of the Autonomías. (2) The internal history of the Spanish language: Just when did Latin become Spanish? Why are some linguistic changes predictable while others aren't? Why don’t Spanish speakers say "fiestivo" or "duermimos"? But what about "cuentista"? Why do some Spanish speakers say "hablastes", "siéntensen" and "la di el libro a María"? And what about that lisping king? (3) What did the earliest Spanish texts look like? No prior knowledge of Latin or linguistics is necessary, but having an unquenchable curiosity about language is a definite advantage.

Not Offered Every Year

Prerequisite: SPAN 1800 OR SPAN 1900

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3130 Spanish-English Translation

This course is designed for students who already have a solid foundation in Spanish and English grammar. It provides an introduction to the theory and practice of translating between English and Spanish, addressing important topics such as discourse strategies, register and mood, dialect, genre, and cultural norms linked to written and oral communication. This is a very writing-intensive class, both in and out of the classroom. There are assinged readings from the textbooks and/or assignments online for every class meeting, which will be used to discuss both the practicalities and the cultural implications of translation. Class meetings will consist of class discussions about translation in general, and critiques of your own translation efforts in particular, combined with small group or pair work on translation exercises. While there will necessarily be some use of English, the class is conducted primarily in Spanish.

Not Offered Every Year

Prerequisite: SPAN 1800 OR SPAN 1900

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3200 Studies in the Spanish Middle Ages

This course treats the major works of the Spanish Middle Ages in light of their cultural and historical context. Course content may vary. Please see the department website for current course offerings: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/undergraduate/hispanic-studies

Not Offered Every Year

Prerequisite: SPAN 1800 OR SPAN 1900

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3300 Studies in Golden Age and Early Modern Spanish Literature and Culture

A study of the major literary and cultural achievements of the Spanish Golden Age and early modern period. Course content may vary. Please see the department website for current course offerings: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/undergraduate/hispanic-studies

Not Offered Every Year

Prerequisite: SPAN 1800 OR SPAN 1900

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3350 Don Quijote

A study of Miguel de Cervantes' Don Quijote. Special attention will be paid to this masterpiece's cultural and historical context, as well as to its reception.

Not Offered Every Year

Prerequisite: SPAN 1800 OR SPAN 1900

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3400 Studies in Spanish Literature and Culture: 1700-Present

Studies in Spanish Literature and Culture from the early Enlightenment through the present (1700 onward). Course content may vary. Please see the department website for current course offerings: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/undergraduate/hispanic-studies

Not Offered Every Year

Prerequisite: SPAN 1800 OR SPAN 1900

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3402 The Evolution of the Don Juan Myth in the Western Literary Tradition

In this course, we will study the appearance and evolution of the Don Juan myth in Spain and in the Western literary tradition. We will start with Tirso de Molina’s Don Juan in his El Burlador de Sevilla and move from the Baroque and Romantic periods up to the modern day. In addition to studying the myth in its social and historical context, we will analyze the different dramatic and literary strategies used by authors in their construction of Don Juan. Finally, we will see how filmmakers have interpreted and deviated from the original myth.

Not Offered Every Year

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3404 The Spanish Short Story

In this course, we study the development and evolution of the Spanish short story from its origins to the present. Students learn to analyze and recognize different points of view, voices and narrative strategies in the readings, thus becoming more aware of their active role as readers in the text.

Not Offered Every Year

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3406 The Gothic Tradition in Spanish Literature

This course examines how the Gothic tradition is manifested in Spain by reading and analyzing the works of different Spanish writers from the Romantic period to the present. Although this is a course on Spanish literature, film and literary works from other national traditions will be incorporated in order to compare the different uses of the Gothic genre. By the end of the semester, students will have gained a better understanding of what the Gothic tradition is and how it manifests itself in different cultures.

Not Offered Every Year

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3430 Studies in Modern and Contemporary Spanish Literature

A study of the major literary works of modern and contemporary Spain. Course content may vary. Please see the department website for current course offerings: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/undergraduate/hispanic-studies

Not Offered Every Year

Prerequisite: SPAN 1800 OR SPAN 1900

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3432 The Generation of 1898

"The Generation of '98" is the name used to bring together a group of Spanish writers, essayists, and poets that were profoundly affected by the moral, social and political crisis in Spain caused by the military defeat by the US and the subsequent loss of of its last overseas colonies. The shock of Spain’s defeat in the war, which left it stripped of its last vestiges of empire and international prestige, provided an impetus for many writers and thinkers to embark on a period of self-searching and an analysis of Spain’s problems and its destiny. Novelists, poets, essayists, playwrights and thinkers such as Miguel de Unamuno, Antonio Machado, Azorin, Ramiro de Maeztu, Valle-Inclan, Ganivet, and Pio Baroja reinvigorated Spanish letters and restored Spain to a position of intellectual and literary prominence that it had not held for centuries. Some of the topics covered in this course may include Spanish nationalism and the identification of Spain with Castile, regionalisms, the crisis of Spain, tradition and reform, religion, the perception and position of Spain in the world, etc.

Not Offered Every Year

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3434 Spanish Post-Franco Narrative by Women

Since the final years of the Francoist dictatorship, women writers started to abandon the subterfuge strategies through which they had avoided the regime’s censorship. Soon they began to explicitly state issues that had been dangerous to mention previously, such as sex and female bodily experience, national and individual identity, collective and personal memory, and surrounding changing realities like consumerism, media, migration, counter cultural movements, globalization, and human (in)communication. Using journalistic collaborations and literary prizes, they wrote their way up to the editorial market and the Royal Academy of Language, becoming prominent figures in the aesthetic and gender debates of a new canon in the making. In this course we will analyze women's writing in post-Franco Spain from a variety of perspectives and theoretical positions to explore what it means to be a woman writer: to be feminine, to be queer, to be oneself, to be a part of, to be free.

Not Offered Every Year

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3500 Studies in Modern and Contemporary Spanish Culture

This course treats important themes and questions in modern and contemporary Spanish cultural production. Course content may vary. Please see the department website for current course offerings: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/undergraduate/hispanic-studies

Fall or Spring

Prerequisite: SPAN 1800 OR SPAN 1900

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3502 The Spanish Avant-Garde

A study of the Spanish avant-garde including the poetry of García Lorca, the films of Luis Buñuel, and the paintings of Salvador Dalí. We will explore the reception of the avant-garde and of Surrealism in Spain followed by the transformation of the avant-garde into two politically rival ideologies.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3504 Spanish Surrealism: The Works of Salvador Dalí

The Spanish painter Salvador Dalí (1904-1983) is the most recognizable figure in the Surrealist movement. In the public eye he was considered at times the embodiment of the movement itself. Dalí responded with a high dosage of histrionics by cultivating an extravagant public persona. However, this public image often obscures the importance of his seminal contributions to the avant-garde movement. Dalí is arguably one of the most serious and interesting thinkers and theorists of the avant-garde movement during the 1930's and 1940's. He is also one of the most important painters of the movement, and his contributions to contemporary art are irreplaceable. In this course we will read his written work and we will study and analyze his paintings trying to uncover constant topics, motifs, obsessions, etc.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3600 Studies in Spanish, Latin American and Latinx Cinema

This course explores fundamental aspects of Spanish, Latin American, and Latinx cinema. Course content may vary. Please see the department website for current course offerings: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/undergraduate/hispanic-studies.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: CIMS 3600

Prerequisite: SPAN 1800 OR SPAN 1900

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3602 Cyborgs, Robots, Gadgets: Technologies in Contemporary Hispanic Cinema

Contemporary Latin American and Spanish Cinema offer a great reflection on the role that new technologies have in the film industry, and in our lives, in the digital era. Often, we find that technologies are used in an original way to overcome financial shortages in times of crisis, or when resources are limited. In this context, sometimes it is actually thanks to the new technologies that the work of new directors can be produced or distributed. Some recent Latin American and Spanish sci-fi movies find genuine ways to bring about social and political commentary through the use of technological narratives. Reflections on technology are often found in many other film genres too. Our aim in this course will be to explore the use of technology in film in the present and in the past, as well as to study narratives that place technology at the center. We will focus our study on films where technology is a key factor and will reflect on the impact of technologies in our experience as spectators as well.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: CIMS 3602, LALS 3602

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3620 Contemporary Spanish Cinema

A survey of Spanish cinema from the 1940’s to the present. Special attention will be paid to the political, cultural, and social discourses that the films reproduce, adapt or question. This will allow an understanding of the implicit or explicit social dialogues that shaped cinematographic production in Spain from the post-civil war years, through Franco’s dictatorship, the advent of the democratic state in the 1970’s, and the economic and political crisis of the 21st century. At the same time films will be analyzed from the standpoint of their rhetorical construction, examining the specificity of cinematic language and its particular case.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: CIMS 3620

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3622 Spanish Non-Fictional Film

This course will explore the flourishing of the genre of documentary and non-fiction film in the last decades in Spain. We will study poetic, experimental, and social documentaries in their socio-historical context. For this we will need to engage not only films and film theory texts, but also historical recounts of contemporary Spain. We will also analyze the limits between non-fiction and fiction film, focusing on some recent works that have critically blurred the distinction between both genres.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: CIMS 3622

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3624 Crossing Borders in Spanish Cinema

Through the lens of border crossing, we will explore various current topics in Contemporary Spanish Cinema, such as immigration and emigration narratives in times of globalization and economic crisis, cinematic transgressions, and the emergence of glocal vs. national films. A fluid conceptualization of the border will guide our exploration on how Contemporary Spanish Cinema talks about gender, race, nationalisms, migration, history, and psychology.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: CIMS 3624

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3626 The Films of Pedro Almodóvar

One of the most acclaimed filmmakers of the world, Almodóvar is unquestionably the most international of today’s Spanish filmmakers. The aim of the course is to familiarize students with Pedro Almodóvar’s films and to shed some light to the intricacies of its themes, cultural background, and visual style. Together with primary and secondary texts, we will offer an overview of Almodóvar’s career from his early iconoclastic Post Franco films of the late 1970’s and early 1980’s to his most recent work that has gained him a reputation as an international auteur. Some of the topics covered will include questions of national identity, gender, sexuality, as well as Almodóvar’s original use of genre, visual style, and the director’s relationship to the postmodern concepts of performance and parody.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: CIMS 3626

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3650 Latin American Cinema

This course aims to familiarize students with the major achievements and cultural moments of Latin American cinematography. We will cover a broad set of themes, nations and time periods employing multiple theoretical positions.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: CIMS 3650, LALS 3650

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3652 Crossing Borders in Latin American Cinema

Through the lens of border crossing this course will explore various current topics in Contemporary Latin American Cinema such as immigration, exile and travel narratives, gender crossing, social and political transgressions, transnationalism, and co-productions. The concept of the border will be fluid and central to the course, and through it we will reflect upon what separates and unites people at an individual, sexual, social, cultural, political, national, and geographical level. This focus will help us explore a wide variety of “movements”, negotiations, and transgressions taking place in the Latin American Cinema of the last three decades.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: CIMS 3652, LALS 3652

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3680 Studies in Hispanic Theater

This course offers students the chance to explore the rich theatrical traditions of Spain and Latin America as well as works by new Latinx writers. Course content may vary. Please see the department website for current course offerings: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/undergraduate/hispanic-studies

Not Offered Every Year

Prerequisite: SPAN 1800 OR SPAN 1900

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3682 Staging Gender in Latin America

This course is based on an understanding of theater as a social space and a cultural practice that allows a collectivity--in its most concrete sense, the audience--to think in public about itself and about the fundamental forces facing and shaping it. In this course, we will mainly read contemporary Latin American and Latinx theatrical texts produced by women and queer authors. Our focus will be to discuss how, in the last approximately four decades, the stage as space and performance as practice have been used in Latin America as vehicles to represent and discuss issues related to gender and sexuality, to reconfigure the parameters of these debates, to examine and question existing social structures and attitudes, to propose and rehearse alternative solutions to the problems faced by marginalized subjects, and overall to explore the transformative capabilities of theater. We will also examine how conceptions and representations of gender and sexuality intersect with other identitarian coordinates, such as race, class, and nationality.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: LALS 3682

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3684 Theatrical Modernity and Postmodernity in Latin America

This course will focus on the theatrical tradition of Latin America during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. In addition to reading some of the most influential playwrights of the region, we will discuss the aesthetic theories and sociohistorical contexts that have shaped contemporary Latin American and Latino theater and performance practices. We will also explore how the stage has served as a space in which to represent, debate, negotiate, and complicate issues related to national, gender, political, and ethnic communities and identities.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: LALS 3684

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3686 Spanish Theater: Text and Representation

This course treats multiple aspects of Spanish theater from the Golden Age (16th and 17th centuries) to the present through the reading of some of the main dramatists of the Spanish literary canon, such as Lope de Vega, Cervantes, and Lorca. We will focus on textual analysis and performance as two fundamental elements in the understanding and appreciation of Spanish theater. Students will thus gain an understanding of how to interpret the the theatrical text, whether for meaning or performance.

Not Offered Every Year

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3700 Studies in Colonial Latin American Literature and Culture

The colonial period in Latin America spans more than 400 years. In this course, we study the culture of the Spanish-speaking Americas from the moment Christopher Columbus arrived in the Caribbean to the Latin American wars of independence during the 19th century. We analyze the role that religion and race played in the emergence of colonial societies and the development of national revolutionary discourses. We reflect on the tensions between indigenous populations and Spanish settlers and study the literary culture that developed in the New World. Course content may vary. Please see the department website for current course offerings: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/undergraduate/hispanic-studies

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: LALS 3701

Prerequisite: SPAN 1800 OR SPAN 1900

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3702 There Will Be Blood: The Spanish Conquistador in Latin America

Who was the Spanish conquistador? A brave soldier, a devoted religious man or a voracious murderer? An enemy or a benefactor? This course will study the Spanish “conquest” of the so-called New World through the analysis of a variety of cultural artifacts, from early modern chronicles, poems, and paintings, to contemporary literature and film. We will also reflect on the many forms in which Spanish colonialism is still visible in the present in Latin America and the United States.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: LALS 3704

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3730 Studies in Modern and Contemporary Latin American and Latinx Literature

Studies in Modern and Contemporary Latin American and Latinx Literature is an upper-division seminar taking a literary-studies approach to Latin American cultural production of the 19-21st centuries. Traditions covered may include Spanish American, Brazilian, and U.S. Latinx literature. Course content may vary. Please see the department website for current course offerings: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/undergraduate/hispanic-studies

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: LALS 3730

Prerequisite: SPAN 1800 OR SPAN 1900

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3732 New Women's Writing in Latin America

Something unprecedented has been happening lately in the Latin American literary market and scene. Women writers in great numbers have been publishing without encountering major constraints or pressures, and their fictional work has been receiving more awards and critical accolades than ever before. Hence, the assertion made by a critic in El País that “the other Latin American Boom is female” (“El otro ‘boom’ latinoamericano es femenino”) merits to be considered and unpacked. For example, compared to their literary precursors, have the 21st-century female authors presented the customary topics of family, motherhood, sexuality, illness, etc. in a radical new way? Which are the social, political, economic, and aesthetic conditions that have given raise to this proliferation of female authors and the wide acceptance of their fictional worlds? How do these conditions differ from the Latin American literary Boom of the 20th century? These are among the questions we will explore.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: LALS 3732

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3734 The Boom in Latin American Literature

Why has Latin American narrative of the 1960s and 70s enjoyed such popular and critical success? What distinguishes this literature from that which was written earlier or later or outside Latin America? Who were the major writers of the boom generation, and what unites or separates them? In this course we will consider these questions as we read important works of fiction by authors such as Cortázar, Donoso, Fuentes, García Márquez, and Vargas Llosa as well as criticism that sheds light on the phenomenon of the boom.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: LALS 3734

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3736 Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Contemporary Latin American Literature

The publication of Cien años de soledad in 1967 was one of the highest moments in 20th century Latin American literature. Behind this masterpiece was the arduous and tireless work of a writer that had been searching for a personal style during almost a decade. This search also has a continental dimension. In García Marquez’s work, readers find the main topics, aesthetic quests, and political conflicts that hold the Latin American imagination, from the “crónicas de conquista” to the artistic vanguard adventures of the middle of the century. His narrative brings together early discussions about magical realism and the literary boom, anthropological inquiries rooted in transculturation and critical regionalism, as well as questions on class, race, and gender. In this course we will read different moments of his work, from his early short stories to some of his major novels. In addition, we will compare his writing to some of their contemporaries’, in order to have a comprehensive idea about the formation of the Latin American contemporary canon.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: LALS 3736

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3738 Coming of Age in Latin America

This course examines contemporary narratives of childhood and adolescence from Latin America. These stories critique the forces that shape young people as they attempt to define themselves in societies marked by racial, ethnic, gender, and class divisions. Texts for the course will be drawn from different geographical regions and will include novels, short stories, and films from the second half of the twentieth century through the present.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: LALS 3738

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3740 Latin American Non-Fiction

Non-fiction is a narrative mode that presents an account of a subject as fact, but it is a label that began to be used to describe narratives dealing with real events and real people fairly recently. This course studies the boundaries and tensions between facts and fiction in Latin America from a historical perspective. We start by analyzing early modern writing by the Spanish conquistadors: cannibals, human sacrifices, sirens, sea monsters, and El Dorado are just a few subjects that 16th-century “non-fiction” presents as facts. We move then to discuss 19th-century journalism about cosmopolitanism and urban modernization. Technological innovations blur the boundaries between fact and fiction, something that film, narrative journalism, and literary chronicles would exploit thought-out the 20th century. Finally, we study non-fictional narratives in contemporary podcasts and social media.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: LALS 3740

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3742 Detectives, Criminals, and Writers in Latin American Fiction

Born as a sub-genre, crime fiction (a denomination which encompasses a wide number of texts: classical detective stories, hard-boiled, true-crimes and the non investigative crime novel) has become one of the most attractive literary forms for writers, and one of the favorites for readers. Because it is built around topics like the crime and the law, the search of the truth and the unstable identity of the subject in mass societies, it has become an ideal vehicle for the expression of the anxieties and fears that dominate the contemporary culture. Its versatility has been used by many Latin-American authors to express the social and political conflicts of the continent, as well as to explore its literary possibilities through formal searches, characterized by parody, meta-literary and auto referential games. The aims of this course are, on the one hand, to offer a panoramic vision of the crime fiction in Latin America through the reading of some representative authors; and, on the other, to explore how they can be can be read from different theoretical approaches.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: LALS 3742

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3800 Studies in Modern and Contemporary Latin American and Latinx Culture

Studies in Modern and Contemporary Latin American and Latinx Culture is an upper-division seminars focusing on significant issues or historical moments in Latin American and Latinx culture. Course content may vary. Please see the department website for current course offerings: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/undergraduate/hispanic-studies

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: LALS 3800

Prerequisite: SPAN 1800 OR SPAN 1900

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3802 Rural Modernity in Latin America

This course focuses on literary representations of rural Latin America in the 19th and 20th centuries. While it remains common to understand rural societies as traditional or backward in contrast with the city (considered the true center of modernity), this course approaches rural social orders as sites of modernity and modernization in their own right. We will be primarily concerned with examining how works Latin American literature and film created rural visions of modernity, particularly in relation to land reform, political revolution, and capitalist agriculture. While our principal focus will be literature, we will also consider how other forms such painting, film, and political documents envisioned rural transitions.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: LALS 3802

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3804 Mexico: Revolution and Culture

Studies the central role played by cultural production in forging and imagining national revolutionary projects, from the 1910s to the 1970s. Focusing on literature, photography, painting, and film, we will examine the works of figures such as Diego Rivera, José Vasconcellos, Tina Modotti, Sergei Eisenstein, Octavio Paz, Juan Rulfo, Rosario Castellanos, Nellie Campobello, José Emilio Pacheco, and Carlos Monsiváis, among others.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: LALS 3804

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3806 Representations of Dictatorship in Latin America

This course explores the phenomenon of Latin American dictatorship through literature, film, graphic novels, and visual and public art, asking how these different media and genres depict and respond to state violence, censorship, and trauma.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: CIMS 3806, LALS 3806

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3808 Urban Life in Latin American Literature

Cities exist not just in their geography, but in their spirit, and that spirit is captured in literature. In this course we will read compelling works from Mexico City, Lima, and Buenos Aires that represent life in these Latin American capitals at different points between 1950 and the present. As we explore fiction and non-fiction writing by both established authors and emerging writers, we will learn about the forces and events that have shaped narratives of the urban experience in Latin America.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: LALS 3808

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3810 Jungle Narratives: la selva

The Amazon evokes opposing images. It has been described alternately as paradise lost and green hell, a place to retreat from the restraints of civilization or to be devoured by savage men and beasts, a land of natural abundance and environmental degradation. Our objective in this course is not to determine which of these descriptions is most accurate, but to understand how these opposing visions were created and what they aim to communicate. As we explore the Amazon through works of fiction we will gain an appreciation of the problems and promise of the region as well as greater knowledge of important authors, themes, and techniques of Latin American literature.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: LALS 3810

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3812 Afro-Latin America: Culture, History, and Society.

A transnational and interdisciplinary examination of the black experience in Latin America and the Spanish, French and English-speaking Caribbean, since slavery to the present. Combining cultural analysis with the study of fundamental theoretical works on race and racialization, students will gain a thorough comprehension of historical, political and sociocultural processes shaping the existence of Afro-descendants in the Americas. The scrutiny of systemic racial exclusion and marginalization will allow the understanding of how these dividing practices condition cultural production.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: AFRC 3812, LALS 3812

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3814 The Caribbean and Its Diaspora: Culture, History, and Society

A thorough panorama of contemporary Caribbean societies and their diasporic communities, this course enhances the students' knowledge of the region's main historical, political, and sociocultural trends. We will examine Caribbean multiple narratives of survival and resilience within a global context, through the study of 20th and 21st-centuries literary, cinematographic, musical, visual and performative works. The cultural analysis will be supported by a theoretical framework encompassing critical Caribbean theories on identity and identification.

Fall or Spring

Also Offered As: AFRC 3814, LALS 3814

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3900 New Hispanisms and Latin Americanisms

This course engages students with current theoretical trends and approaches to Spanish and/or Latin American literatures and cultures. Course content may vary. Please see the department website for current course offerings: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/undergraduate/hispanic-studies

Not Offered Every Year

Prerequisite: SPAN 1800 OR SPAN 1900

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3902 What Is Mexico? Questioning Mexican Icons

This course studies Mexico through many lenses. From history to art, from anthropology to pop culture, from literature to film, our primary objective is to question current and past iconicity to develop a more complex and nuanced understanding of Mexican history and culture.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: LALS 3902

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3904 Latin American Marxisms

This course examines Marxist thought in Latin America, from the early twentieth century to the present. We will study a range of materials from across Spanish America, including essays, novels, films and speeches. We will ask after the specificities of Latin American Marxist thought (on the land and indigenous questions, dependency, guerrilla warfare, etc), at the same time as we contextualize those specificities within a wider Marxist tradition. We will also inquire into the waning and resurgence of Marxism in recent decades in the region.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: LALS 3904

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3906 Literature and Ethnography in Latin America

This course asks students to read ethnographic accounts as literature and to read literature in light of interdisciplinary concerns surrounding representation and cultural difference. The course is transhistorical and transatlantic but with a strong focus on Latin America.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: LALS 3906

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3908 Body and Soul: Hispanic Perspectives on Health, Illness, and Healthcare

TBD

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: LALS 3908

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3910 Sustainable Development And Culture in Latin America

This interdisciplinary course exposes students to the three dimensions of sustainable development -environmental, economic, and social- through an examination of three products -peyote, coca, and coffee- that are crucial in shaping modern identity in areas of Latin America. The course integrates this analysis of sustainable development in relation to cultural sustainability and cultural practices associated with peyote, coca, and coffee and their rich, traditional heritage and place in literature, film, and the arts. This is an upper level seminar open to majors and minors of Spanish and those who have completed Pre-requiste SPAN 1800 or SPAN 1900 or permission of the Undergraduate Chair.

Fall, even numbered years only

Also Offered As: ENVS 3053, LALS 3910

Prerequisite: SPAN 1800 OR SPAN 1900

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3912 Labor in Contemporary Latin American Literature and Film

This course studies different forms of cultural production (film, novel, short story, critical essay) as entry-points into new settings and conditions for work in Latin America, in four sectors that have become especially salient in the region: services, finance, agro-industry and the informal economy (particularly drug trafficking). We will pay particular attention to how cultural production allows us to envision the coordinates of the larger, indeed global, economy into which workers are inserted. We will examine how cultural production allows us to map shifting class structures; we will also track how gender and race shape national and international divisions of labor.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: CIMS 3912, LALS 3912

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3914 Madness and Women in Contemporary Hispanic Culture

The first goal of this course is to examine different “cases” of mental disturbances suffered by women in Hispanic cultures as they have been depicted in novels, short stories and films in the last 50 years. We will study "cases" of female madness precipitated by maternity, domesticity, sexuality, creativity, historical events, and biculturalism. Secondly, we will focus on the “causes” psychoanalysts, authors and literary critics have proposed for those mental illnesses. Additional readings on a wide range of disciplines --feminism, literary theory, psychology and psychoanalysis-- will enhance our understanding of the works selected for the course and will help us identify their political and ideological underpinnings.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: LALS 3914

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3916 Contemporary Latin American and Latinx Cultural Production

This course provides an insightful understanding of the main aesthetic, socioeconomic, political and cultural dynamics at play in the 20th and 21st centuries Latin American societies and Latinx communities in the United States. Combining the analysis of literary, cinematic, musical, visual and performative works with theoretical readings, students will discuss issues on national, racial, gender and sexual identifications; pervasive inequalities, the impact of globalization and new technologies; migration, violence, terror, revolutions, dictatorships, the Cold War, and the implementation and effects of Neoliberalism.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: LALS 3916

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3930 Latinx Environmental Justice

This course explores the involvement of the Latinx environmental justice movement since the 1960s. It addresses theories and concepts of environmental racism and environmental justice, underscoring how Latinx have challenged, expanded, and contributed to the environmental justice discourse. In this course, students will explore national case studies of environmental and racial injustice as they bear on Latinx communities both in rural areas and in urban barrios throughout the United States. The course will analyze these case studies through the lens of Latinx artistic and literary texts (essays, paintings, short stories, documentaries, and short films) as they provide a unique historic and multicultural perspective of the Latinx experience with environmental injustice and of how Latinxs imagine alternative transitions and responses to environmental marginalization. In addition, the works of Latinx artists and writers will serve as case studies to deconstruct racial stereotypes of Latinxs as unconcerned about environmental issues, shedding light on how they share a broad engagement with environmental ideas. The case studies analyzed in this course emphasize race and class differences between farmworkers and urban barrio residents and how they affect their respective struggles. The unit on farmworkers will focus on workplace health issues such as toxic chemicals and collective bargaining contracts. The unit on urban barrios will focus on gentrification, affordable housing, and toxic substances in the home. We will also review current and past programs that have been organized to address the aforementioned problems. This is an Academically Based Community Service Course (ABCS course) through which students will learn from and provide support to a Latinx-serving organization in the City of Philadelphia on preventing exposure to hazardous substances, thus bridging the information gap on environmental justice issues in the Latinx community in Philadelphia. Information dissemination and education efforts will be conducted by collaborating with Esperanza Academy Charter School in Philadelphia to implement lessons on preventing exposure to hazardous substances. Studying environmental justice and pairing it with community service will heighten students' awareness of the complexities of culture, race, gender, and class while providing them with an invaluable experience of cross-cultural understanding.

Spring

Also Offered As: ANTH 3930, ENVS 3445, LALS 3930, URBS 3930

1 Course Unit

SPAN 3999 Independent Study

Independent research under the supervision of a department faculty member. Research topic is determined in consultation with the supervising faculty member.

Fall or Spring

Prerequisite: SPAN 1800

1 Course Unit

SPAN 4000 Honors Thesis

Honors thesis in Hispanic Studies. This course is open to undergraduate majors by permit only.

Not Offered Every Year

Prerequisite: SPAN 1800

1 Course Unit

SPAN 5010 Norte, Desierto, Frontera: Countertopographies of the NAFTA Era

Analyzing Mexican, Central American, and Chicanx cultural production, this course examines the uneven reconfiguration of the U.S.-Mexico borderland in the era of the North American Free Trade Agreement. Drawing from critical geography, migration and border studies, and the environmental humanities, we consider how different cultural artifacts have imagined, projected, and challenged the political and socioeconomic boundaries of the Americas. Likewise, we consider how trans-border bodies, spaces and species can help us interrogate the history of the nation-state as well as the social, emotional, and economic toll experienced on both sides of the border from the early 1990s onward. Interdisciplinary in methods and scope, this course strives to develop an understanding of how cultural production responds to and, at the same time, participates in the process of the production of social space. Particularly, we consider how the production of desert and border as sites of socio-ecological devastation prefigures a new paradigm in the relationship between the environment, migration, and the global circulation of capital. Special attention is given to demographic trends and new patterns of forced migration that arose in the aftermath of the so-called Mexican “War on Drugs” (2006). Assignments include presentations, discussion facilitation, and a seminar paper. Alongside readings and class discussions, students will work as a group on a digital timeline/story map using a platform of their choosing (StoryMapJS, ArcGIS StoryMaps, etc.) The goal is to create an annotated cartography of North America’s recent history. The class is structured around four units, each refers to a particular concept that specifies the relation between spatial literary studies and the regional integration of North America: 1. North. Focusing on the entanglements between industrial agriculture and the rise of the maquila industry, we ask how labor and labor relations across the U.S.-Mexico border evolved during the last decade of the 20th century. We consider how urbanization and patterns of residential differentiation affected populations on both sides of the border, while allowing for the consolidation of Northern Mexican and Chicanx identities. 2. Desert. Moving beyond the city as a spatial referent, we consider how the representation of the desert biome in contemporary Mexican and Central American narratives refracts the increased use of violence as a stabilizing agent for capital accumulation. We consider the novel’s ecological imagination and the valences of form to think through the ecological crisis associated with the urban climateric. 3. Border. Studying how neoextractivism intersects with new patterns of international forced migration, we analyze changes in public space, gender, and ethnic identities derived from the contemporary proliferation of borders (political, economic, geographical). We consider the role cultural production plays in the changing border and migration regimes across the Americas. 4. Countertopographies. Finally, we study how memorialization, nostalgia, and loss in contemporary Mexican, Central American, and Chicanx cultural production become spatial vectors that extend the sense of belonging in geographical form. We consider how literary form delineates a countertopography to NAFTA’s ideal of globalization.

Fall

Also Offered As: LALS 5010

1 Course Unit

SPAN 5230 Modern Novel

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

Not Offered Every Year

1 Course Unit

SPAN 5280 Modern Spain and Hispanic America

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

Not Offered Every Year

1 Course Unit

SPAN 5430 Environmental Humanities: Theory, Method, Practice

Environmental Humanities: Theory, Methods, Practice is a seminar-style course designed to introduce students to the trans- and interdisciplinary field of environmental humanities. Weekly readings and discussions will be complemented by guest speakers from a range of disciplines including ecology, atmospheric science, computing, history of science, medicine, anthropology, literature, and the visual arts. Participants will develop their own research questions and a final project, with special consideration given to building the multi-disciplinary collaborative teams research in the environmental humanities often requires.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: COML 5430, ENGL 5430, ENVS 5410, GRMN 5430

1 Course Unit

SPAN 6060 Pedagogy Across the Spanish Curriculum

The aim of this seminar is to prepare graduate students in Hispanic Studies to teach a wide range of courses typically offered at North American universities and colleges--from the elementary Spanish language level to upper-division seminars--while familiarizing themselves with current approaches and methodological trends in foreign language instruction. By designing a content-based syllabus, including selecting and sequencing of reading materials and choosing the appropriate learning outcomes and assessment methods, graduate students will gain a greater awareness of curricular planning and development and acquire skills that will significantly ease their future teaching endeavors such as using a backward design model, incorporating their own research interests into their lessons and courses, or taking advantage of the resources available to language learners on campus. By the end of the course, graduate students will be able to talk about and reflect on their teaching in an effective and professional manner.

Fall

1 Course Unit

SPAN 6300 Studies in the Spanish Middle Ages

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: COML 6301

1 Course Unit

SPAN 6480 Don Quijote

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

Not Offered Every Year

1 Course Unit

SPAN 6500 Golden Age Literature

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

Not Offered Every Year

1 Course Unit

SPAN 6820 Seminar on Literary Theory

Topics vary. See the Spanish Department's website for the current offerings. https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

Fall

Also Offered As: COML 6820

1 Course Unit

SPAN 6840 La Novela Realista

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

Not Offered Every Year

1 Course Unit

SPAN 6860 Studies in Spanish Culture

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

Not Offered Every Year

1 Course Unit

SPAN 6900 Studies in 19th- and 20th-Century Spanish American Literature

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

Not Offered Every Year

1 Course Unit

SPAN 6920 Colonial Literature of Spanish America

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: LALS 6920

1 Course Unit

SPAN 6930 Vanguardias culturales hispanoamericanas

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

Not Offered Every Year

1 Course Unit

SPAN 6940 Spanish and Latin American Cinema

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: LALS 6940

1 Course Unit

SPAN 6970 Studies in Latin American Culture

Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: LALS 6970

1 Course Unit

SPAN 6971 Afro-Latin America

In-depth analysis of the black experience in Latin America and the Spanish, French and English-speaking Caribbean, since slavery to the present. The course opens with a general examination of the existence of Afro-descendants in the Americas, through the study of fundamental historical, political and sociocultural processes. This panoramic view provides the basic tools for the scrutiny of a broad selection of literary, musical, visual, performance, and cinematic works, which leads to the comprehension of the different ethical-aesthetic strategies used to express the Afro-diasporic experience. Essential concepts such as negritude, creolite, and mestizaje, as well as the most relevant theories on identity and identification in Latin America and the Caribbean, will be thoroughly examined, in articulation with the interpretation of artistic works. Power, nationalism, citizenship, violence, religious beliefs, family and community structures, migration, motherhood and fatherhood, national and gender identities, eroticism, and sexuality are some of the main issues discussed un this seminar.

Not Offered Every Year

Also Offered As: AFRC 6971, ENGL 7971, LALS 6971

1 Course Unit

SPAN 6980 Workshop on Scholarly Writing

This course aims to develop awareness about what constitutes effective scholarly prose in Spanish. It proposes to hone the student's handling of writing as a vehicle for the expression of intellectual thought, but also to develop a consciousness of the rhetorical strategies that can be used to advance a critical argument effectively. Extensive writing exercises will be assigned; these will be followed by intense and multiple redactions of the work originally produced. The ultimate goal is for students to develop precision, correctness, and elegance in their written work. Students will also work on a class paper written previously, with a view to learning the process of transforming a short, limited expression of an argument into a publishable article.

Not Offered Every Year

1 Course Unit

SPAN 8000 Field Exam

PhD Exam Preparation

Not Offered Every Year

1-3 Course Units

SPAN 9990 Independent Study

Independent research under the supervision of a department faculty member. Research topic is determined in consultation with the supervising faculty member.

Fall or Spring

1 Course Unit